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What's a Stylocarf?

Joybell 19 Aug 08 - 08:16 PM
Newport Boy 20 Aug 08 - 06:16 AM
GUEST,lox 20 Aug 08 - 06:26 AM
GUEST,lox 20 Aug 08 - 07:19 AM
Newport Boy 20 Aug 08 - 07:39 AM
Joybell 20 Aug 08 - 05:44 PM
GUEST,Matsu 20 Aug 08 - 09:32 PM
Joybell 20 Aug 08 - 10:11 PM
katlaughing 20 Aug 08 - 10:20 PM
katlaughing 20 Aug 08 - 10:24 PM
katlaughing 20 Aug 08 - 10:32 PM
Joybell 20 Aug 08 - 10:33 PM
Joybell 20 Aug 08 - 10:37 PM
katlaughing 20 Aug 08 - 10:55 PM
Newport Boy 21 Aug 08 - 04:11 AM
GUEST,Matsu 21 Aug 08 - 07:54 AM
Joybell 21 Aug 08 - 07:13 PM
Joybell 21 Aug 08 - 08:11 PM
GUEST,Matsu 21 Aug 08 - 08:37 PM
Joybell 22 Aug 08 - 03:11 AM
Sandra in Sydney 22 Aug 08 - 03:49 AM
AliceinWonderland 22 Aug 08 - 06:30 AM
GUEST,Matsu 22 Aug 08 - 09:02 AM
Joybell 22 Aug 08 - 08:11 PM
GUEST 08 Aug 10 - 11:42 PM
The Fooles Troupe 08 Aug 10 - 11:54 PM
Jack Campin 09 Aug 10 - 05:12 AM
Bernard 09 Aug 10 - 10:38 AM
open mike 09 Aug 10 - 01:38 PM
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Subject: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 19 Aug 08 - 08:16 PM

I have an article from an 1881 New Zealand newspaper mentioning it. It would seem to be one of those strange hybrid musical instruments from the 19th century. From the article I note that the audience recognized the airs and that it had a pleasant sound.
That's it. Nothing online that I can find.
Anyone able add to this please?
Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Newport Boy
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 06:16 AM

Joy

A little success - from an Australian magic magazine:

Louis Haselmayer (1839-1885) an Austrian magician who toured the world during the late 19th century. He performed in Australia during 1872, 1873, 1874, 1880 and 1882. Haselmayer invented the antecedent to the modern xylophone.

Phil


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,lox
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 06:26 AM

Another Australian - Rolf Harris - famously played the stylophone ...

... aussies and instruments involvong pens ... any help? ...


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,lox
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 07:19 AM

Well the celestial empire was China.

So we know that it must look like a chinese instrument.

perhaps something like this?


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Newport Boy
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 07:39 AM

Rolf Harris is Australian, Prof Haselmayer was Austrian. The extra 2 letters are important!!

And the instrument is reported as being the antecedent of the xylophone, which would be percussion, not strings.

Not that I can find any other reference to his version of the xylophone, and the story seems doubtful. Gusikov had been playing his instrument extensively around Europe by 1830, 9 years before Haselmayer was born.

Bearing in mind that Haselmayer was a magician, the story was probably good enough to fool the Australians!

(Ducks for cover)

Phil


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 05:44 PM

Phil, I think you're onto something. Thank you.
It's true that the article from NZ mentions that "Australian Billy Barlow" (Robert Barlow) played a similar instrument and that he said he found it in the Celestial Empire. This man -- (who is the subject of a 10 year study of mine) toured China. His tour was well before this 1881 article. Of course he would give a story like this so "found it in the Celestial Empire" may not necessarily mean much. I have an impressive list of the instruments he played -- among other things -- and this is the only referece to him playing "a similar" instrument to the stylocarf. He did play Chinese fiddle -- but he was a multi-instrumentalist and he could, and probably did, play anything.
Thanks lox, for the picture. It's an interesting possibility.
Also I've been thinking about the word. Pen? Stylo? Carf bit mean anything?
Easily amazed Aussie Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,Matsu
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 09:32 PM

Hello

I am looking for any program or advertisement of Louis Haselmayer, telling his various magic that were actually performed in the Australian theaters as well as NZ, in his 1872, 1873 and 1874 viists.
I think he also visited Melbourne in early 1875.

I wonder whether his program included "Psycho", magic by automaton.
If any of you could tell me the firsthand material for it, I appreciate it very much.

M. Matsuyama
from Yohohama, Japan


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:11 PM

Hello Matsu,
There's a long article from the Hawera & Normanby Star from 1881. It's on a New Zealand site called "Papers Past". Sorry I'm not able to give the link. He seems to have used a "wonderful drum" as part of a clairvoyant act.

There's no mention of an automaton -- but my Robert Billy Barlow was known to have used one, as part of his act, in Gympie -- so I'm naturally interested.
Good luck. Please tell us about your findings.
Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:20 PM

That's a fantastic, well set-up site, Joybell! Is THIS the article you mentioned? What fun to read!


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:24 PM

Matsu, welcome to the Mudcat. I entered a search at the Papers Past site with keywords of "Professor Haselmayer Psycho" and it came up with twenty-six results which you may search through by clicking HERE. Hope that helps!


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:32 PM

ONe mroe and then I promise to stop.:-)

Joy, I found a reference to a "stylocarfe" in the Brisbane COURIER which described it as "pieces of hardwood fitted on guttapercha tubes" from HERE. Note the "e" on the end...it was spelled that way in one of his advertisements, too.


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Subject: RE: Found a Stylocarf
From: Joybell
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:33 PM

Kat -- thank you that's it.

Bingo. The Brisbane Courier tells me it's a xylophone alright. Spelled stylocarfe. Found it described in an article about the good professor.
There's a metion of the professor using an automaton called "Psycho" in the same article.
It's so easy to get lost in these old newspapers.

Quite a lot is to be found under the name "Professor Hazelmayer" Matsu. Keep us posted. Maybe you would like to join Mudcat and give him his own thread.

Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:37 PM

Cross-posting aren't we. Fun though. Was just about to mention the guttapercha tubes and all.


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Aug 08 - 10:55 PM

What fun! Thanks, Joy!


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Newport Boy
Date: 21 Aug 08 - 04:11 AM

Matsu - There's a photograph of Haselmayer's Psycho here - his debut with it in Melbourne in January 1875.

Phil


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,Matsu
Date: 21 Aug 08 - 07:54 AM

Kat, thank you for your comment.

I know Haselmayer was in Australia in 1881 with his Psycho.
However, I don't believe he was there in January "1875" with Psycho.
Because it is widely believed that J. N. Maskelyne of Britain invented and performed it in London in May 1875 for the first time, other magicians including Louis Haselmayer must have purchased to perform it after 1876. (Thus, Haselmayer was able to perform it in 1881)

I believe that the Psycho photo in State Library is just a reproduction from a magicians' magazine "The Sphinx," vol.36, no.7, Sep 1936, that is identical one, and the author of the article put the wrong date on it.

If we can find the firsthand material, not a copy from the magazine, proving that it is actually of Jan 11, 1875, it would be great discovery!

Matsu


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 21 Aug 08 - 07:13 PM

I have files on my Billy for those dates, Matsu. I'll see what I can come up with about Haselmayer.
Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 21 Aug 08 - 08:11 PM

There's an article in "The Port Phillip Herald" -- (Melbourne paper)about him -- dated 11th January 1875. So far I can't get into this paper to find details. I've joined up so I'll be back. He may not have had Psycho with him of course -- but looks as though he did tour here in 1875. The 1881 tour is in there too.
Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,Matsu
Date: 21 Aug 08 - 08:37 PM

Joy

Thank for your kind comment.

Yes, I have examined a lot of pages of The Port Phillip Herald, and identified an article of Jan 11, 1875, but it said Haselmayer had appeared at the Sydney School of Arts for three weeks.

That suggests he was in Sidney, not in Melbourne at that time.
I wonder if there is any online seachable database on Sidney newspapers. Maybe not.

Do you think to whom I should ask whether the his program at the Sydney School of Arts could be obtainable?

Anyway, any report on his Melbourne appearance in early 1875 has not been found so far. I wonder if any theatrical magazine at that time gave some review on his performance.

Matsu


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 03:11 AM

Matsu, Looks as though you are ahead of me on this one. I'm having trouble getting into this paper. There might be something at the National Library in Canberra. It has a searchable database.
I'll send a message to Sandra in Sydney. She might have some ideas.
Maybe when you've got your answers we could talk about automatons. There's one I'm interested in too.
Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 03:49 AM

Ask Now is a service of the National Library & state libraries & librarians are on line Mon-Fri 9am- 7pm my time to answer enquiries, so you have about 90 minutes to ask, otherwise you'll need to wait till Monday for an answer!

Matsu, some questions can be answered by return email, others like yours are likely to take longer. Don't forget to say you're in Japan. I'm not sure how much they can do for you, I've had info from New Zealand that included a search of early 20th century newspapers.

Sydney (Mechanics) School of Arts website only members can use the library but the Catalogue is on-line and can be searched. You can find email addresses for Library staff on the site.

sandra


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: AliceinWonderland
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 06:30 AM

This is a fascinating thread.
Matsu, there are a number of articles about his performances in the Brisbane Courier from 1874. I am assuming you have seen these but just in case I have added one for you here:
http://mountaintracks.com.au/alice/BrisCourier-Mo6Jun-1874.pdf

I have some more if you are interested.

[ps. Hello Joy!! I'm your 'partner in crime' - is that cryptic enough for you? hehehe]


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST,Matsu
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 09:02 AM

Dear Joy, Sandra and Alice

Thank you very much for those kind assistance.
Since I will leave my home early tomorrow morning and won't be back home for one week, I could try to follow your advice.

I really impressed this forum and all of you!
Thanks again.

Matsu


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Joybell
Date: 22 Aug 08 - 08:11 PM

Alice!! How nice to join you here. Hee hee hee indeed.

Matsu, It's been fun. So nice to meet you. Please tell us about your findings when you can.
You'd be a very welcome member of the Mudcat family -- if you ever decide to join.
Cheers, Joy


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 11:42 PM

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/service/pnp/cph/3b20000/3b27000/3b27200/3b27266r.jpg

Stylocarfe Drawing on Sheet Music


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 11:54 PM

"just about to mention the guttapercha tubes"

That reminds me - you don't see them any more , the old codgers, hand rolling their cigarettes, perching in the gutter ...


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Jack Campin
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 05:12 AM

From the picture on the LoC site, the bar layout is that of a strohfidel rather than a modern xylophone - the bars are aligned left to right in overlapping rows, like the strings of a hammered dulcimer. As its name suggests, a strohfidel has the bars supported on bundles of straw lined up crosswise along the nodal points.. Gutta percha would be less bulky. I'd guess Haselmayer's only innovation was to use that.


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: Bernard
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 10:38 AM

Yes, it does rather remind one of a hammered dulcimer in that picture!


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Subject: RE: What's a Stylocarf?
From: open mike
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 01:38 PM

gutta-percha (gut′ə pʉr′c̸hə)   noun
a rubberlike gum produced from the latex of various SE Asian trees (esp. genera Palaquium and Payena) of the sapodilla family and used in electric insulation, dentistry, golf balls, etc.

Origin: < Malay < getah, tree sap, latex + ? perca, rag, strip of cloth (so called because sold in strips): form infl. by L gutta, a drop.

gut·ta-per·cha (gŭtˌə-pûrˈchə)   noun
A rubbery substance derived from the latex of any of several tropical trees of the genera Palaquium and Payena, used as an electrical insulator, as a waterproofing compound, and in golf balls.

Origin: Malay getah perca : getah, sap + perca, strip of cloth (from Hindi pārcā, from Persian pārche, probably diminutive of pāre, from Middle Persian pārang).

and from http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/kings/isonandra.html

The concrete juice of Isonandra Gutta, Hooker (Dichopsis Gutta, Bentley), and other species of the same order.
Nat. Ord.—Sapotaceae.
COMMON NAMES: Gutta-percha, Gutta-taban, Gutta-percha depurata,
Gummi-plasticum.

Botanical Source.—This is the concrete milky juice of a tall tree, a native of the Malayan Archipelago, especially of Singapore, where it is now becoming rapidly extinguished through ruthlessness in collecting gutta-percha.....

here is how it is used in communications and cable
http://atlantic-cable.com/Article/GuttaPercha/index.htm


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