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Origin: Pleasant and Delightful

DigiTrad:
COSMIC AND FREAKY
NICKELODEON
PLEASANT AND DELIGHTFUL
PLEASANT AND DELIGHTFUL, SEATTLE
TWAS EFFICIENT AND COST EFFECTIVE


Related threads:
Cosmic and Freaky - what's an Earth Shoe (40)
Lyr Req: Cosmic and Freaky (Grit Laskin) (8) (closed)
another Willie song (Pleasant and Delightful) (4)
Tune Add: Pleasant and Delightful (9)
Lyr Req: 'Pleasant & Delightful' parody (27)


Phil Edwards 02 Jun 08 - 02:43 PM
Def Shepard 02 Jun 08 - 02:50 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 02 Jun 08 - 02:51 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 02 Jun 08 - 02:52 PM
John MacKenzie 02 Jun 08 - 02:54 PM
Phil Edwards 02 Jun 08 - 03:10 PM
GUEST 02 Jun 08 - 04:30 PM
nutty 02 Jun 08 - 04:47 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 02 Jun 08 - 05:01 PM
Phil Edwards 02 Jun 08 - 06:10 PM
Big Al Whittle 02 Jun 08 - 06:29 PM
Steve Gardham 02 Jun 08 - 06:35 PM
open mike 02 Jun 08 - 06:41 PM
Folkiedave 02 Jun 08 - 06:44 PM
GUEST,Derek Schofield 02 Jun 08 - 06:55 PM
Malcolm Douglas 02 Jun 08 - 07:18 PM
open mike 02 Jun 08 - 07:46 PM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 02 Jun 08 - 07:53 PM
GUEST,tweetiepie 03 Jun 08 - 03:27 AM
GUEST,PS 03 Jun 08 - 03:29 AM
Phil Edwards 03 Jun 08 - 04:22 AM
Richard Bridge 03 Jun 08 - 07:03 AM
Leadfingers 03 Jun 08 - 08:39 AM
BB 03 Jun 08 - 03:04 PM
Steve Gardham 03 Jun 08 - 03:28 PM
nutty 03 Jun 08 - 05:23 PM
Steve Gardham 03 Jun 08 - 05:28 PM
r.padgett 04 Jun 08 - 02:47 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jun 08 - 07:38 PM
Leadfingers 04 Jun 08 - 08:20 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 05 Jun 08 - 04:52 AM
Phil Edwards 05 Jun 08 - 05:08 AM
Malcolm Douglas 05 Jun 08 - 11:47 AM
peregrina 05 Jun 08 - 12:05 PM
Phil Edwards 05 Jun 08 - 12:48 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Jun 08 - 04:04 PM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 28 Jun 08 - 08:29 AM
Joe Offer 12 Nov 10 - 08:50 PM
Mr Happy 26 Jan 11 - 06:16 AM
bill\sables 26 Jan 11 - 09:12 AM
GUEST,julia L 26 Jan 11 - 10:57 PM
MGM·Lion 27 Jan 11 - 01:19 AM
Wheatman 27 Jan 11 - 03:34 AM
janemick 27 Jan 11 - 05:03 AM
Wheatman 27 Jan 11 - 06:32 AM
GUEST,leeneia 27 Jan 11 - 10:48 AM
Mo the caller 03 Mar 18 - 06:08 PM
Steve Gardham 04 Mar 18 - 10:39 AM
mayomick 04 Mar 18 - 10:55 AM
Steve Gardham 04 Mar 18 - 10:56 AM
Steve Shaw 04 Mar 18 - 08:55 PM
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Subject: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:43 PM

Are there any sightings of this song before Louis Killen sang (and recorded) it in the early 60s?


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Def Shepard
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:50 PM

so far I've found the Louis Killen link

a midnight folk concert in London in1963 which was recorded by Decca for the LP Hootenanny in London.
plus two later recordings by Shirley Collins, on her records Anthems in Eden and Amaranth.
Still hunting for any earlier recordings though. :-)


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:51 PM

A. L. Lloyd makes a reference to it in Folk Song In England - if somebody doesn't beat me to it I'll look it up but can't right at the minute.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:52 PM

Phil - are you after the history of the song itself, or history of recordings? (Def & I cross-posted.)


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 02:54 PM

Earlier thread here , with quoted collection facts.

G


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 03:10 PM

Thanks - don't know how I missed that. So it goes back to 1939 and Bert Lloyd - or at least a microphone held by Bert Lloyd.

Interesting that Paul Clayton recorded a bluegrass version.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 04:30 PM

Sorry it's taken me so long to find this but the song exists on a broadside in the Bodleian Libraray and is much earlier than the 1939 previously mentioned although unfortunately a date is not given

Printer:         Plant, T. and W. (Nottingham)
Date:         [s.a.]
        Imprint: T. & W. Plant, Printers, Clare Street, Nottingham
Illus. Ballads on sheet: 2
        
Copies:         Harding B 11(2059)
        
Ballads:         
1.         The lark and her nestlings ("A lark fed her nestlings one day in the corn ...")
2.         The blackbird and thursh [sic] ("How pleasant and delightful is the bright summer's morn ...")


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Subject: Lyr Add: BLACKBIRD AND THRUSH (from Bodleian)
From: nutty
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 04:47 PM

Sorry but the above was from me - I'd lost my cookie

I have transcribed the words from The Blackbird and Thrush mentioned above
^^
How pleasant and delightful is the bright summer's morn
When the hills and the valleys were covered in corn
The blackbird and thrush sing on every green tree
And the lark sing melodious by the dawning of the day

As a soldier and his true love their pleasure did take
Said the soldier to his true love I must you forsake
I am going to cross the ocean where the loud cannons roar
I must go and leave my Nancy the girl I adore

Three heavy sighs she gave saying , Jemmy my dear
Are you going to leave me in sorrow and despair
Are you going to leave me in sorrow to complain
While you from the Indies do return back again

Fare well my dear charmer I can no longer stay
For our ships sails are hoisted and I must away
I'm going to the ocean with a sweet pleasant tide
And when I return love I will make you my bride

Then the ring from her finger she instantly drew
Take this dearest Jemmy and more you shall have
And while they were embracing tears down her eyes did flow
May heaven go with you wherever you go


The earliest broadside I found in the Bodleian is dated .....

Printers:         Bebbington, J.O. (Manchester); Beaumont, J. (Leeds)
Date:         between 1855 and 1858
        Imprint: J.O. Bebbington, Printer, 26, Goulden-street, Oldham Road, Manchester, sold by J. Beaumont, 176, York Street, Leeds. Printer's Series: (346).
Ballads on sheet: 3
        
Copies:         Firth c.26(295)


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 05:01 PM

The Roud Index shows earlier collected versions than Lloyd's - the Greig-Duncan collection (53 entries in my copy) has a handful collected between 1903 and 1907, and Hammond also collected several version around 1905/6, for starters

My copy of the Roud Broadside index shows only one listing (plus two references to the song) - by Harkness of Preston in the Madden Collection.

Mick


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:10 PM

Thanks both, that's brilliant. I've a good mind to work up the five-verse version - the promise followed by the ring makes more narrative sense.

I'm also pleased to see "the hills and the valleys" being covered with corn, instead of "the fields and the meadows" - meadows, of course, aren't where you grow corn. Nice to see it's just a bit of oral mangling.

(Compare "Rosebud in June", which in the Span version makes no agricultural sense at all - "O to plough where the fat oxen graze", indeed. But if it's nonsense, it's genuine orally-transmitted nonsense. (The agricultural story editor seems to have had more input to The Watersons' version.))


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:29 PM

I think it was Fred Jordan pointed out, no one ever picked wild mountain thyme....bloody useless stuff!


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:35 PM

Mick,
Can you please do him a bluey to our website where he can get a Yorkshire version that has a long pedigree and the history of the song in print?
See 'Castle Hill Anthem'


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: open mike
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:41 PM

It seems I have heard a Hippie version of this..a parody..
how freaky and cool or something like that???


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Folkiedave
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:44 PM

There you go Steve.....You can find it here........


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: GUEST,Derek Schofield
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 06:55 PM

Looking back at the other thread, one version that no-one has mentioned is that sung by Sam Larner and included in the 1961 Folkways LP Now is the Time for Fishing (now available on Topic). It was called 'Happy and Delightful' and the first line was ... 'O, I was happy and delightful on one midsummer's morn'.

But I think this has wandered from the original question .... who first sang the song in the revival? I had always believed that Louis popularised the song in the revival. Prior to the 1963 recording that Def Shepard mentions, likely recordings would be by MacColl or Lloyd I suppose. Did they record it? It was very popular later in the 60s and into the 70s thanks to The Spinners and Fred Jordan is credited as the source of the song sung by Shirley on Anthems in Eden I think -- Fred would have learnt it from a revival singer.

I find it interesting to know how and from whom these well known songs of the revival came to be so well known. (See The Leaving of Liverpool article in the issue of English Dance and Song before the new one!).

Derek Schofield


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 07:18 PM

The other thread seems to have been talking mainly about the particular version that Lou Killen picked up, but it may have wandered off topic; I don't know if that was an arrangement of the set Bert Lloyd recorded at the Eel's Foot. I doubt if anyone seriously thought that the song originated in 1939: that is probably the earliest audio recording, though.

'Blackbird and Thrush' was a later form of the broadside song, though it seems to have introduced the 'pleasant and delightful' verse. Here is a list of those editions available at the Bodleian Library website:

The blackbird and thrush ("How pleasant and delightful is the bright summer's morn ...")

T & W Plant seem to have been contemporary with Such, though a J Plant was printing at the same address back as far as the early 1830s, I gather.

See also two earlier forms of the song, lacking the 'pleasant and delightful' verse:

The sailor and his truelove / Jemmy's farewell

For more detail, see

Marrow Bones (revised edition, 2007), 'The Soldier and His True-Love'.

I see that Dave has already added Steve's link, but here it is again for the sake of completeness:

Yorkshire Garland: Castle Hill Anthem


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: open mike
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 07:46 PM

i am pretty sure the modern (60's) version says "cosmic and freaky"
here it is...
COSMIC AND FREAKY
                              (Grit Laskin)
It was cosmic and freaky,
on a midsummer's day
And the pipes in the meadow,
Man, they blew me away,
And the blackbirds and the thrushes
were into their own thing,
    And the larks got off on music,
    Man like all they did was sing

A freak and his ol' lady
were out tripping through the heather
Said the freak to his ol' lady,
"Man, my head's not together,
So I'm trucking out to Frisco,
Where the alpha waves run free,
    And the highs you reach on skateboards,
    Have transcended LSD."

Well, a picture of his Earth Shoe,
she instantly drew
Saying, "This is where I'm at, man,
I'm still tuned into you."
And as they dug each other's head space,
Tears from her eyes he did see
    She said "Can I come?" and he said "No,
    Man, don't lay that trip on me."

He said, "Man, we're getting heavy,
I'm not into what's going down
The taxi meter's running,
and I'm [turned/bummed off this town
But you'll still be my ol' lady
If you're ever near San Francisco
    After all, babe, you're a Pisces,
    And I'm a Scorpio."

from sondra stigen, 1984
Recorded by Laskin- Unmasked
see also Pleasant and Delightful


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 02 Jun 08 - 07:53 PM

Just a minor correction to my post above: that 53 entries in my copy was supposed to refer to the Roud Index, not the Greig-Duncan collection.

Steve - as you see you've got several links to The Castle Hill Anthem before I got back here!


Mick


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: GUEST,tweetiepie
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 03:27 AM

Thankyou for this thread. A few years ago on one of our visits to Trewarmett, I was asked to learn this song by Edwina. It is a beautiful song but often people sing "The sharks they played melodions" In the first verse!

Just shows hows the words are changed as they are passed from one to another but then that is the folk tradition. As In a song by Graham and Eileen Pratt..."Take a song and sing it on and make it all your own"in "Kerry is no more" about a mythical session singer who has gone.

It is an evolving part of folk...whether good or bad...

Linda X


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: GUEST,PS
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 03:29 AM

PS that is a joke line---but I meant the general words of songs change. Like chinese whispers and I love the original version but having the version given to me firmly engraioned in my head ...don't think I could memorise it again in a different mode.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 04:22 AM

I doubt if anyone seriously thought that the song originated in 1939

I'm going to have to look at some of those there books before I ask any more stupid questions.

In half-hearted defence of the original question, the oldest date that's attached to a song called "Pleasant & Delightful", catalogued online, is the Digitrad's 1963. (That title doesn't appear in the YG, the Folkinfo db or the Coppers' collection; Cantaria has it but dates it back to 1970(!).) Obviously, what this tells me is a) not to rely on online catalogues & b) not to rely on titles staying the same.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 07:03 AM

There re other lines that are parodied too.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Leadfingers
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 08:39 AM

We (That 'we' inclded Johhny Colins) once did this in four part harmoy with all the wrong last lines !!

'The Sharks they played melodeons at the bottom of the bay'

'I must go and leave my Nancy , she's a filthy old whore'

'Saying May I go along with you ? Oh No my love , like Hell'

'And if ever I return again , I'll be out of my mind'

Some of us have NO respect for the tradition at all , have we ??


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: BB
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 03:04 PM

This song is well-loved in the tradition throughout the West Country and amongst 'revival' singers down here, and the jokey modern words, and the 'pop' after 'The ring from her finger she instantly drew' were never appreciated. Personally, I wish people would actually take in the rather beautiful words of this song instead of taking the p... out of it.

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 03:28 PM

I think this one can also be found in the shortest folk song lists

It was pleasant and delightful...
But she doesn't come here any more... or something like that.

Cheers, Dave, Malcolm, Mick.
Just spotted the 'Make a bluey' at the bottom. Give it a try next time.

Damn, just missed something on Ebay! This Mudcat thing is getting more addictive than Ebay!


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: nutty
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 05:23 PM

You may already know this Steve but just in case you don't .....

Pressing 'Control N' opens up a new browser window so you can watch mudcat and ebay at the same time.

Now that is addictive


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 03 Jun 08 - 05:28 PM

Oh God no! I'll have to retire from retirement!
Cheers, Nutty


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: r.padgett
Date: 04 Jun 08 - 02:47 PM

Sheesh!

Ray


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jun 08 - 07:38 PM

Some of those, Leadfingers, ar quite restrained!


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Leadfingers
Date: 04 Jun 08 - 08:20 PM

Well Johnny C WAS involved - and he IS a 'proper' singer !


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 04:52 AM

"Compare "Rosebud in June", which in the Span version makes no agricultural sense at all - "O to plough where the fat oxen graze", indeed."

I have always suspected that it's not 'ploughing' in the strictly agricultural sense that's being referred to in this song.

"And it's O to plough,
Where the fat oxen graze low,
And the lads and the lasses
To sheep shearing go."


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 05:08 AM

That would make sense! But I think it's more likely that it's a slightly mangled version of a precursor which it shares with the Watersons' version, which puts the ox and the plough together properly ("If it weren't for the plough, the fat ox would grow slow").


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 11:47 AM

Charles Johnson's 'The Sheep-Sheering Ballad' (music by John Barret[t]) was written for his comedy The Country Lasses: or, the Custom of the Manor, first staged at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, 4 February 1715 (though Cibber, writing in 1753, said it was 1714). It was sung in the first production by Mr Burkhead.

The original couplet was

When without the plough fat oxen low,
The lads and the lasses a-sheep-sheering go.

See Marrow Bones: supplementary material: Sheep Shearing for a transcription from sheet music of 1716.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: peregrina
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 12:05 PM

Interesting, thanks... the 'if it weren't for the plough' variant just seemed to have too much gratuitous logic to be other than a repair..


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 05 Jun 08 - 12:48 PM

Thanks again, Malcolm! I really am going to have to get that book.


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Subject: RE: Pleasant and delightful
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jun 08 - 04:04 PM

One of the broadsides at the Bodleian collection has a better rhyme that the one Nutty posted above. From Johnson Ballads 1161:

Then the ring from her finger she instantly drew,
Take this dearest Jemmy, and more there's for you;


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 28 Jun 08 - 08:29 AM

On the US side of the water, two important early artists introducing "Pleasant and Delightful" to the folksong revival were:

Wallace House (a Channel Islander living in the US), on his Folkways LP "English County Songs," 1952. He titled his version "The Lover's Departure."

Paul Clayton, who was singing it in club dates and concerts by at least 1952, when he recorded it with Bill Clifton in a set of tapes not issued on LP till 1975. He would first release it on LP on the 1957 Folkways album "American Broadside Ballads in Popular Tradition," but by that time he'd been popularizing it in gigs for some five years.

Bob


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Subject: ADD Version: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Joe Offer
Date: 12 Nov 10 - 08:50 PM

Here's one more:
    Thread #69527   Message #1179757
    Posted By: JWB
    06-May-04 - 05:47 PM
    Thread Name: Need a seafaring love song
    Subject: Lyr Add: PLEASANT AND DELIGHTFUL
    Guest,

    Here's a song that was first published around 1810. I included it on my O'Brian companion CD Roast Beef of Old England.

    PLEASANT AND DELIGHTFUL

    It was pleasant and delightful one midsummer's morn,
    When the fields and the meadows were all covered in corn,
    And the blackbirds and thrushes sang on every green spray,
    And the larks they sang melodious at the dawning of the day.
    And the larks they sang melodious
    And the larks they sang melodious
    And the larks they sang melodious at the dawning of the day

    A sailor and his true love were a'walking that day.
    Said the sailor to his truelove, "I am bound far away
    I am bound for the East Indies where the load cannons roar
    I must go and leave my Nancy, she's the girl that I adore."
    (as above)

    Then the ring from off her finger she instantly drew
    Saying, "Take this my dearest William and my heart will go too."
    And whilst they stood embracing tears from her eyes fell,
    Saying, "May I go along with you?" "Oh, no, my love, farewell."

    "So it's fare thee well my Nancy, I can no longer stay,
    For the topsail is hoisted and the anchor aweigh,
    And the ship lies awaiting for the next flowing tide;
    And if ever I return again, I will make you my bride."

    I'm not a tech-savvy guy, so can't do midis and such. This is a pretty well-known song in folk circles, so I'll bet you can get a listen to the tune without much ado.

    What's your event? Will you be serving spotted dog, by any chance?

    Jerry


Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry for this song:

    Pleasant and Delightful

    DESCRIPTION: On a "pleasant and delightful" midsummer's morn, a sailor bids farewell to his true love. She gives him a token, and begs to come along with him. He forbids it, but promises that they will be wed "if ever I return again."
    AUTHOR: unknown
    EARLIEST DATE: before 1841 (broadside, Bodleian 2806 c.18(276))
    KEYWORDS: love farewell ring separation
    FOUND IN: Britain(England,Scotland(Aber))
    REFERENCES (2 citations):
    GreigDuncan1 64, "The Sailor and His True Love" (12 texts, 10 tunes)
    DT, PLESDELT*

    Roud #660
    RECORDINGS:
    Sam Larner, "Happy and Delightful" (on SLarner02)
    Cyril Poacher, "A Sailor and His True Love" (on Voice02)

    BROADSIDES:
    Bodleian, 2806 c.18(276), "The Sailor and his Truelove" ("As a young sailor and his truelove one morning in May"), J. Jennings (London), 1790-1840; also Firth c.12(147), Harding B 17(266b), "Sailor and his Truelove"
    CROSS-REFERENCES:
    cf. "Farewell, Charming Nancy [Laws K14]" (plot, lyrics)
    cf. "The Bold Privateer" [Laws O32] (meter)
    cf. "The Soldier and the Sailor" (meter)
    ALTERNATE TITLES:
    Mary Ann
    Charming Mary Ann
    Notes: This song shares many similarities with "Farewell, Charming Nancy" [Laws K14]; it is not impossible that they have a common ancestor. But the degree of difference is now so large that, until an intermediate version shows up, I must regard them as separate. - RBW
    File: DTplesde

    Go to the Ballad Search form
    Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
    Go to the Bibiography
    Go to the Discography

    The Ballad Index Copyright 2009 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


I can't find my way around the Bodleian Ballads Collection as well as I'd like to, but I think this link will lead to the broadsides referenced above.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Mr Happy
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 06:16 AM

I heard someone sing another verse in which the sailor returns to Nancy & there's a happy ending, anyone know it?


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: bill\sables
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 09:12 AM

There was a last verse sung in the Durham area in the 60's

Now as Willie was a sailing to his own hearts content.
His ship struck a reef and to the bottom she went.
This left poor Nancy all alone in her sorrow to complain.
For the loosing of her William who died on the main.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: GUEST,julia L
Date: 26 Jan 11 - 10:57 PM

We heard the most soulful version of this song by the Bilgerats in St Augustine.. Fred and I usually ham it up in a music hall sort of way, but after hearing the Rats sing this "with feeling", well, it was worth hearing and put the song in a whole different light.

Julia


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 27 Jan 11 - 01:19 AM

DON'T please "ham it up"; STOP IT!; NOW!

It is a beautiful song. Why has it always been subject to such mindless, tasteless, humourless, contemptible disrespect?

God, how I hate all those popping noises on "ring from finger" & gazing, eyes shaded, in different directions, on "ship rides at anchor". I really felt shame & embarrassment for a group of the quality of The Spinners indulging in such unspeakable arseholeries.

OK, so I am a SOH-less fusspot.

I'll live with it.

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Wheatman
Date: 27 Jan 11 - 03:34 AM

Yes it is a beautiful song and I resent the hamming up although I was guilty of that in my teens. I always considered the derogatory comments and actions stemmed from after feast song sessions at Morris (Ring) gatherings, and blamed the Morris for belittling the song. I'll stick to Sam Larner's version and just enjoy it.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: janemick
Date: 27 Jan 11 - 05:03 AM

I also loathe the hamming up that people do to this beautiful song. Fortunately, as we now live and sing here in Brittany, the song is appreciated for itself and I can enjoy singing it in public again!


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Wheatman
Date: 27 Jan 11 - 06:32 AM

The late Tommy Morrissey sang it straight in Padstow, ah happy may days. OSS OSS WEE OSS


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 27 Jan 11 - 10:48 AM

I like to play this song on piano. I agree, this world needs less derogation of lovely things.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Mo the caller
Date: 03 Mar 18 - 06:08 PM

Our choir are going to learn this a version arranged by Moeran
It says Norfolk Folk son collected & arranged by Moeran.
Bit different from the folk club version. What do you think?
Maybe I'll get used to it when we learn it ????


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 04 Mar 18 - 10:39 AM

Since we published a regular version in the second edition of Marrow Bones with a list of printed versions from the early 19thc other older versions have come to light, as often happens. An oral version will be published in the next volume in the series, but for now I'll post a printed version from a garland of about 1800 but possibly older.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: mayomick
Date: 04 Mar 18 - 10:55 AM

Musically it's like Bunclody with a chorus.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LLPJ4IJyg4k


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 04 Mar 18 - 10:56 AM

Ref. BL 11621 b 5, item 11.
The Lord of Warwickshire's Garland, page 5.
The Sailor's Departure from his True Love Nancy.

A Young Sailor with his true Love,
One Morning in May,
Was walking in the Meadows
So green and so gay,
Where the Birds are sweetly singing,
And the Lark ascending high,
Which was most sweet and charming
To hear their Melody.

And as they were Walking,
Sweet pleasure for to take,
Says the Sailor to his Lover,
My dear Love for our Sake,
I'll away to the Indies,
Whatever may betide,
And when I do return Love,
I will make you my Bride.

Then a heavy Sigh she gave him,
Saying, Jemmy My Dear,
Whilst down her soft Cheeks,
Dropt many a soft Tear:
What will you leave me Love,
Hear in Sorrow to remain,
Till you from the Indies
Do return back again.

Then off from his Finger,
A Gold Ring to her he gave, (plop)
Saying take this as a Token,
And more you shall have;
I am bound over the Ocean,
Where the Billows loudly roar,
For the sake of my Nancy,
The Girl whom I adore.

Fare you well, my dearest Nancy,
No longer can I stay,
Our Topsails are loose
And our Anchors under Way,
Then with Ten Thousand Kisses,
Down her Cheeks the Tears they fell:
May the Heavens protect thee,
Dearest Jemmy farewell.

No doubt hot from the Pleasure Gardens. Of course 'Topsails loosed', & 'Anchors under way' should be as in later versions 'anchor's aweigh' (weighed/raised).
Sorry about the plop! Couldn't resist.


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Subject: RE: Origin: Pleasant and Delightful
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Mar 18 - 08:55 PM

The "Anthems" version, in its context in that "song cycle," is one of my very favourite treasured things and it's on one of the very few folk CDs I play anything like frequently. We were friends with a lovely fellow who used to give it out at the folk club, not a great singer but a smashing bloke, who, sadly, died untimely a few years ago and the song always reminds us of him. It does tend to bring out the lusty and unsubtle, but where's the harm in that!


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