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Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby

Sleepy Rosie 04 Jan 09 - 09:17 AM
john f weldon 04 Jan 09 - 09:21 AM
Waddon Pete 04 Jan 09 - 09:26 AM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 09 - 09:28 AM
bfdk 04 Jan 09 - 09:28 AM
melodeonboy 04 Jan 09 - 09:29 AM
GUEST,Joe G 04 Jan 09 - 09:48 AM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 09 - 10:12 AM
Ruth Archer 04 Jan 09 - 10:50 AM
peregrina 04 Jan 09 - 11:06 AM
GUEST,Joe G 04 Jan 09 - 11:06 AM
open mike 04 Jan 09 - 12:09 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 09 - 12:22 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 09 - 12:32 PM
open mike 04 Jan 09 - 01:29 PM
GUEST 04 Jan 09 - 01:41 PM
Bert 04 Jan 09 - 01:41 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 04 Jan 09 - 03:47 PM
BB 04 Jan 09 - 04:41 PM
Richard Bridge 04 Jan 09 - 04:45 PM
Ruth Archer 04 Jan 09 - 04:51 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 04 Jan 09 - 04:58 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 04 Jan 09 - 05:12 PM
Ruth Archer 04 Jan 09 - 06:17 PM
Suegorgeous 04 Jan 09 - 08:58 PM
Gurney 04 Jan 09 - 10:50 PM
Big Al Whittle 04 Jan 09 - 10:58 PM
treewind 05 Jan 09 - 03:47 AM
The Borchester Echo 05 Jan 09 - 04:17 AM
Ruth Archer 05 Jan 09 - 04:39 AM
The Borchester Echo 05 Jan 09 - 04:48 AM
Ruth Archer 05 Jan 09 - 05:02 AM
The Borchester Echo 05 Jan 09 - 05:06 AM
Sleepy Rosie 05 Jan 09 - 05:50 AM
GUEST,Shimrod 05 Jan 09 - 06:29 AM
Ruth Archer 05 Jan 09 - 07:17 AM
Stringsinger 05 Jan 09 - 12:40 PM
Sleepy Rosie 05 Jan 09 - 01:08 PM
Ruth Archer 05 Jan 09 - 01:18 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 05 Jan 09 - 01:43 PM
Sleepy Rosie 05 Jan 09 - 01:54 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 05 Jan 09 - 02:02 PM
Sleepy Rosie 05 Jan 09 - 02:29 PM
Ruth Archer 05 Jan 09 - 02:38 PM
Tootler 05 Jan 09 - 04:24 PM
Colin Randall 07 Jan 09 - 02:37 PM
TheSnail 07 Jan 09 - 03:03 PM
peregrina 07 Jan 09 - 04:06 PM
peregrina 07 Jan 09 - 04:09 PM
The Sandman 07 Jan 09 - 04:51 PM
The Sandman 07 Jan 09 - 06:32 PM
Suegorgeous 07 Jan 09 - 07:31 PM
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dick greenhaus 08 Jan 09 - 05:39 PM
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Subject: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:17 AM

I'm still a real newby to all this folk music and trad song type malarky, and the only reason I initially became interested, was because I love to *sing*. More or less by chance I discovered that I really enjoyed singing unacompanied traditional English and Irish songs. And that was why I joined Mudcat a couple of months ago.

So I'm not quite sure what I really want to be *listening* to...

Please indulge me here, I really *don't* know what I should begin delving into listening to. I know that sounds dumb.

I feel my musical tastes are reasonably eclectic without being avante gard. But I like 'interesting' music perhaps more than easy to listen to music.

Ruch Archer introduced me via YouTube to Jim Moray and his 'Lucy Wan.' To which I thought "Hmm, now thats quite interesting." And I'll be getting the album.

Anyone else here fancy proferring a YouTube or similar, of interesting folk music, with which they would wish to genuinely *capture the interest of a newby* to folk music?

Cheers, Rosie


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: john f weldon
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:21 AM

John Roberts and Tony Barrand (expatriate Brits) have lots of cds & lps that cover everything from the 6th century ballads to music hall. Love them myself.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Waddon Pete
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:26 AM

Cruise the CDBaby web-site and listen in to a few people on there!

Best wishes,

Peter


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:28 AM

Try the Young Tradition


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: bfdk
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:28 AM

Mudcat's own Hils (My Guru Always Said) does a cracking un-accompanied version of Follow the Heron. This is the original version by Karine Polwart. Lovely song.

Bente


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: melodeonboy
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:29 AM

Shirley Collins has got a few songs on YouTube. I shall avoid the adjectives and superlatives that I generally use when I talk about her singing. All I will say is "Suck it and see!".


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST,Joe G
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 09:48 AM

Try some of the artists apearing at the Queensbury Music festival (links to their MySpace sites are on the festival MySpace site here:
Queensbury Music Festival

As well as these I'd recommend Jez Lowe, George Papavergis, Bellowhead, Glorystrokes, Tickled Pink, Whapweasel and loads more when I have time!

Happy listening


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 10:12 AM

Rosie, you say that your first focus was "unaccompanied traditional English and Irish songs".

I can't suggest anything on the Irish front.

But the YT who I suggested earlier included the famous (late) Peter Bellamy and they are in my mind the finest exponents of English tradiional song in harmony - better even than the Copper family.

If unaccompanies English song pushes your buttons you might also try the Watersons and/or Anne Briggs.

Probably the best guitar accompanist of English traditional song is Martin Carthy. He might or might not be the best guitarist as such (some would say Martin Simpson for that) but for the way the accompaniment weaves into the song I think there are really only two contenders: Martin Carthy and Nic Jones.

Scottish song, you might want to try Ian Bruce - he has recently done some recordings of some very unvarnished rude Burns songs and he has a spectacular voice.

June Tabor is for me the most admirable female singer. Very restrained and controlled, and you need to ignore the sometimes intrusive piano arrangements on some songs.

Eliza Carthy is also admirable, but I would steer clear of the Blue Murder CD, the Anglo-American harmony style puts me right off.

Shanties - try Kimber's Men. An earthshaking wall of harmony.

I like the first couple of recordings from Ramskyte - after that they get a bit too religious for me.

If you like pretty harmony, you could try the Devil's Interval or Lynn Herauld and Pat Turner.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 10:50 AM

I would second Richard Bridge's recommendation of the Young Tradition and Peter Bellamy. I do love his voice. Not sure about comparing YT with the Coppers, though - it's not really like-with-like, and both are excellent for very different reasons, IMHO.

If you fancy getting back to the source of the unaccompanied tradition, there are a few good CDs, such as A Century of Song, Hidden English, and the Voice of the People sampler. Once you decide from those which are the traditional singers who really push your buttons, several of them have got full CDs of their own - Sam Larner, Harry Cox and Fred Jordan are great, and I LOVE Mary Anne Haynes and Phoebe Smith. Of course, if you decide you really want to pursue this vein, the Voice of the People collection (20 CDs) is well worth having. It's not cheap; I was a very lucky girl and got mine for my birthday last year. But I absolutely love it.


You should definitely give Eliza Carthy a listen - I think you'll like her. Jim Causley is also great - stunning voice. His CD with the band Mawkin is worth a listen. and anything with Jon Boden in it always gets my vote - have you heard Bellowhead yet?

Oh, there's loads more...


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: peregrina
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 11:06 AM

The Yorkshire Garland Folksong website
here is worth browsing through and listening to.

Mike Tickell's CD Warksburn is very special--he sings unaccompanied, but the CD includes accompaniments of various kinds, yet still conveys the real flavour of some special North Eastern regional songs.

The Blind Jack Henshaw's benefit CD has some wonderful traditional singing and songs, both accompanied and unaccompanied: singers include Dave Burland, Laura Hockenhull and John Greaves.

If you are interested in Appalachian traditional music (where some British ballads survived in oral tradition longer than in the British Isles) check out Smithsonian Folkways CD Dark Holler, or use their website or the digital library of Appalachia

I've found that the more I got to like traditional unaccompanied singing, the more some music I had previously enjoyed came to seem, at times, like food with artificial colours and e-numbers.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST,Joe G
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 11:06 AM

The Young Un's & The Wilsons also spring to mind for unaccompanied singers - though Coope Boyes & Simpson are my personal favourites


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: open mike
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 12:09 PM

rosie--where are you? I would recommendthat you might want to join up with other singers and pickersin your area...perhaps there is a regularly scheduled jam or singing circle. this is a good way to learn new tunes, and become acquainted with the music scenein your area. attendingconcerts or festivals is alsoa great way to learn
about new (or old) performers and music, and meet others who also
enjoy it.

here is a plce where you can find jams
Folk Jams

a magazine that has been around a very long time Sing Out! This magazine has workshops, printed music, and more

And here is a magazine that has an extensive listing of concerts
and performances Dirty Linen Magazine


And here is a place to find festivals festivallink.net


Festival Link


these are mostly U.S, resources -- hope this is helpful.
if you tell us where you are, perhaps folks here can provide
more local pointers for you
good luck and happy singing


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 12:22 PM

I think Sleepy Rosie is UK, and not south-eastern UK


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 12:32 PM

Ah - well almost south-eastern - near Colchester Essex, mentioned on a couple of threads, so Virginia Tam (also Essex) may be able to point you to local libraries having useful resources


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: open mike
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 01:29 PM

see also the thread on Rise Up Singing...which is a book published
by the Sing Out! magazine publishers--iit is not universally appreciated, but is a good resource.
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=117284&messages=264


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 01:41 PM

Check out Kate Rusby.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Bert
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 01:41 PM

Ya need to listen to Seamus Kennedy and Oliver McElhone plus any Mudcatters that you can find.

Then you might take a look at Aine's song book I think Amos has a collection of songs you can listen to and Mmario is still working on music for Mudcat songs.

And don't forget the digital tradition. Camsco Records have CDs of just about any folk music that is available.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 03:47 PM

I have to endorse Ruth Archer's recommendations - Topic's Voice of the People is essential listening - and the sampler is as good a place to start as any. Of all the great British trad. singers recorded - and I absolutely had to pick one for each UK country, I would have to say:

England: Sam Larner
Scotland: Lizzie Higgins
Ireland: Joe Heaney
Wales: Phil Tanner

Not easy choices - and they might change tomorrow.

For revivalists you have to listen to Ewan MacColl and Bert Lloyd, of course (even though you can't have the enormous privilege, as I had, of listening to them live - poor you!). I also like Shirley Collins but for sheer awesome, beautiful singing you can't beat early Frankie Armstrong. There's a compilation CD of her early work called: 'Lovely on the Water' (Fellside FECD151, 2000). It's fabulous!! I hope it's still available.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: BB
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 04:41 PM

Trying to think of specifically unaccompanied singers that I rate. I think, from the revival rather than the tradition, I'd go for John Waltham, Louis Killen, Roy Harris, Barry Lister. Sad to think that I can think offhand of no solo unaccompanied women singers that you're likely to be able to get easy access to.

Good luck, and happy hunting and discovering!

Barbara


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 04:45 PM

There are quite a lot of Anne Briggs recordings readily available, some on Youtune and/or myspace too.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 04:51 PM

Frankie Armstrong - good call.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 04:58 PM

I've gone orf most traddy music nowadays, for various reasons, but Barry Lister is still on my list, as he's the greatest sense of humour. alongside an amazing voice. That man can literally make you double up with laughter, just by looking at you, when he'll splutter with giggles, or..he can bring tears to your eyes with his singing.
He has the twinkliest eyes and a naughty sense of humour, and he has a very large instrument too. :0)



He sings rrrrrrrracy songs about doxy's, doxies and even doxeeeeees too. 'Scuse me psellin' but I is inteelectually beereftt which is why I's given up traddie music 'cos I ain't intellijent enuff for it and kan't kope wiv all them akademiks wot have tacen it ova.



'Ghosts and Greasepaint' Rosie..get it and you'll love it. It's Barry's CD, HIGHLY recommended.

Oh, and Barry's instrument is a tuba, by the way. :0)

Or.....was it a euphonium....or perhaps a trombone...or...a slide guitar...doh...Anyways ups, it was very big and he blows on it hard, and it made me laugh when I saw him playing it, 'cos I've a terrible sense of humour and find things like that ridiculously funny..

Anyway..(adjusts face to more normal expression of sour & dour to get back to the true trad experience)...acoustic singer songwriters are very good too, because, of course, they are the New Tradition.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 05:12 PM

Some more recent recordings, that you might like to try, which include some excellent women singers (not all unaccompanied, of course):

'Black Crow White Crow' by (Annie) Dearman, (Vic) Gammon and (Steve) Harrison (EFDSS CD11, 2005)

'Fenlandia' by Mary Humphreys and Anahata (Wild Goose WGS 340 CD, 2006)

'Parallel Strands' by Martin Graebe and Shan Cown (Wild Goose, WGS 323, 2005)


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 06:17 PM

Shan Cown is now Shan Graebe, of course. :)

Fenlandia - great recommendation. I like the gutsiness of Mary's voice very much.

Howe could I have forgot the wonderful Chris Coe, too?


Rosie, it's just occurred to me that, since I now have the full Voice of the People set, my sampler CD is somewhat redundant - would you like it?


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 08:58 PM

Some great stuff here for me too, gonna look at them all when I have time.

Shimrod - Lovely on the Water is still available - I bought it only recently.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Gurney
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 10:50 PM

Rosie, go to folk clubs. They are cheap and informal, and they offer the best part of folk music, singing. And choruses. They will also give you something to measure yourself against as a performer.
Folk Festivals in the warmer months.

Apart from that, as advised, YouTube for recorded performance and CD Baby for recordings, which are mostly not quite the same thing.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Big Al Whittle
Date: 04 Jan 09 - 10:58 PM

and whatever you do - don't drink the water.....


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: treewind
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 03:47 AM

If you really like unaccompanied English song, try Jack Crawford's Pride of The Season. He's been singing and researching for years but only recently actually committed any of his work to CD. All quite slow and reflective in style, but beautifully done and well received (see the reviews). Yes, I have an interest, but not a commercial one, and the instrumental contributions on the few tracks that have them are quite minimal.

As for Fenlandia (thanks for mentioning that!) you'll find it HERE together with two similar albums.

Anahata


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 04:17 AM

Some I've seen recently:

Peta Webb
June Tabor
Jackie Oates
Bára Grímsdóttir
Frankie Armstrong
Sandra Kerr
Fay Hield
Maggie Boyle
Lauren McCormick
Mary Humphreys
Chris Coe
Alice Jones
Anna Tabbush
Emily Portman
Lynne Heraud
Ray Fisher

Not seen recently:

Felicity Greenland (cos she's in Japan)
Anne Briggs (ditto in the wilds of Scotland)
Lena Willemark (ditto in Sweden)
Heather Wood (cos she's doing something else in New York)
Dolores Keane (lost in Ireland)


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 04:39 AM

I heard Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner at a singing session at Sidmouth last year and really liked them - great harmonies.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 04:48 AM

A line got cut off my last post which was meant to indicate [i]women[/i] singers known for unaccompanied interpretations, in response to someone who couldn't think of any.
Re Lynne Heraud and Pat Turner: Pat's pretty good solo too, but you don't often hear it. A voice workshop with the two of them is a hilarious experience not to be missed.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 05:02 AM

If you are interested in American music at all, see if you can get your hands on anything by Jean Ritchie. A lot of her songs have their roots in British traditional music, and her voice is simply beautiful.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 05:06 AM

Jean Ritchie - seconded. And her young protegé Elizabeth LaPrelle.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 05:50 AM

Ruth - Yeah, the offered sampler would be most helpful cheers! I'll PM you.

My recent interest in 'folk music' arose out of accidentally discovering that there is a tradition of unacompannied song - a type of singing which 'clicked into place' for me and perfectly satisfied my own need to sing. And yes, that does sound unbelievably ill educated. Though I suspect there are an awful lot of English people like me who similarly have no clue about their own traditional arts... But of course that's a whole other thread!

In my meagre efforts at autodidactism I hit YouTube to find amatuer singers of traditional songs, and learned a few Child Ballads that way. So, a rather a clumsy backwards way in you see. And really I'm still none the wiser regards all the various catagories of recorded and performed folk out there.

I could really do with a "Dummies Guide to Folk Music", preferably in pamphlet form with illustrations!

Anyhoo, thanks to those who have made recomendations thus far, keep up the good work.. I will over the next few decades be trawling MySpace pages for samples of music by some of the artists cited below. Cheers to Spleen to for the PM and heads up for that.

Rosie


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 06:29 AM

How could I forget? You've got to listen to two of Scotland's finest:
Alison McMorland and Geordie McIntyre. I've got 4 of their CDs but 2 to start with (just can't choose one!) would be:

'Cloudberry Day' Alison's solo recording (Tradition Bearers LTCD 1003, 2000)

and

'Ballad Tree' with Alison, Geordie and Alison's daughter Kirsty Potts (Tradition Bearers LTCD 1051, 2003)

I'll leave you to discover the others. Excuse me while I go and play all 4 - one after the other!


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 07:17 AM

"And yes, that does sound unbelievably ill educated."

No, it really doesn't. I've been involved in folk music of various kinds and breeds for more than 20 years, and my own awareness of "the English tradition" really opened up only about 5 or 6 years ago. It was consolidated by my first visit to the (sadly demised) National Folk Festival 3 or 4 years ago, where the light just went on for me, same as it did for you. The National was probably the best festival in England for focusing on traditional music, and it was probably the place where I realised that unaccompanied singing was a respected tradition in its own right, and not something you simply did if you couldn't find a guitarist to play with you! And I wouldn't have even gone to The National if it wasn't right down the roasd from where I worked and if Waterson:Carthy hadn't been playing, so a whole damascene conversion may have been avoided... :)

I think there are fewer "entry points" for traditional, unaccompanied singing. or at least a lot of them fly under the radar of the more commercialised folk scene, so it's possible to potter quite happily in "folk music" for quite a long time without even developing a meaningful awareness of traditional song. I think music is different - there are a lot of music sessions around, and I tapped into those very early on. It isn't as easy to stumble upon traditional singing sessions out in the community, away from certain festivals, etc.

But I'm ever so glad I did! I daresay you are, too.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Stringsinger
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 12:40 PM

Rosie, go back, go back, go back to the early recordings. Remember, too, that the voices you hear may be untrained and harsh to some ears but they carry the emotion and the history of the times.

Margaret Barry, (The Irish Tinker Lady), Jeannie Robertson (from Scotland), Texas Gladden (from American Appalachia), Vera Hall (From Alabama), Almeda Riddle (Appalachian)
Jean Ritchie (a must hear who is a great songwriter as well as tradition carrier from the Cumberlands of Kentucky), Aunt Molly Jackson, Florence Reese (early labor singers)
and in later times of course my late friend Odetta, Sweet Honey In The Rock, and lesser known by the public women singers such as Lucy Murphy, Hally Wood, Bess Hawes, Peggy Seeger, Sara Grey........there are so many.

These women have an important part in the legacy of folk music. They are the carriers
of the tradition. Today, there are a great many fine singers such as Judy Collins, the ladies
in Celtic Woman, but the important thing is to study the tradition by going back to the old recordings and finding out what folk music really is. You are not going to be able to accurately reproduce any of them but what you will gain is an understanding of your own voice in this music and why this music is so durable. It is not subject to public popular whims even in the nouveau-folk scene. To understand history go back, go back, go back.

Frank Hamilton


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 01:08 PM

I think there are probably two distinct streams of listening for me to do. The first is for aiding me to do what I'm learning to persue as a hobby, i.e. singing unaccompanied traditional song. And that's why I landed at the Mudcat in the first place. So that's more research with a pragmatic aim in mind.

The second is more about exloring and discovering 'folk music' purely for listening fun. Very, very much a new thing for me. I got put off folk music a long time ago and have simply never been sufficiently exposed to it as a musical genre, to have a single clue about what I may potentially enjoy listening to.

In the second catagory, I have thus far 'discovered' with the aid of MySpace and the suggestions below: Bellowhead, Glorystrokes and Jim Moray. All of whom are pleasing. All by myself, I've also 'discovered' Faustus and they sound pretty good to me.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 01:18 PM

Faustus are great. You might also want to check out Paul Sartin's other band, Belshazzar's Feast. And Saul Rose in one of the 50 or so other bands he's currently playing with. :D

Oh, and Benji Kirkpatrick, the third member of Faustus, is also in Bellowhead.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 01:43 PM

And...Benji's one of the New Tradition Singer Songwriters too.

Take a listen to his fabulous song 'Wallbreaker'

Funky Benji Kirkpatrick's Myspace


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 01:54 PM

Any idea what his marital status is Lizzie?
Just y'know, asking...


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 02:02 PM

Taken, I'm afraid, Rosie.. :0)

He's a great pal of Seth Lakeman.

Ooh, that reminds me. Wasn't it lovely to hear Seth's music playing on the trailer for Larkrise to Candleford the other day.

Sock it to 'em Seth!!   :0)

Now Rosie, don't get too excited, but...I've a feeling that Seth's still available.............................

Our Dartmoor Lad :0)


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Sleepy Rosie
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 02:29 PM

"You might also want to check out Paul Sartin's other band, Belshazzar's Feast."

Yes, I like some of the samples they've got here


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 02:38 PM

excellent! They're great live. They have no musical boundaries, and it's a bit of a roller coaster ride keeping up with them! Very funny and incredibly adept musically.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Tootler
Date: 05 Jan 09 - 04:24 PM

Rosie, I echo what Gurney says. Go to folk clubs. It can be a bit of a mixed bag but you will usually find there are a core of good singers in most clubs. I have been aware of the unaccompanied tradition for many years but really only started going to folk clubs after I retired, and I am having to catch up on what I have been missing. The great thing about going to folk clubs is that you can be part of it yourself.

You need to say where you are and someone from your area will surely post where the best local clubs are, though it does seem to be patchy round the country.

I live on Teesside and we are very lucky as there are many excellent clubs within easy reach.

Oh and ingore those grumpy old naysayers who inhabit threads about the state of folk clubs and tell you that they are all crap and doomed to extinction. They are wrong.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Colin Randall
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 02:37 PM

I was about to say how typical it was of Mudcat that your thread about the worst imaginable sounds in folk should still be in soaraway mode, 99 hits when I looked a minute ago, while the appeal for recommendations is now slipping, apart from this little bump up the ratings, into oblivion

But I won't. You've been set on the right path here. i'd personally go easy on the whole Topic Voice of the People collection until you've heard the sampler someone - Ruth? - promised to send. It is heavy going, even if there is some magical material in there.

Try the new Brian Peters album, "Songs of Trial and Triumph" but certainly look up the Young Tradition and more recent harmony groups and DEFINITELY June Tabor, even if there is a piano. I would also recommend anything by Bob Fox, or Graham and Eileen Pratt, but I haven't the technical know-how to be sure as to whether it is a good idea for an unaccompanied singer to follow my recommendations to artists who use instruments


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: TheSnail
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 03:03 PM

It's interesting that The Copper Family have only been mentioned so far as a benchmark against which to measure others. Their excellence is taken for granted. Seek them out.

As Gurney and Tootler say, go to folk clubs and get amongst like minded people.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: peregrina
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 04:06 PM

If it hasn't already been mentioned, the

Harry Smith Anthology

is a must! (Greil Marcus's book Invisible Republic makes a good accompanying book.)

(Google, wikipedia, Amazon and Smithsonian Folkways all have lots about it--it was a massive catalyst for the American folk revival...weird, wonderful, gripping... )


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: peregrina
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 04:09 PM

SF Folkways website and write up
--from the website:
The Anthology of American Folk Music (SFW 40090), Edited by Harry Smith, is one of the most influential releases in the history of recorded sound. Originally issued by Folkways in 1952 as three volumes of 2 LPs each, (a total of 84 tracks), it had been commercially unavailable for many years before this 1997 reissue.

The importance and quality of the Anthology reissue and the accompanying documentation was recognized by the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, which bestowed two Grammy Awards on Folkways for this project: 1997 Best Historic Album, and 1997 Best Album Notes.

When it was initially released, the Anthology brought virtually unknown parts of America's musical landscape to the public's attention. It inspired a generation of musicians to go in search of the traditions, and, in some cases, the musicians whose recordings Harry Smith had selected to include in the Anthology.

Released at a time when the commercial recording industry had largely congealed into a few relatively homogeneous mass markets, the Anthology successfully answered a widespread need for fresh inspiration, aesthetic authority, and uncommon artistry in popular music. It played a seminal role in the folk music revival of the 1950s and 1960s, which has had lasting political, economic, and aesthetic impact on American culture.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 04:51 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0zAr1t6nTE&feature=channel_pag


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: The Sandman
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 06:32 PM

Ron Taylor,is amuch better unaccompanied singer then anyone else that has been mentioned so far.
Jeff Gillett,has a my space page,and sometimes works win a duo with Ron.
the Wilson Family,are avery good unaccompanied Harmony group.
Mike Waterson.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 07 Jan 09 - 07:31 PM

Talking of Faustus... their track "Brisk lad" (on Faustus) is a stunning example of unaccompanied harmony singing. Can't stop playing it!


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: PoppaGator
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 04:18 PM

"More or less by chance I discovered that I really enjoyed singing unacompanied traditional English and Irish songs."

Are you familiar with the term "Sean Nos"? If not, run a search and see (I mean, hear) what you think.

I got involved with a sea-shanty-singing group a couple of years ago and, through them, began learning a thing or three about singing without instrumental accompaniment.

My personal favorite piece to sing without playing along on my guitar is Dave Van Ronk's "Last Call." Decidedly NOT truly traditional, but set to a melody that certainly sounds ancient. (I don't know for sure whether DVR "stole" an existing tune, or simply was able to compose a very authrntic-sounding new melody.)

The above link provides the (wonderful) lyrics, but not the tune. I didn't find a free audio link right away, but here's an MP3 download ($0.89).


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: PinkAliPink
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 05:18 PM

I'm in a similar position, I love British & Celtic folk music, but am not really very familiar with names for purchasing or listening to on Youtube etc. So recently with a view to finding some artists to add to my collection. I've looked at popular folk compilation albums on Amazon & then Youtubed the various artists.

I also listen to shoutcast radio with Winamp & have found various artists in this way. The Internet archive can also be a free source of lesser known music of podcasts & MP3's & can be downloaded or streamed, Download.com also offers free MP3 downloads across many genres, while efolkmusic.com (although haven't visited for a couple of years) always had mainly American artists but also some celtic & possibly english sounds & has various options including some free MP3's.

Kate Rusby is my favorite new find at the moment, how I missed her before, who knows.


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Subject: RE: Folk Music: Recommendations For a Newby
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 08 Jan 09 - 05:39 PM

I won't even bother to pick individual selections: my website lists some 3500 titles that I think are good.


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