Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Reels, dots and hornpipes

Les in Chorlton 17 Dec 08 - 11:30 AM
Jack Campin 17 Dec 08 - 11:37 AM
Marje 17 Dec 08 - 11:46 AM
The Sandman 17 Dec 08 - 11:47 AM
The Sandman 17 Dec 08 - 11:52 AM
pavane 17 Dec 08 - 12:00 PM
Paul Burke 17 Dec 08 - 12:05 PM
The Sandman 17 Dec 08 - 12:32 PM
Wolfhound person 17 Dec 08 - 12:33 PM
Gedpipes 17 Dec 08 - 12:35 PM
Les in Chorlton 17 Dec 08 - 12:41 PM
Tootler 17 Dec 08 - 02:10 PM
Les in Chorlton 17 Dec 08 - 02:37 PM
Stringsinger 17 Dec 08 - 02:48 PM
GUEST,Jim 17 Dec 08 - 03:12 PM
GUEST 17 Dec 08 - 03:20 PM
treewind 17 Dec 08 - 03:22 PM
The Sandman 17 Dec 08 - 03:37 PM
ThreeSheds 17 Dec 08 - 05:02 PM
Peter the Squeezer 17 Dec 08 - 05:36 PM
GUEST,Howard Jones 17 Dec 08 - 06:56 PM
greg stephens 17 Dec 08 - 07:32 PM
The Sandman 18 Dec 08 - 03:16 AM
Les in Chorlton 18 Dec 08 - 03:18 AM
treewind 18 Dec 08 - 04:00 AM
The Sandman 18 Dec 08 - 04:03 AM
GUEST,Howard Jones 18 Dec 08 - 04:16 AM
Tootler 18 Dec 08 - 09:34 AM
Mo the caller 18 Dec 08 - 09:43 AM
greg stephens 18 Dec 08 - 09:43 AM
GUEST,Working Radish 18 Dec 08 - 09:46 AM
The Sandman 18 Dec 08 - 10:09 AM
JohnB 18 Dec 08 - 10:31 AM
GUEST,Paul Davenport 18 Dec 08 - 12:59 PM
Les in Chorlton 18 Dec 08 - 01:14 PM
The Sandman 18 Dec 08 - 01:24 PM
GUEST,Howard Jones 18 Dec 08 - 03:01 PM
Les in Chorlton 18 Dec 08 - 03:24 PM
Desert Dancer 18 Dec 08 - 05:22 PM
GUEST,Howard Jones 18 Dec 08 - 06:51 PM
Phil Edwards 18 Dec 08 - 07:27 PM
Les in Chorlton 19 Dec 08 - 04:42 AM
Marje 19 Dec 08 - 03:15 PM
Helen 19 Dec 08 - 04:41 PM
GUEST,Howard Jones 19 Dec 08 - 08:46 PM
The Sandman 19 Dec 08 - 09:04 PM
Helen 20 Dec 08 - 01:14 AM
Phil Edwards 20 Dec 08 - 05:45 AM
Paul Burke 20 Dec 08 - 06:08 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 20 Dec 08 - 07:26 AM
GUEST,Howard Jones 20 Dec 08 - 07:31 AM
The Sandman 20 Dec 08 - 11:40 AM
Stringsinger 20 Dec 08 - 01:41 PM
Jack Campin 20 Dec 08 - 02:20 PM
Les in Chorlton 20 Dec 08 - 02:20 PM
The Sandman 20 Dec 08 - 02:44 PM
Les in Chorlton 20 Dec 08 - 04:40 PM
The Sandman 21 Dec 08 - 08:29 AM
Les in Chorlton 21 Dec 08 - 09:42 AM
pavane 22 Dec 08 - 02:16 AM
Paul Burke 22 Dec 08 - 02:58 AM
treewind 22 Dec 08 - 03:16 AM
GUEST,Howard Jones 22 Dec 08 - 04:40 AM
GUEST 22 Dec 08 - 08:02 AM
The Sandman 22 Dec 08 - 12:57 PM
The Sandman 22 Dec 08 - 02:06 PM
Stringsinger 22 Dec 08 - 02:36 PM
Les in Chorlton 22 Dec 08 - 05:45 PM
Jack Campin 22 Dec 08 - 08:36 PM
The Sandman 23 Dec 08 - 07:35 AM
Jack Campin 23 Dec 08 - 08:04 AM
Mo the caller 23 Dec 08 - 07:31 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 11:30 AM

Just wrestling with Hornpipes in Noteworthy Composer.

When I listen or play hornpipes eg. Harvest Home or Boys of Blue Hill I am aware of the jerky nature of hornpipes that gives them their characteristic swing but when checking written versions ie, notation, the dots that indicate the long - short feature are sometimes missing.

Which is correct dots or no dots?

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Jack Campin
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 11:37 AM

Depends on what the generated notation looks like. With poor quality typesetting it's more readable if you leave them out. (In which case you have to find some other way of telling your reader that the tune is in fact a hornpipe).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Marje
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 11:46 AM

Also, if you write down a hornpipe in dotted-crochet-followed-by-quaver notation, and play it stricly as written, it will come out as too jerky - it will come out as 3 plus 1 quavers, which is not the effect you want. You really want triplets (2 plus 1) and there's no very tidy way of notating that in 4/4 time. You could put it into compound (6/8) time, but that would suggest that it should be played as a jig, with different tempo and stresses.

I think that's why hornpipes are often written undotted, and the dotting left to be added by the player(s) as required.

Marje


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 11:47 AM

dots are correct,however they are not generally played as strictly written,In Scotland and for English country dancing,they are in my experience played more dotted.,more swing.
in Ireland they tend to be played slightly less dotted.
for solo step dancing,they are more dotted,than for the faster hoppies[Dancing in sets],.
best advice is to listen to recordings of good ceilidh bands[in Ireland Scotland and England].
many of the younger players while they are great players,dont seem to have had much dancing experience,and are not good role models.
the Tulla ceilidh band,are a good band for danceabilty,likewise any recordings of the Kilfenora ceili band,or most of the ceil bands on the Comhaltas website


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 11:52 AM

marje,
for some dances Nottingham Swing, Belfast Duck,heavy dotting 2 and half to 1,is really nice to dance to,really swingy.
there is no correct or incorrect,its personal taste.
2 to 1 is good also,depends on the dance,the musician should be able to do both.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: pavane
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:00 PM

If you are using my program HARMONY, you could try the "REEL to HORNPIPE" converter, which puts in the dots automatically!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Paul Burke
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:05 PM

My preference is leave the dots out. They generally do the same with the very uneven rhythm of Swedish polskas, and notate them as straight 3/4. It's up to the musician to put the hornpipiness into it, and the place for telling them how to do it is an instructional book, CD or video.

And don't forget that some players hornpipify reels.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:32 PM

yes Paul,but the problem with leaving them out is that some berks,then think they are played dead even.
I even had one say to me once, oh well thats how the music was written:undotted.
yes, and you are quite right some players play certain reels slightly dotted,but reels can be successfully danced to dotted or undotted,in my experience hornpipes cant be danced to well, undotted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Wolfhound person
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:33 PM

Some tunes are hybrids - can be played flat as reels or dotted (to a greater or lesser extent) as hornpipes. Some are definitely more comfortable as one or the other.

Leaving the dots out saves a lot of space when publishing.

Paws


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Gedpipes
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:35 PM

I hope you dont mean Paul is Berk Cpt Birdseye? ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 12:41 PM

So, leave all the dots out and add a rider that hornpipes are jerky - some more jerky than others?

Thanks

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Tootler
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:10 PM

Looking through tunebooks there does not seem to be total agreement as to whether to notate hornpipes dotted or undotted. However my observation is that the majority notate them undotted. That's my preference FWIW and that's how I notate them. For the reasons given above - that the degree of dotting varies between players.

As an interesting aside, at a session the other day, someone produced the dots for a jig (I can't remember the title) but it was claimed to be a Morris Dance tune. When they started playing it the tune was clearly "Roxburgh Castle" which I have heard played both as a hornpipe (dotted) and as a reel.

Thus do tunes evolve.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:37 PM

Well well, I have been playing Roxburgh Castle twice through like a strathspey then twice as a reel. Much fun

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Stringsinger
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 02:48 PM

Dots are antiquated. Playing with "swing" is commonly annotated "straight" but the feel
can't be. I see hornpipes as being more 12/8 like jazz with not quite as much swing but
still there for dancing. The hornpipe should have a bounce to it unlike the reel which
is more even although the Irish player has a slight swing in playing them.

Dotted eighths and sixteenths were how they used to annotate ragtime and early jazz figures. This was discontinued because they intimated a jerky rhythm as used in classical music. "Swing" changed it all.

I am in favor of "straight" annotation without dots and indicating that the feel should be "Irish". This can only be gained by listening to the Tradition.

Frank


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Jim
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 03:12 PM

Paul Burke said,"And don't forget that some players hornpipify reels."

In North America, many players seem to "reelify" hornpipes. Listen to a bluegrass band play Red Haired Boy.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 03:20 PM

Hornpipes are definitely not always played dotted. They aren't always played at the same speed either. They are just tunes that you use for dances, and there are lots of different types of dance that need different playing styles. Even then it's sometimes a matter of opinion which is the "best" way to play a tune for a particular dance...

Some hornpipes like the dotted style better than others. I'd never play Stoney Steps dotted, but by no stretch of the imagination is it a reel.

Hornpipes and rants are fairly interchangeable too, depending on how you play them. I often play Roxburgh Castle after Morpeth Rant, and I've heard Soldier's Joy and The Coleford Jig (no it's not a jig) played in slow dotted hornpipe style.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: treewind
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 03:22 PM

Sorry, that was me with temporary loss of cookie.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 03:37 PM

Stringsinger,I think the feel should be Scottish not Irish,and that the annotation should be marked .
oh yes, and most of the Irish reels are Scottish in origin.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: ThreeSheds
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 05:02 PM

Well its all clear then


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Peter the Squeezer
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 05:36 PM

If you're playing solo, then do what you feel the tune needs. After all it's your interpretation of the tune.

Obviously different rules must apply if you're playing in a group.

Peter


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 06:56 PM

"I think the feel should be Scottish not Irish"

For hornpipes, the feel should be English :)

The problem is, the term "hornpipe" is fairly imprecise, and its meaning varies according to locality and period. In some areas they're played fairly smoothly, in others they're emphatically dotted. The term also encompasses tunes in 3/2 time, which are nothing like the modern idea of a hornpipe.

Compare the "Sailor's Hornpipe" with "Stoney Steps", the feel is completely different.

This isn't much help if you're trying to decide how to play a particular tune, all you can do is decide for yourself what sounds best, and if you're playing it for a dance, see what suits the dance best.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: greg stephens
Date: 17 Dec 08 - 07:32 PM

Howard Jones says "In some areas they're played fairly smoothly, in others they're emphatically dotted".

This may be true of some areas, I don't know, I think he should specify. I would think generally the truth has ben the opposite of this, historically. That any given player has tunes he or she plays in the more dotted fashion, and others in a more even way. For example, the average fiddler you'd meet in a pub in England nowadays if asked to play classic hornpipes like Soldiers Joy or the Sailors(the College) would play with the quavers of fairly even lenghth. If asked to play the Harvest Home or Fisher's, by contrast, they would be more likely to play dotted(or more strictly,not dotted as such but with the first quaver of the pair twice as long as the second, not three times).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 03:16 AM

it depends what ytou are using them for.
my experience is this,solo step dancing slow ,dotted about 2 and a quarter, 2 and half to one .
nottingham swing 2 and a half to one.
fast irish hoppies[keel row seems ideal].2 to one.
most of the classic hornpipes for dances like stack of barley,have a stamp to them[one two three]often at the end of a phrase.
Scottish players[in my experience][[I used to play regularly for Burns nights and scottish societies]] tend to swing them a bit more,and I think thats great for dancing,they are very particular about their dottedness are the Scots, their strathspeys often have reversed dottedness,and are heavily dotted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 03:18 AM

The thing is this, as some of you may have guessed - and been round the same problem:

A collection of us are planning to start a beginners tune session. Most of this collection have never played together before. Although we have some tunes in common they don't sound quite the same. I have much enjoyed and valued the Beginners Sessions at Whitby and Shrewsbury and was able to join in much more at Shrewsbury because they put the dots on the website.

And so, like quite a few other sessions we decided to make a tune book, put it on the net and print it off for the night.

I know Greg has councelled against this but we are a committee of mostly inexperienced tune players not experienced musicians with a great understanding of style, and we feel this will be the best bet.

And so to hornpipes and reels. Some books dot 'em and some don't. Some explain why, pretty much as above. The simplest thing seems to miss of the dots and write something on the bottom of the page.

Thanks to all

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: treewind
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 04:00 AM

Print them without the dots and let the musicians get used to playing them not quite as written. They'll be confused at first but at least they'll learn the principle that what's written on the page does not always precisely specify how if should be played.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 04:03 AM

no, print the dots and then explain[as Matt Crannitch does in his fiddle tutor] that they are open to interpretation


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 04:16 AM

Greg, to generalise wildly I believe that in the South of England hornpipes would generally be played more smoothly, and quite fast for stepdancing, whereas in the North they would often be played more dotted. But "dotted" often misrepresents how they are played, often it's just with more emphasis on the first beat, rather than giving it a significantly longer value (which may be what you were saying).

I've heard Fisher's played both ways. I don't have it to hand, but I think Barry Callaghan's "Hardcore English" gives two versions, one dotted and one not. But most of the hornpipes in that book are shown undotted.

The fact is that traditional music has subtleties of rhythm which are very difficult to reproduce in standard musical notation. The choice is either to notate it in great detail, which may be of academic interest but is almost unreadable for the purpose of playing the tune, or simply to regard the notation as a basic framework for the tune.

To understand how to play it, you really have to listen to a lot of music, ideally including traditional as well as modern players, to get the "feel" of it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Tootler
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 09:34 AM

I'm with the notate undotted and add a note about interpretation but I think it is a matter of personal choice and neither way is more correct, IMHO. If you are running a beginners tune session, then at the session itself, you can supplement your comments in the notation by playing the tunes through first and explaining how you interpret the notation.

One of the most memorable comments about written notation I heard came from a classical recorder player who was conducting a day workshop at a recorder society branch. She waved the score of the piece we were working on and said "This is not music. What you are playing is" The point she was making was that written notation is always open to interpretation. What she was trying to explain was how that particular piece was normally interpreted and on that particular occasion we were not getting it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Mo the caller
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 09:43 AM

I was confused by the American dance 'Homassassa Hornpipe', which is definitely danced to an undotted reel. But I suspect 'hornpipe' means something different over there.
Then of course there are those 'other' hornpipes; 3/2 are they? What step are you supposed to dance to them? Is this a case of same name for a different thing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: greg stephens
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 09:43 AM

I say publish undotted. Then it's up to the musician kicking the tune off. Writing them out dotted has the inevitable disadvantage that a clasically trained player will tend to play them as written, and that really doesn't work for a hornpipe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Working Radish
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 09:46 AM

The choice is either to notate it in great detail, which may be of academic interest but is almost unreadable for the purpose of playing the tune, or simply to regard the notation as a basic framework for the tune.

Not entirely novice-friendly, that. Put it this way, I've learnt Harvest Home undotted - and Soldier's Joy. (If I was meant to play 3/1 why didn't you write dotted-quaver-semiquaver? If I was meant to play 2/1 why didn't you write it in triplets?)

H'mph. I'll have to unlearn 'em now...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 10:09 AM

I say publish undotted. Then it's up to the musician kicking the tune off. Writing them out dotted has the inevitable disadvantage that a clasically trained player will tend to play them as written, and that really doesn't work for a hornpipe.[quote greg stephens]
but then publish undotted and the classically trained player will play them even,and that doesnt work for a hornpipe either.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: JohnB
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 10:31 AM

I'm really glad this is all clear now. The question still remains though, are hornpipes REALLY Folk Music? :)

Speaking as not the greatest sight reader in the world, I totally agree with Anahata ....Print them without the dots ....They'll be confused at first but at least they'll learn the principle that what's written on the page does not always precisely specify how if should be played.....
I also agree with Cap'n Birdseye ....no, print the dots ...

I agree with Anahata about the interpretation, which is a commom problem I have with people who really read music. (If you have ever heard the music to the Parting Glass played straight you will understand)
I personally though understand and read the music better for Hornpipes if it is written dotted.
JohnB


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Paul Davenport
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 12:59 PM

I spent a lot of time looking at hornpipes for some rather complex reasons. The result was intended to be a diatribe which I wanted to use to assault the examination board who asserted that playing a 'simple folk tune' would only get a minimum mark. The outcome turned into a detailed analysis of the hornpipes in the Joshua Burnett Ms. 1840 (ish). As a result the paper was presented at the Fiddle Conference at SOAS in 2005.
Basically, the hornpipe is a much more complex proposition than merely 'dotted' or 'undotted' (although I expect you already knew that). It starts off in 3/2 then suddenly changes to 2/2 during the late Georgian period. It acquires dots much later and whoever noticed its self-destructive tendency to mutate into 12/8 is pretty much on the money. Its a real workhorse of a tune-type and deserves much more playing than it gets. How you play it is actually a product of your geographical and mental location - it defies description. Dave Shepherd called it the 'Quintessential English tune' and I think this is also spot on. Please feel free to visit my website and download a copy of the paper (.pdf)
http://www.hallamtrads.co.uk/research
cheers,
Paul


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 01:14 PM

Thanks Paul,

what am I doing in such company? My problem is as confronted by many above. I think we all recognise that the written music and the live performance and related but not the same.

If I adopt the dots policy and put a tune into Noteworthy Composer the outcome sounds quite like the jerky hornpipe I play. If I adopt the no dots policy but give the written advice - play it a bit jerky - it will probably get people thinking a bit more about the tune. Is that right?

Cheers

Les


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 01:24 PM

no, make notes of the names of the tunes,then google to see if there are any versions to listen to. 2 to one is not perfectly right but its probably the easiest,to start with,and is better than playing them even,I reckon its about 2 and a quarter to one
listen ,listen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 03:01 PM

"Not entirely novice-friendly, that"

If novices are hoping to learn to play folk music from notation, they're sadly mistaken. The only way to learn it is to listen.

The notation will give you the shape of the tune, but won't tell you how to play it properly. If it's written undotted and you play it exactly as written, it will be too smooth. If it's written dotted and you play it as written, it will be wrong the other way. It should be somewhere in between - to find out exactly where you have to listen to a lot of musicians. There's no right answer either, it depends on geographical origin, personal preference and the needs of the dancers.

Just because this music is simple doesn't mean it's easy to play.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 03:24 PM

It sounds a bit like which is the most important leg of a three legged chair.

I cannot pick up tunes by listening either to people or recordings and I cannot read music at any speed. But somewhere between the three - people, recordings and dots I can play quite a few tunes - about 80 at present.

In seeking to organise a beginners session I feel I need to offer the three legs of the chair.

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 05:22 PM

Paul's link, fixed


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 06:51 PM

What I meant about listening was not to do with picking up the tunes - the notation is fine for that - but about how to play them. You can get the basis of the tune from the notation, and its a perfectly good way to learn tunes. But that's all - it won't give you the subtleties which make a tune come alive, you can only learn those from listening to other musicians and how they interpret the bare tune.

It's absolutely fine to offer a beginners session a tunebook to get them started - in fact, it's probably essential. But whether you write the hornpipes dotted or not, neither will quite get across how they should be played. To move beyond the novice stage the musicians will need to do more than just learn the notes.

Best of luck with it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 18 Dec 08 - 07:27 PM

it won't give you the subtleties which make a tune come alive

Fair enough, but the difference between Harvest Home with and without dots is a bit more than a subtlety - one sounds like something you could dance to, the other sounds like a Mozart piano finger-stretcher. They're effectively two different tunes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 19 Dec 08 - 04:42 AM

Well, Harvest will be in the tune book probably without dots and I suspect we will play it quite dotty. So bring your whistles and flute to the Beech Phil, the last Tuesday of the Month starting January 27th, and we will see where it takes us

Thanks to all

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Marje
Date: 19 Dec 08 - 03:15 PM

I don't think it matters greatly how you write hornpipes. Its simply easier and less messy to write them out undotted.

And it's not quite fair to say that classical players will stick rigidly to what's written, and thus get it wrong. In, for example, Handel's Messiah, some parts are written as dotted but played and sung as double-dotted (even jerkier) which is probably close to what was meant at the time. The decision on the time-values for each performance is made by the conductor, and the musicians adapt according to his interpretation.

Marje


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Helen
Date: 19 Dec 08 - 04:41 PM

Thanks for this discussion, it makes me feel better about having been confused about hornpipes.

Len in Chorlton, can you play the tunes on a midi keyboard and see how the notation turns out in the software? That would be interesting, seeing how the software interprets it.


And thanks, too, for the new additions to the English technical language of music: hornpipiness, hornpipify, reelify, "play it quite dotty", etc

When I first started learning tunes I bought a book called "Begged, Borrowed or Stolen" which had hand transcribed session tunes which were wonderful for beginners or more advanced players.

I just Googled and found these ABC tunes, and the first few are from the book:

Ceolas ABC tunes: Begged, Borrowed or Stolen

and some more here:

Ceolas ABC tunes: Begged, Borrowed or Stolen

There are even more on the site.

I believe that Mudcatter Bob Bolton was somehow involved in the book's production.

From memory I think the notes were undotted for the tunes you are referring to. Word of mouth tradition was that you play them NOT as written, by listening to other musicians or recordings.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 19 Dec 08 - 08:46 PM

Pip, the point I've been trying to make is that the dots don't convey the correct time value, if you treat them strictly as meaning 1 1/2 times the value of the preceding note. Writing them undotted is equally incorrect (but quicker to write).

The correct value lies somewhere in between, although what is "correct" by no means fixed. The only way to understand this is to listen to other musicians.

I'm not saying the notation has no value, just that it does not fully convey the feel of the music, whether dotted or not. To get the feel you have to listen. Once you get that feel for the music you can apply your own judgement on how much "dot" to give it. But the notation won't tell you.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 19 Dec 08 - 09:04 PM

no non no,a thousand times no,hornpipes should be written dotted.
jigs are not played exactly as written either.
hornpipes written dotted is closer to how they are played ,than to write them undotted.writing them dotted is the closest portrayal of how they are played,and lets face it there is regional variation in the dottedness.
the purpose of musiscal notation,is to be as accurate as possible ,writing them undotted is not closer than writing them dotted 3 to 1,is closer to 2 to 1[by 2],than writing 0 to 1 or undotted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Helen
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 01:14 AM

No I was wrong about Begged, Borrowed AND (not "or") Stolen: there are dots on the music, i.e. the notes are "dottified" (another new word), for the hornpipes. It's a long, long time since I used the book, so it's not surprising that I forgot.

Helen


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 05:45 AM

writing them undotted is not closer than writing them dotted

Hear hear. Transcribing Harvest Home - to take an example close to my heart - you've got three choices:

1. Write it in 2-1 crotchet/quaver pairs (DUM-pa DUM-pa). This means that the triplets stop being triplets and the time signature goes to 12/8.

2. Write it in 3-1 dotted quaver/semi-quaver pairs (DUM... pa-DUM...pa). No change to the triplets or the time sig.

3. Write it in straight quavers (Dum dum, Dum dum).

As I understand it, both 1 and 2 sound something like what it's supposed to sound like. So why should we prefer option 3, which doesn't?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Paul Burke
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 06:08 AM

If your dots program is up to it, can you put the dum note in bolder face, or ever-so-slightly-larger than the dee note?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Jack Campin
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 07:26 AM

Pip Radish - the reason you don't need to dot the notes is because ALL of them are dotted. With reels, jigs or marches, you will often have some notes dotted and some straight, so you have to say which is which. The only variety you get in hornpipes is when you go into triplets.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 07:31 AM

Yes, but how much emphasis do you put on the DUM? The notation doesn't really tell you. Some hornpipes are played with a very definite emphasis - Harvest Home is possibly one of them - but others may be played more smoothly. If a particular tune is to be played emphatically dotted, then by all means write it like that, but be aware that it may not the only way to play it. Even if it is to be played dotted, that can sound very plodding unless you give it a bit of swing, which the notation can't capture.

The point I'm trying to get across is that whether hornpipes are written dotted or undotted, the player has to decide for themselves how much emphasis or swing to give the tune. They can't get that from the dots, they can only get it from listening, or even better by dancing to a few.

To take a tune dear to my heart, Barry Callaghan's "Hardcore English" gives two versions of the Cliffe Hornpipe, one dotted and one undotted. The dotted version, played as written, sounds absolutely fine. But it is only one way to play the tune, and doesn't represent the way Bob Cann, for example, played it. In fairness, neither does the undotted version, played exactly as written. This is my point - once you've learned the notes from the dots you have to understand how to play those notes, and conventional music notation isn't up to it (unless you get very detailed, when it's almost impossible to read). The interpretation and understanding has to come from listening.

Cap'n, out of more than 50 hornpipes in "Hardcore English", only 5 are written dotted, and these are presumably those tunes such as "Kirkgate Hornpipe" which are intended to be played with a lot of emphasis. But I knew Barry well enough to know that he did not intend the others to be played exactly as written, with little or no emphasis - he would expect the player to understand how to interpret a hornpipe. And this goes for jigs and other rhythms too.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 11:40 AM

sorry,Howard.
Ihave to disagree with you,the way to write hornpipes is dot them, if thay are meant to be dotted in any way.,if they are supposed to be played even, write them undotted
Geoff Bowen,in his book Folk Fiddle,writes them dotted,then puts an explanation,above such as,play in triplet rhythm,
MattCranitch in his tutor writes them dotted,then puts an explanation,as to how they are nearer to two to one.
Geoff Bowen,also notates a strathspey,dotted and reverse dotted,but explains about the scottish snap,and the lengthening of the dotted notes.
good books give detailed explanations,bad books dont, often because the author is too lazy,or because the publisher wants to save time and money.
Geoff Bowen,notates a scottish tune Wife she brewed it,dotted,but gives notes such as this; this tune introduces another charecteristically Scottish feature.The unequal rhythm is exageratted by lengthening the dotted notesand shortening the semi quavers,.this produces a snap rhythm which is very precise,and which differs markedly from the more relaxed triplet ryhthym,the triplet rhythym reducesthe contrast betweenbetween dotted notes and semiquaver, whereas the snap ryhthm increases it.
this is what is required more information not less.
there is, just for a start, a marked contrast between Scottish styles of hornpipe playing and Irish,what is needed from books is more information like this not less,people buy books to get guidance,it is the authors responsibilty,to give detailed info on how he thinks the tunes should be played,preferably with a recording.
personally[and this is only my opinion]Ihave always found that for dancing,purposes the more heavily dotted hornpipes[yes nearer 3 to 1,than 2 to 1] more satisfactory for dances like Belfast Duck and Nottingham Swing,and for strathspeys,and much scotrtish dancing.
so we will have to agree to differ.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Stringsinger
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 01:41 PM

>From: Captain Birdseye - PM
>Stringsinger,I think the feel should be Scottish not Irish,and that the annotation should be >marked .
>oh yes, and most of the Irish reels are Scottish in origin.

I disagree that most Irish reels are Scottish and I suggest the opposite. Scotia was originally
a name for Ireland before Scotland. Many of these reels did not come from Scotland but earlier sources perhaps from the Gaelic culture in Spain.

I agree that the annotation should be marked for strathspeys. Hornpipes suggest
a 2/4 approach rather than the reel which is in cut-time in 4/4. It has to do with
the unit of phrasing.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Jack Campin
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 02:20 PM

Brendan Breathnach thought most older Irish reels were of Scottish origin, and Alois Fleischmann's book traces the Scottish (and often English) originals for most of them. By the twentieth century Ireland's reel industry reached the point of satisfying domestic demand. (For jigs, the story was more or less the other way round, as Irish jig farming seems to have been more intensive than in Britain).

No traditional tune known from either Scotland or Ireland can be shown to have any origin from a Celtic culture elsewhere.

Many tunes now played as strathspeys were originally published undotted. That was because they were played as reels at first and only strathspifficated decades later (example: Carraig's Reel, which became The Smith's a Gallant Fireman). You can't guess the exact dotting pattern of a strathspey so it has to be put in explicitly.

An anomalous one: John of Badenyon. The 18th century sources for that all give it a systematic hornpipe-like dotted rhythm. But it wasn't a hornpipe, it was a slowish song. It's most often played these days as a reel (a Cape Breton "wedding reel"), very fast and with no dotting. If it ever had a hornpipe stage in its evolution (fast-ish and dotted) there's no trace of it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 02:20 PM

"Many of these reels did not come from Scotland but earlier sources perhaps from the Gaelic culture in Spain."

Roughly when would that be then?

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 02:44 PM

Stringsinger,I quote from 1001 oneills.the earliest mention of the reel as A DANCE is found in news from Scotland printed in 1598.
miss mcleods reel is one, the high reel, kate dalrymple,and virtually all the reels that use the mixolydian mode ,flattened 7,[are scottish in origin, or came to Ireland via Scotland]that is the scottish bagpipe scale,these pipes were being played before the uillean pipes were invented.
If they are Spanish,please provide proof,perhaps is not good enough.
O neill suggests they come from clan marches,which makes them as Scottish as they are Irish.
you might be right,in as far as it is possible that gallic pipes were around before Irish and scottish pipes,but there are suggestions that the scottish Bagpipes have been in existence for 1400 years.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 20 Dec 08 - 04:40 PM

"but there are suggestions that the scottish Bagpipes have been in existence for 1400 years. "

Who suggested that then?

Haven't most agricultural communities with sheep and such had bagpipes for quite a while now?

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 21 Dec 08 - 08:29 AM

Les,someone on the internet.[possibly Wikapeadia]
Haven't most agricultural communities with sheep and such had bagpipes for quite a while now?

Check out history of Scottish bagpipes,you will find they have been around alot longer than the Uillean pipes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 21 Dec 08 - 09:42 AM

Check out history of Scottish bagpipes,you will find they have been around a lot longer than the Uillean pipes.

I am sure you are correct on this. I started a thread years ago when I realised that the Uillean pipes need a fair degree of technology, ie post Industrial Revolution type technology, to make a set. I guess I could dig it out at a push.

The Uillean pipes are pretty modern. I have little doubt that simple blown bagpipes go back a long way. A sheep or goat's stomach and various wooden pipes would get a pretty good bag pipe in the right hands.

Belows blown seem a good bit more complicated and Highland Pipes perhaps fall between the two. I don't know why I am rambling on it will all be known and available through Google.

Although their is clearly a connection between Ireland Scotland, Brittany, Spain, various celtic languages, bagpipes and tunes lots of people who join in the 'discussions' have a confused grasp of time scales and events.

I have just read about half of 'The Origins of the British by Stephen Oppenheimer'. It's academic but readable. It's mostly concerned with language and genes but it gives a good account of who got here when and how they moved about. This kind of background makes it easy to test ideas about tunes and so on.

Cheers

Les


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: pavane
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 02:16 AM

Bagpipes were also used in the Middle East and Asia centuries ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Paul Burke
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 02:58 AM

Oh dear, Grattan Flood has a lot to answer for. The fact is, we know very little about who played what bagpipes and when. Even GBH pipes from 300 years ago were a very different beast from their current configuration.

Howard Jones, how much emphasis to put on the DUM? The right amount of course. That's the whole point, the emphasis is somewhere between none and a dotted note, and varies according to your instrument, your taste, and the tune. The same happens with reels, particularly slow ones. When does a slow reel become a mildly emphasised hornpipe I wonder?

Where I have to disagree with Dick is about the notation- always dotting it becomes simply visually boring after a while. Some tunes, the ones that really want the dot, should be dotted, but most don't need it.

Spain? How did the tunes get to Spain? I think it was Aztecs in reed boats that they copied from the Egyptians, who brought tunes they had been taught by balsa- rafting Polynesians, who had been taught them by lost tribes of Jews.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: treewind
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 03:16 AM

Dick: "the way to write hornpipes is dot them, if they are meant to be dotted in any way. If they are supposed to be played even, write them undotted"

It's not the job of the transcriber to dictate how they should be played. In some tunes both interpretations make musical sense, and when transcribing from an old manuscript written in straight quavers one can't be sure of the original writer's intentions.

Howard: I wonder if the dotted notation in Barry's book is simply because that's how they were supplied. As I'm sure you know, Hardcore English was a collaborative effort where many musicians sent in ABC from different sources or their own transcriptions. No doubt Barry and Johnny (and others, for all I know) did some editing and proof reading but I don't think there was a clear policy on hornpipe notation.

Talking of Bob Cann, listen to the way he plays that version of The Cliff. It's a superb example of how to play an English hornpipe in a style that really is neither one thing nor the other. You really have to listen to it to understand how to play it. You can hear that same style unmistakably in the playing of Mark Bazeley and Jason Rice, and imitate it at your peril, but here's no way on earth you can bottle it in musical notation.

I've noticed, though, that Mark, when playing that tune for step dancing, has a more dotted style to it than Bob's recorded version.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST,Howard Jones
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 04:40 AM

Dick, I'm not arguing for or against writing hornpipes with dots, my point is that however you write them, the notation cannot get across exactly how much emphasis to give. If the authors you quote have to give so much additional information, then clearly the notation alone is inadequate.

The point I am making, which I would have expected you to agree with, is that while the notation may give you the notes to play, to understand how to play them you have to immerse yourself in the music, and the only way to do this is by listening to it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: GUEST
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 08:02 AM

Dick - the purpose of musical notation today may be to give the tune as accurately as possible. But you can't extrapolate from that this is what happened in the past. In actual fact that was NOT always the case: certainly in the Baroque period the rhythmic value of dotted notes was more approximate than it is today and could vary according to a number of performing conventions or expressive considerations. And it was NOT given in the score. What are now known as 'notes inégales' were never expressly indicated in notation - we only know about the style because it is mentioned in early music tutors.

Many notational rules were simply a matter of convention - the performer of the time was expected to read it according to the rules of the tradition of the times. Hence old manuscripts may not have dotted hornpipes, but it may have been the intention to play them that way.

So whatever you do now, be aware of the conventions of the past if you're trying to interpret old manuscripts.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 12:57 PM

Howard,yes musical immersion is a good idea,However I prefer to immerse,myself in the scottish style of hornpipe playing,rather than the Irish,which is difficult because I live in Ireland,and when playing in sessions,have to go with the flow.
my favourite fiddle player is Angus Grant[the left hander with the tassle]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADyHCb8q7eM


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 02:06 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYvU7oBBgKA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYvU7oBBgKA
now this in my opinion is nearer to 3 to 0ne, than two to one,and is perfect for dancing,a great example of how hornpipes should be played for solo dancing,unfortunately 45 years later there are not many people who can play this well for dancing.,because so many of the knowalls who attend irish sessions,have never played for dancing and its clearly ev ident in their playing,and then we have the idiot bozooki players who thrash away regardless.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Stringsinger
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 02:36 PM

"Many of these reels did not come from Scotland but earlier sources perhaps from the Gaelic culture in Spain."

"Roughly when would that be then?"

Since much of this material was handed down aurally there is no written record, Brendan Breathnach notwithstanding although I honor his scholarship. Printed material can't be the final source for the origination of any tune in the aural tradition. It is reasonable to assume that the Irish culture does stem from the Galicia area of Spain and from ancient Celtic cultures as well. The problem with folk music generally is that the original sources cited for music generally comes from print and dated accordingly. This is not necessarily the definitive starting point for this music.

"No traditional tune known from either Scotland or Ireland can be shown to have any origin from a Celtic culture elsewhere. "

Not if you only rely on published or printed sources to make this claim. But logic suggests that these tunes are a lot older and must have been transmitted from other
cultures. The problem for folk music academicians is to establish their precedence of music based on published or annotated accounts. This is inconclusive when it comes
to origins of any kind of music.

I submit that a Scottish bias occurs here in relationship to Irish music. The idea of Scottish culture is sketchy in and of itself. The so-called "clans" are of comparatively recent origin as they have become standardized by such groups as the Royal Scottish Society.

I believe that in order to annotate Strathspeys you have to use a sixteenth note followed by a dotted eighth to indicate the "snap" that is required. Otherwise you'd have to make the case that annotation should be abandoned entirely as a means of conveying musical information about reels, jigs, straths etc. Precise annotation will not work for most music anyway but you can come close.

Frank Hamilton


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Les in Chorlton
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 05:45 PM

Interesting Frank.

"It is reasonable to assume that the Irish culture does stem from the Galicia area of Spain and from ancient Celtic cultures as well."

When did this happen then? Roughly?

"But logic suggests that these tunes are a lot older and must have been transmitted from other
cultures."

Any actual evidence of any kind then?

I've had good advice on "Reels, dots and hornpipes" so thanks again

L in C


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Jack Campin
Date: 22 Dec 08 - 08:36 PM

The problem with folk music generally is that the original sources cited for music generally comes from print and dated accordingly. This is not necessarily the definitive starting point for this music.

In some cases (a hell of a lot of them) it certainly is. Tunes like the "Irish" reel "The Musical Priest", which is a straightened-out version of a strathspey composed by William Marshall and published by him in 2 different keys and under 3 different titles about 100 years before we have any evidence that anyone in Ireland played it. For a dead cert that was written in 1780-1. If it had existed any earlier, one of Scotland's innumerable transcribers of any interesting tune going would have got hold of it. Those guys were *thorough*. And we know exactly how the sheet music market worked - it only functioned at all because the punters could count on the publishers to come out with new stuff. The selling point was always "here's something you haven't heard before". When somebody tried to palm off an old tune as something new, it wasn't long before they got picked up on it (none too politely).

We have a pretty good idea how the dance culture in Ireland developed, even for times and places where we have no actual tune or dance transcriptions. What would they have DONE with thousands of reels at a time when nobody danced to them and there were no instruments in wide use that could have played them? You might as well argue that the ancient Spanish Celts developed the printed circuit diagrams for modern microprocessors 400 years before anybody could make them.

There are lots of tunes known in Spanish tradition back to the Middle Ages, like the 200 Galician songs in the Cantigas de Santa Maria. Not a one of them bears any detectable resemblance to any tune from the British Isles. Comparative methodologies DO produce resemblances over far spans of time and space in other cultures, like Kodaly's comparison of Hungarian folk tunes with those of the Mari and other Uralic peoples in west-central Asia. The result of such efforts in the "Celtic" world is a big fat zero. There is no unified Celtic musical culture and never has been.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: The Sandman
Date: 23 Dec 08 - 07:35 AM

thanks Jack,do you have the name of the strathspey of Marshalls, and musical notation,eventually I might get round to learning it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Jack Campin
Date: 23 Dec 08 - 08:04 AM

"Miss Watson" or "The North Bridge of Edinburgh" in B minor. "Miss Watson" seems to have come first, it was published in a separate sheet before Marshall's first book

"Belhelvie House" in C minor.

It's usually known as "The North Bridge of Edinburgh", since that's what the Gows called it when they reprinted it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Reels, dots and hornpipes
From: Mo the caller
Date: 23 Dec 08 - 07:31 PM

I go to a monthly workshop in Rainford Lancs. which focuses on playing for dancing.
I would suspect that it doesn't matter what Les starts out doing with his tune book, people will end up contributing a variety of tunes, from a variety of sources and there will not be a standardised way of notating.

The other oddity when writing music is that the lead note is sometimes played in the repeat and this may make the last bar 'wrong'. E.g. you may have to hold the last note for a different length of time when going from B1 to B2 / B2 back to A / B2 and out. A trained musician would notate it with complicated 1s and 2s (over the last bars), someone who plays by ear would get it right. Those of us in between follow the dots then trip over when 'eyes' and 'ear' tell us something different. Until we know the tune.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 21 August 4:13 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.