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Origins: Lili Marleen

DigiTrad:
LILI MARLEEN
LILI MARLENE (informal)
LILLI MARLENE (English)
THE D-DAY DODGERS


Related threads:
Aug 18th, 1941: Lili Marleen (110)
Lili Marlene by As sung by June tabor (11)
Chords Req: D-Day Dodgers / Lili Marlene (9)
happy? - Aug 18 (Vor der Kaserne) (10)
Lyr Req: We Are the D-Day Dodgers (39)
Lyr Req: Lilli Marlene in Irish (7)
Chords Req: Lili Marlene in German and English (23)
Lyr Req: Wedding of Lili Marlene (19)
Lyr Req: D Day Dodgers (25)
Another Lili Marlene (5)
Lyr Add: Lili Marlene (an extra clean verse) (4)
D-Day Dodgers.Lili Marlene (5)


Ron Davies 30 Nov 08 - 09:59 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Nov 08 - 11:10 PM
Joe Offer 30 Nov 08 - 11:24 PM
trevek 01 Dec 08 - 07:50 AM
Ian 01 Dec 08 - 09:09 AM
GUEST,DWR 01 Dec 08 - 12:52 PM
ard mhacha 01 Dec 08 - 02:31 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Dec 08 - 05:11 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 01 Dec 08 - 05:22 PM
Joe Offer 02 Dec 08 - 02:05 AM
Ron Davies 02 Dec 08 - 08:07 AM
meself 02 Dec 08 - 11:08 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Dec 08 - 02:52 PM
Susanne (skw) 02 Dec 08 - 08:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Dec 08 - 09:24 PM
Ron Davies 02 Dec 08 - 11:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Dec 08 - 03:20 PM
Ron Davies 04 Dec 08 - 11:50 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Dec 08 - 12:58 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 05 Dec 08 - 01:00 AM
ard mhacha 05 Dec 08 - 06:49 AM
Dave the Gnome 05 Dec 08 - 07:50 AM
Susanne (skw) 07 Dec 08 - 10:01 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 08 Dec 08 - 12:48 PM
GUEST,Sena 14 Feb 09 - 12:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Feb 09 - 06:01 PM
Susanne (skw) 14 Feb 09 - 06:16 PM
Fidjit 15 Feb 09 - 05:04 AM
bubblyrat 15 Feb 09 - 05:39 AM
GUEST,Sena 15 Feb 09 - 10:53 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 15 Feb 09 - 02:57 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 02 Mar 09 - 03:17 PM
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Subject: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Ron Davies
Date: 30 Nov 08 - 09:59 PM

This appears to be the spelling of the song in German.

Just wanted to note there is a fascinating new book out on the song, with considerable detail on the poet ( Hans Leip), the writer of the melody under which the song became famous (Norbert Schultze) and the singer of the most famous version ( Lale Andersen). Lale Andersen was born Elizabeth Bunnenberg (book says Bunterberg), then became Liselotte Wilke (married name) then took the name Lale Andersen.

Destroys some persistent myths, like the one that Lale Andersen was Danish or Norwegian--and is just a riveting story, with an amazing cast of characters. And of course, the story is all the better for being true.

Book is by Liel Leibovitz and Matthew Miller and called: Lili Marlene: The Soldiers' Song of World War II.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Nov 08 - 11:10 PM

Thanks, I'll have to look for it. I have a couple of volumes of Leip's poetry.
There is a thread here somewhere, I know I posted on Leip but I can't find it. Par for me.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Nov 08 - 11:24 PM

Darn, I would have thought Dietrich did the most famous recording. Click here for a YouTube recording of the song, as sung in German by Lale Andersen. This recording by Andersen comes from 1968.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: trevek
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 07:50 AM

There is an old wartime documentary about the song and how it moved from being a German favourite to a British one.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Ian
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 09:09 AM

Memory advises me that this song was discussed on BBC radio 2s Folk on 2. It was suggested that the tune originated from an South African dutch imigrant song (Tramp across the velt) which may in turn be a recycle of a dutch folk tune.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: GUEST,DWR
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 12:52 PM

Joe, back in '99 we had a pretty good discussion on Lili Marleen in the WWII thread. thread.cfm?threadid=10366#72364 It's buried in with the other things, but worth a look. I think I missed the exact beginning with my link, but close enough. Just back up a few.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: ard mhacha
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 02:31 PM

The 1968 recording by Lale Anderson beats anything I have heard.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 05:11 PM

Found the thread with discussion of Hans Leip- 37963:
Aug 18th 1941 Lili Marleen.
One of my treasures is the little book of poetry; Hans Leip, 1942, "Die Laterne, Lieder und Gedichte," printed in Germany during WW2, "Feldausgabe, 20. Tausend."

The music was written by Norbert Schulze, 1941. See Abby Sale, and discussion by Wolfgang, thread 83904: Aug 18 Vor der Kaserne

The full five verses, written by Leip in 1915 for his two girl friends, Lili and Marleen, are in the DT.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 01 Dec 08 - 05:22 PM

Foul Ball!
The music, thread 83904: Aug 18 Vor der Kaserne


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Subject: DT Correction: Lili Marleen
From: Joe Offer
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 02:05 AM

The lyrics we have in the Digital Tradition make me cringe, but I realized that I didn't have a fully credible printed copy of the song. The best I could find was at ingeb.org, which is usually quite accurate. I have removed the German characters so they won't goof up the formatting of the DT. Any corrections? You'll note down toward the bottom that I underlined one word I wonder about, but my Cassel's Dictionary says either "Leid" or "Leids" is correct. I listened to the 1939 Lale Andersen recording and noticed a few differences - I put what I hear in italics. Comments?

[this is the working copy, for submission to the Digital Tradition when perfected]

LILI MARLEEN
(words, Hans Leip 1915; music, Norbert Schultze, 1938)

Vor der Kaserne
Vor dem grossen Tor
Stand eine Laterne
Und steht sie (die) noch davor
So woll'n wir uns da wieder seh'n
Bei der Laterne wollen wir steh'n
Wie einst Lili Marleen.
Wie einst Lili Marleen.

Unsere beiden Schatten
Sah'n wie einer aus
Dass wir so lieb uns hatten
Das sah man gleich daraus
Und alle Leute soll'n es seh'n
Wenn wir bei der Laterne steh'n
Wie einst Lili Marleen.
Wie einst Lili Marleen.

Schon rief der Posten,
Sie blasen Zapfenstreich
Das kann drei Tage kosten
Kam'rad, ich komm sogleich (ja gleich)
Da sagten wir auf Wiedersehen
Wie gerne wollt ich mit dir geh'n
Mit dir Lili Marleen.
Mit dir Lili Marleen.

Deine Schritte kennt sie,
Deinen zieren (schoenen) Gang
Alle Abend brennt sie,
Doch mich vergass sie lang
Und sollte mir ein Leids gescheh'n
Wer wird bei der Laterne stehen
Mit dir Lili Marleen?
Mit dir Lili Marleen?

Aus dem stillen Raume,
Aus der Erde Grund
Hebt mich wie im Traume
Dein verliebter Mund
Wenn sich die spaeten Nebel drehn
Werd' ich bei der Laterne steh'n
Wie einst Lili Marleen.
Wie einst Lili Marleen.


(Alternate lyrics in parentheses)



Lyrics as they appear at ingeb.org - I have marked the parts I question. Most would be correct either way, but the words in italics are what I hear.

1. Vor der Kaserne
Vor dem großen Tor
Stand eine Laterne
Und steht sie (die???) noch davor
So woll'n wir uns da wieder seh'n
Bei der Laterne wollen wir steh'n
|: Wie einst Lili Marleen. :|

2. Unsere beide (beiden??) Schatten
Sah'n wie einer aus
Daß wir so lieb uns hatten
Das sah man gleich daraus
Und alle Leute soll'n es seh'n
Wenn wir bei der Laterne steh'n
|: Wie einst Lili Marleen. :|

3. Schon rief der Posten,
Sie blasen Zapfenstreich
Das kann drei Tage kosten
Kam'rad, ich komm sogleich (ja gleich???)
Da sagten wir auf Wiedersehen
Wie gerne wollt ich mit dir geh'n
|: Mit dir Lili Marleen. :|

4. Deine Schritte kennt sie,
Deinen zieren (schoenen??) Gang
Alle Abend brennt sie,
Doch mich vergaß sie lang
Und sollte mir ein Leids gescheh'n
Wer wird bei der Laterne stehen
|: Mit dir Lili Marleen? :|

5. Aus dem stillen Raume,
Aus der Erde Grund
Hebt mich wie im Traume
Dein verliebter Mund
Wenn sich die späten Nebel drehn
Werd' ich bei der Laterne steh'n
|: Wie einst Lili Marleen. :|




I also wonder about the background notes in the Digital Tradition. Can we verify this?

    Note: In 1915 'Gardefuesilier' (some kind of military person with firearms?) Hans Leip wrote a farewell poem for his two girl friends, Lili and Marleen. Shortly before WWII it was set to music by Norbert Schultze. It became the most popular song of WWII; it's said to have been translated into 48 languages, and was widely parodied.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7heXZPl2hik


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Ron Davies
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 08:07 AM

I would say it's not actually a farewell note.   According to the book--and it makes sense to me--Leip just felt in the mood to write a romantic poem--and certainly could not foretell if he would even survive the war, much less see them again. He was of course lucky enough to do, for a reason I could give, if you like--it's in the book.

He was interested in both girls, though according to the book, one of the girls was his comrade's girl. He seems to have been much more interested in Marleen.

Lili was not the name of the first girl, but he and his comrade gave her that name, partly in tribute to Goethe's first love, and partly for another reason--which I could say, but I don't really want to steal the book's thunder too much.

The book is not footnoted enough for my taste, but I suppose that's just a quibble.

One of my questions is what became of Karl-Heinz Reintgen, the man who ran Radio Belgrade.   Interviews with him--not by the authors of the book-- are given as source for much of the story.   And he was captured by the Russians.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: meself
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 11:08 AM

"for a reason I could give, if you like--it's in the book"

If it's a good story - let 'er rip!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 02:52 PM

Joe, a few minor corrections to the working copy, taken from "Die Laterne," the book of poems and 'thoughts' by Hans Leip, where the poem was published.
Two general notes-
German poetry does not start a line with Upper case letter unless the line starts a sentence. The same is true of Spanish. However, in English we find this wrong. You may wish to follow English useage.

Poetic usage of stehen and similar words, eliminating the 'e' to eliminate the syllable, as stehn, does not call for an apostrophe.

Verse 1
line 10 ...Kaserne, (add comma)
line 3- ...Laterne, add comma)
line 4- sie, not die
line 5- "so wolln wir uns da wiedersehn"; In poetical German when an 'e' is removed, apostrophes are not inserted.
wiedersehn is one word.
lines 4-5- commas after each line
line 6- stehn.
lines 7-8- comma after wie einst,
Leip did not repeat line 7 in his poem, but it is sometimes repeated when sung.
2
line 2- sahn. Period at end of line.
Line 3- comma at end,
line 4- period after daraus.
lines 5-6, end with comma,
line-7- wie einst, (add comma after einst in all verses)
3
lines 1-2- add commas at end
line 3- kosten! (add !)
line 4- kamerad (the 'e' is used and pronounced)
line 4- Kamerad, ich komm ja gleich (not sogleich). Period after gleich.
line 6- gehn
Line 6-7- add commas at end of line,
line 7- Mit dir, Lili Marleen (add comma)
4
line 1- add comma at end,
line 2- Deinen zieren Gang, (not schoenen); comma at end,
line 3- comma at end,
line 4- remove 'Doch'; mich vergass sie lang, is the corect ending to line 3. Add period after lang.
line 5- geschehn (poetical), Add comma at end,
line 6- stehn
line 7- mit dir, (add comma)
5
line 1- add comma at end,
line 4- ...Mund. Add period at end.
line 5- ...drehn, add comma
line 6- poetically, Werd ich bei der laterne stehn
line 7- wie einst, Lili Marleen.

Based on the poem in "Die Laterne, Lieder und Gedichte."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 08:05 PM

For anyone able to read German, there is a 'song biography' by Werner Hinze: Lili Marleen. Ein Lied zwischen Soldatenromantik und Propaganda (Hamburg 2003). It's a slim volume (at 5 Euros), so easily sent abroad. PM me for the address if you're interested. (No, I don't get any commission.)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 09:24 PM

Katja Behling, "Martha Freud, a Biography," has interesting remarks about Leip and a woman named Lilly Marlé.
The old story about the two girl friends, Lili and Marleen, may have been a tale to keep quiet the real identity of "'Lili'.
Anton Freud had a cousin named Lilly Marlé, who said that she was the woman in the poem. Before her marriage to Marlé in 1918, Lilly and Leip had been friends.
"Lilly had always maintained that she was Lili Marleen, but people only started to believe her once Hans Leip (1893-1983) himself conceded that he had known Lilly Marlé 'well'. If events really were as...(to p. 149)"
This on p. 148, but the google 'preview' omits page 149, leaving the story up in the air.
Someone please buy or borrow the book and finish the story here.

(Martha Freud was the wife of the famous Sigmund, married to him for 50 years)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Ron Davies
Date: 02 Dec 08 - 11:39 PM

Lots of women have claimed to be "Lili". And Leip knew a lot of women "well". He did marry Lina Stellmann, "his childhood sweetheart", in 1916. But it seems that in the 20's he became a literary lion. Seems to have been somewhat like a rock star. As this book puts it, Leip and his friends "declared themselves free of the constraints that tethered human sexuality to the rusty fence of morality"--(how's that for a turn of phrase?)

There seem to be a fair number of theories as to the identity of "Lili". I'd be inclined to believe Leip's own answer--a combination of the two girls--rather than the cover-up theory. But if there is more evidence to back up the cover-up idea, we can certainly examine it.

To answer the other question, about Leip's WW I experience, he appears to have been very lucky.   Not even a month into combat, he fell and injured his spine.   Enough to have been invalided out of the military--but, it appears, not a permanent disability.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Dec 08 - 03:20 PM

The Freud-Marlé-Leip story is not simple, but this seems to be the gist of it.
Lilly was the daughter of Marie (Mitzi) and Moritz Freud (a distant relative of Siegmund Freud, the psychoanalysist). Marie, her mother, was a sister of Siegmund Freud. At one time Lilly was a girlfriend of Hans Leip (he was handsome, intelligent, and attractive to women).

Leip wrote the song in 1915. Lilly married Marlé, a thespian, in 1918, thus did not have the name until then. The story thus seems false.

Lilly became an actress after marriage to Marlé. Formally, she used the name Lilly Marlé-Freud (a letter to her from the writer Rainer Marie Rilke, so addressed, recently sold at auction).

Anton Freud, a relative of Sigmund, told the story of Leip and Lilly, suggesting that 'Lili Marleen' was Lilly. Others in the family took it up and Lilly said it was true- it may have been a joke among friends and families because the Freud's (both Siegmund's and Moritz's) families and Leip were friends. Leip was not(?) Jewish and Siegmund professed atheism; his wife Martha was the daughter of a rabbi.

Between 1915 and 1939, the poem underwent changes. The original title was "Das Mädchen unter der Laterne." Leip added verse five in 1937, and used the title "Das Lied eines jungen Soldaten auf der Wacht."
Lale Andersen and Norbert Schultze(?) may have first applied the name "Lili Marleen" when he wrote the music in 1938 and she recorded it in 1939.

The story about the two girls Lili and Marleen also may have been fiction. I doubt that we will ever know for certain.
Leip was a story teller, writing novels and children's books in addition to poetry. He was a filmographer, working on films including "Judgement at Nuremburg." He also wrote non-fiction, his story of the Gulf Stream was translated into English and sold well. A minor artist, he made prints; one of two dancers recently sold for $550.

-Katja Behling, "Martha Freud, a Biography." Portions on line at books.google.com/books?isbn0745633382..
-Leip biography- "Lili Marleen," from Wikipedia, copied in http://www.radioswissclassic.ch/cgi-bin/pip/html.cgi?lang=en&m=entity&v=b&w=Lili+Marleen
-Freud biography- http://www.salus-institut.de/ siegmundfreudzentrum/awfreud.htm


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Ron Davies
Date: 04 Dec 08 - 11:50 PM

The book which is the origin of this thread says that Leip ran across the 2 verses "Deine Schritte kennt sie..." and "Aus dem stillen Raume..." in 1937 when he was preparing some of his early work for publication, but up to then had always left them out of the poem. He had however written them in 1915, at the same time he wrote the others.

It also says that he in fact did not want the poem included in that book of early work--it was too personal.   But his publisher stood firm, and eventually persuaded him to include it.

Also it appears Leip was a prominent figure on the Hamburg literary scene in the '20's.

As I said, I don't know how much detail I should give--I don't want to steal the book's thunder.

It's definitely worth the time of anybody interested in the song--or even the period.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 12:58 AM

I should have said the last two verses instead of 'last verse'.

Different writers have treated the story differently; Leibowitz and Miller may have approached it as a romance.

Sigmund Freud's grandson, writing for the Freud Center at the Salus Institut, had this to say (leaving part in German) to avoid mis-translation:
"Mitzi and Moritz [Freud] had two daughters, the younger named Lilly, born in November, 1888. She married the thespian Arnold Marlé in July, 1918. Before their marriage, they were friends with the Berlin librettist Hans Leip. Im Jahre 1915 wechseite sie das Objekt ihrer Zuneigung von Leip zu Marlé, ihrem zukünftigen Mann. Leip was sehr getroffen und entäuscht, und um sich zu rächen schrieb er sein später sehr bekanntess Soldatenlied, Lilly Marleen.
    Vor der Kaserne
    vor dem Großen Tor
    stand eine Laterne
    und stand sie noch davor. usw.

Das heißt er hat sie als Soldatenhure bezeichnet, und um nicht in Schwierigkeiten zu kommen hat er den Namen ein "en" angehängt. Meine Cousine zweites Grades, Lilly hat immer behauptet das sie die Lilly Marleen war, aber man hat es ihr nicht glauben wollen. Erst Nachforschungen bei Hans Leip haben die Wahrheit ergaben, er gab zu dass er die Lilly Marlé "gut gekannt hatte"! Komisch, dass so viele Deutschen Soldaten ein Lied über eine jüdische Nichte Freuds gesungen haben".

Interesting- the German soldiers singing about Freud's Jewish niece!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 01:00 AM

The reference-
http://www.salus-institut.de/_siegmundfreudzentrum/awfreud.htm.

A. W. Freud lives in Oxted.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: ard mhacha
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 06:49 AM

Lale Anderson is still numero uno.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 05 Dec 08 - 07:50 AM

Shouldn't that be zahl eine, Ard?

:D (eG)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 07 Dec 08 - 10:01 PM

I don't think that story about Marlé at all likely. That he knew her well may have suggested the name to Leip, but the song is not doing the girls down in any way and was certainly not understood as being about ladies of the night, but about a soldier's romance. The only explanation I've ever heard (as Leip's own) is the one that he was in love with two girls and therefore included them both in the song.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 08 Dec 08 - 12:48 PM

Leip conceded latterly that he knew Lilly "well." (Katja Behling, "Martha Freud, a Biography, p. 148). The story also is told by Anton Freud. Lilly was a daughter of Sigmund Freud's sister, Mitzi, and Moritz Freud (a distant relative of Sigmund's).

I doubt that a conclusive answer can be given.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: GUEST,Sena
Date: 14 Feb 09 - 12:06 PM

Lyrics from Lale Andersen's page (http://www.lale-andersen.de/songs/lili_marleen.htm )

Vor der Kaserne,
vor dem großen Tor,
stand eine Laterne
und steht sie noch davor.
So woll'n wir uns da wiedersehn,
bei der Laterne woll'n wir stehn
wie einst, Lili Marleen.

Unsre beiden Schatten
sahn wie einer aus;
daß wir so lieb uns hatten,
das sah man gleich daraus.
Und alle Leute solln es sehn,
wenn wir bei der Laterne stehn
wie einst, Lili Marleen.

Schon rief der Posten:
Sie bliesen Zapfenstreich!
Es kann drei Tage kosten.
Kamerad, ich komm ja gleich!
Da sagten wir auf Wiedersehn.
Wie gerne würd ich mit dir gehn,
Mit dir, Lili Marleen!

Deine Schritte kennt sie,
deinen schönen Gang.
Alle Abend brennt sie,
doch mich vergaß sie lang.
Und sollte mir ein Leids geschehn,
wer wird bei der Laterne stehn
mit dir, Lili Marleen?

Aus dem stillen Raume,
aus der Erde Grund,
hebt mich wie im Traume
dein verliebter Mund!
Wenn sich die späten Nebel drehn,
werd ich bei der Laterne stehn
wie einst, Lili Marleen.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Lili Marleen (Hans Leip poem)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Feb 09 - 06:01 PM

Guest's punctuation and a word or two differ from that published by Hans Leip. Of course singers vary the lyrics slightly to suit their preference, change punctuation to suit emphasis, and often repeat the last line of each verse.

Far up above, I posted corrections to Joe's working version, but it is easier for most of us to have the Leip words in full.

Lyr. Add: LILI MARLEEN

1
Vor der Kaserne,
vor dem großen Tor
stand eine Laterne,
und steht sie noch davor,
so wolln wir uns da wiedersehn,
bei der Laterne wolln wir stehn
wie einst, Lili Marleen.
2
Unsere beiden Schatten
sahn wie einer aus.
Daß wir so lieb uns hatten,
das sah man gleich daraus.
Und alle Leute solln es sehn,
wenn wir bei der Laterne stehn,
wie einst, Lili Marleen
3
Schon rief der Posten,
sie blasen Zapfenstreich,
es kann drei Tage kosten!
Kamerad, ich kamm ja gleich.
Da sagten wir auf Wiedersehn,
wie gerne wollt ich mit dir gehn,
mit dir, Lili Marleen.
4
Deine Schritte kennt sie,
deinen zieren Gang,
alle Abend brennt sie,
mich vergaß sie lang.
Und sollte mir ein Leids geschehn,
wer wird bei der Laterne stehn
mit dir, Lili Marleen?
5
Aus dem stillen Raume,
aus der Erde Grund
hebt mich wie im Traume
dein verliebter Mund.
Wenn sich die späten Nebel drehn,
werd ich bei der Laterne stehn
wie einst, Lili Marleen.

In the DT, I understand that certain HTML letters are not possible; thus ß has to be rendered ss, and umlaut letters are rendered with an added e (blühte is bluehte, etc.).

Poetically, Leip did not use apostrophes with shortened words, thus wollen is wolln and not woll'n, etc.

Hans Leip, "Die Laterne, Lieder und Gedichte," Feldausgabe, J. G. Cotta'sche Buchhandlung Nachfolger, Stuttgart, [57 poems], pp. 5-6.
(Paperback field edition, 1940, 20th thousand, with cover drawing by Hans Leip of a German helmet with two poppy flowers, one open, one with seed pod).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Susanne (skw)
Date: 14 Feb 09 - 06:16 PM

Thanks, Sena, but those lyrics don't seem to be different from what Joe Offer posted above.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Fidjit
Date: 15 Feb 09 - 05:04 AM

No! No! No!

Dietrich Rules

Her version is much more sexy.


Chas


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: bubblyrat
Date: 15 Feb 09 - 05:39 AM

I was watching yet another re-run episode of the excellent BBC documentary series "The World At War" on Friday afternoon,it being the section that dealt with Rommel,Montgomery,and the battles for Tobruk, etc., and it was suggested that this was the time when the song became popular with the German Army, or at least the "Afrika Korps",and,soon afterwards,with the British Army.It is amazing (and heartening) that such a song was able to register so deeply with soldiers of opposing sides in a bitter conflict.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: GUEST,Sena
Date: 15 Feb 09 - 10:53 AM

I was, like Joe, curious to find lyrics exactly as heard in Lale Andersen's original version of the song. Differences that Joe missed are in the third verse:

"bliesen" instead of "blasen"

"es kann" instead of "das kann"

"gerne wuerd ich" instead of "gerne wollt ich"


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lili Marleen
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 15 Feb 09 - 02:57 PM

Each vocalist has their own touch; I dislike attempts to name the one, true interpretation.

I have recordings of the song by Dietrich, Andersen, Fritsch, Lynn, and Suzy Solidor, and I think one by Lemper. There may even be an old Hildegard in the basement.

Lale Andersen's recordings are the ones I perhaps prefer (not all identical!), but I usually play Solidor's afterwards. Vera Lynn sings it as many British and Americans knew it. And then there are Fritsch and Dietrich- Dietrich was heard often in America, but Andersen's was known mostly in Europe before the war's end. Andersen also recorded as "Wie einst, Lili Marlene."

Perhaps this is why I revert to Leip's original poem, to which I can add my bathroom vocal and my own interpretation of the day.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Lily Marlène; Suzy Solidor
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 02 Mar 09 - 03:17 PM

Lyr. Add: LILY MARLÈNE
French lyrics by Henri Lemarchand, 1940.
Sung by Suzy Solidor.

1
Devant la caserne
Quand le jour s'enfuit,
La vielle lanterne
Soudain s'allume et luit.
C'est dans ce coin-lá que le soir
On s'attendait, remplis d'espoir

Tous deux, Lily Marlène, (bis)

2
Et dans la nuit sombre
Nos corps enlacés
Ne faisaient qu'une ombre
Lorsque je t'embrassais.
Nous échangions ingé:nüment
Joue contre joue bien des serments

Tous deux, Lily Marlène (bis)

3
Le temps passe vite
Lorsque l'on est deux !
Hélas on se quitte
Voici le couvre-feu ...
Te souviens-tu de nos regrets
Lorsqu'il fallait nous séparer ?

Dis-moi, Lily Marlène (bis)

4
La vielle lanterne
S'allume toujours
Devant la caserne
Lorsque finit le jour
Mais tout me paraît étranger
Aurais-je donc beaucoup changé ?

Dis-moi, Lily Marlène (bis)

5
Cette tendre histoire
De nos chers vingt ans
Chante en ma mémoire
Malgré les jours, les ans.
Il me semble entendre ton pas
Et je te serre entre mes bras

Lily...Lily Marlène. (bis)

Lili Marleen

Suzy Solidor (1900-1982)
was well-known internationally. A 2-cd set covers many of her best-known songs; "Suzy Solidor, 1933-1952," Frémeaux & Associes. Excellent sound restored.

Well-worth a look- her portrait, by the famous artist, Tamara de Lempica:
Suzy Solidor, 1933


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