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Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)

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California Bloomer (3)


Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Apr 09 - 04:43 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Apr 09 - 05:17 PM
Jim Dixon 08 Apr 09 - 10:02 PM
catspaw49 08 Apr 09 - 10:34 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 09 Apr 09 - 01:08 AM
Jim Dixon 09 Apr 09 - 05:11 PM
Rex 09 Apr 09 - 10:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Apr 09 - 09:50 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Apr 09 - 10:17 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Apr 09 - 10:36 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 10 Apr 09 - 11:13 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Apr 09 - 12:49 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 11 Apr 09 - 05:56 PM
Rex 28 Apr 09 - 06:41 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Apr 09 - 09:07 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 29 Apr 09 - 11:51 AM
Rex 30 Apr 09 - 01:38 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 30 Apr 09 - 02:55 PM
Rex 04 May 09 - 02:57 PM
Rex 04 May 09 - 03:03 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 May 09 - 03:37 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Apr 09 - 04:43 PM

MISS LUCY LONG
No composer cited, 1842

1
Oh I jist come out afore you,
To sing a little song
I plays it on de banjo
And dey calls it Lucy Long.

Cho.
Oh! take your time Miss Lucy
Take your time Miss Lucy Long
Oh! take your time Miss Lucy,
Take your time Miss Lucy Long.

2
Miss Lucy she is handsome
And Miss Lucy she is tall,
To see her dance Cachucha
Is death to Niggers all.
3
Oh Miss Lucy's teeth is grinning
Just like an ear ob corn,
And her eyes dey look so winning!
Oh would I'd ne'er been born.
4
I axed her for to marry
Myself de toder day,
She said she'd rather tarry
So I let her habe her way.
5
If she makes a scolding wife
As sure as she was born,
I'd tote her down to Georgia
And trade her off for Corn.

George Willig, Philadelphia, 1842.
Sheet music at The Detroit Public Library, the E. Azalia Hackley Collection, 19th and 20th Century Sheet Music of Negro Themes.
http://www.thehackley.org/gsdl/cgi-bin/library?p=about&c=dplhacsm
then use Titles button.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Apr 09 - 05:17 PM

This minstrel song is mentioned in chanteys and was revised in presentations by several minstrel groups. It has persisted in folk use, and was collected in the John and Ruby Lomax 1939 Southern States Recording Trip (collected in Texas, recording at American Memory).
Lucy Long is included in the Fiddlers Companion.
Fiddlers Companion


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 08 Apr 09 - 10:02 PM

Q: I'm grateful that you brought a web site to my attention that I hadn't known about before—The E. Azalia Hackley Collection—but when I go there and search for the song you have supplied, I can't find it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: catspaw49
Date: 08 Apr 09 - 10:34 PM

LOL......This little tune is known by many bassoonists. The Godfrey version of tune with vaiants is an extremely well known solo piece that can really highlight the instrument and the performer (for good or bad).

**Ahem** I did this as high school senior featured with our concert band. Somewhere there is a wax recording of it too! Probably the only copy left would be with my band director at the time who recorded every concert and sold each to loving parents.....

Spaw


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 09 Apr 09 - 01:08 AM

Lighter, the Hackley Collection site has a photograph of the cover of the sheet music, but they don't show the rest of it.
Most frustrating. I haven't checked other collections to see if they have the contents.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 09 Apr 09 - 05:11 PM

I have surveyed all the versions I could find on the Internet. Here is a summary:

Variations I found in the verses posted above:
    Title: LUCY LONG
    CHORUS line 4: Oh, Lucy, Lucy Long
    Verse 4 line 2: She hadn't much to say
    Verse 5 line 1: If I had...
    Verse 5 line 2: I'd whip her sure your (sic) born
    Verse 5 line 3: I'd take her down to New Orleans
Additional verses found in a broadsheet at Library of Congress:
    I took Miss Lucy walking, I did not mind expense,
    I bought her dat ere parasol, it cost me eighteen pence.

    Miss Lucy, when she trabbels, she always leaves de mark
    Ob her footsteps in de gravel, you can see dem in de dark.

    The world was made in six days, an' 'twas built up very strong,
    But I guess it took de sebenth, to finish Lucy Long.

    Lucy cuts de widgeon ping, and dances fancy reels,
    Fust time I eber seen her, I cotch'd her skinnin' eels.
An additional verse found somewhere else: (I lost the citation!)
    My mamma's got de tisic and my daddy got de gout.
    Good morning, Mister Phisick. Does your mother know you're out?
Sheet music can be found online at:


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Rex
Date: 09 Apr 09 - 10:45 PM

A most worthwhile study here. I thank you gentlemen. These 1840s pieces are hard to track down and I had little material to this title. Much obliged,

Rex


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Subject: Lucy Long (in Randolph)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Apr 09 - 09:50 PM


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Lucy Long 2
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Apr 09 - 10:17 PM

Lyr. Add: LUCY LONG

1
One night when the moon was beaming,
I strayed with my Lucy Long,
The beautiful stars were beaming
and the night bird sang his song,
We wandered by the brookside
where we never had wandered before,
And listened to the gurgling waters,
and the notes on the pebbled shore.
The silver shining moon,
Guide Ephraim on his way,
O soon, you see, we'll married be,
And oh, what a happy day.
2
The nighthawk sang his soft ha-ha,
and the owl sat in the tree,
And the whippoorwills were watching
around my love and me.
We wandered by the brookside,
where we never had wandered before,
And listened to the gurgling waters
and the notes on the pebbled shore.
3
I asked her if she'd marry me,
a blush came o'er her cheek,
Her heart it palpitated,
and my Lucy could not speak.
At last she whispered in my ear
and said she'd marry me soon,
I kissed away the dewy tears
as they danced by the light of the moon.

Collected in Arkansas; the singers said they learned it about 1892.
Randolph said that there is a minstrel dialect piece, "Oh Silber Shining Moon," in a song sheet printed by Andrews NY in the Los Angeles Public Library.
No. 780, 295-296, Vance Randolph, "Ozark Folksongs," vol. 4; 1980 ed.

"Oh Silber Shining Moon" songsheet is also at American Memory. It follows in the next post.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Oh! Silber Shining Moon
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Apr 09 - 10:36 PM

Lyr. Add: OH! SILBER SHINING MOON

1
Last night when the moon was beaming,
I strolled wid my Lucy lub,
De flowers were sleeping around us,
An' de stars were shining above.
We walked along by the brook side,
Where I nebber wandered before,
An' we heard de waters gurgling
Dar notes by de pebbled shore.

Chorus:
Oh! silber shining moon,
Guide Ephram on his way,
An' soon you'll see, he'll married be,
Oh! what a happy day.

2
De night hawk had sung his song,
De owl sang in de tree,
De whippoorwills dey were waltzing,
Around my gal an' me.
I axed her if she would hab me,
A blush came o'er her cheek,
Her heart it palpitated,
But Lucy could not speak.

Chorus

3
I took her in my arms,
An' tried to make her speak,
De tears as pure as drops ob dew,
Roll'd down her sable cheek.
At length she whispered in my ear
An' said she would hab me soon,
I kiss'd away de dewy tears,
An' danced by de light ob de moon.

J. Andrews, NY, Printer of songs, etc.
American Memory; American Songs and Ballads.

I would not be surprised if this also is found as sheet music, perhaps without the dialect.

No relation to "Lucy Long," but a simple change from "Lucy Lub," and it appears in Randolph under the name "Lucy Long."


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Take Your Time Miss Lucy (1842)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 10 Apr 09 - 11:13 PM

Lyr. Add: TAKE YOUR TIME MISS LUCY
Words by A. Allan, Melody by George Loder, 1842

1
When young my heart was bent, sir,
Upon a nice young beau,
So to my ma I went, sir,
And she reprov'd me so.
"Indeed, my dear, you're joking,
You're still too young you know,
So take your time Miss Lucy,
Miss Lucy, Lucy, oh!
So take your time Miss Lucy,
Miss Lucy. Lucy oh!"

2
But not content with that, sir,
To father I did go;
But he my head did pat, sir,
And plumply answer'd, "No!
There's time enough for Lovers,
So don't impatient grow,
Just take your time Miss Lucy,
Miss Lucy, Lucy, oh!
Just take your time Miss Lucy,
Miss Lucy, Lucy, oh!"

3
And now I'm sent to you, sir,
I thought I had a beau-
Like them you snub me too, sir,
And tell me "'tis no go;"
The burthen will be ever,
"Till I an old maid grow."
"Oh! take your time, Miss Lucy," &c.

A comic ballad as sung ... at Mitchell's Olympic Theatre by Miss Taylor...
Atwill, NY, 1842

Published in 1842, the same date as the minstrel song, "Miss Lucy Long."
This could be the origin of the Lucy Long minstrel tunes, some verses of sea chanteys, etc. The 'take your time' chorus is used in the Willig 1842 printing of "Miss Lucy Long." It also explains why the "Miss Lucy Long" printing by Willig is not credited to a composer.

http://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/levy-cgi/display.cgi?id=050.085.000;pages=4;range=0-3


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Apr 09 - 12:49 PM

Lyr. Add: LUCY LONG
London printing, 1844

Oh now I come before you,
To sing a little song
And play the tum tum Bango (sic)
Bout lubly Lucy Long.

Oh none's so fair as Lucy,
Dat sweet Miss Lucy Long.
Oh none's so fair as Lucy,
Dat Lucy, Miss Lucy Long.
2
Miss Lucy's berry saucy,
When'eer I talk ob lub-
You'd tink her eyes were comets-
Dey're as big as a washing tub.
Oh none's so fair, etc.
3
Her face, all black and shiny,
Is smooth as the skins ob soles;
Her figure is so charming,
Just like a great sack ob coals.
Oh none's so fair, etc.
4
When last she went a dancing
She trod the floor so light
Dat all de Niggers jump up
And run off in a fright.
Oh none's, etc.
5
And when dat we are married,
As sure as she was born,
If she turn out a wixen,
I'll trade her away for corn,
And nebber again see Lucy,
Dat Lucy, Miss Lucy Long.

1844, London, "Musical Bouquet" No. 82, p. 136. Office: 192 High Holborn. K. J. Allan, 20 Warwick Lane, Paternoster Row.

John Hopkins Collection, American Memory. https://jscholarship.library.jhu.edu ... Not included in the "Music" link at American Memory.
Another version to add to the post by Jim Dixon.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 11 Apr 09 - 05:56 PM

George Loder (1816-1868), composer of the music to "Take Your Time, Miss Lucy," was director of the Olympic Theatre, NY.
In 1840, he staged "The Cat's in the Larder."

In 1842, he was a founding member of the New York Philharmonic, and conducted the American premiere of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony in 1846.
In 1843, he compiled "The New York Glee Book" in 1843 for the NY Vocal Institute and in 1857 compiled the "Philadelphia and New York Glee Book." He also conducted in Australia.

The Marshall Collection.
http://parlorsongs.com/issues/2009-3/thismonth/feature.php


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Rex
Date: 28 Apr 09 - 06:41 PM

Q, I applaud your efforts. And your sources. I wonder now, if you are familier with Dan Emmett's "Machine Poetry"? I have found but one example of it. After seeing the above, perhaps you are the one to ask.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Apr 09 - 09:07 PM

You've got me there. Could you post it, or summarize it?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 29 Apr 09 - 11:51 AM

refresh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Rex
Date: 30 Apr 09 - 01:38 PM

Very well, here is what I have for Dan Emmett's "Machine Poetry". This is almost worthy of another thread but I don't think this will carry far. I've heard references to more of this kind of poetry by Emmett but it all ends up being this one song. Adios, Rex

------------------------------------------------------------------

Machine Poetry. - Oh, Ladies All!
from Phil Rice's Banjo Instructor, 1858,
Sung by Swain Buckley. Composed by Dan Emmett
(likely written in the 40s)

I went from here to Baltimore,
De long tail blue an coat what I had on,
I lay my head agin de door,
My heel work a hole right thro' de carpet.
O ladies all! Ah, ah! my dear honey!

Eighteen pounds in de corner ob de fence,
Lynchburg gals hant got no larning,
I danc'd all night wid Fanny on de fence,
Until I run my head against a post.
O ...

Wid Fanny B. I fell in lub.
But darn my skin she gib me de sack,
When Fanny me began to snub,
I felt as tho' I'd been struck wid a hot tater.
(Dis nigger felt as though he'd...)
O ...

My heart was broke, I like to died,
I stuck me head into a pint of water,
To drown myself it was my pride,
When Fanny step'd up and ask'd me in to take a chowder.
O ...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 30 Apr 09 - 02:55 PM

Machine Poetry-
"The following may not apply," as one disclaimer has it.

The song "Oh Ladies All" seems to be a legimate minstrel song, perhaps inspired by the published non-dialect song, "Oh Gentle Ladies All!," 1849, words by Fitzgerald and music by James Bellak (sheet music at American Memory), http://memory.loc.gov/music/sm2/sm1849/461310/002.gif

There is a poem, "Machine Poetry," about sitting down, turning the crank and grinding out poems with no meaning. Did Emmett make a remark about this, or did someone say it about his rhymes?
I can't find the phrase with relation to Emmett specifically.

Here are the first two verses of the poem "Machine Poetry," by Ellen P. Allerton (pub. 1896):

MACHINE POETRY

I sit me down to make a batch of rhymes;
I've nothing in particular to say;
'Tis just to turn a crank and count the times-
Such poetry is ground out every day.
2
The papers teem with it, why shouldn't I
Help swell this tone that current poets sing?
'Tis neither soft and sweet, not grand and high,
And has no meaning- just an empty ring.

Machine Poetry

Seems to apply to much of minstrel and tin pan alley rhymes!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Rex
Date: 04 May 09 - 02:57 PM

Just a reminder that "Machine Poetry.--Oh Ladies All!" is found in Phil Rice's banjo instructor, published 1858. This predates Ms. Allerton's verses. Another titled simply, "Machine Poetry" by no less than Frank Converse, also appears the 1858 instructor. I have found no such "Machine Poetry" in any other 1800s banjo instructors. This version has no chorus. There is a melody line that accompanies the verses through the fourth line. The fifth line has but one note assigned to it suggesting that it is spooled out with no particular beat, just a run-on note. Below are the words as they appear in the instructor, more or less. If you wish to make some sense of it, replicas of the instructor should still be available through Elderly Instruments of Lansing, MI or found through Interlibrary loan. Adios, Rex
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Machine Poetry - Arranged by F. B. Converse
from Phil Rice's Banjo Instructor, 1858

De way dey bake de hoe cake,
Virginny neber tire,
Slap de cake upon de foot,
And stick em in de--stove-pipe
and keep it dere till it's done brown.

De monkey climbed a tree,
   When he got to the top
He says to himself,
I guess I'd better--turn
right round and come down agin.

Wake up skillet tar on de heel,
Tar on de heel,
Go away colored man,
Or I'll skin you like--one of
dem long slickery fish dat looks like
      a black snake

Nigga cotched a woodchuck,
He eat him in a minute,
He eat him up so quick,
Dat he didn't have time to--take
      de hide of de animile.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Rex
Date: 04 May 09 - 03:03 PM

Ahem, the correct title for the instructor is:
Phil. Rice's Correct Method for The Banjo: With or Without a Master. Reproduced by Tuckahoe Music, 1998.

Rex


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Miss Lucy Long (minstrel)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 May 09 - 03:37 PM

I did not mean to imply that 'machine poetry' originated with Ellen Allerton; her poem expressed what the term means to me. It is, of course, much older, but who or where the term was first applied I don't know.

William Cowper (1731-1800) said Pope "Made poetry a mere mechanic art," which expresses the same idea.


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