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EFDSS Take 6 Archive

Vic Smith 21 May 09 - 11:56 AM
Vic Smith 21 May 09 - 12:35 PM
Ruth Archer 21 May 09 - 12:35 PM
Steve Gardham 21 May 09 - 12:47 PM
Matthew Edwards 21 May 09 - 12:50 PM
RTim 21 May 09 - 12:56 PM
Gervase 21 May 09 - 01:03 PM
Brian Peters 21 May 09 - 01:58 PM
Vic Smith 22 May 09 - 06:13 AM
greg stephens 22 May 09 - 06:20 AM
johnadams 22 May 09 - 06:43 AM
Vic Smith 22 May 09 - 06:45 AM
GUEST,nickp (cookieless) 22 May 09 - 06:46 AM
GUEST, Sminky 22 May 09 - 06:53 AM
greg stephens 22 May 09 - 09:41 AM
johnadams 22 May 09 - 10:08 AM
Vic Smith 22 May 09 - 10:09 AM
Spleen Cringe 22 May 09 - 10:22 AM
RTim 22 May 09 - 10:25 AM
GUEST,bigJ 22 May 09 - 10:57 AM
GUEST, Sminky 22 May 09 - 11:36 AM
MartinRyan 22 May 09 - 11:41 AM
greg stephens 22 May 09 - 11:43 AM
Will Fly 22 May 09 - 11:43 AM
Will Fly 22 May 09 - 11:45 AM
GUEST, Sminky 22 May 09 - 11:49 AM
MartinRyan 22 May 09 - 11:52 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 22 May 09 - 01:27 PM
greg stephens 22 May 09 - 01:28 PM
MartinRyan 22 May 09 - 01:43 PM
Vic Smith 22 May 09 - 01:49 PM
Vic Smith 23 May 09 - 09:38 AM
GUEST,Shimrod 23 May 09 - 11:44 AM
Matthew Edwards 24 May 09 - 11:32 AM
DMcG 25 May 09 - 04:35 AM
GUEST,Lord O'May (Sedayne Astray) 25 May 09 - 06:27 AM
johnadams 25 May 09 - 06:38 AM
GUEST,Ian cookiless 25 May 09 - 02:17 PM
GUEST,Richard B 26 May 09 - 03:50 PM
Jack Blandiver 26 May 09 - 04:16 PM
MartinRyan 26 May 09 - 04:38 PM
GUEST, Sminky 27 May 09 - 06:04 AM
BB 27 May 09 - 04:07 PM
GUEST,bigJ 27 May 09 - 04:19 PM
tijuanatime 27 May 09 - 05:20 PM
Vic Smith 02 Jun 09 - 08:39 AM
GUEST, Sminky 02 Jun 09 - 10:43 AM
GUEST,Richard B 02 Jun 09 - 10:55 AM
Folknacious 02 Jun 09 - 01:08 PM
GUEST,Richard B 02 Jun 09 - 04:54 PM
GUEST, Sminky 03 Jun 09 - 05:19 AM
RTim 05 Jun 09 - 03:37 PM
Will Fly 05 Jun 09 - 03:41 PM
greg stephens 06 Jun 09 - 05:45 AM
greg stephens 06 Jun 09 - 05:49 AM
Vic Smith 07 Jun 09 - 10:08 AM
GUEST,Richard B 09 Jun 09 - 04:03 PM
johnadams 09 Jun 09 - 04:13 PM
GUEST,Richard B 09 Jun 09 - 04:32 PM
Vic Smith 20 Jun 09 - 11:05 AM
Vic Smith 21 Jun 09 - 07:36 AM
RTim 28 Jan 11 - 08:46 AM
Brian Peters 28 Jan 11 - 09:33 AM
Brian Peters 31 Jan 11 - 07:58 AM
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Subject: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 21 May 09 - 11:56 AM

This (in bold below) from Malcolm Taylor of the VWML Library

I thought about posting this on the fRoots and the EFDSS thread, but then decided that it is going to be so important that it should have a thread all to itself. A quick perusal of the site - http://library.efdss.org/archives/ - shows that it is going to be of extraordinary help to those with an interest in English song, along with Steve Roud's Folk Song Index which they have also put on-line.

Since a lot of hot air is being generated on various boards about whether or not the EFDSS has been rising phoenix-like from its previously moribund state, here is further evidence of that renewed vitality.

Vic Smith
(Interested in traditional song for over forty years - finally joined the EFDSS at the end of last year having been convinced that, at last, here was an organisation that was worth being a part of.)


http://library.efdss.org/archives/
By the end of this month, certainly the very beginning of next, the Take 6 archives website will be officially live. It hosts six of our manuscript collections: those of the Hammond Brothers, George Gardiner, Janet Blunt, Francis Collinson, George Butterworth and Anne Gilchrist. Some 22K images will be linked to the catalogue. You will note that the site is certainly not finished as yet but you can still use it by searching as you would Roud Index on VWML Online. I'm sending you this sneak preview so that, if you care to, you can comment on the essential content after you have had a play with it. These comments may effect the final outcome if they are things we have missed.
Over the next two weeks it will change. The front page will fill up with logos, links and additional information about Take 6, and the help pages and boigraphies will appear. The Gilchrist collection, which is massive and disparate, will not be completed until probably the end of June (at the moment the prefix for it is KAM - this will change to AGG). The essential collected material will be there, though. Simply search the catalogues. The box on the right will also change to produce a 'tree' showing where the item you are looking at appears in the structure of the collection.
I look forward to your comments - I think!

Best regards,
Malcolm Taylor


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:35 PM

I am finding it absolutely compulsive stuff.

There is a version of McDonald's Return To Glencoe noted by George Gardiner in Portsmouth Workhouse in 1907 which is almost word for word the way I heard it from the great Scots traveller singer, Davy Stewart, in the 1960's - different tune but an extraordinary beautiful one..... This is like Christmas.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:35 PM

I hope Vic won't mind me highlighting in this thread the other dimension of the Take 6 project, mentioned previously elsewhere: through a specially-appointed offcer, Take 6 has worked with school children in London, Lancashire and Hampshire, bringing traditional songs back to the communities where they were collected.

There will be live events celebrating the work of Take 6 this summer: Folk in the Park, Stanley Park, Blackpool 22 August, 2-4pm, admission free. And at Petersfield Museum, discover your own musical talents at two workshops led by Hampshire folk singer Sarah Morgan. Adult workshop on 12 June, 7.30-9.30pm, and a family singing session
on 30 July from 10-12noon. Workshops are free but the museum suggests donations of £5 per adult and £1 per child. To book your
place, contact Petersfield Museum on 01730 262601. Plus the Museum is holding an exhibition on local folk song, past and present from 8 to 27 June, in association with Hampshire Record Office.


I, too, am very excited about the digitised collections being available soon online!


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Steve Gardham
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:47 PM

I am also very excited about the Take 6 Project, from both aspects, the mss online, and the education projects. We have Doc Rowe at our Yorkshire Garland Seminar on 20th July presenting information on his Take 6 experiences in an East London school, as well as Sam Lee from the London Links Project. The seminar is free to all and takes place at the Murton Park Museum near York.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:50 PM

Thanks Vic for posting this; it looks like being a superb resource. It is wonderful to be able to read the original notebooks. Congratulations to everyone involved in making this happen, and especially to Malcolm Taylor and all the team at VWML.

Matthew Edwards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: RTim
Date: 21 May 09 - 12:56 PM

Hi all, Can I personally commend the EFDSS for the fabulous work on The Take 6 Project.
These are the very images and information that I used when creating my latest CD - George Blake's Legacy - I just had to go the The VWML to look at the images on Microfilm, etc..
It is so wonderful that I can now, in the privacy of my own home - in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, examine the manuscripts and notebooks at my leisure. A wonderful resource for anyone interested in collected versions of Traditional songs and music.
Well done to ALL involved.

Tim Radford.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Gervase
Date: 21 May 09 - 01:03 PM

What a fantastic achievement. I'm speechless.
Well done to Malcolm and all those involved.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Brian Peters
Date: 21 May 09 - 01:58 PM

I've been looking forward to this. Absolutely brilliant! Great work by Malcolm and the gang.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:13 AM

More from Malcolm:-


It will be even better next week when we upload a lot more and put something on the home and help pages. Of course, all we often get back are the criticisms and not the praise, so your comments are most welcome. I'm really proud of this and it is something to build upon. I plan to have the Sharp Appalachian diaries up there at some point. They really are very special and the Americans will love them - if they can read them!

Best regards,
Malcolm Taylor


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:20 AM

This doesn't seem to work for me. If I search for anything and click on the thumbnail, a window opens which is generally blank. Sometimes the picture flashes up momentarily and then vanishes. Am I doing something wrong? Anybody else experience any problems? Infuriating when such unbelievable gems are available.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: johnadams
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:43 AM

It works fine for me in both Safari and Firefox. It appears to be CGI driven, possibly off a perl script (not that I know very much about these things). I don't think there's anything particularly exotic for your browser to cope with.

Perhaps you should try a different browser?


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:45 AM

I use Firefox and have no problems with it - and I've looked at loads of it already.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,nickp (cookieless)
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:46 AM

" I plan to have the Sharp Appalachian diaries up there at some point. They really are very special and the Americans will love them "

As will those of us in the UK with an interest in all things Appalachian.

It's like Christmas!!!

Nick


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 22 May 09 - 06:53 AM

It doesn't work in IE6 - I've tried on two PCs.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 22 May 09 - 09:41 AM

Afraid I am not suficiently clever to know what trying a new browser might entail.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: johnadams
Date: 22 May 09 - 10:08 AM

The browser is the piece of software that you use to look at the internet web pages. The most used one is Internet Explorer ie. Sminky is using IE version 6, sadly to no avail where the take 6 archive is concerned.


A popular alternative is Firefox which can be downloaded and installed from Mozilla

You might find that it solves more than efdss archive problem once you've set it up.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 22 May 09 - 10:09 AM

Greg Stephens wrote:-
Afraid I am not suficiently clever to know what trying a new browser might entail.


Please do not get confused between clever and good with computers. Now I have only really been in Greg Stephens' company once for an extended conversation, but that was enough to establish that here was an intelligent, knowledgeable, well-informed and enthusiastic person who is a great asset to the music scene in the UK. So he came late to an interest in computers and is still to an extent learning; that does not make him any less clever.

Personally, I would not rush into this until it has been established why your brower (which I assume to be a version of Internet Explorer) does not cope well with the EFDSS Archive site. We have your posting and the one from Sminky stating problems. If there is a problem with this website and IE, then Malcolm needs to be made aware of that, and I intend to email him with this information, but it would be useful to have some other information, particularly from IE users.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you decide that you would like to try another browser than I would suggest that you try clicking here to be taken to the Mozilla website and click on the Download Now - Free button which will then give you a symbol on your desktop to allow you to install Firefox as a web browser.

In practice there is very little to choose between Firefox and Internet Explorer in the way they function, in my opinion. I use Firefox because -
1] I think it operates a bit more quickly than IE
2] I believe that Firefox is less susceptible to viruses because thare are a lot of people out there who really hate Microsoft and try to devise ways of disrupting their software.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 22 May 09 - 10:22 AM

This is fantastic stuff. Congratulations and big thanks to all involved.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: RTim
Date: 22 May 09 - 10:25 AM

I have been looking at info. today (not enough hours in the day to complete) for my area of interest - and I have found stuff today that I have NOT SEEN before - it is WONDERFUL and I can't wait for the Gardiner Note Books to be available - unless they already are and I don't know how to access them???
Keep up the great work!

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,bigJ
Date: 22 May 09 - 10:57 AM

Greg, did you get your problems sorted?
I'm having the same difficulties as you but when I try to download Firefox it tells me that my Windows ME is too old.
John


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:36 AM

I've tried:

IE6 (sp1) on Windows 2000
IE6 (sp2) on Windows XP

and I get the same problem as Greg.

We need to hear from IE7 users. (I can test this myself later if necessary).


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:41 AM

No joy with IE6/SP3/Win XP

Regards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:43 AM

How do I find out what version of IE I have?


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Will Fly
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:43 AM

I've tried it with a Mac Book Pro (OS 10.5) + Firefox 2.0 - and with Windows XP + the latest IE - no problems with either.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Will Fly
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:45 AM

Greg - if you click on the application icon with the right-hand mouse button, you should get a "Properties" menu item in the pop-up.

Selecting that might give you the IE version.

I can't be more specific as I'm talking from memory - away from the office machine.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:49 AM

...or in the browser, click 'Help' then 'About Internet Explorer'.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 May 09 - 11:52 AM

Alternatively, in Explorer, go to HELP and select ABOUT. Apart from the version number, watch out for the letters SP and the number that follwos it i.e. the "service pack" - though there's nothing to suggest that's part of the problem, yet.

Regards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 22 May 09 - 01:27 PM

I'm using IE7 (7.0.5730.11. I had IE8 up for a while but took it off) and XP/Pro and it's fine. My first searches returned no results without comment and I wasn't sure, but when I hit something that worked it was fine.

(In fact when I open the link it comes up with Error on Page - Line 31, Char 2, Object required, Code 0 - but does work).


If you want to check, try the Open Tree View and see if anything's visible there.


Mick


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 22 May 09 - 01:28 PM

Well, I had a look. It said version 6.0.2900 and a load more numbers and letters. Then a bit further on it said update sp2. Does this mean I have IE6 sp2?
Maybe I'll email Malcolm Taylor at the Library and report.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: MartinRyan
Date: 22 May 09 - 01:43 PM

Yep, greg, that's it. I must have a look on another machine with Vista/IE7...

Regards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 22 May 09 - 01:49 PM

Malcolm Taylor's response to the Internet Explorer problems was:-
Yes, I am aware of this. I believe on version 6 and below it wont work and we are thinking of placing a download button for version 7 on the site. I'm afraid (and I am told) that that's life with modern websites. It works on Firefox, which again is a free downloadable browser.

He also adds:-
It should be pointed out, though, that the site it not yet finished and the selected mailings were for pre-publication comment. When we go live in a couple of weeks, people can complain to their heart's content.

....which made me feel a bit embarrased that I had jumped the gun with my enthusiastic postings. However, Malcolm being Malcolm tags on the following:-
But I've no problem with the word being out about it. It will simply get better over the next weeks.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 23 May 09 - 09:38 AM

I am trying to find a way of restricting my search, finding a way to concentrate on one aspect of this treasure trove.

I found early on (second posting above) that George Gardiner collected a song in Portsmouth Workhouse. I knew that Portsmouth Workhouses then became the initial part of what is now the huge St. Mary's Hospital complex - this was a building that I cycled past every day on the way to and from my grammar school - so I did a search for Portsmouth Workhouses and find that Gardiner collected over 100 songs there! Any song that I now learn from this source, I am going to feel that I have a real connection with.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 23 May 09 - 11:44 AM

Wow!

What a fantastic resource!


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 24 May 09 - 11:32 AM

There's even a recipe! See the Anne Geddes Gilchrist Collection KAM/1/20/70 for Easter-Ledges Pudding from Grayrigg, Westmorland.

There are three lovely songs from Birkenhead in the Janet Blunt Collection collected from a Miss Haigh in 1921 JHB/13/4-5-6, but these appear under Lancashire in the index, which should be amended to Cheshire.

Lots of goodies here, I hadn't realised how much work George Butterworth had done.

Matthew Edwards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: DMcG
Date: 25 May 09 - 04:35 AM

I've just tried it on a Blackberry mobile and, apart from a few layout issues concerned with the heading it worked fine. I also found it worked well using IE7.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Lord O'May (Sedayne Astray)
Date: 25 May 09 - 06:27 AM

Is there any way of just browsing the archives, or do you have to know what you're looking for? Are the archives indexed at all?


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: johnadams
Date: 25 May 09 - 06:38 AM

If you search on a collectors name you can browse a complete collection. That seems to be as near as you can get at this stage.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Ian cookiless
Date: 25 May 09 - 02:17 PM

This is fantastic. I learned a while ago (through Malcolm Taylor) that what was collected from a singer isn't necessarily what ended up in song books. Not just bowdlerisations (is that the word?) and 'improvements' of lines, but also whole verses added or even omitted at will for no apparent reason. For those who care about such things, now we can see just what the singer did or did not sing and the omissions of collectors. Thank you so much.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Richard B
Date: 26 May 09 - 03:50 PM

Just to let you know that I think that the Internet Explorer v6 problems have now been solved. Those of you who were experiencing problems, please try again.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 26 May 09 - 04:16 PM

Thanks for this; shame Annie G. didn't have an H4...

Are there plans to digitise any of the EFDSS sound archive for similar open access after the example of The Max Hunter Collection?


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 May 09 - 04:38 PM

Yeah - no problem now with IE6/WinXP. Thanks to all concerned - it's a great resource and a great example of how to do things.

Regards


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 27 May 09 - 06:04 AM

....seconded, from one very happy and grateful IE6/Win2000 user.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: BB
Date: 27 May 09 - 04:07 PM

Yippee! Thank you!

Barbara


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,bigJ
Date: 27 May 09 - 04:19 PM

I will second that yippee!


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: tijuanatime
Date: 27 May 09 - 05:20 PM

It's now possible to open a tree window, which is an excellent way to browse the collections.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 08:39 AM

from Malcolm Taylor
Clearly, I jumped the gun when I started this thread - but here, now, are the full details of what will undoubtedly be the most important event in English traditional song in this decade. Three cheers for Malcolm and the VWML Library staff.


Press Release
from the
English Folk Dance and Song Society
Cecil Sharp House,
2 Regent's Park Road,
Camden Town,
London NW1 7AY

Take 6 Archives Website Goes Live!
ENGLAND'S HERITAGE OF FOLK SONGS 'GIVEN BACK' TO THE NATION


From a small room in London's Camden Town, a treasury of England's folk songs is made available online.

In 2007 the Heritage Lottery Fund awarded £154,000 to the English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS) for its "Take 6 Project." The aims of the project were to:

• Catalogue, conserve and digitise six of its major manuscript collections of England's folk songs – those collected by Janet Blunt, George Butterworth, Francis Collinson, George Gardiner, Anne Geddes Gilchrist, and the Hammond Brothers

• Make the collections freely accessible to all through a dedicated website

• Give the songs back to the areas where they were first collected in the early twentieth century through projects with primary sc hools in Lancashire, Hampshire and London

• Develop an interactive website designed especially for children to explore and learn folk-songs from the EFDSS archives, with additional tips and classroom materials
and for teachers (to be launched Thursday 2 July 2009)

• Raise community awareness of Take 6 and the songs and music collected in Lancashire and Hampshire through leaflets, displays and events


The EFDSS is delighted to announce that 9th June 2009 sees the launch of a dedicated website for these six manuscript collections – a first in the field of folklore in the UK. Access to 22,000 images of the actual documents, notebooks and letters of six major fieldwork ers at the tips of your fingers, fully indexed and searchable.

'What inspired George Butterworth's masterpiece, The Banks of Green Willow?'
What did William 'Binx' Walton tell the Lady of the Manor about Morris Dancing and Christmas Carols in Oxfordshire?
What do Andover, Portsmouth and Preston Candover in Hampshire all have in common?
Go to:
http://library.efdss.org/archives


For further information please contact Jon Garlick at EFDSS Marketing Department on 020 7485 2206 ext. 22 or
marketing@efdss.org


NOTES TO EDITORS:
For nearly a century the English Folk Dance and Song Society have been
preserving and disseminating our folk heritage. The Society aims to promote the best
of folk arts through a range of mediums including dance, music, song, film,
exhibitions, publications and our library collections; engage new generations with the
folk arts through workshops, classes and study, and to ensure that the folk arts are a
fundamental part of the cultural life of the UK. The EFDSS is a charity registered in
England and Wales, No. 305999

The Vaughan Williams Memorial Library is the internationally renowned multi-
media library and archive of the English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS).
Recognised as England's national repository for folk arts materials, it has evolved
into an outstanding multi-media collection since its inception with the opening of Cecil
Sharp House in 1930.

HLF
The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) was set up by Parliament in 1994 to give
grants to a wide range of projects involving the local, regional and national heritage
of the United Kingdom. The fund distributes a share of the money raised by the
National Lottery for Good Causes. HLF is administered by the Trustees of the
National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) which allocates around £10 million per
annum to our national heritage, acting as a fund of 'last resort'.
http://www.hlf.org.uk/English

Janet Heatley Blunt (1859-1950)
Born in India to a military family but settling at
Halle Place, West Adderbury, Oxfordshire after the death of her mother, Janet initially
became interested in folk song because they were like the songs her father had
known as a boy in Hampshire. She was further inspired by the work of Cecil Sharp
and other collectors associated with the Folk-Song Society and English Folk Dance
Society. Concerned that the old songs were dying out, she spent many hours with
local singers, writing down the words and music she found, sometimes inviting
singers into her home so she could use the piano to help her notate the tunes
accurately. One of her most important informants was a stonemason, shopkeeper
and pub landlord, William 'Binx' Walton, who gave her both songs and also the
dancing traditions of Adderbury Morris, of which he was the leader. These are
significant in that the dances incorporated songs. She also had a keen interest in
Basque music and dance. She noted down around 125 songs from forty-six singers,
mainly from or around Adderbury, while friends and fellow collectors sent her an
additional 80.

Francis James Montgomery Collinson (1898-1984)
Born in Edinburgh to a musical
family, after demobilization in 1919 he matriculated in music studies at the University
of Edinburgh and gained a MusBac in 1923. He sought his fortune in the sphere of
musical entertainment in London, where he met with some success and conducted
for both Cole Porter and Richard Tauber. In 1941 Collinson took charge of the BBC's
Country Magazine programmes. These programmes, many of them outside
broadcasts, involved Collinson in the study, collection, and arrangement of folk-
songs throughout Britain, Bob and James Copper from Sussex and Harry Cox from
Norfolk being three of his 'finds'. He not only published these arrangements in a
series with Francis Dillon from 1946 onwards but also issued three unique 78 r.p.m.
recordings of folk songs in the Gramophone Company's Plum Label series. His
manuscripts of music collected from English sources, principally in the southern
counties, reside with VWML. They comprise six volumes of mainly handwritten notes,
musical notation and letters, containing over 500 items.

George Barnet Gardiner (1852/3-1910)
Born in Kincardine-on-Forth, Perthshire,
Gardiner learned of the burgeoning interest in folk song in England in the early years
of the twentieth century and immediately joined the Folk-Song Society. Lucy
Broadwood, then secretary of the Folk-Song Society, suggested to Gardiner that he
concentrate his collecting on the county of Hampshire, which was largely unexplored
and where composer Balfour Gardiner (no relation) lived and would assist with the
noting of tunes. After an initial burst of activity there in 1905, Gardiner returned with
two other collaborators, Charles Gamblin and C.F. Guyer, to work in a more
concentrated manner. Of approximately 1100 songs noted up to December 1907,
Gardiner copied out only 800, but another 600 or so songs remained in his
notebooks, which he either felt were not good enough to copy or he simply didn't
have the time or energy to work on them. Gardiner seems to have ceased his
collecting activity in 1909 when the Folk-Song Society's Journal (no. 13) was devoted
to his work. That year also saw the publication of a third volume of Folk-Songs of
England, under the general editorship of Cecil Sharp, sixteen of Gardiner's collected
songs being included as arranged for piano by Gustav Holst. But it was not until the
work of James Reeves and Frank Purslow that his immensely important collection
was fully re-appraised and its true worth realised and placed in context with his
contemporaries.

Henry Edward Denison Hammond (1866-1910)
Born at Priston, Somerset, his
brother Robert Francis Frederick two years later, Henry met George Gardiner whilst
on the staff of the Edinburgh Academy. Henry was appointed Director-General of
Education in Rhodesia in 1899 until his health failed and he returned home after only
a year. He then teamed up with George Gardiner for his first foray into folk song
collecting in 1904 (Henry noting the tunes) and continued in a more serious manner
with brother Robert (who noted the texts) the following year in Minehead, Somerset,
where they were 'trying to collect some of the gleanings of Mr. Sharp's harvest'.
Correspondence with Lucy Broadwood in June 1905 resulted in the brothers turning
their attention to Dorset where, in August, September and October, they noted 193
songs. From then until the end of 1907 they worked tirelessly, meeting a number of
singers with impressive repertoires, including Mrs. Russell at Upwey in 1907, who
finally gave them a hundred songs. Over 900 songs were noted in total from 193
singers in six counties, the vast majority from Dorset.

Anne Geddes Gilchrist (1863-1954)
Anne Gilchrist was born in Manchester to
Scottish parents and dedicated much of her life to collecting and studying folk music
in England, specializing in songs and tunes from her home county of Lancashire.
Known among folklorists of her time for her supporting role in England's Folk Song
Society, she was one of several independent-minded women active in folk music's
so-called First Revival between 1880 and 1914. Exposed to folk songs through her
parents' singing, Gilchrist was also fond of church hymns and the singing games she
learned as a child at her grandfather's house in Cheshire during Christmas visits.
Though as an adult she had 'put away childish things', her chance attendance at a
public lecture by an English folk song collector later re-awakened her childhood
memories and Gilchrist began actively studying and collecting folk songs. Between
1898 and 1909, she used contacts from her daily life to locate likely singers and
musicians, documenting singing games such as 'In and Out the Windows' and 'Sally
Waters' that she found at an orphanage in Southport where she and her sisters did
volunteer work, gathering songs like 'Barbara Allen' and 'Green Gravel' in Sussex
during visits to her brother who was a minister there, and persuading her aunts and
uncles to sing songs like 'The Barring of the Door' and 'Cuddy Alone' for her. As a
collector, Gilchrist amassed a considerable number of broadsides, Child ballads,
carols, street cries, nursery songs, hymns, and dance tunes, among other types of
folk music. She was especially proud of the shanties and sea songs she collected
from an old sailor in Southport (the first published in the Folk Song Society's journal)
and the seasonal Lancashire rush-cart and pace-egging songs. Though not as large
as other collections from the period, Gilchrist's work gained her the respect of her
fellow folk music collectors.

George Sainton Kaye Butterworth (1885–1916)
One of England's most distinctive
composers, Butterworth was born in London, the only child of Sir Alexander Kaye
Butterworth (1854–1946), a solicitor and later general manager of the North Eastern
Railway Company, and his wife, Julia Marguerite (1849–1911), a professional
soprano before her marriage. He first attended school in Yorkshire before entering
Eton College as a King's scholar in 1899. Following a brief teaching post at Radley
College he returned to London and from October 1910 to November 1911 he was
enrolled at the Royal College of Music, where he studied organ and piano, as well as
theory and composition. His involvement with English folk music and dance now
began, and his intimate friendship and collaboration with a leading figure of this
movement, Ralph Vaughan Williams, which had begun in his Oxford days, was
central to this. He became a collector, noting down more than 450 items, including
songs, dance tunes, and dances. In 1906 he joined the Folk-Song Society, and he
was a prominent figure in the English Folk Dance Society, of which he was one of the
founders in 1911, as well as a member of its dance demonstration team. He collected
and arranged an album of Sussex folk songs and, in collaboration with Cecil Sharp,
published several books of country and morris dances. Butterworth enlisted on the
outbreak of war in August 1914 and was commissioned in the 13th Durham light
infantry. He was three times recommended for, and was twice awarded, the Military
Cross. The second decoration honoured conduct on the morning of his death, 5
August 1916, when he was killed by a bullet through the head at Pozières during the
first battle of the Somme. He was buried at the front line.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 10:43 AM

If you browse a collection it displays the first 100 records. But there doesn't seem to be a way of displaying the next 100. Any ideas, or am I jumping the gun?

(I shouldn't be jumping guns at my age, plus it's too damned HOT!).


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Richard B
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 10:55 AM

You're jumping the gun. Its on the list of things to fix.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Folknacious
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 01:08 PM

More guns jumped. Small print in the epic post above: "The EFDSS is delighted to announce that 9th June 2009 sees the launch . . . "

In other words it ain't there yet. Come back next week.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Richard B
Date: 02 Jun 09 - 04:54 PM

"Come back next week."

You can come back now if you want. Its fixed.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 03 Jun 09 - 05:19 AM

If gun-jumping were an Olympic event I'd be in with a chance of a medal. Thanks RichardB.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: RTim
Date: 05 Jun 09 - 03:37 PM

Hi All,
I have been going cross eyed looking at the George Gardiner Original Field Notebooks online. I have only been going thru to find any additional information on my main subject - ie. Mr George Blake, etc..
This is a truly wonderful resource, I have thus far wasted the best part of 2 days, and I haven't even looked at the other singers I am interested in.

I do have one question...Does anyone know what the abbreviation (in a handwritten manuscript) - "Cf", actually means?

Thanks - Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Will Fly
Date: 05 Jun 09 - 03:41 PM

Cf. means compare - used in texts to point the reader to another location in the text. For example: "Cf. page 22..."


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 06 Jun 09 - 05:45 AM

Cf means "compare"


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: greg stephens
Date: 06 Jun 09 - 05:49 AM

Sorry, Will F's posting wasn't visible for some reason when I made mine


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 07 Jun 09 - 10:08 AM

A concert to celebrate the launch of the Take 6 website


Take 6 Concert
Saturday 27 June, 3-5pm
Cecil Sharp House


Over the past 18 months the English Folk Dance and Song Society has undertaken a mammoth project to make available on the Web six song collections from its Vaughan Williams Memorial Library archive, and run schools and community projects in Hampshire, Lancashire and London using these materials.

On Saturday 27 June we celebrate this project and the collections that inspired it with a concert featuring Andy Turner, Tim Laycock, Craig Morgan Robson, The Askew Sisters and the Adderbury Village Morris Men and narrated by Shirley Collins and Tim Laycock.

The six collectors featured are Janet Blunt, George Butterworth, Frank Collinson, George Gardiner, Anne Gilchrist and The Hammond Brothers, and the concert will include well-known and well-loved standards of the English repertoire performed alongside some of the hidden gems gleaned from the thousands of items in the archive.

A pre-concert talk on George Gardiner by Bob Askew (1pm) and the launch of The Axford Project CD by Craig Morgan Robson and The Askew Sisters will also take place on the day.


Tickets: £8 available from
www.wegottickets.com


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Richard B
Date: 09 Jun 09 - 04:03 PM

Just to let you know that, after several speeches and glasses of champagne, the site is now officially live.

If you've been looking at the in development version, you may need to press 'Refresh' a few times to get the new version. Once the warning message that you're looking at the in development version disappears, you're looking at the officially released version.

All feedback and comment is welcome.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: johnadams
Date: 09 Jun 09 - 04:13 PM

Richard

There's a problem with the funwithfolk and teachingfolksong links. They've been given relative links instead of full urls.

http://funwithfolk.com/staff-room.html

It looks very good. Congratulations to all. It's good to see the education division starting to make its presence felt. I look forward to further developments.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: GUEST,Richard B
Date: 09 Jun 09 - 04:32 PM

Doh!

Thanks Johhny. Now fixed.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 20 Jun 09 - 11:05 AM

There is a YouTube video of the speeches at the launch party for the Take 6 project at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qyk1zOqAyLg

You can even enter a competition associated with it at
http://froots.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=4538


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Vic Smith
Date: 21 Jun 09 - 07:36 AM

Malcolm Taylor - on another board - says -

This is great!! I have only this minute discovered this quiz and the YouTube link (I am suitably embarrassed). Thanks Vic being our unofficial PR man. There is more Gilchrist to come, by the way, and we have plans to extend the website to include the Broadwood papers and Sharp's Appalachian diaries. We also hope to input information about the singers. Keep an eye on the site - and please let us know if you discover any mistakes and can suggest any improvements.
Malcolm Taylor


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: RTim
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 08:46 AM

Hi all,

The latest news from The EFDSS is that the Baring-Gould Manuscripts have been added to the Take 6 archives.
=====================
Latest news...

From February 2011 this website also includes the Baring-Gould Folk Song archive, which was created by Wren Music as part of the Devon Tradition project. This was a Heritage Lottery funded project that ran from July 2009 to February 2011. The collection was designed to fit alongside the Take 6 website, and can be searched and used in the same way.
=====================
This is again great news, and a wonderful resource. Well done all.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Brian Peters
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 09:33 AM

"Well done all", indeed!

Obviously Martin Graebe deserves our thanks for his efforts and boundless enthusiasm regarding the Baring-Gould material, but credit's also due to Shan Graebe, to Paul Wilson and Marilyn Tucker of Wren Music, and particularly to Melanie Smith, who did a huge amount of the archive spadework.


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Subject: RE: EFDSS Take 6 Archive
From: Brian Peters
Date: 31 Jan 11 - 07:58 AM

... and how could I have forgotten to include Steve Roud at the head of the above list?


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