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Origins: Sucu Sucu

Joe Offer 05 Feb 09 - 05:40 PM
katlaughing 05 Feb 09 - 05:47 PM
Monique 05 Feb 09 - 06:01 PM
Joe Offer 05 Feb 09 - 06:37 PM
Joe Offer 05 Feb 09 - 07:19 PM
Joe Offer 05 Feb 09 - 07:41 PM
Ross Campbell 05 Feb 09 - 11:17 PM
Jim Carroll 06 Feb 09 - 08:50 AM
Suegorgeous 06 Feb 09 - 10:02 AM
Micca 06 Feb 09 - 11:55 AM
Jim Carroll 06 Feb 09 - 01:14 PM
Jeanie 06 Feb 09 - 01:30 PM
Joe Offer 06 Feb 09 - 07:04 PM
Jeanie 07 Feb 09 - 04:28 AM
Herga Kitty 07 Feb 09 - 03:38 PM
GUEST,djoko, Indonesia 17 Sep 10 - 09:09 AM
Joe Offer 18 Sep 10 - 03:54 AM
Northerner 18 Sep 10 - 08:18 AM
GUEST,a todos 26 Oct 10 - 12:24 AM
GUEST 26 Oct 10 - 12:27 AM
GUEST,acerca de la versión "cubana" 26 Oct 10 - 02:09 AM
GUEST 08 Aug 11 - 02:47 AM
michaelr 08 Aug 11 - 06:50 PM
GUEST,PM 20 Aug 11 - 04:20 PM
GUEST,Cecilia Rojas 28 Jul 17 - 01:57 AM
Joe Offer 28 Jul 17 - 02:06 AM
GUEST,Cecilia Rojas 28 Jul 17 - 02:07 AM
GUEST,Cecilia Rojas 28 Jul 17 - 02:27 AM
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Subject: ADD: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 05:40 PM

In another thread, there's mention of "Sucu Sucu," recorded by Nina and Fredrik. One message says the song was the theme music from the William Franklyn TV series "Secret Agent" - was the Nina and Fredrik recording the theme music?

This page gives me the impression that "Sucu Sucu" was a dance that originated in Cuba as early as 1840.

This page at answers.google.com gives the following information about the song:
    You are definitely right, the song you remember does really exist. It was the title theme of the British secret agent TV series, "Top Secret", which was broadcast in the USA in 1961 and 1962. The action took place in Argentina, thus the South American flavored theme.

    The title theme's original name was "Sucu Sucu", composed by Tarateno
    Rojas and Ren Jan Van Hoogten. The English vocal version had the
    title "Step Right Up (And Say You Love Me)", though it is known as
    "Sucu Sucu"; the British lyricists were Ray Maxwell and Phil Belmonte.
    It was played by the Laurie Johnson and his Orchestra, the same who
    later also did the famous title theme for the British TV series "The
    Avengers". The single became a 1961 Top 10 hit in the UK, peaking at
    #9 on 30 Sep 1961.


The answers.google.com Website offers a transcription of the lyrics. Here's that transcription, with corrections I've added from what I hear on the Nina & Fredrik recording (YouTube):

SUCU SUCU
(English lyrics by Ray Maxwell and Phil Belmonte)

(Male singer, spoken:)
- Come and do the Sucu Sucu!

(Male singer:)
Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.

It is becoming the moda,
In every big capital.
From Buenos Aires to Paris,
From Rajastan to Nepal.

Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.

Please come with me to bailar
This thing is most popular.
I hope you don't mind I sigh,
How Sucu Sucu you are.

Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.

(Spoken:)
- Excuse me, please?
- Yes, miss?
- What is the Sucu Sucu?
- Sucu Sucu is most complicated. If you comprende Sucu Sucu, you can
feel it. But if you don't have Sucu Sucu, it is nothing.
- Oh!
- Sucu Sucu!

(Male and female singer in duet:)
Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.

(Female singer:)
I am beginning to feel it,
Something is making me high.
Everything seems to be giggit,
Everything's so me oh my!

(Male and female singer in duet:)
Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.

(Male singer, spoken:)
- Sucu Sucu!

(Male and female singer in duet:)
Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
Sucu Sucu I do not care.



You'll find a Spanish-language recording of the song on this YouTube Video. Can somebody give us a Spanish transcription, and more information about the song?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: katlaughing
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 05:47 PM

Neat song, Joe. I looked up "baillar" as I didn't know what it meant. The dictionary I found it in had it spelled with one "l" and its main meaning is "to dance."


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Monique
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 06:01 PM

I found that

EL VAIVÉN DEL SUCU SUCU
sucu sucu \

Se está poniendo de moda en toda la capital
Se está poniendo de moda en toda la capital
El vaiven del sucu sucu, sucu sucu te voy a dar.
Ay, ay, ay, negra bandida, sucu sucu te voy a dar.

(estribillo)
Vamos, cholita, a bailar, el ritmo más popular (2x).

here It's on page 203 of the Word document


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Subject: ADD: EL BAILE DEL SUCU-SUCU
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 06:37 PM

I guess you're right, Kat, about "bailar" - so I changed it in my transcription. I thought it was pronounced "buy-YAR," which would require a double "ll," but in "La Bamba," it's definitely "baila."

Monique's post includes the entire Spanish version I found on the YouTube Video, a 1963 recording by Alberto Cortez.

Good catch.

So, does this tune really go back to Cuba, 1840?

-Joe-
Here's another Spanish version, a little longer:

    http://www.rickycorreo.com

    EL BAILE DEL SUCU-SUCU

    Te voy a dar sucu sucu.
    Te voy a dar sucu sucu.
    Te voy a dar sucu sucu.
    Se está poniendo de moda
    ir a la playa a bailar. BIS

    El vaivén del sucu-sucu
    sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    El vaivén del sucu-sucu
    y sucu-sucu te va a gustar.

    Ay ay ay ay.. sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Ay ay ay ay.. Sucu-sucu te va a gustar. ESTRIBILLO

    Como no tengo dinero
    nada te puedo comprar. BIS
    Pero tengo un sucu-sucu
    y sucu-sucu te voy a dar. BIS

    Ay ay ay ay.. sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Ay ay ay ay.. Sucu-sucu te va a gustar.

    Si quieres sucu-sucu te voy a dar
    lo quieres por delante, lo quieres por detrás BIS

    Si tú quieres gozar sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Ay tú no pases mas hambre que a mi me hierve la sangre, nene.
    Si tú quieres gozar sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Arrímate mi negrita, arrima tu cinturita.
    Si tú quieres gozar sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Quererse no tiene horario ni fecha en el calendario.
    Si tú quieres gozar sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Mi negra saca jugo ala vida y bebe pronto que se termina.

    Ay ay ay ay.. sucu-sucu te voy a dar.
    Ay ay ay ay.. Sucu-sucu te va a gustar

And, for your viewing pleasure, yet another YouTube Video (Maja Brunner, 2008)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 07:19 PM

So, here's the entry on sucu-sucu from Cuban Music from A to Z by Helio Orovio

    sucu-sucu. Variation of the son, the origins of which stretch back to the nineteenth century on the Isle of Youth (Isla de Pinos - the name changed by the Castro regime in 1978). The term sucu-sucu describes a dance, a musical form, and the party at which this song and dance is performed. As a musical form, sucu-sucu is played in a distinctive style. Maria Teresa Linares notes of the sucu-sucu that its music is similar, in its formal, melodic, instrumental, and harmonic structure, to that of a son montuno. A soloist alternates with the chorus; the two sing the same lines to the accompaniment of the musicians. The sucu-sucu is precluded by a soloist's improvisation of either an octo-syllabic quatrain or a country ballad; then comes an introduction in which each instrument joins gradually, after the tres. This eight-beat introduction is followed by a choral refrain that alternates continually with the soloist's singing. When the body of the song begins, the tres and the guitar both strum a bass part over a tonic, both dominant and subdominant, or in descensions falling toward the tonic. The maracas beat a regular rhythm based on semi-quavers, the drum and bongos are allowed free rhythmic schemes, and a machete is used against a knife as a scraper to create a regular rhythm pattern. All the while the clave keeps the time.
    The sucu-sucu is danced in groups, and the couples hold each other close. The man puts one arm behind the woman's back and both dancers extend the other arm and clasp hands The shoulders and hips remain stationary. The sucu-sucu is danced as if it were a son (Linares, El sucu-sucu de Isla de Pinos). In the 1940s Eliseo Grenet based several songs on the sucu-sucu style, helping to diffuse this new style all over Cuba and abroad.


Gee, did you think we'd get all that out of a Nina & Fredrik song that sounds like grocery store music?

Sucu Sucu!!!!



-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 07:41 PM

WHAT WAS THE SUCU SUCU IN CUBAN MUSIC?
by Maria del Carmen Mestas
http://www.cubanow.net/pages/loader.php?sec=4&t=2&item=4897

The voice of the old man from Isla de la Juventud rose up in the night accompanied by the rhythm of a beautiful sucu sucu, and there, in that improvised get-together, was awakened the curiosity to investigate this rich expression of Cuban folklore.

Its origin dates back to 1840, in La Tumbita farm, close to the town of Santa Fe, in what is nowadays Isla de la Juventud, formerly Isla de Pinos. According to musicologist María Teresa Linares, the music is similar in its formal, melodic, instrumental and harmonic structure to a son montuno. It alternates a soloist with a chorus that sings a fixed passage, accompanied by the band. The soloist sings improvisations on a quartet or a ten-stanza verse.

The sucu sucu reached a greater standing around 1950, when the famous author Eliseo Grenet stylized it and composed pieces that achieved a huge popularity in Cuba and abroad. During that phase, the best-known one was called Felipe Blanco, which was promoted by the radio on a large scale and, later on, was prohibited because of the political jokes prompted by its lyrics.

The story says that Felipe Blanco was in service to Spain; his task was to cut off the ears of Cuban rebels.

On July 26, 1896, those participating in the uprising of the Evangelina Cossío conspiracy had dispersed themselves around the hills of the Sierras de las Casas and, worn out from the long treks, were sleeping in some caves close to the La Concepción ranch.

Felipe Blanco, using some tricks, attracted the rebels to his house and offered them food and shelter, before he betrayed them. They were all handed over to the Spanish and subsequently massacred.

The sucu sucu begins to spread around the 1920s and 1930s. By that date Jamaicans and people from the Cayman Islands, who work mainly in the recollection of grapefruit and other fruits, reach the North American haciendas established on Isla de Pinos. Workers from Niquero, Guantánamo, Manzanillo and other places from the eastern region also settle there, at the start of the construction of the so-called Presidio Modelo.

From 1948 to 1950 new elements enter into sucu sucu; in this way it breaks with the traditional scheme. The genre became more stylized, rapidly becoming commercialized. This was due to the work of Eliseo Grenet and Ramírez Corría, who introduced variations to that folkloric expression from Isla de Pinos.

There are two types of structure in the musical bands: one, made up by accordion, harmonica, kettledrum and güiro, violin or guitar; the other one, following the style of the traditional son bands, made up by marímbula, tres, guitar, bongo, claves and maracas.

Groups from Santa Fe and Jacksonville used a stool or conga drum in sucu sucu to mark the rhythm. More modern groups now use even trumpets. In the past, the machete was used as a rasper.

How is it danced? Many people describe sucu sucu's choreography like that of the son, with the only difference that there is not a long and a short step, but two short shuffle steps with each foot. Older people tell us that in the past, the dancers used to light a candle to Saint Nicholas, and they would dance while it remained lit. The respite depended on giving a sieve to those who were awaiting the opportunity to join the dance.

What is true is that the choreography of this genre has been changing and that each generation has introduced its own modalities.

Several Cuban bands have worked for an international reach of sucu sucu in their albums as well as in their international tours. Among the best-known bands are Sonny Boy and Mongo Rives y su Tumbita. Nowadays this expression of great resonant strength arouses enthusiasm not only on Isla de la Juventud, but also abroad, thanks to the work developed by the Isla Caribe orchestra, directed by Frank Federico Boza.

* The author is a Cuban journalist and Cubanow contributor.

* Translated by Karen López

* English revised by Susana Hurlich



Azizi thinks "Sucu-Sucu" may be derived from the Spanish word for sugar, azucar. See what she has to say in this thread (click).


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 05 Feb 09 - 11:17 PM

This brought back some odd memories. I guess I was 11 or 12 years old when "Top Secret" was being serialised, the first time we had a TV in our house, and it was compulsory weekly watching. The theme tune remains stuck in my head, and seems to have had a similar effect on others.
I was a computer programmer in the early eighties and worked for a while with what I now realise was a very remarkable group of people. Wilie Carroll, the team leader, had started his working life as a shipyard apprentice in Stephens of Linthouse, in the Govan area of Glasgow. Quiet spells in the office would be broken up by fragments and sometimes whole renditions from his amazing repertoire of both Orange and Green songs. A big Celtic fan, he didn't seem to favour any particular shade of music (if anything, his preferences lay with the more scurrilous verses from either side). Rosie Harrison, married to a local folk-singer, went on to gain a first-class honours degree in computer studies and helped run the old Kirkham Folk Club for many years. Ivan McKeown, then just an occasional visitor to Fleetwood Folk Club, has gone on to become an adept song-writer in his own right with an eclectic choice among other people's material. Richard West, who sat opposite me, had obviously been affected (or afflicted) by similar exposure to "Top Secret" and its catchy theme tune. A successful bit of coding or the results of a good trial run would be celebrated by an outburst of "Ay! Ay! Ay! The beat is crazy, Sucu Sucu is everywhere", sometimes the full chorus. His alternate celebratory "crow" was "'scuse me, while I kiss the sky!"
I always meant to bring in a recorder to tape Willie's Glasgow songs. Office re-organisation took him away from the area and he died (too young) a few years ago.
If you've got something to do, do it now.
Ay!Ay!Ay!
Ross


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 08:50 AM

I have always thought (obviously wrongly) that Sucu Sucu was the theme tune for the Dutch detective series Van Der Valk - somebody remind me what that one was so I can get a decent night's sleep - please
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Suegorgeous
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 10:02 AM

Awww... when I heard this when I was little, I used to think it was SueSue SueSue, and thus meant there were a lot of little girls called Susan everywhere! :)


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Micca
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 11:55 AM

Jim, The Theme to "Van der Valk" was called "Eye level"


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 01:14 PM

Micca,
Thanks - now all I have to do is remember it and then - the sweet arms of Morpheus.
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Jeanie
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 01:30 PM

"Sucu Sucu" was the theme tune for the UK television series "Top Secret" starring William Franklyn, in an instrumental version, which you can hear here

Very interesting thread. It also brought back memories - I hadn't heard or thought of that tune in decades. For those interested in TV theme tunes and programmes of the 50s/60s, there are links from that YouTube page to programmes such as "No Hiding Place" - you can watch entire episodes.

- jeanie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 06 Feb 09 - 07:04 PM

But is it true that the "Top Secret" show used the English lyrics from the first post?

    Ay ay ay the beat is crazy,
    Sucu Sucu is everywhere.
    Ayay ay ay I feel so hazy,
    Sucu Sucu I do not care.

    It is becoming the moda,
    In every big capital.
    From Buenos Aires to Paris,
    From Rajastan to Nepal.

It doesn't seem to fit my conception of proper theme music for a spy show, unless it had at lease some alteration. Also, who sang the theme song recording? I found this YouTube (instrumental) recording of the theme. If there are no lyrics, the tune fits a lot better - but did the show's theme have lyrics?

I got an interesting personal message from someone on the "Isle of Youth" in Cuba, which appears to be the birthplace of "Sucu-Sucu":

    The Isle of Pines (now Isle of Youth) has a strange history. The American companies established plantations there after 1900, and brought in workers from other Caribbean Islands and the mainlands, and the old culture was diluted and lost. Not till 1925 did the U. S. formerly cede it to Cuba.
    The Castro regime spread cultivation, and much of the old flora and fauna was destroyed. Much of the pine forest has been lost. The population was much increased by people from other parts of Cuba.
    The old pre-1900, pre-U. S. occupation and plantation era, might have left a few records in government archives, but we may never know much about the old culture of the island.

Azizi thinks "Sucu-Sucu" may be derived from the Spanish word for sugar, azucar. See what she has to say in this thread (click).

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Jeanie
Date: 07 Feb 09 - 04:28 AM

Joe - if you play the link I gave in the post immediately before yours, you will see it is the same link that you have just duplicated in your post !
This is the signature tune/intro music to the TV programme, which was an instrumental, as played on my (and your identical) link. In the UK, certainly in that era, signature tunes to TV programmes generally were *always* instrumentals, as this one was. Believe me, I am old enough to remember watching the show circa 1961.

The title of the tune was still "Sucu Sucu" and if you do a Google Search you will find that someone is selling the sheet music for the (instrumental) signature tune.

Cheers !
- jeanie


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 07 Feb 09 - 03:38 PM

Pavlovian response - I saw the thread title, and thought "Ay, ay, ay, the beat is crazy"! Not a song I'd thought about since I heard Nina and Fredrik on the radio. My recollection is that they sang "It is becoming the fashion" (not "the moda").

Kitty


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,djoko, Indonesia
Date: 17 Sep 10 - 09:09 AM

What about the information hat Sucu Sucu was created by Alberto Cortez in 1963 in Swtizerland and became a world hit? Who would own the copyright for Sucu Sucu?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 18 Sep 10 - 03:54 AM

Hi, Djoko-
As far as I can tell, Alberto Cortez only recorded the song. The Harry Fox Agency licenses songs in the United States, and they have four listings under the title "Sucu Sucu."
The writer of the song recorded by Alberto Cortez was TARATENO ROJAS, and the copyright holder is FILMTRAX COPYRIGHT HLDGS INC. OBO EMI MOGULL INC.

Two listings are for a song written by RIGOBERTO ROJAS SUAREZ - with the shared name Rojas, I'm wondering if Tarateno and Rigoberto have a connection.

The fourth listing is for a song titled "El Sucu-Sucu," written by J. BARBOZA, LUIS F. VINA BETTA, FERVI.

Hope that answers your question.

Nice song, isn't it?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Northerner
Date: 18 Sep 10 - 08:18 AM

What an intresting thread. I actually have the single of this in my home. Yes, I bought it!


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,a todos
Date: 26 Oct 10 - 12:24 AM

Estimados amigos, mi nombre es Cecilia Rojas, soy hija del Tarateño Rojas o Rigoberto Rojas Suarez, UNICO AUTOR Y COMPOSITOR DEL SUCU SUCU. REGISTRADO EN SADAIC, BUENOS AIRES EN LA DECADA DE 1950 y que Alberto Cortéz llevó a España en 1960, donde lo grabó en Europa en 1961 y se hizo famoso llamándose Mr. Sucu-Sucu. Desde fines de la década del 60, mi padre tuvo que soportar, muchos plagios de distintos lugares, tanto de algunos supuestos autores de Cuba, como de España. El Sucu-sucu es un ritmo de Taquirari con acento de Saya, y es muy usado para el baile de los Caporales Bolivianos, sobre todo por los Caporales de la Universidad de San Simón en Bolivia, ya que en los Carnavales todas las entradas, se toca en Sucu-sucu. El ritmo de saya, es originario de la zona de las yungas bolivianas, donde vivían esclavos originarios de Africa, de allí el ritmo afro-boliviano que ha dado origen al baile Caporal. Todos los ritmos afro-americanos son bastantes parecidos, ya que tienen el mismo origen, en fusión con la música española, pero en sudamérica, se le añade la música de los pueblos originarios, con sus instrumentos andinos. Bueno, espero que ya no hayan más dudas. mi email es cecilia_rojas1@yahoo.com.ar.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST
Date: 26 Oct 10 - 12:27 AM

Estimated friends, my name is Cecilia Rojas, I am daughter of the Tarateño Rojas or Rigoberto Rojas Suarez, THE ONLY AUTHOR Y COMPOSER OF THE SUCU SUCU. REGISTERED IN SADAIC, GOOD AIRS IN THE DECADE GIVE 1950 and that Alberto Cortéz took Spain in 1960, where it recorded it in Europe in 1961 and became famous being calling Mr. Sucu-Sucu. From ends of the decade of 60, my father had to support, many plagiarisms of different places, so much of some supposed authors of Cuba, since of Spain. The Sucu-sucu is Taquirari's pace with accent of Skirt, and is very used for the dance of the Bolivian Chiefs, especially for the Chiefs of San Simón's University in Bolivia, since in the Carnivals all the income, it touches itself in Sucu-sucu. The pace of skirt, it is original of the zone of the Bolivian yungas, Where there were living original slaves of Africa, of there the Afro - Bolivian pace that has given origin to the dance Chief. All the Afro-American paces are similar enough, since they have the same origin, in merger with the Spanish music, but in sudamérica, is added the music of the original peoples, with his Andean instruments. Well, I hope that already there are no any more doubts. My email is cecilia_rojas1@yahoo.com.ar.
    From the source identitied as "a todos" (to all) above.
    -Joe Offer, Forum Moderator-


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,acerca de la versión "cubana"
Date: 26 Oct 10 - 02:09 AM

LA VERSION CUBANA ES SUCU-SUCO, Y ES MUCHO MÃ쳌S RÃ쳌PIDA QUE EL SUCU-SUCU ORIGINAL. NO HAY CANCIONES DE ESTE RITMO REGISTRADOS EN CUBA SINO HASTA ENTRADA LA DECADA DEL 60. LA MUSIC�"LOGA QUE HA "INVESTIGADO EL TEMA" SE HA LLEVADO POR COMENTARIOS DE ANCIANOS Y MEMORIOSOS,LO CUAL ES MUY IMPORTANTE, PERO LO QUE NO HA TOMADO EN CUENTA ES EL RITMO ORIGINAL.HA EDITADO LIBROS Y EXPUESTO EN CONGRESOS, PARA MOSTRAR SU "DESCUBRIMIENTO" PERO LO REAL ES QUE NO HAY REGISTRADAS LEGALMENTE NINGUNA OBRA, ANTES DEL SUCU-SUCU DEL TARATE�'O ROJAS, QUE FUE ESCRITA EN LA DECADA DEL 40 EN ARGENTINA Y REGISTRADA DESPUÉS CON SUS DERECHOS DE AUTOR.
MI PADRE, NUNCA VIAJ�" A CUBA, CUANDO ESCRIBI�" EL SUCU SUCU, FUE A INICIOS DE LA DÉCADA DEL 40, CUANDO ESTABA VIAJANDO HACIA BUENOS AIRES DESDE BOLIVIA Y EMPEZ�" A COMPONER AL RITMO DE LA CADENCIA DEL TREN, POR ESO LO LLAM�" SUCU-SUCU. LA LETRA DICE "EL VAIVÉN DEL SUCU SUCU..." REFIRIÉNDOSE AL VAIVEN DEL TREN. Y COMO SE DIRIGÃ쳌A A BUENOS AIRES, DECÃ쳌A "SE ESTÃ쳌 PONIENDO DE MODA, EN TODA LA CAPITAL, EN CAPITAL FEDERAL..." CON RESPECTO AL RITMO YA LO HE ACLARADO. POR ÚLTIMO, TAMBIÉN DESEO REITERAR QUE EL SUCU SUCU DEL TARATE�'O ROJAS ES BOLIVIANO, COMO EL CAPORAL. GRACIAS.
    From the source identitied as "a todos" (to all) above.
    -Joe Offer, Forum Moderator-
Here's a Babelfish-esque translation: THE CUBAN VERSION IS SUCU-SUCO, AND IS MUCH MORE FAST THAT THE ORIGINAL SUCU-SUCU. THERE ARE SONGS OF THIS RATE NO REGISTERED IN CUBA BUT UNTIL ENTRANCE THE DECADE OF THE 60. The MUSIC�" LOGA THAT IS " INVESTIGATED the TEMA" ONE HAS TAKEN BY COMMENTARIES OF OLD AND MEMORIOSOS, WHICH IS VERY IMPORTANT, BUT WHAT IT HAS NOT TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT IS PUBLISHED BOOKS AND SET OUT RATE ORIGINAL.HA IN CONGRESSES, TO SHOW HIS " DESCUBRIMIENTO" BUT THE REAL THING IS THAT IT DOES NOT HAVE REGISTERED ANY WORK LEGALLY, BEFORE THE SUCU-SUCU OF THE TARATE�' OR RED, THAT WAS WRITTEN IN THE DECADE OF THE 40 IN ARGENTINA AND REGISTERED LATER WITH ITS RIGHTS OF AUTHOR. MY FATHER, NEVER VIAJ�" TO CUBA, WHEN ESCRIBI�" SUCU SUCU, WENT AT BEGINNINGS OF the DECADE OF the 40, WHEN IT WAS TRAVELING TOWARDS BUENOS AIRES FROM BOLIVIA and EMPEZ�" TO COMPOSE TO the RATE OF the CADENCE OF the TRAIN, FOR THAT REASON the LLAM�" SUCU-SUCU. THE LETTER SAYS " THE SWING OF SUCU SUCU… " TALKING ABOUT TO THE SWING OF THE TRAIN. AND AS ONE WENT TO BUENOS AIRES, IT SAID " IT IS BEING PUT FASHIONABLE, IN ALL THE CAPITAL, FEDERAL CAPITAL… " WITH RESPECT TO THE RATE I HAVE CLARIFIED ALREADY IT. FINALLY, ALSO DESIRE TO REITERATE THAT SUCU SUCU OF THE TARATE�' OR RED HE IS BOLIVIAN, LIKE THE FARM MANAGER. THANKS.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST
Date: 08 Aug 11 - 02:47 AM

Como siempre,robándole a los cubanos el producto de su incomparable talento musical que ha sido inspiración del mundo. Pueden hacer cuantas conjeturas quieran, pero no admite discusión que el Sucu Sucu nació en Isla de Pinos incluso antes de que se conociera. Como era una variante del son que se tocaba localmente, no habia llegado a ciertos estratos hasta que EG grabó su famoso "Felipe Blanco" que dió la vuelta al mundo conjuntamente con otro casi tan famoso titulado "Domingo Pantoja". Repito, pueden conjeturar y desinformar cuanto quieran pero todos los historiadores y musicólogos serios coinciden en que el Sucu Sucu es otra creación de ese pueblo increiblemente musical que es el cubano y el cual espero conocer antes de morir.
    BabelFish translation:
    As always, robbing to him to Cuban the product of its incomparable musical talent that it has been inspiration of the world. They can make whichever conjectures want, but it does not admit discussion that the Sucu Sucu was even born in Island of Pines before it was known. As it were a variant of is that it was touched locally, not habia arrived at certain layers until EG recorded their famous “White Felipe” who jointly gave to the return to the world with another one almost so famous titleholder “Domingo Pantoja”. I repeat, they can conjecture and to disinform whatever they want but all the serious historians and musicologists agree in which the Sucu Sucu is another creation of that incredibly musical town that he is the Cuban and which I hope to know before dying.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: michaelr
Date: 08 Aug 11 - 06:50 PM

Google translate does a slightly better job:

As always, stealing the Cubans the product of his unique musical talent that has inspired the world. They can make as many guesses you want, but can not be disputed that the Sucu Sucu the Isle of Pines was born even before they knew. Since it was a variant of which are played locally, had not reached certain strata until EG recorded his famous "Felipe Blanco" that went around the world together with another almost as famous titled "Domingo Pantoja". Again, can speculate all they want and misinform but all serious historians and musicologists agree that the Sucu Sucu is another creation of this incredible village that is Cuban music and which I hope to meet before I die.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,PM
Date: 20 Aug 11 - 04:20 PM

Sucu sucu is also included in the Hindu film "Jungli" 1961


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,Cecilia Rojas
Date: 28 Jul 17 - 01:57 AM

Estimados amigos. Soy la hija del Tarateño Rojas, cantante y compositor fallecido en Bueno Aires, Argentina, el 7/8/2001, autor y compositor del SUCU-SUCU.
Mi padre era de nacionalidad boliviana, nacido en Tarata, Cochabamba, el 4/1/1917. De muy joven emigró a la Argentina, en 1938/9 después de la guerra del Chaco. La familia de mi padre había sufrido dramáticas consecuencias de la guerra y mi abuela le rogó a mi padre que viniera a Buenos Aires Argentina, en busca de mejores horizontes. En el viaje, a Buenos Aires, como tantos inmigrantes bolivianos, subió a un tren de cargas. Durante días escuchó el ritmo del tren, que lo inspiró en el ritmo del SUCU SUCU.Su talento y amor a la música de su tierra, le dieron el sabor necesario para que se convirtiera en un clásico de la música y ritmo popular, 100% boliviano, y que registrara en SADAIC EN LA DÉCADA DEL 50 y que fuera llevada a Europa por Alberto Cortez a principios de los '60. Ya que su ritmo inicial fué el Taquirari. Y después con la aparición del CAPORAL, la Universidad Nacional de San Simón, lo incorporó como canción "emblema", ya que inicia su pasada en los carnavales,con esta canción. El ritmo cubano, no tiene nada que ver con el boliviano, y se denomina "SUCO" como deformación de la palabra "sueco", sandalia de madera que usaban los esclavos y que al caminar por los pisos de madera, hacían un sonido característico. No obstante, tanto el "TAQUIRARI",el "CAPORAL" como el "SUCO" son danzas con origen "afro", que le dan esa cadencia distintiva. Saludos a todos.

Dear Friends. I am the daughter of Tarateño Rojas, singer and composer who died in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 7/8/2001, author and composer of SUCU-SUCU.
My father was of Bolivian nationality, born in Tarata, Cochabamba, on 4/1/1917. Of very young emigrated to Argentina, in 1938/9 after the war of the Chaco. My father's family had suffered dramatic consequences from the war, and my grandmother begged my father to come to Buenos Aires, Argentina, in search of better horizons. On the way to Buenos Aires, like so many Bolivian immigrants, he got on a freight train. For days he listened to the rhythm of the train, which inspired him in the rhythm of SUCU SUCU. His talent and love of the music of his land, gave him the necessary flavor to turn it into a classic music and popular rhythm, 100% Bolivian, and to register in SADAIC IN THE DECADE OF 50 and that it was taken to Europe by Alberto Cortez in the early '60s. Since its initial rhythm was the Taquirari. And then with the appearance of CAPORAL, the National University of San Simón, incorporated it as a song "emblem", since it begins its past in the carnivals, with this song. The Cuban rhythm has nothing to do with the Bolivian, and is called "SUCO" as a deformation of the word "Swedish", a wooden sandal that slaves used to make a characteristic sound when walking on wooden floors. However, both "TAQUIRARI", "CAPORAL" and "SUCO" are dances with "afro" origin, which give it that distinctive cadence. Greetings to all.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jul 17 - 02:06 AM

Thank you very much for that information, Cecelia. It's a great song.
-Joe Offer, Mudcat Music Editor-


Here's a recording by Alberto Cortez: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ll7aUp0nkA8

And by Nina & Frederik; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFyT_s-eohw


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,Cecilia Rojas
Date: 28 Jul 17 - 02:07 AM

Todos los años desde 2004, realizamos en Avellaneda, Buenos Aires, un FESTIVAL HOMENAJE AL TARATEÑO ROJAS EN EL TEATRO ROMA, que ha sido declarado "Dia de confraternidad argentino-boliviana en Avellaneda" Lo realizamos durante el mes de Agosto/Septiembre. Donde participan grupos de danzas y música folklórica. Si están por Buenos Aires por esos meses, los invitamos.

Every year since 2004, we have held in Avellaneda, Buenos Aires, a FESTIVAL TRIBUTE TO TARATEÑO ROJAS IN THE THEATER ROME, which has been declared "Argentina-Bolivian fraternity day in Avellaneda" We performed during the month of August / September. Where groups of dances and folk music take part. If you are in Buenos Aires for those months, we invite you.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Sucu Sucu
From: GUEST,Cecilia Rojas
Date: 28 Jul 17 - 02:27 AM

Gracias por tus palabras Joe Offer. El Sucu Sucu, es una canción muy alegre, fácil de recordar y con muy buen ritmo, después de tantos años, cuando la interpretan, todos la cantan. Increíble.


Thank you for your words Joe Offer. Sucu Sucu, is a very joyful song, easy to remember and with a very good rhythm, after so many years, when they interpret it, all they sing it. Amazing.


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