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Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow connect

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Lyr Req: Breast of Glass (34)
(origins) Origins:The Blackest Crow: meaning/Dearest Dear (74)
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GUEST,Guy Wolff On Lap top 30 Jul 08 - 07:50 PM
GUEST 30 Jul 08 - 07:53 PM
GUEST,guy wolff On Lap top 30 Jul 08 - 07:55 PM
Malcolm Douglas 31 Jul 08 - 01:53 AM
GUEST,Guy Wolff On Lap top 31 Jul 08 - 09:23 AM
Banjovey 31 Jul 08 - 11:06 AM
GUEST,guy Wolff On Lap top 31 Jul 08 - 04:35 PM
GUEST,garthman 04 Aug 08 - 03:30 PM
Malcolm Douglas 04 Aug 08 - 06:31 PM
GUEST,Rory 10 Jul 24 - 04:20 AM
GUEST,Rory 10 Jul 24 - 04:40 AM
GUEST,Guest Joan F 10 Jul 24 - 11:37 PM
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Subject: My Dearest Dear /Blackest Crow conect
From: GUEST,Guy Wolff On Lap top
Date: 30 Jul 08 - 07:50 PM

I have been listening and watching at youtube a bunch lately and I found a wonderful version of "The Blackest Crow" played by Bruce Moilski and after listening a few times I realized the words were very close to those of My Dearest Dear .. a song I had learned from a AFS student returning from Finland in 1975who had learned it from a Finish Bluegrass band who learned it in Ireland .. Can any of the experts here give me an idea if My Dearest dear is olderl ?? Is it Irish or scotch or English ?? .. I have heard The Blackest Crow was from the American Civil War .


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow cone
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jul 08 - 07:53 PM

Bruce Molski and friends playing The Blackest Crow

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6jh1vqNvMs


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow cone
From: GUEST,guy wolff On Lap top
Date: 30 Jul 08 - 07:55 PM

My Dearest dear : Guy Wolff as remembered from 1975

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfD0YaJkrj0


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 31 Jul 08 - 01:53 AM

Various past discussions here, but see in particular

Breast of Glass
The Blackest Crow: meaning?

Some at least of the material in these related songs is to be found in English broadside ballads of the 17th century.


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow cone
From: GUEST,Guy Wolff On Lap top
Date: 31 Jul 08 - 09:23 AM

Yes in the version I learnt She says " with a pen and parchment near pray send a line to me ".. I thought using pen and parchment was a pretty ancient description . Thanks Malcolm .. Al the best , Guy


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: Banjovey
Date: 31 Jul 08 - 11:06 AM

Tommy Jarroll does a fine version of this playing banjo. Its on one of the County Clawhammer banjo CDs and tabbed in Brad Leftwich's book on Round Peak banjo playing


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow cone
From: GUEST,guy Wolff On Lap top
Date: 31 Jul 08 - 04:35 PM

I think Ive read that thats the source for Bruce's version .


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: GUEST,garthman
Date: 04 Aug 08 - 03:30 PM

I believe that "My Dearest Dear" originates from Yorkshire, probably mid 18th century. It was recorded as "lost" in England but was rediscovered, c. early 20th century, in the Appalachian mountains whence it had been taken by emigrants.


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: Malcolm Douglas
Date: 04 Aug 08 - 06:31 PM

'Recorded as lost'? By whom? When? Where? Why Yorkshire? See links above for a London broadside of the late 17th / early 18th century.


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: GUEST,Rory
Date: 10 Jul 24 - 04:20 AM

My Dearest Dear

Also known as "The Blackest Crow",
"As Time Draws Near"
And related to
"A-Roving on a Winter's Night",
"The Unkind Parents, or, The Languishing Lamentation of two Loyal Lovers",

Roud# 3601

1866 Version
Earliest date previously known about 1866.
The song under the title "Banishment" was first published in the US by H.M. Belden in 1906. Ballads and Songs Collected By the Missouri Folk-Lore Society by editor Belden, H.M. 1906, p.484
The Belden text from 1906 was taken from the Civil War diary of E. J. Sims, "sent to me in 1906..." Belden's text is incomplete.


1784 Version
A hand-written copy of a version in a manuscript dated 1784 is in the possession of the Dartmouth Libraries Archives & Manuscripts, Hanover, New Hampshire.

Joseph Goffe notebook, Mss 783626, 1784
Rauner Library Archives and Manuscripts, Hanover, New Hampshire

Although the hand-written song does not have a title, three of the four verses are in keeping with the previously known early versions from the 20th century of My Dearest Dear.

The author of the manuscript Joseph Goffe (1721-1846) was born in Bedford, New Hampshire, and this hand-written version of the ballad has a reference to North America, indicating this ballad could likely have its origins from North America.

The reference in the song is "League of Friendship" and is mentioned in The Articles of Confederation of 1781. It is synonymous with the first constitution of the United States. This is compelling evidence that this song was likely composed in North America soon after 1781. In the period 1781 to 1789, as can be surmised in the next paragraph.

The Articles of Confederation were adopted by the Continental Congress on November 15, 1777. This document served as the United States' first constitution. It was in force from March 1, 1781, until 1789 when the present-day Constitution went into effect.

The Articles of Confederation created a weak central government — a “league of friendship” for the 13 sovereign and independent states — that largely preserved state power (and independence).

New Hampshire, where Joseph Goffe lived, was one of the 13 states that united and entered into a firm league of friendship.

Article III. The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other, for their common defence, the security of their Liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other, against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.

Article IV. The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different states in this union, the free inhabitants of each of these states, paupers, vagabonds and fugitives from Justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several states;


Joseph Goffe notebook, Mss 783626, 1784
Rauner Library Archives and Manuscripts.
Dartmouth Libraries Archives & Manuscripts
Hanover, New Hampshire

Description
Notebook from Joseph Goffe (1766-1846) containing an account of the labor and cost of building a saw mill in Bedford, N.H. Entries for work done for Samuel Goffe. On last six pages are songs.
Dates: 1783-11-26 - 1784-12-17

A thankyou to Scout Noffke, for providing images of manuscript,
Reference & Administrative Specialist
Rauner Special Collections Library

A woe is me the time draws near that you and I must part
There's few that knows the cares & fears of my poor tender heart
Who daily suffer'd for your sake for whom I love so dear
I wish I could go along with you or else you would stay here

O who is there for to enjoy my love when I am gone
Or is there any company like you there is not one
Or is there any like unto be lodged in your heart
O no no no replyed she since you and I must part

When I am gone you may think on dear and absent friend
And in a League of Friendship a line or two pray send
By every gale that blows this way pray send a line or two
And I'll return the same again when the wind blows fair to you

With his breast a glass was made wherein I might behold
And in the same I might perceive his name wrote down in gold
To be the object of my heart and ne'er to be remov'd
That all the world might plainly see how deeply I'm in love


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: GUEST,Rory
Date: 10 Jul 24 - 04:40 AM

Joseph Goffe was born in 1766 (1766-1846) in Bedford, N.H. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1791, and was ordained pastor of the Congregational Church at Sutton, Mass., in 1794, and was dismissed from that church in 1830. His published works include: The Flaming Sword .... (Worcester, 1816); Incapable of Vindication ... (Worcester, 1817); Spirits in Prison ... (Worcester, 1803); and others.


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Subject: RE: Origins: My Dearest Dear & Blackest Crow conect
From: GUEST,Guest Joan F
Date: 10 Jul 24 - 11:37 PM

In my opinion its joined at the hip to "Parting Friend", Denson Sacred Harp page 414 bottom, also in Cooper SH, both lyrically & a little bit tune-wise.


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