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Folk Club Newbie Pointers

Sleepy Rosie 12 Nov 08 - 03:38 PM
The Villan 12 Nov 08 - 03:42 PM
Spleen Cringe 12 Nov 08 - 03:55 PM
Sleepy Rosie 12 Nov 08 - 04:00 PM
Sleepy Rosie 12 Nov 08 - 04:09 PM
Richard Bridge 12 Nov 08 - 05:03 PM
gnomad 12 Nov 08 - 05:15 PM
Les in Chorlton 12 Nov 08 - 05:23 PM
jimslass 13 Nov 08 - 03:55 AM
GUEST,Mr Red 13 Nov 08 - 12:49 PM
Northerner 13 Nov 08 - 01:32 PM
BB 13 Nov 08 - 02:47 PM
Anglogeezer 13 Nov 08 - 03:46 PM
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Subject: Folk Club Newbie Etiquette??
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 03:38 PM

This may seem a bit of a cross thread, but it's not really.

I've read with interest the thread on club manners, but it would still be helpful to completely *inexperienced* newbies to the folk scene like me, who are developing an embrionic interest in folk song and singing and thus do not know the 'understood' club etiquette, to be guided in how to avoid pitfalls which will be obvious to the non folk-club virgin.

For example, I read in the folk club manners post, that one shouldn't sing a song that a regular sings. But what if you're a neb and you only have a tiny handful of songs under your belt and that's the one you feel confident with, or you don't even know it's someones regular song?

Thorticles appreciated from those that nowes. And I'm sure you all are less strangely tenticled in the flesh... ;-)

Rosie the innocent


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: The Villan
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 03:42 PM

Rosie
You do it. What is worse, is if somebody before you does the song, and you decide to do it as well. That would be a mistake.
Its almost like a first come first served situation.
You can't be expected to know who does what, but if that is the only song you know and somebody does it before you, just decline from singing.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 03:55 PM

You don't seem that cross...


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 04:00 PM

Thanks for that Villian,

'Cos I genuinely might not have realised that it was bad form for someone to do the same song twice.

You really never know what the unspoken understandings are within a given social group are, until you're a part of it.

However 'blindingly obvious' or 'common sense' they may appear to those to whom it is second nature.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 04:09 PM

Ah well Spleen Cringe,

I guess you ain't crossed me enough as yet to get me properly venting?

At least grant me a little time on-list.

I do likes me Baudelaire tho', so I'm hoping we can still be friends....


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 05:03 PM

Listen first.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: gnomad
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 05:15 PM

Some thoughts that work for newbies in many situations, not just folk clubs:

Keep a low profile and observe for a while, you will pick up quite a few of the conventions and ideas. You may also get a picture of the power structure, and the personalities involved. All this info is useful if you decide to get more deeply involved, and it helps you decide whether or not you wish to do so.

It is generally better to be considered enigmatic and interesting, than a brash blow-in that thinks (s)he knows it all. Make it clear you are open to guidance (checking with others before nabbing the best seat in the room is a good plan) You are bound to tread on somebodies corns at some stage so try to tread lightly, and be ready to jump back.

Finally, if you think you have a great new idea for the club, don't be too messianic about it; better to talk it over privately with one or two folks you feel confident with first. Your new idea may have been tried and roundly rejected before you appeared on the scene. If you don't yet have one or two with whom you feel confident it may be a little early to be suggesting major changes.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 12 Nov 08 - 05:23 PM

Sounds like it might be simpler to join the Masons.

People sit in rooms and sing songs. Give it 60 minutes, if it it isn't friendly try some where else.

perhaps the Beech, Chorlton, first Wednesday of the month

L in C


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: jimslass
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 03:55 AM

.....and Don't for Gods sake air a pet peeve!!!

(Ahm still a'grovellin', and duckin' raspberries)


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: GUEST,Mr Red
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 12:49 PM

The usual thing in any environment is to lurk a-while.

As for singing other peoples songs - it depends on the person. Some will give you the words and leave you to it. And if you learn a song and later find it is done by someone else don't be afraid. The songs don't belong to one person, if they have a small repertoire then logic will inform you.

Find ways to lay nerves - I half sit on the back of a chair or stool, and have a tankard of cider to refresh the mouth - though too alcohol much doesn't make you sing any better. BUT everyone else sounds better.

Learn the words and sing without the page. It improves the delivery and you don't look down and sing to the floor. By all means have the words handy but only for dire emmergency. Breath from the diaphragm.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Northerner
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 01:32 PM

Make contact with the audience. Look at them, and speak to them. I would recommend keeping your eyes open - I generally try to look towards someone at the back of the room. It's not a bad idea to ask someone at the back if they can hear you all right. Aim to have good diction - say your words clearly.


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: BB
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 02:47 PM

However it may seem from some of these threads, most clubs are encouraging and sympathetic to new performers - remember that, and if you do go wrong, remember that most people will be on your side and willing you to get it right. Most clubs, too, are delighted to have some new blood, particularly amongst the performers. Go for it, girl!

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Folk Club Newbie Pointers
From: Anglogeezer
Date: 13 Nov 08 - 03:46 PM

Hi Sleepy Rosie,
welcome to the world of folk music!! A number of good points already made.
This site of Hamish Currie's may give you some useful tips.
Most clubs/sessions are only too pleased to welcome some one new and I've never yet met anyone that was truly annoyed if someone sang one of "their" songs, after all it's by listening to other people sing that makes you think "By Heck!! Thats a cracking song!!"
So, keep on singing

regards
Jake


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