Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Metis music

Related thread:
Lyr Req: Ballade de Louis Riel (29)


mg 06 Sep 08 - 02:30 AM
meself 06 Sep 08 - 02:42 AM
mg 06 Sep 08 - 01:08 PM
meself 06 Sep 08 - 04:43 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Sep 08 - 04:59 PM
RangerSteve 07 Sep 08 - 07:29 AM
bankley 07 Sep 08 - 09:03 AM
GUEST,bankley 07 Sep 08 - 10:13 AM
Joe Offer 30 Oct 08 - 02:37 PM
GUEST,bankley 30 Oct 08 - 03:10 PM
Big Mick 30 Oct 08 - 05:29 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Oct 08 - 06:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Dec 11 - 03:38 PM
meself 31 Dec 11 - 04:22 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 31 Dec 11 - 03:16 PM
meself 31 Dec 11 - 09:27 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Metis music
From: mg
Date: 06 Sep 08 - 02:30 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7dKUTxgZmE&feature=relatedbr>
This is the Metis anthem. I know they are awesome fiddlers and have heard some on occasion. Also some great songs..among them chanson de Luis Riel...some say he wrote it, some say he didn't, but it is a great song. Any other information? mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: meself
Date: 06 Sep 08 - 02:42 AM

About ... that song in particular, or Metis music generally?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: mg
Date: 06 Sep 08 - 01:08 PM

generally. mg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: meself
Date: 06 Sep 08 - 04:43 PM

Fiddling traditions are very strong in Metis communities today; the fiddle is as prominent a symbol of Metis culture as it is of Cape Breton (and doubtless some other cultures). Dance, both solo step-dancing and square-dancing, is likewise alive and well. Both fiddling and dance traditions are based largely in French-Canadian and Scottish traditions, with of course significant Native influence. Having said that, where I live now - northern Alberta - there is an overwhelming Texas-swing style of American influence, as I interpret it anyway, and the 'two-step' is the most common dance.

This site
has notes on the fiddling tradition in the area of Manitoba where I used to live, and which perhaps had a more 'traditional' fiddling scene.

Prominent names in Metis fiddling currently: Calvin Volraith (who has played the White House), Teddy Boy Houle, ... Arcand (first name has slipped my mind). Older names: Reg Bouvette, Andy DesJarlis.

There were strong song traditions in French, English, and Mechif, but these have been largely displaced by the Nashville repertoire. There is a lot of original song-writing going on that shows influence mainly of Nashville and '60's/70's style 'folk' (e.g., Lightfoot).

Music generally has a central place in Metis culture.

I will add more links if I get time ...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Sep 08 - 04:59 PM

Louis Riel wrote many poems. Best to start with Savoie and Campbell, 1993, "Selected Poetry of Louis Riel," Exile editions, Ontario.

Please see thread 17431, which has two versions: Ballade de Louis Riel

Barbara Cass-Beggs, 1967, "Seven Metis Songs of Saskatchewan," BMI Canada Limited, has lyrics and music score for one version of "Chanson de Louis Riel," collected at Lebret, Sask.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: RangerSteve
Date: 07 Sep 08 - 07:29 AM

Smithsonian-Folkways issued a CD of Metis music, mostly singing with a few fiddle tunes, too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: bankley
Date: 07 Sep 08 - 09:03 AM

"Ballad of Louis Riel".... Willie Dunn

"Summer Sage" CD.... Laura Langstaff who is a descendent (shirt-tail cousin) of Riel...

singer/songwriter/artist Dennis Lakusta....

anyway my 3 main Metis friends.... and I have a beautiful sash, given me by Langstaff, (her family's weave and colours)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Louis Riel
From: GUEST,bankley
Date: 07 Sep 08 - 10:13 AM

correction, Willie Dunn's song is simply called "Louis Riel" written in the late 60's.... one of my favorites from him, so I'll take a bit of time to type the words for you.... the music is uptempo, with either Bob Robb or Lee Cremon on fiddle, ....

LOUIS RIEL
(Willie Dunn)

In eighteen hundred and eighty four
Half breed horsemen knocking at the back door
Louis, Louis what about the people
The people are hungry, the people need food
Damn the traders and the buffalo skinners
Let's send them back from where they came
And bring the good days back again right now
Send them packing and fight right now

There's a half breed scout down at Piapot's camp
Then on to Pasqua, Big Bear everywhere
He urged them and begged hem, cajoled them
There he was, a-laying on the wisdom
The people are hungey, there they stand a-dying now

The priests are upset and the agents up and angry
Letters are a-flying from agencies to Ottawa
Better stop the man no matter what the cost is
Beat him, defeat him, throw him in the jailhouse now

Oh, Middleton's men from the Fish Creek fight
Running like the devil from the half-breed might
Beaten by the Breeds of Lac Laloche
Showed up later at the town of Batoche
With the Gatling guns a-ripin' up the town
And the half-breed bullets shaking up the sky
Sure it's a good day to stand and die right now
Against oppression, and we'll fight right now

Well the R.C.M. horsemen, the government-of-course men
Sent out the guards to stop him and arrest him
Told young Louis that he was going to hang high
Well, you can't get away with putting down the government
Beat him, defeat him, throw him in the piss can now

Well, the rest of the story has often been told
They hung young Louis so brave and so bold
Fought so hard a-workin' for the people
Giving his life, working for the people
I know another man who did that too
They hung him on a cross in Calvary
Working for the people
And they took his life


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 02:37 PM

And, for those of those of us who didn't know, here is the beginning of the Wikipedia article on Métis people
    The Métis are descendants of marriages of Cree, Ojibway, Algonquin, Saulteaux, and Menominee aboriginals to Europeans, and are one of three recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada, along with the First Nations (Indians) and Inuit (Eskimo).


If you click here, you will find the text of The story of Louis Riel, the rebel chief (1885).

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: GUEST,bankley
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 03:10 PM

thanks Joe, I'm still waiting for the Federal Gov't to finally pardon Riel and recognize him as one of the founding fathers of Canada through the creation of Manitoba as a province....

at least his hanging rope was removed from the RCMP museum in Regina where it had been displayed for years.....   the Metis found it to be in poor taste and made it known quite eloquently...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Big Mick
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 05:29 PM

And, while it isn't Metis music, there is a wonderful song written by Canadian Bill Gallaher titled "The Last Battle" which is about the final battle of the Metis. Still one of my favorites.

All the best,

Mick


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Oct 08 - 06:13 PM

A good brief summary of the Metis and their current status is found at the website of the Metis Nation of Alberta:
Metis Nation Alberta


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Dec 11 - 03:38 PM

Louis Riel, seminary-educated in Quebec, wrote hundreds of poems, mostly religious in attitude. He was a prolific writer and correspondant; five volumes of his collected papers (one volume devoted to his poetry) were published by the University of Alberta.

The song by Dunn is largely nonsense; Riel's and the Metis' fight was against the settlers, mostly English, that the Ottawa gevernment wished to establish on the old Hudson's Bay Company lands, parts of which had been given to the Metis, both by deed and custom.

Riel had been to Washington, D. C., became an American citizen, and taught briefly at a school in Montana. He was never strong physically, had mental problems (his father placed him in an institution for a while).

A brief bio here: http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/riel/rielbio.html

Also see threads on Louis Riel.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: meself
Date: 31 Dec 11 - 04:22 AM

Riel was a complicated character, to put it mildly. To see him only as a hero or only as a villain is to be blind to - or (wilfully?) ignorant of - much of what he was, and much of what he did.

Riel became the spokesman and leader of the Metis in their struggles with the Canadian government ca 1870 and again in the early 1880s. In both time periods, his leadership led to as much misfortune as satisfaction for the Metis. In the first instance (Manitoba 1870-71), his unnecessary and unjustified execution of Thomas Scott prompted a vengeful, militaristic response from the Canadians, which drove a great many Metis out of Manitoba - while the point of the resistance in the first place had been to secure them land rights and political rights in Manitoba. In the second instance (1885) - well, Gabriel Dumont said it best, his last words to Riel being, reportedly (in paraphrase), "Why did you lead us into this? You knew we couldn't win" (The implication being that Riel, having spent time in central Canada, would have known the kind of military force the federal government could bring against them).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 31 Dec 11 - 03:16 PM

Gabriel Dumont also was a complex man. Illiterate (supposedly), he was adept in languages, and proved himself as a leader. After leading the unsuccessful (and un-winable) fight at Batoche, he went to the U. S. Later, he returned to his homestead near Batoche and lived quietly. His memoires are interesting reading.
Brief Bio:
http://library.usask.ca/northwest/background/dumont.htm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Metis music
From: meself
Date: 31 Dec 11 - 09:27 PM

The Metis in all likelihood would have been more successful militarily - and ultimately might have been able to force the Canadian government to some sort of compromise or concessions - if Dumont had had a free hand as to tactics. However, Riel, after having committed the Metis to rebellion, did not seem to have much of a stomach for bloodshed, his earlier treatment of Scott notwithstanding. He overruled Dumont at one or two key moments, giving up potential strategic advantage in order to avoid probable annihilation of federal forces. (That's my impression from the reading I've done on the subject; I'm rusty on the details).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 14 August 8:08 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.