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Portable acoustic keyboard instruments

Mo the caller 24 Oct 08 - 06:47 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Oct 08 - 08:06 AM
Mr Happy 24 Oct 08 - 08:35 AM
RiGGy 24 Oct 08 - 10:17 AM
Stringsinger 24 Oct 08 - 05:43 PM
GUEST,Smokey 24 Oct 08 - 06:48 PM
Jack Campin 24 Oct 08 - 07:47 PM
Bernard 24 Oct 08 - 07:54 PM
The Fooles Troupe 25 Oct 08 - 01:18 AM
Bernard 25 Oct 08 - 07:19 AM
Mo the caller 25 Oct 08 - 08:46 AM
GUEST 25 Oct 08 - 01:00 PM
GUEST 25 Oct 08 - 01:07 PM
McGrath of Harlow 25 Oct 08 - 05:56 PM
The Fooles Troupe 26 Oct 08 - 01:28 AM
Ross Campbell 26 Oct 08 - 02:17 AM
GUEST,gordon 25 Jun 09 - 05:28 PM
Tim Leaning 25 Jun 09 - 06:52 PM
John Wood 25 Jun 09 - 07:14 PM
Tootler 25 Jun 09 - 07:47 PM
Leadfingers 25 Jun 09 - 07:55 PM
GUEST,melinda 25 Jun 09 - 08:17 PM
vectis 26 Jun 09 - 06:24 PM
GUEST,.gargoyle 27 Jun 09 - 04:35 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Jun 09 - 08:24 AM
Leadfingers 27 Jun 09 - 08:29 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 27 Jun 09 - 09:09 AM
Jack Campin 27 Jun 09 - 11:14 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Jun 09 - 05:33 PM
rod_in_tucson 27 Jun 09 - 07:57 PM
Andy Jackson 28 Jun 09 - 05:46 AM
Andy Jackson 28 Jun 09 - 06:10 AM
Will Fly 28 Jun 09 - 10:51 AM
Will Fly 28 Jun 09 - 10:54 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 28 Jun 09 - 11:57 AM
Will Fly 29 Jun 09 - 06:06 AM
Leadfingers 29 Jun 09 - 05:23 PM
GUEST,abskii 01 Sep 09 - 12:55 PM
Jack Campin 01 Sep 09 - 01:52 PM
M.Ted 01 Sep 09 - 07:13 PM
banjoman 02 Sep 09 - 06:18 AM
The Fooles Troupe 02 Sep 09 - 05:33 PM
SharonA 02 Sep 09 - 06:33 PM
Mr Happy 03 Sep 09 - 09:14 AM
BobKnight 03 Sep 09 - 09:33 AM
Jack Campin 03 Sep 09 - 09:58 AM
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Subject: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Mo the caller
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 06:47 AM

Last year I was pondering about what instrument would be easy to learn.
After all your good advice I decided that there wasn't anything easy I should stick with my descant recorder.

It's the cold season again and I'm bunged up and breathless and looking for an alternative instrument again.

I thought that the only thing that would work might be an accordian, and I have seen some that are fairly small. Asking advice from an accordian player led to him arranging for me to borrow one ('only 72 basses'!!!!). This seems massive to me, I can't see over the top when sitting down.
The change in orientation of the keyboard (from a piano) is not the problem I thought it might be, I can get a tune out of it, especially if I stand up with the dots in front of me to remind my where my fingers are.
The bellows are a bit jerky (one week on), I stop pumping when wondering what note to play. And I haven't worked out how to vary the volume.
The left hand buttons are a complete mystery. I'd need a different mind set to play them.

My husband says 'why not get a spinnet or harmonium, then it would be the same as playing the piano?'
Does anyone know if such things are available, and fairly portable?
I don't want something I have to plug in as I want to play in pub sessions. Would a spinnet need tuning every time it was moved?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 08:06 AM

Would a spinnet need tuning every time it was moved?

Very likely - and it would cost a pretty packet too, even in kit form. Indian harmoniums are cheap and effective, though essentially monophonic because you use the left hand to work the bellows, as with a medieval portative. Portable pedal harmoniums are quite hard to come by, especially the ones that are truly portable! You can get an extra small Indian harmonium, like a melodica with a bellows - but I'm not sure how much better these would be than those toy 8 button accordions you get in most music shops these days... I have one & love it dearly, but I have a particular fondness for musical toys.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Mr Happy
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 08:35 AM

PM John Kelly/Harmonium Hero, he plays 'em


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: RiGGy
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 10:17 AM

Check out the Portative Organ ! It's a bellows blown set of windpipes like a set of sweetly tuned recorders. Dolly played one along with sis Shirley Collins back in the day.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portative_organ

Riggy


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Stringsinger
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 05:43 PM

The portative or "field" organ is a good choice and can be pumped electronically without
sounding like an electronic instrument.

The Vibraphone, Xylophone and Marimba are similar to piano keyboards and are all
acoustic and somewhat portable.

The Celeste is another choice, a bell-like piano.

Then the Harpsichord, the Virginal and other reproduced replicas of early instruments
are a choice. Some are portable.

The Hurdy-Gurdy has a similarity in that it requires pressing keys like a keyboard while
cranking with the other hand. (Used in early music).

Then there is the end-blown Melodica. Limited in what it can do.

Frank Hamilton


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST,Smokey
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 06:48 PM

Try here Mo, if you're in the UK/North. They've got allsorts and are always very helpful and understanding.

http://www.earlymusicshop.com


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Campin
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 07:47 PM

Portative organs sound beautiful but are *very* expensive, even as a kit.

I have never heard of a portable harpsichord. Clavichords are often portable but they are also almost inaudible. Both harpsichords and clavichords need thorough retuning before every performance, even more so if transported.

Vibraphones are enormous, as hard to transport as an upright piano.

Celestas are also far too big. A reduced-size version was the dulcetone, intended as an organ substitute for missionaries in hostile tropical climates. I've played one that had been left in the same room in a rarely-heated cottage in a remote part of the Western Isles of Scotland for about 80 years, and it had no major problems. They sound very nice. I don't think they've been made since WW1, though, and there aren't many around on the second-hand market, unless you want to scour the flea markets in Fiji and Kenya.

The accordion gives you the most power and flexibility for the size, weight and money.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Bernard
Date: 24 Oct 08 - 07:54 PM

Hohner used to make an electric 'piano' in the 1970s which had metal springs similar to reeds. The keys had rubber suction pads which deflected the springs, and the springs sounded when the suction couldn't hold the spring, causing it to flick back. There was an electromagnetic pickup assembly which could be used to amplify it, but it was just about usable as an acoustic instrument.

It was called a 'Pianet T' (mine is S/No 964447 made by Matth Hohner, Germany), and production ceased in the early 1980s.

Sadly, mine needs some rust cleaning from the reeds, and quite a bit of tuning... not my fault, I hasten to add, as it was already that way when it was given to me. It's otherwise in full playing order.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 01:18 AM

Bernard, I would love to get one of those. I have several 'reed organs' some of them have small Stradella bass sections - most need the blower motors replacement - working on using 12V computer fans.

I am also looking for the 'clavichord' which was made - some forms even came in 'roadie proof' (and that's saying something!) cases - used by some pop groups.

As for piano accordions, all you really need to get started is a 32 (8x4) bass - or a 48(12x4, not 8x6) if you really want to play in a few more keys. Much lighter and smaller. 72(12x6) is really almost 'full size' (20x6) in terms of physical size, abilities, and weight. Unless you can get a 'miniaturised' form of 120 bass - I have a couple... :-)

I have prepared a small "guide to the accordion for recycled musos' guide which is in a thread here.
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63945

Also on Wiki a group of us has been working on the Accordion article - with all its sub articles - piano accordions, etc. Starting to look quite good now, lots of history and references.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Bernard
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 07:19 AM

Do you mean 'Clavichord' or 'Clavioline' (as used on 'Telstar', etc.)?

Just to make you even sicker... I also have a Selmer Clavioline in my collection!! :o>

It's the one with its own 15 watt amplifier, which is also the power supply.

Interestingly, unlike more modern electronic keyboards, the keys are carefully crafted pieces of wood with plastic glued on, much like older pianos (no, not ivory, I'm pleased to say).

It needs a little work doing on it (broken switch rockers and the 'tremelo' doesn't work), but is otherwise in working order.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Mo the caller
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 08:46 AM

Thanks everyone.
That confirms what I thought, that the accordian is probably what I need, just got to practise, and not stop the bellows while I'm thinking about the keys.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 01:00 PM

Steve Allen once bought a Melodica so that the next time he went to a jazz jam he hwould have it in his pocket when someone asked him to "blow a little piano."


Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 01:07 PM

Shruti and Indian portable harmonium


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 25 Oct 08 - 05:56 PM

Then there is the end-blown Melodica. Limited in what it can do.


Well, all instruments have limitations - that's part of their charm. But the Melodica is a pretty clever instrument, with its ability to allow you play all the notes you can finger at the same time. It's not just a toy. And you can get it with the extended rubber blowing tube so you can put it in front of you while you are playing, rather than have to squint along with the end stuck in your mouth.

I don't know of anyone had ever rigged one up with a elbow or foot pump, so you could sing along with it...

The Spanish name for it is the Escaleta.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 26 Oct 08 - 01:28 AM

I saw a TV doco on a London busker group - the piano accordion guy had it rigged up on the side of his box so that he could blow and play it instead of the instrument keyboard.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 26 Oct 08 - 02:17 AM

Hohner Pianet


Hohner Clavinet

Both currently available on UK Ebay. If I thought I could get £599 for my Pianet, I'd put that up for auction! However, there are also much cheaper options.

The Clavinet is essentially an amplified clavichord (and how portable you would regard it depends on your own physique - it's a fairly heavy beast, and how much amplification you're prepared to carry around (a Pignose amp would do)).

Some years ago (15? 20?) we had a duo from the Kendal area play at Fleetwood Folk Club (Strange Fruit? - not sure about the name - old copies of Rock'n'Reel might provide the answer). One of them played a Japanese instrument which had a small keyboard (18" long?) whose mechanism may have been similar to the Pianet action described above.

Ross


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST,gordon
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 05:28 PM

I've been checking this out too.

A couple of options maybe are the Helpinstill and the Yamaha CP80.

But where on earth to get hold of one that is the question. search Youtube and you'll find them being demoed. as close to a portable piano as you'll get, They are both real pianos that fold into a more compact case. You certainly need a car to move it anywhere though!


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Tim Leaning
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 06:52 PM

Used to see a lady at the folk club at the folk club in Darleys Hotel Cleethorpes (AKA white horse,aka Leaking boot) Regularly unfold a small harmonium to play.
Sounded great but was highly polished wooden floor so she had quite a journey around the room while performing.
Sadly the Hotel is no more as it exploded and burned a few weeks ago.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: John Wood
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 07:14 PM

I have to go with McGrath about the Melodica.
We bought one from Hobgoblin for £30.Ideal for sessions,though frownd upon by purists,it does sound a bit similar to a concertina.
We're working on that about using an elbow pump from a set off small pipes but will report back if sucessfull.
Greetings
Oslo John


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Tootler
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 07:47 PM

How about a concertina?

Not cheap but much more portable than an accordion.

The Jack/Jackie English and Rochelle Anglo from Concertina Connection have had good reviews and seem to represent value for money as starter instruments. Stagi make instruments at a similar price, but I have heard criticism about their tuning.

Music Room in Cleckheaton have them.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Leadfingers
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 07:55 PM

Can anyone think of the objections to fitting a Foot Pedal to and Indian Harmoniium so that both hands could be uused ?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST,melinda
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 08:17 PM

Are the Indian Harmoniums tuned to regular western pitch, so they can play along with other instruments?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: vectis
Date: 26 Jun 09 - 06:24 PM

I play piano accordion but carry a melodica to sessions because it is a lot lighter. Mine has a pipe which I can attach so I can lay it on a table and play it like a piano keyboard. If i am unsure of the tune I have the option to stop blowing during the really dodgy bits so I don't put other people off. A much underrated instrument.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST,.gargoyle
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 04:35 AM

The stories I could tell ... about experiences with two different military field organs...in two totally divergent locations....one in the front yard of a massive log cabin beneath towering ponderosa pines with fresh baked cookies and lost hikers .... the other on the street in front of a church drinking warm beer from a one gallon pickle jar. Both were olive drab in color and I suspect Korean War era.

The field organ can also be called a "chaplains organ" or "suitcase organ" ...

http://www.temacle.com/A-L-WHITE-CHAPLAINS,i110395961799,c37977.html

Sincerely,
Gargoyle

They weigh ...perhaps as much as 3 gallons of milk...(aka 25 pounds)


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 08:24 AM

What was that portable mouth blown keyed pan-pipe that cropped up a wile back? Reminded me of the old Early Learning Centre plastic keyed panpipe my daughter had when she was a kid back in the 80s - amazing things, long gone now, alas - though I do keep my eyes open at car boot sales.

See this thread: any ideas what to do with a melodica?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Leadfingers
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 08:29 AM

GUEST Melinda - I have seen the Indian Harmoniums played with other Folk intruments in groups , so I would assume they are 'Normal' tuning .


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 09:09 AM

Having read with interest, all I can add is that there are glockenspiels with keyboards attached - never tried one, though..?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Campin
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 11:14 AM

A glockenspiel with a keyboard is a celesta.

I've never heard of a xylophone or marimba being fitted with a keyboard. They're much bigger so the mechanism would have to be slower and heavier.

We've already had a long-running thread on the taishogoto (cheap Japanese clavichord).

I kinda fancy an accordion-sized steam calliope powered by a camp stove, propane torch, party-sized bong, or for liturgical use, incense burner.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 05:33 PM

Generally speaking Indian harmoniums are compatible with Western instruments, although they're often a little sharp of concert.

*

taishogoto (cheap Japanese clavichord)

I dare say that classification might raise a few eyebrows in organological circles...


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: rod_in_tucson
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 07:57 PM

Early Music has been mentioned here before. They have a portable reed organ that folds up into a box. I think the price was 485 pounds on ebay.

I have a couple of their racketts and they make great kits. Fortunately, this isn't a kit.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Andy Jackson
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 05:46 AM

Watching Glastonbury last night. Wide tastes see! I noticed a female singer in a band playing an Indian Harmonium,which I remembered is also known as a Bahja.
Go to
Indian Harmoniums site

for more informatiom. Interesting site, it's worth a read anyway.

Andy


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Andy Jackson
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 06:10 AM

Now where was I, how's a bloke supposed to get his decorating done when he sends himself off to a site like the above. Go take a look and find the mouth harp guy...amazing.
Of course it's only a derivation of English Traditional singing :)

Andy


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Will Fly
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 10:51 AM

The dulceola is the perfect, portable keyboard instrument, and you can hear one played, by Paul Mason Howard, to perfection as accompaniment to Leadbelly and his 12-string guitar on "Ella Speed".

However, whether dulceolas are still made, I have no idea...


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Will Fly
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 10:54 AM

And here's a picture of a dulceola

Basically, a zither with a keyboard.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 11:57 AM

Interesting, thanks, Will - I'd like to hear it.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Will Fly
Date: 29 Jun 09 - 06:06 AM

WAV - if you have Spotify on your computer, you can hear Leadbelly singing "Ella Speed" with a dulceola accompanying his 12-string guitar. The most well-known dulceola recordings - probably - are reputed to be by Washington Phillips, but there's some doubt as to whether he played a dulceola or a fretless zither...


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Leadfingers
Date: 29 Jun 09 - 05:23 PM

Now THAT is what I call a sensible post !


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: GUEST,abskii
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 12:55 PM

Hi... hoping this is the right place... I bought a Taishogoto (waiting for it to arrive) and am having trouble finding useful information for it.
It will need restringing - what sort of strings should I use?
And does anyone know of anywhere where I can find easy advice on getting strated with it? (UK).

Thank you,
       Abskii.


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Campin
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 01:52 PM

You want this thread:

Playing the Taishogoto


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: M.Ted
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 07:13 PM

The instrument's name is actually "Dolceola"--and Phillips seems to have played an instrument that he created himself, by altering two instruments of the "fretless zither" family, rather than an actual dolceola-Fretless Zither is the name that is now given to that family of zither-like instruments that no one ever had a real generic name for--

These instruments were interesting because none of them had any playing tradition, and they were invented to be sold through catalogs and by door to door salesman to people who didn't know how to play them--they appeal being that they could be played with no musical training--


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: banjoman
Date: 02 Sep 09 - 06:18 AM

I hope this is relevant but a couple of years ago I bought a "Roll Up Piano" as a present for my wife. Although it was intended as a bit of a novelty it turns out to be a full size keyboard with single note chords if required and a variety of different sounds built in. It is powered by four "D" type batteries or a small transformer and the whole lote rolls up into a very portable package weighing about as much as a bag of sugar. Great for taking into sessiona and we have used it in the band when our keyboard packed up. Check it out if you want the ultimate in portable instruments


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 02 Sep 09 - 05:33 PM

"the appeal being that they could be played with no musical training-- "

Shudder! .... sigh.... :-0


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: SharonA
Date: 02 Sep 09 - 06:33 PM

Banjoman: "Single note chords"? Sounds oxymoronish to me. Do you mean that the roll-up piano won't allow true chords to be played, but that one can play arpeggios on it?


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Mr Happy
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 09:14 AM

http://www.thanksdarling.com/usb-rollup-piano.html


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: BobKnight
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 09:33 AM

Anybody got any ideas how much an Indian Harmonium would cost? i've looked at the websites links above - couldn't see any prices. I was thinking of buying a Shrewti Box, but it seems expensive (£185) for what it is - basically a "drone."


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Subject: RE: Portable acoustic keyboard instruments
From: Jack Campin
Date: 03 Sep 09 - 09:58 AM

A lot of electronic keyboards have a "single note chord" option - it's a switchable mode where the lowest octave of the keyboard will produce a chord when you strike one key. Hit a bass C, get a C major chord. Dunno if any of them give you minors or 7ths as an option.


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