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Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'

Wild Goose 05 May 09 - 01:29 PM
Michael Harrison 05 May 09 - 03:00 PM
The Borchester Echo 05 May 09 - 03:07 PM
Herga Kitty 05 May 09 - 05:30 PM
The Borchester Echo 05 May 09 - 06:36 PM
Dave the Gnome 05 May 09 - 07:13 PM
Jim Dixon 21 May 09 - 12:07 AM
GUEST,GUEST - Old Rugface 21 May 09 - 09:37 AM
GUEST,old rugface 21 May 09 - 09:52 AM
Steve Gardham 21 May 09 - 12:58 PM
Phil Edwards 21 May 09 - 01:41 PM
Jim Dixon 22 May 09 - 02:19 PM
Jim Dixon 22 May 09 - 02:29 PM
Rowan 23 May 09 - 02:43 AM
Wild Goose 28 May 09 - 12:36 PM
Jim Dixon 29 May 09 - 02:33 PM
Jim Dixon 29 May 09 - 02:42 PM
Jim Dixon 30 May 09 - 04:37 PM
Jim Dixon 30 May 09 - 05:22 PM
GUEST,Marty Williams 03 Dec 10 - 04:58 AM
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Subject: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: Wild Goose
Date: 05 May 09 - 01:29 PM

I've been looking for the words to a hunting song I used to sing the chorus to years ago but nobody I know now remembers the song. It was a cracking song. Parts of the chorus I remember are:

With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy jan
All over the merry merry downs I ran (my man?)
With the oogle oogle oogle of the bugle horn
............................

I remember the tune, or most of it, quite well but I can't read or write music. If anyone can help I would be very grateful.


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Subject: RE: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: Michael Harrison
Date: 05 May 09 - 03:00 PM

Find a web-site for Gail Davies. She wrote a really fine song about her grandmother,...ah,..."Mrs. Whitten," or something like that and in the song she has a bit of nonsense much like what you printed above. If you can email her at her site she may be able to expand on yours, verify it, etc. It's worth a shot, though - never know what might come of it. Cheers,......................mwh


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Subject: RE: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 05 May 09 - 03:07 PM

Three Jolly Huntsmen


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Subject: RE: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: Herga Kitty
Date: 05 May 09 - 05:30 PM

I once sang this at the Four Fools festival (in Redditch) and Les Barker said it was silly.....

I've also heard it sung with an extra verse - something like, Bold Reynard wasn't there at all, it was only our old tom cat upon the garden wall.

Kitty


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Subject: RE: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: The Borchester Echo
Date: 05 May 09 - 06:36 PM

Yes, the lyrics are very silly, though no more so than However Many Nights Drunk or Who's The Fool Now?
Fab tune though.


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Subject: RE: With my ran tan tan and my jimmy jimmy..
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 05 May 09 - 07:13 PM

Mondegreen alert - After I sang this someone asked where the Scottish accorianist fitted in

With a ran-tan-tan and a Jimmy, Jimmy Shand...

:D (eG)


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE JOVIAL SPORTSMEN (Isle of Wight)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:07 AM

From A Dictionary of the Isle of Wight Dialect by William Henry Long (London: Reeves & Turner, 1886):


THE JOVIAL SPORTSMEN.

1. There was zome jolly sportsmen
Went out to hunt a fox,
And where d'ye think they vound him ?
Among the hills and rocks.

CHORUS: With my whoop, whoop, whoop, and my halloa!
All in this merry train;
With my ran, tan, tan, and my tivy, tivy, twang;
Right droo the woods we'll ride, brave bwoys,
Right droo the woods we'll ride.

2. The vust we met was a ploughman,
A ploughen of his land;
He swore he zid bold Kenyard
Run by on his right hand.

3. The next we met was a miller,
A peepen out o' his mill;
He swore he zid bold Renyard
Run up the yonder hill.

4. The next we met was a blind man,
As blind as he could be;
He swore he zid bold Renyard
Run up a hollow tree.

5. The next we met was a paason,
Clad in his mournen black;
He swore he zid bold Renyard
Run up the huntsman's back.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: GUEST,GUEST - Old Rugface
Date: 21 May 09 - 09:37 AM

Can't remember any verses; can't remember the song's title, BUT the chorous ? You don't forget that one in a hurry ! (As sung at the Nottingham


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: GUEST,old rugface
Date: 21 May 09 - 09:52 AM

what happened to the rest of the above post ?

(As sung at the Nottingham Tradtional Music Club, circa 1972)
With a hip-hip-hip and a holler
away went the merry-merry band.
With a ran-tan-tan and a chivvy-chivvy chan
all over the merry-merry strand.
With me oogle-oogle-oogle on the bugle horn,
fol-de-rol, fol-de-rol fol-de-riddle day
and through the woods we'll go brave boys
and through the woods we'll go.

verses were just two lines I seem to remember.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:58 PM

Whilst going through some 18th century garlands in the BL recently I came across a version printed by S Harward of Tewkesbury. First line 'There was three jovial Welshmen'

Chorus runs
With a hoop, hoop, come along brave boys,
This is brave news, the huntsman cries,
With my twivy, twivy twing,
Over the downs we'll ride brave boys,
Over the downs we'll ride.

I'd say it was printed about 1760 looking at the style of garland.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 21 May 09 - 01:41 PM

With a hip-hip-hip and a holler
away went the merry-merry band.
With a ran-tan-tan and a chivvy-chivvy chan
all over the merry-merry strand.
With me oogle-oogle-oogle on the bugle horn,
fol-de-rol, fol-de-rol fol-de-riddle day
and through the woods we'll go brave boys
and through the woods we'll go.

As sung at the Nottingham Tradtional Music Club, circa 1972)


And by Alan Grace at the Beech, just the other week. He lost most of us at oogle-oogle-oogle, but we got back for the last two lines. Very fine stuff.


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Subject: Lyr Add: COME, ALL YE MERRY HUNTERS
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 May 09 - 02:19 PM

From an article "The Transmission of Folk-Song" by Phillips Barry, in The Journal Of American Folk-Lore, Vol XXVII, 1914, page 71:

COME, ALL YE MERRY HUNTERS.

1. Come, all ye merry hunters who love to chase the fox,
Who love to chase Bull Reynard among the hills and rocks!

CHORUS: Then a ho ho ho, and a hi lo, along the merry stream,
Tay tay tay and a ti ti ti, and away to the rocky bow wow wow,
A yank fi fiddle and a bugle-horn,
Through the woods we'll run, brave boys, and through the woods we'll run!

2. The first they saw was a teamster a-loading up his team,
He said he saw Bull Reynard go floating up the stream.

3. The next they saw was a blind man, as blind as he could be,
He said he saw Bull Reynard run up a hollow tree.

4. The next they saw was a hunter a-winding up his horn,
He said he saw Bull Reynard run . . . through the corn.

5. The next they saw was a little boy a-feeding of his sheep,
He said he saw Bull Reynard as he lay fast asleep.

6. The next they saw was a little girl a-combing out her locks,
She said she saw Bull Reynard run through her flock of ducks.

7. The next that came was a shepherd herding of his sheep,
He said he saw Bull Reynard as he lay fast asleep.

8. The next they saw was a little boy walking down the road,
He said he saw Bull Reynard eating up a toad.

Text not available
The journal of American folk-lore By American Folklore Society


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Subject: Lyr Add: THREE JOVIAL HUNTSMEN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 22 May 09 - 02:29 PM

From The poetry of sport by Hedley Peek (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1901), page 155:


THREE JOVIAL HUNTSMEN

1. There were three jovial huntsmen. A hunting they would go,
To see whether they'd find sly Reynard, Among the woods and groves.

CHORUS: With a hoop, hoop, hoop, and a hallow,
All in this merry train,
To my ran tan too, to my chevy, chevy chase,
Away to the royal bar,
With my ugle, ugle, ugle, and the blast of the bugle horn.
To my ri fal de ra, to my diddle don,
And it's through the woods we'll run, brave boys.

2. The first was an old woman, A combing down her locks,
She said she saw bold Reynard Among the geese and ducks. Chorus.

3. The next was a miller, A grinding in his mill,
He said he saw bold Reynard, Approaching yonder hill.

4. The next it was a blind man, As blind as blind could be,
He said he heard bold Reynard Running up yonder tree.

5. The next it was a Parson, He was dressed in black,
He said he saw bold Reynard Tied to the huntsman's back.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...
From: Rowan
Date: 23 May 09 - 02:43 AM

When Pageant sang it we reckoned the ugle ugle ugle was best accompanied by an electric jug on the boil.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: Wild Goose
Date: 28 May 09 - 12:36 PM

Many thanks for the replies I wasn't sure I would get any. The song I heard was obviously a version of these songs. I think I will be able to piece together something that will work quite well.

I know it is a bit of a silly song in some ways but I think the playfulness is at the heart of much traditional dance and song. I used to enjoy it a lot. Joy in words and sounds is deep inside. Thanks.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 May 09 - 02:33 PM

From a column called "The Literary Querist" edited by Rossiter Johnson, in The Book Buyer: A Summary of American and Foreign Literature, Volume XI [New Series], February 1894-January 1895 (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1894), page 399:
    831.—For a considerable time I have tried to ascertain, from many sources, from what song the following is taken. I am told it was sung in the nursery forty years ago. Music-dealers fail to give light on the subject. Can some of your readers aid me?

    "There once was a bold sportsman
    Who loved to hunt the fox;
    He loved to chase bold Reynard
    Among the hills and rocks.
    With a hoot, hoot, hoot, and a holloa.
    All in a merry strain:
    With a ram-tam-tam, and a tivy-tivy-tam.
    And away to the Royal Dover.
    Ri-tu-ra-lu goes the bugle horn.
    Ri-fol-a-rol-a-rol-a-tidy-i-de-um:
    Through the woods we roam, brave boys,
    Through the woods we roam."

    C. Е. P.
And from a later issue in the same volume of the same magazine (page 514):
    ANSWERS.

    831.—I know a fox-hunting song that I sometimes sing when I can get people to listen to me. I learned it of an Englishman who brought it from Cornwall fifty years ago. The words differ somewhat from those given by "C. E. P." I quote the first verse and the chorus. Words and music make the most soul-stirring chorus I ever heard. I shall he glad to furnish them to "C. E. P."

    "Come all ye merry sportsmen
    Who love to hunt the fox,
    Who love to chase bold Reynard
    Among the hills and rocks!
    Come a-whoop, come a-whoop, come a-hilo,
    Along the merry lane,
    With a rap-tap-tap and a rip-a-tip-tip
    And hurrah, boys, with a bow-wow-wow!
    And a roodle-doodle-do goes the bugle horn,
    Sing fee-fi-fiddle-di-i-di-aye;
    And through the woods we'll run, brave boys,
    And through the woods we'll run."

    W. O. F.


    I am familiar with a song that appears to be of German origin, though it is the same in substance as the English one referred to. I never have seen it in print. This is it:

    "O the first who saw him was a farm maid,
    A-counting out her flock;
    She said she saw Beau Reynard
    Among her geese and duck.

    With a hoop, hoop, hoop, and a heigh O,
    Along the narrow straat,
    Rat, tat, tat, and a tippe, tippe tap,
    With a bow, wow, wow,
    Cum a hoodle, doodle, doo,
    And a bugle sound,
    As thro' the woods he ran, brave boys,
    As through the woods he ran.

    The next who saw him was a teamster
    A-coming with his team;
    He said he saw Beau Reynard
    A-crossing of the stream.

    The last who saw him was a gunner,
    A-coming with his gun;
    He said he saw Beau Reynard
    And shot him as he run."

    H. E. C.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 29 May 09 - 02:42 PM

I should point out that this song has been assigned number 796 in the Roud Folksong Index, and the website of the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library lists some 46 versions.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE RANGER (trad. W. Va.)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 May 09 - 04:37 PM

From Folk-songs of the South By John Harrington Cox (Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1925), page 476:

THE RANGER

"RANGER" is a corruption of "Reynard." Barry (Journal, XXVII, 71) prints a Massachusetts text (as well as two stanzas from Kansas), which begins:
    Come, all ye merry hunters who love to chase the fox,
    Who love to chase Bull* Reynard among the hills and rocks. [* For Bold
Baring-Gould (A Book of Nursery Songs and Rhymes, p. 7) prints a version beginning:
    There were three jovial Welshmen; they would go hunt a fox.
    They swore they saw sly Reynard run over yonder rocks.
See also Alfred Williams, Folk-Songs of the Upper Thames, p. 67.

Communicated by Miss Emma Boughner, Morgantown, Monongalia County, 1917; obtained from Miss Jane Carle, Parkersburg, Wood County, who said it was crooned to her by a Dutch nurse. Title supplied.


1. The first I saw was a maiden, a-combing of her locks;
She said she saw a ranger among the hills and rocks.

CHORUS: With a root-toot-toot and a harlow, along the narrow strand,
With a rat-tat-tat and a tippe-tippe-tan, and away with a roaring boo-woo-woo,
Come a roodle-doodle-doodle and a jongo sound,
Away unto the woods they ran, brave boys, away to the woods they ran.

2. The next I saw was a teamster, a-coming with his team;
He said he saw a ranger, a-crossing the narrow stream.

3. The next I saw was a black man, as black as he could be;
He said he saw a ranger climb up the blackjack tree.

4. The next I saw was a driver, a-coming with his flock;
He said he saw a ranger crawl in behind a rock.

5. The next I saw was a white man, as white as he could be;
He said he saw a ranger climb up a white-oak tree.

6. The next I saw was a hunter, a-coming with his gun;
He said he saw a ranger and shot him as he run.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE THREE JOLLY HUNTSMEN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 30 May 09 - 05:22 PM

From Shropshire Folk-lore: A Sheaf of Gleanings edited by Charlotte Sophia Burne from the collections of Georgina Frederica Jackson (London: Trübner & Co., 1883), page 557:


THE THREE JOLLY HUNTSMEN.

Two versions: the first has been traditional in my own family for at least fifty years, and Mr. Thomas Powell informed me is well-known among his kindred in South Shropshire with the single 'various reading' of ivy tree for old oak tree. The second is contributed by a Herefordshire gentleman who clearly recollects learning it from his brother about the year 1823, when the latter was at Shrewsbury School, and they met in the holidays. But the mention of 'the Downs' and the river Dee shows that this version cannot have originated in Shropshire. Air given, as sung in my own family.

1. There were three jolly huntsmen, went out to hunt the fox,
And where d' ye think they found him? Amongst the woods and rocks.

CHORUS: 'Tally-ho! Tally-ho! stick to it, my boys!' aloud the huntsman cries,
With a hip, hip, hip! and a hallo! and through the woods he flies.

2. And first they met a plough-boy, who merrily sang Tally-ho!
He swore he saw bold Reynard behind the barley-mow.

3. And now they met an old man, whose age was sixty-three.
He swore he saw bold Reynard run up the old oak tree.

4. And next they met a miller, whose mill went clickety-clack.
He swore he saw bold Reynard run up that very mill-bank.

Second Version.

1. There were three jolly huntsmen, went out to hunt a fox,
And where d' you think they found him? Behind the woods and rocks.

CHORUS: 'Tally-ho! Tally-ho!' (etc., as above).

2. First they met with a blind man, as blind as he could be.
He swore he saw poor Reynard run up a hollow tree.

3. Next they met with a lame man, as lame as he could be.
He swore he chased poor Reynard all up the river Dee.

4. Next they met with a miller, whose mill went clickety-clack.
He said he saw old Reynard run away with a goose on his back.

5. Next they met with a schoolboy, a schoolboy out of bounds.
He swore he saw poor Reynard, run all across the Downs.

6. Last they met with a soldier, a soldier dressed in red.
He swore he saw poor Reynard (Slowly and with great pathos) amongst the dogs,—quite dead!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: 'With my ran tan tan and my jimmy ...'
From: GUEST,Marty Williams
Date: 03 Dec 10 - 04:58 AM

My grandmother used to sing a folk song. The way I remember it - it went:

Once there was a blind man, as blind as he could be - said he saw Ball Rainer run up a holler tree. With a whoop and a whoop and a holler - along the merry way - ran tan tan tan tippy tippy tan - away the Royal dogs - hoot hoot horn sign fax fall diddle ding a dod d o.


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