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BS: 90 years ago....

Rapparee 05 Nov 08 - 10:14 PM
Beer 05 Nov 08 - 10:38 PM
Beer 05 Nov 08 - 10:44 PM
katlaughing 05 Nov 08 - 11:00 PM
Beer 05 Nov 08 - 11:16 PM
Bee 05 Nov 08 - 11:18 PM
Beer 05 Nov 08 - 11:28 PM
topical tom 06 Nov 08 - 12:10 AM
Ebbie 06 Nov 08 - 12:12 AM
beardedbruce 06 Nov 08 - 01:45 AM
Folk Form # 1 06 Nov 08 - 03:53 AM
Liz the Squeak 06 Nov 08 - 04:04 AM
Megan L 06 Nov 08 - 04:22 AM
Cluin 06 Nov 08 - 08:16 AM
Rapparee 06 Nov 08 - 09:21 AM
gnomad 06 Nov 08 - 09:27 AM
Rapparee 06 Nov 08 - 09:36 AM
GUEST,crazy little woman 06 Nov 08 - 09:37 AM
Bill D 06 Nov 08 - 10:46 AM
artbrooks 06 Nov 08 - 11:00 AM
Micca 06 Nov 08 - 11:22 AM
KB in Iowa 06 Nov 08 - 11:33 AM
EBarnacle 06 Nov 08 - 12:27 PM
Rapparee 06 Nov 08 - 12:58 PM
gnu 06 Nov 08 - 04:14 PM
Sandra in Sydney 06 Nov 08 - 06:35 PM
bobad 06 Nov 08 - 06:43 PM
Monique 06 Nov 08 - 07:44 PM
kendall 06 Nov 08 - 09:11 PM
kendall 07 Nov 08 - 03:32 AM
Nigel Parsons 07 Nov 08 - 04:41 AM
meself 07 Nov 08 - 11:15 AM
Monique 07 Nov 08 - 12:12 PM
Rapparee 07 Nov 08 - 12:23 PM
beardedbruce 07 Nov 08 - 03:38 PM
Rapparee 07 Nov 08 - 03:55 PM
Beer 07 Nov 08 - 09:04 PM

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Subject: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 10:14 PM

Ninety years ago a goodly chunk of the world was engaged in The War To End All Wars.

Most people seem to have forgotten the sorrow, the suffering, the glory, the pain, at least in the US. As I've tried to do every Armistice Day since 2003 the Library will have a display honoring those who fought on any side -- primarily the Americans (this is the US), but all who fought.

This year our display will be a shaving stick; a US Rifle, Caliber .30, Model of 1917 and its bayonet; a "tin hat"; a mess kit; some fired cartridge brass, and some poems and photos spread out on an Army blanket.

(The rifle, while functional, will be trigger locked and the bolt removed to render it inoperable.)

The poems include Owen's "Dulce Et Decorum Est"; the photos include ones taken at Gallipoli, of a line of gassed British soldiers, of life in the trenches. We're displaying the trenches, and most importantly, what those who were there saw and felt (as best we can).

I'll also observe a moment of silence at 11:00 a.m., November 11.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Beer
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 10:38 PM

Good for you Rapaire. I am not a Vet, but through my blood line I was able to join the Legion and worked all the ranks and had the honor to serve 3 years as President at our local Branch. You have made me remember some of the great songs that Eric Bogle has written about WW1.
May we never forget.
Just to add a little note. I was happy to represent our Legion about 8 years ago in an unveiling of a monument honoring the Canadians in Quebec that served in Vietnam. It sent chills up my spine when I marched besides the U.S. Vets that came for the unveiling.
Beer (adrien)


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Beer
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 10:44 PM

Not to dig up old wounds,but the person marching in front of me had a crest on his jacket that read "Jane Fonda Is a Traitor". I had forgotten all about that. But please folks lets not get on the Jane thing at this time. It is more important to reflect in what Rapaire is saying.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: katlaughing
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 11:00 PM

I will dig out the photo of my dad's maternal uncle, in uniform, who fought in WWI and post it to my photo page at myopera. Thanks, Rapaire, for remembering.

I see that Canada has some WWI war diaries available online: HERE.

Cyndi's List has a bunch of links related to WWI and the military: Click Here.

I just recently found a copy of a draft card my great-grandfather received, but was never called upon to activate. He was in his forties, if I remember correctly.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Beer
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 11:16 PM

Canada became a nation because of World War 1.
So it is said. Strange in a way. But I guess one has to prove it self by killing to be recognized. Still, I don't think that is the proper way to say it. I think that it is said because we are such a vast Country and the war brought all Provinces together as one and made us all proud to be Canadians.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Bee
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 11:18 PM

My uncle served in the last year of WWII, my Dad was a year too young.

When my uncle died, the local vets came in after the sermon, and each placed a poppy on the casket as their bugler played Taps. I'd been managing my emotions in our family's proper stone-faced manner up til then, but that was it: the tears just streamed seeing all those old guys in their caps and medals, come to honour a comrade one last time.

There'll be a moment of silence in this house.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Beer
Date: 05 Nov 08 - 11:28 PM

I could be wrong , but I think we have one living WW1 vet left in Canada. Then again we may have none. In the U.S., anyone here know who many are still with us?


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: topical tom
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 12:10 AM

I lost an uncle in World War 1, my mother's brother.He apparently enlisted (along with a few friends ), after an evening of drinking and while under the influence.Imagine my grandparents' horror when two mps came to get him as he had neglected to report as ordered.He had not told them of the volunteering.He subsequently was sent overseas and was later reported as missing in action.
How ironic, the "war to end all wars".There have been so many since.Governments have not yet learned that killing only perpetuates hatred.Those who begin the wars are rarely the ones to die.Meeting, talking, listening, and eradicating poverty, I believe, are the ways to go.Having said this, World War 2 unfortunately had to be fought.
I will observe a minute of silence on November 11.God bless and protect our soldiers in harm's way the world over.
Let us hope that the governments of the world can learn to stop killing our own species.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Ebbie
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 12:12 AM

From Wikipedia:

"Frank Woodruff Buckles (born February 1, 1901) is, at age 107, the last identified living American veteran of the First World War."


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: beardedbruce
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 01:45 AM

My grandfather was in the 42nd (Rainbow) division. Wounded at Ch. Thierry.


" from July 25 through August 3, 1918, the Rainbow Division had suffered 5,476 killed and wounded, mostly in the four infantry regiments. Its attached units had an additional 983 casualties for a total of 6,459 during those decisive few days of battle at the Ourcq. In General Douglas MacArthur's own words, "We...took Meurcy Ferme in (a) hand-to-hand fight...But the center at Seringes et Nesle still held....Their artillery was concentrated; their machine guns east and west of the town raked us fore and aft; but nothing could stop the impetus of that mad charge. We forded the river; we ascended the slopes; we killed the garrison in the town to a man. At dusk on July 29 we were in sole possession."


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Folk Form # 1
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 03:53 AM

90 years ago. So long ago and yet not so long ago.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 04:04 AM

There's a photograph in our living room of a man I never knew personally... he died 90 years ago this September, fighting for his country.

The man was my great uncle, Eli James Christopher, and he was killed in action on the 18th of September, less than 8 weeks before the end of the war.

He was just one of the donkeys, his battle brought no heroics, no glory or fame, just a name inscribed in stone on a Memorial where he died, and the village church where he lived.

Around this photo are seven poppies, all year round. One of them is for him, the other six for family members I know of who died in WWI. Two of them lie in some unknown corner of a foreign field. The others are at the bottom of the North Sea, all four killed in 24 hours, at the Battle of Jutland, 31/5-1/06/1916.

Some of us remember their sacrifices every day, and wonder why more young men and women have to make the same sacrifice.

LTS


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Subject: Lyr Add: HOW BLOWS THE WIND
From: Megan L
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 04:22 AM

Rapaire your mention of the photograph of the gassed soldiers reminded me of this.

There used to be an old man came to visit us when I was a little girl. One night it was very foggy when he walked down the road and he was having a hard time breathing when he reached us. After mum had got him settled and he had got his breath back I asked him why he couldn't breathe properly.

He told us he had been gassed during the First World War. He called it 'Mustard Gas' He said he'd been fairly lucky, that you used to see lines of men with their eyes bandaged, their hand on the shoulder of the man in front, like snakes waiting to board the ship for home.


HOW BLOWS THE WIND

How blows the wind? The old man asked.
Though no one knew quite why
How blows the wind? The old man asked.
Then he'd begin to cry

Is it fair and from our backs?
Oh tell me how it blows.
But they were silent when he'd ask
His answer no one knows.

They'd say there isn't any wind today
Come David look outside.
But he had heard it all before
He knew how much they lied.

In the end they didn't answer,
There was nothing they could say.
And still each time he'd ask them
How blows the wind today?

As David's dying in his bed
A tired old priest comes round
He thought he heard him whisper,
And strains to hear the sound.

How blows the wind? The old man asked.
Is it fair and from our backs? Oh tell me how it blows.
He hears the words and understands
At last someone who knows.

Aye lad it's fair and from our backs
Come take a breath with me
Here lies no shadow of a cloud
The air is sweet and free.

Two tired old men, they take a breath
Of air that's sweet and rare
The old priest closes David's eyes
He says a simple prayer.
Then he continues down the ward
He knew for he'd been there.


Margaret Harkness Thomson Barclay-Laughton
8.05pm 22nd November 1998


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Cluin
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 08:16 AM

Time to revisit another book on my list for periodic re-reading.

Pierre Berton's Vimy.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 09:21 AM

Grass

Pile the bodies high at Austerlitz and Waterloo.        
Shovel them under and let me work—        
            I am the grass; I cover all.        

And pile them high at Gettysburg        
And pile them high at Ypres and Verdun.                 
Shovel them under and let me work.        
Two years, ten years, and passengers ask the conductor:        
            What place is this?        
            Where are we now?        

            I am the grass.        
            Let me work.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: gnomad
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 09:27 AM

BBC Story Another veteran gone.

Good verses, MeganL. I too remember talking with a few who served in the trenches in WW1, and gas seemed to linger in their minds even more than shelling and shooting.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 09:36 AM

Shrapnel and bullets are "clean". Phosgene, chlorine, mustard and the rest would rot your lungs and blister your skin.

       Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
       Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
       Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
       And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
       Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
       But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
       Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
       Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

       Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! – An ecstasy of fumbling,
       Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
       But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
       And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime . . .
       Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
       As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
       In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
       He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

       If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
       Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
       And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
       His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
       If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
       Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
       Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
       Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
       My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
       To children ardent for some desperate glory,
       The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
       Pro patria mori.

                                 --Wilfred Owen


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: GUEST,crazy little woman
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 09:37 AM

Kansas City has a World War I museum, which you can read about here:

http://www.theworldwar.org/s/110/index.aspx


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Bill D
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 10:46 AM

So many Willie McBrides ....... so many "No Man's Lands"


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: artbrooks
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 11:00 AM

..are you a stranger without even a name
Forever enshrined behind some glass pane,
In an old photograph, torn and tattered and stained,
And fading to yellow in a brown leather frame.
    Eric Bogle

Glad you know yours' name, Liz.

I visited my father in Arlington National Cemetery last month.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Micca
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 11:22 AM

1
Young men they came forward and signed up for to go
They knew that God's on our side and we're right
White feathers flew around them like the freshly fallen snow
As they marched off to Flanders for to fight

Rifle smart and dressed in Khaki
just like strolling in the park eh?
Rifle smart and dressed in Khaki
As they marched off to Flanders for to fight

And they sang of "Tipperary" and of "the old kit bag"
And songs of other wars of long ago
They sang to keep their courage up not let their shoulders sag
To the strains of "we think we ought to go"

Rifle smart and dressed in Khaki
Home by Christmas what a lark eh?
Rifle smart and dressed in Khaki
To the strains of "we think we ought to go"

2
My Grandfather hated the Germans
And when asked why this was his retort
There were too many snipers
In the Salient at Wipers
Trying to cut my life short

Verse 1
He went out to France in 1915
A man with the Connaught Rangers
To fight with the Kaiser who he'd never seen
And in the defence of some strangers
But the times they were hard there was no work around
And the Army gave gold in your fist
You didn't need much yourself, it was "all found"
So Grandfather went to enlist

3
Its Halloween midnight in the low lands of Flanders
A cold pale fog on the land it is spread
And out of the mist, come a marching and singing
Long gaunt files of men near a hundred years dead

They stand, parade order, by the building at Thiepval
And at the command each steps up and stands tall
And receives in his turn from the ghost Colour Sergeant
His name rank and number removed from the wall

For Frank Patterson, Died 40 years after being wounded by shrapnel and gassed in the German advance on Amiens, spring of 1918


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: KB in Iowa
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 11:33 AM

My Grandpa won the war. He turned 18 on May 30, 1918 and immediately enlisted in the army. He went through basic training and was set to be shipped out to Europe. When the Kaiser heard grandpa was coming he realized he could not win and surrendered. Or so I was told.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: EBarnacle
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 12:27 PM

Many years ago, the housing development where I lived was near the New Jersey Home for Disabled Veterans. At that time, there were still quite a few Spanish American War veterans living there. It was a pleasure to go listen to their stories.

As Veteran's Day approaches, consider paying a bit of attention to these people, many of whom have no one to listen to what they have to say or to pay attention [non-institutional] to them.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 12:58 PM

Yes. Go to the Veterans' Homes and Hospitals. Talk with them.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: gnu
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 04:14 PM

KB... I love that story!


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Sandra in Sydney
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 06:35 PM

3 of my Grandmother's 5 brothers enlisted in 1914, as they did in those days here in Australia. Her 4th brother was married & her 5th had bad burn scars on his arm from a childhood accident, & he endured several unsuccessful operations by Army doctors to reduce the scar tissue so he would be fit to serve.

The 3 brothers served at Gallipoli, then went to France where Jim died in the Passcehndale battles where Australian & British troops were used as cannon fodder. His body was never recovered & his mother wore the brooch containing his picture every day until she died 20 years later.

I also found their military records on the Govt Archives site & met them decades after their deaths. Bill was guarding a soldier on a desertion charge & allowed him to escape. Today we call it post-traumatic shock, in those days shell-shock was desertion & was punished by a term in prison. So I found this bloke's record & he served 2 years in a British prison when he was recaptured.

Earlier this year I found 2 fantastic books about Gallipoli (Jonathon KING & Michael BOWERS. Gallipoli - untold stories from War Correspondent Charles Bean & front-line Anzacs - a 90th Anniversary tribute. Milsons Point, Transworld, 2005) &
Diggers in France that showed me what life was like for them & their mates. Sheer hell.

Pics of James Royal Lambert & his mother wearing the brooch with his pic, also pics of her with her young family, & her soldier sons here

sandra


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: bobad
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 06:43 PM

IN FLANDERS FIELDS
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Monique
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 07:44 PM

If you're ever interested in how we do it. There're also programs on tv every year.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: kendall
Date: 06 Nov 08 - 09:11 PM

When I was a boy there were two old soldiers who had been in the Army in WW1. One of them was a victim of a gas attack, and he was sent home given 6 months to live. That was in the late 40s. He died an old man who chain smoked Camel cigarettes.

Come Tuesday, I will fly the stars and stripes along with the cross of St. George.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: kendall
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 03:32 AM

He was sent home during the war, I knew him in the 40's.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 04:41 AM

Thanks for starting the thread Rapaire.
Thanks for the poem Megan L.

As long as we keep these remebrances:

"They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old.
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun, and in the morning,
We will remember them!"


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: meself
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 11:15 AM

Merci, Monique.


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Monique
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 12:12 PM

De rien! A similar ceremony takes place on every May 8th for WW II armistice. It's also part of our grade school curriculum from first grade. Of course the history lesson gets more complex with each upper grade. I'd like to add a little story about it: 4 or 5 years ago we were talking about November 11th with my first graders. For the boys war was a bang-bang-you're-dead thing that they played at recess and they seemed to feel quite cheerful about it. After a discussion about actual war being wounded or dead daddies, grandpas and/or big brothers, bombed towns, torn down houses and homeless people they were much less cheerful. As it was about WW I "Who were the Germans?" "The bad ones!" "Why?" "Because they were our ennemies!" Then, a girl raised her hand and said "Maybe that for the Germans we were the bad ones!" She was 6 years old and not every 6 year old kid is able to consider a situation from an opponent's point of view -some people are unable to all their lives long!


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 12:23 PM

Bill Amend, the cartoonist who does "Foxtrot", had his cartoon family in DC a couple years ago. They were visiting The Wall and the mother said, "This guy was your Dad's best friend's older brother." A panel later she asks her son, "What's with you?" and he replies, "I'm an older brother."

We might disagree with the reasons why they died, but we must never forget them.

"...the world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here."


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: beardedbruce
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 03:38 PM

My father's father served from 1915 until wounded in 1918 in the 168th Infantry, 42nd (Rainbow) Division. Note the Regiment was 3600 men: "When the Germans surrendered there were only 107 men left, the
rest had been killed or wounded."

I look at the casualty figures for the troops, and wonder that there were ANY left to come home and tell the stories.




... in July 1915, it reorganized as the Third Infantry, Iowa National Guard. Under this designation, it served on the Mexican border in 1916.

When the order was issued for the mobilization of the national guard, the Third Iowa assembled at Camp Dodge, where it was mustered into the service as the One Hundred Sixty-eighth infantry. There were about 2,000 men in the original Third, and the regiment was raised to war strength by 1,600 additional, mostly from the First and Second Iowa national guard. It left
Des Moines September 10 and arrived at Camp Mills September 13, where it became part of the Forty-second (Rainbow) division and soon thereafter embarked for France.

The service of the One Hundred Sixty-eighth with the Forty-second divisionhas been given with the account of the service of the Rainbow division, of which they were a part. Particular reference to this regiment is justified because of its long and exceptional service. Wherever the fighting was hardest and the responsibility the greatest, there the One Hundred Sixty-eight was sent. In whatever duty assigned, no matter what dangers were incident or what losses were inevitable, the regiment braved the dangers and suffered the losses without complaint and without protest.

Throughout their service they endured privations and faced the hazards of battle with indomitable fortitude and invincible heroism.

Colonel Bennett, who commanded them for a long period of their service, said of them, "I only wish that I had the power to express the character of the work performed by these men. It is wonderful and deserving of the highest praise."

Colonel Brown of the general staff said, "They are a wonderful fighting outfit."

Captain Leon Bentz of the French staff said, "It is the best regiment I ever saw. The men are too brave, too courageous."

Gen. Douglas McArthur, chief of staff, said, "You can tell the people of Iowa that this regiment ranks 100 per cent."

The war correspondent repeatedly singled it out for special praise. As one of the reported, "The One Hundred Sixty-eighth has earned the name of the most famous American regiment. The French cheer whenever it passes. The English have marked it for special praise. The Australians, the Canadians and other colonials, considered the best fighters among the allies, claim the troops of the One Hundred Sixty-eighth as their brothers."

A member of congress describing the battle fronts and that the names of two American regiments were one every tongue: that of the One Hundred Sixty-eighth Iowa, and the One Hundred Sixty-seventh Alabama. These two regiments constituted the Eighty fourth infantry brigade and fought side by side throughout almost their entire service. Representing the blue and the gray together, they gave new luster to the flag they carried on many a foreign battle field and vied in affectionate rivalry in service and
devotion to each other and to the cause for which they fought.

While praise and honors and citations and decorations were lavishly given the gallant boys who composed the One Hundred Sixty-eighth, they were dearly bought. In the fight of July 25th to obtain the heights beyond the Oureq river, Major Stanley's battalion lost over 50 per cent of its enlisted men and 20 out of 26 officers. The next morning only 27 men and officer reported
for duty. Of the 250 men of Company M who were in the service only 27 escaped, 230 men being killed or wounded. Such was the price paid to vindicate American rights and save the civilization of the world."

Judge Towner also told of the capture of Hill 288 in the Argonne by the Iowa troops. Of this, he said, "In the Argonne offensive one of the most difficult tasks assigned the Forty-second division was the taking of Hill 288. The Rainbow boys first attacked it frontally. The attack failed. They made four more vain attempts to storm the hill. One rainy morning the One
Hundred Sixty-eighth regiment started on the sixth trial. With our artillery dropping shells on the crest and the New York troops spreading machine gun fire in all the slopes, the Iowa boys just at daylight, in a cold rain, again started up the hill. Through the barbed wire, over the trenches, driving the gunners from hundreds of machine gun nests, they were at the Germans with bayonets set.

There were hundreds of hand to hand conflicts on the slippery hillside. Captains fell and lieutenants commanded. Lieutenants fell and sergeants commanded. One platoon of nineteen men was led over the top by a private. For six hours the struggle continued before the top was reached and the victory won. When the Germans surrendered there were only 107 men left, the rest had been killed or wounded."


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Rapparee
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 03:55 PM

This picture is from Gallipoli, but it could be anywhere in WW1...or 2...or Korea...or Vietnam...or Malay...or the Franco-Prussian War or....


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Subject: RE: BS: 90 years ago....
From: Beer
Date: 07 Nov 08 - 09:04 PM

It's hard to believe that any of these men that came home were able to lead a normal life.
Adrien


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