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Mozart comic songs

Murray on Saltspring 24 Jun 09 - 07:10 PM
Murray on Saltspring 26 Jun 09 - 07:18 PM
Ron Davies 26 Jun 09 - 11:15 PM
Murray on Saltspring 27 Jul 09 - 06:56 PM
GUEST 16 Jul 11 - 01:02 PM
katlaughing 16 Jul 11 - 01:09 PM
GUEST 16 Jul 11 - 01:13 PM
Artful Codger 17 Jul 11 - 09:50 AM
GUEST,Not me, yet, but looking for that on-line an 16 Aug 16 - 07:12 PM
keberoxu 17 Aug 16 - 01:33 PM
keberoxu 17 Aug 16 - 02:06 PM
keberoxu 17 Aug 16 - 02:19 PM
McGrath of Harlow 17 Aug 16 - 03:14 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 17 Aug 16 - 06:23 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 17 Aug 16 - 06:40 PM
Joe_F 17 Aug 16 - 09:48 PM
McGrath of Harlow 18 Aug 16 - 09:43 AM
keberoxu 18 Aug 16 - 06:04 PM
Steve Shaw 18 Aug 16 - 08:51 PM
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Subject: Mozart comic songs
From: Murray on Saltspring
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 07:10 PM

I used to have a vinyl record of many comic-facetious-scatological songs by Mozart, sung by Erika Koeth et al [Convivium Musicum Muenchen etc]. Having lost it long ago I was pleased to see a CD version available on EMI Classics, called "The Lighter Mozart". I got it today and it's very good, but for some reason [cost??] the words (and translations) that came with the 12 inch LP aren't given. What I'm seeking, therefore, is the info from someone with the old record. Any takers?


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Murray on Saltspring
Date: 26 Jun 09 - 07:18 PM

Refresh

The original was on Seraphim. I've found one or two of the songs, and a bit of comment, but I'm still looking for all the words and translations, particularly since some of it is in dialect.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Ron Davies
Date: 26 Jun 09 - 11:15 PM

Weiss nights about this, but just Zauberfloete auf deutsch is great humor--especially the dialogue.   Auf englisch you lose a lot.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Murray on Saltspring
Date: 27 Jul 09 - 06:56 PM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jul 11 - 01:02 PM

I once had a record of Mozart's comic songs, put out by Deutsche Gramophon Gesellschaft. Some of the "translation" was less than exemplary. For example:

The record included a song called "Das Bandel." In English, "The little Ribbon." The song was about a young man who was teasing his wife, who was desperately looking for her lost hair ribbon. After carrying on for an appropriate length of time, the man finally says "Look -- Ich hab's im Handel!" meaning "Here it is -- I have it in my little Hand.

But instead of translating "Handel" as a diminutive of "Hand," the translator wrote "Look, I have it in my trade!"


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: katlaughing
Date: 16 Jul 11 - 01:09 PM

Thanks, Guest. I wonder how in the world the translator came up with that!?


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Jul 11 - 01:13 PM

Dear Katlaughing,

Not all that diffiuclt. The German word "Handel" is both a diminutive for "Hand," and a translation for the English world "trade." Apparently the translator had no idea what the song being translated was all about.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Artful Codger
Date: 17 Jul 11 - 09:50 AM

Apparently, the translation was farmed out to the same firm that prepares instruction manuals for Japanese-made products, or perhaps by the man who wrote "English as She Is Spoke".

I have a copy of the Seraphim LP. I'd ask you to PM, but at the moment that option's not available. So here are two alternatives: if you have a (temporary?) email address you don't mind posting here--with username and site well separated by verbiage to foil addy-collecting bots. Alternatively, if you have either Kat's or Joe's email address, perhaps they wouldn't mind forwarding an initial email from you. Just tell me which you'll be sending the message to, and I'll shoot them a note so they'll know where to send your message. Make sure to include the URL for this thread.

I think you'll find most of the lyrics (often with translations) through this page:
The Lied, Art Song, and Choral Texts Archive: Wolfie
http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/m/mozart/

For PDF scores and MIDIs, try WIMA: Werner Icking Music Archive: Wolfie
http://icking-music-archive.org/ByComposer/Mozart.php

Other sites, on a hit-and-miss basis, provide full or partial translations, though I can provide the ones from the LP.

Isn't it criminal that, when reissuing CD's, they often omit the original materials. After all, they could just scan the info and include the images as additional files on the CD itself, at virtually no additional cost!


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: GUEST,Not me, yet, but looking for that on-line an
Date: 16 Aug 16 - 07:12 PM

if u find it, can u keep in touch jeffcoimbra@uol.com.br (brazil)

i am also looking for Das Bandchen lyrics since the ones I have found are in Austrian (?), sorry. I don't understand it well:

http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=27594

the audio I have comes from here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWm8xS3ZTyA

and my scores bring a different kind of more standard German, I guess.

drop me a line if anyone may come to think of something to help. Thanks!


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: keberoxu
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 01:33 PM

Columbia Records, on its Epic label, introduced me to this side of Mozart. The album is called:
WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART IS A DIRTY OLD MAN

Now, here's the rub: we're looking mostly at English-language translations here, singable ones. A few of the ditties are in a whole mix of languages, including Latin and the Austrian dialect, all thrown in together; it's been a while since my last listen, but I recall some of those being carefully handled. The canon/round for male voices, Bona Nox Bist A Rechte Ox becomes Bona Nox, What A Clumsy Ox; the translator is one Anne Grossman. The record is long out of print, you must look to sellers at second-hand sources such as Amazon. Probably the best known performer on this presentation is harpsichord/early-music specialist Igor Kipnis, son of operatic bass-baritone Alexander Kipnis; Igor handles the keyboard accompaniments.

In a future post I will submit a contemporary review of the above release; as it is hard to find, I will try to print it out, as well as provide a link.

Finally, the Lieder Art Song website, referenced above. That link several posts back is sort of functional, in that it goes to a page that links you to the thoroughly revised and updated website. And I went ahead and looked, as no doubt the original poster has done. And for shame! NO ONE has posted translations for Mozart's naughty words. You can, however, find the originals there, Austrian dialect and all.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: keberoxu
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 02:06 PM

Dear Guest "not me yet", a friendly warning. Your post is entirely in good faith and you intended no wrong; however there is a Mudcat policy regarding public posts online, and e-mail addresses. You seem to be unaware of this policy.

What you specifically ask after is:
"Das Bandel," K. 441 (catalogue of Mozart's complete works)

As my previous post points out, an English translation -- singable, not literal -- exists, by the late Anne C. Grossman; she was, amongst other things, the niece of violinist Jascha Heifetz. She translated a number of standard-repertoire opera libretti into singable English. Her translations without a doubt are under copyright control.

There must be literal, prosaic English translations of Mozart's naughty words out there, but I have yet to look closely for them, so I can't link you to them.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: keberoxu
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 02:19 PM

Here is a recording I have never heard. Judging from my recognition of a few titles, some of the tracks on this compact disc use the English translations by Anne Grossman.

"Mozart Unexpurgated"


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 03:14 PM

Of course they aren't particularly funny. But Mozart doesn't need to be funny.

zauberflaute is fun rather than funny, I'd say.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 06:23 PM

About "Die Zauberflöte:"   the humor, I would guess, is in the spoken dialogue between the musical parts. There is one bit that is really humorous. Remember how the Queen of the Night's Three Ladies showed up and put a lock on Papageno's mouth? Because Papageno is thus corrected early in the piece -- this is done before the Queen of the Night tells the prince to go and rescue Pamina -- it isn't long before the punishment is concluded. What happens, nevertheless, is that the Prince, getting ready to go on his rescue mission, is confronted with Papageno all locked up, and the two commence a duet: the Prince pointing out that he has no magic to counter the magic lock, and Papageno, who cannot possibly cease from expressing himself somehow:

"HM HM HM HM hm hm hm hm HM hm hm hm hm HM hm hm HM hm hm HM!!!!"


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 06:40 PM

First, an attempt at a link:
1967 review of Dirty Old Man LP on Columbia/Epic

And here's an excerpt. Delos Smith, critic for UPI.
Of all conceivable dubious enterprises, probably the most dubious is the one which has resulted in a recording called "Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is a Dirty Old Man." Ugh! It is quite enough to turn a robust stomach....

....he was human, beyond the slightest doubt, as it witnessed by his fondness for what is now called "the bathroom joke." Nor has it ever been a secret that he, now and then, gave musical lines to scatological and other obscene verse.

All that has been accepted with a shrug -- and dismissed. But now, a big thing is being made of it -- a dirty record issued by Columbia under its Epic label (1366), one of the oldest and most respected names in the industry. On it are twelve obscene canons and songs by a composer celebrated for his aristocratic taste and sublime conceptions.

They survive as scraps and tatters, and to perform them it was necessary to fill in. Indeed, ten of the twelve accompaniments [note, not the vocal parts, the instrumental backing] were composed by Thomas Z. Shepard who was responsible for making the record, and who displayed monumental presumption by collaborating with Mozart even in obscenities. The responsible musicians are Norman Luboff, who conducted the chorus and a bevy of unknown soloists, and Igor Kipnis, the harpsichordist.

Anne Grossman translated the verses, and vividly so that none of the earthy expressions will be lost on English-language ears. Small boys toss four-letter words at one another, and laugh uproariously. But there's a market for such "humor" among adults. This record is for them.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Joe_F
Date: 17 Aug 16 - 09:48 PM

'Dear Guest "not me yet", a friendly warning. Your post is entirely in good faith and you intended no wrong; however there is a Mudcat policy regarding public posts online, and e-mail addresses. You seem to be unaware of this policy.'

Dear Keberoxu: Despite many years on the Mudcat, I too was unaware of that "Mudcat policy", and I remain unaware of it, because you have provided neither an explanation nor a link.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 18 Aug 16 - 09:43 AM

Not putting your email address, or anyone else's, on a publlic site, is pretty sensible. Even apart from the existence of nasty people around on the net, you risk inviting unwanted spam, and we all get too much of that.

There isn't any "ban" on it so far as I know. Just strong advice, based on bad experience.

No kind of ban or advice against stuff like youtube links. There are of course plenty of sites around that it would be a very bad idea to link to, but that's another matter. I know some forums have a ban on all links to public sites for that reason, but I don't think we've done that.


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: keberoxu
Date: 18 Aug 16 - 06:04 PM

Rather than copy it out here, I will link to this blog; it is someone's personal entry, and no author or copyright is acknowledged, so I cannot guess whether or not this translation is published anywhere. However, what it supplies is:
the original Viennese-dialect German/Austrian text (attributed to Mozart himself)
an English literal translation of same, with no credit as stated previously.

The blog itself is in Portuguese (Brazilian?).

Das Bandel lyrics, German and English


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Subject: RE: Mozart comic songs
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 18 Aug 16 - 08:51 PM

Mozart in his teens and early twenties was very fond of bottoms, poo, wee-wee, jokes about kissing arses and, above all, sexy games with the delightful young ladies of his acquaintance (and why not - what have I missed!) As he got older, married, and burdened with debt and family tragedies, he got more serious about life, and I've always regarded his last decade as the most sublime and productive period of creativity of any artist in any genre. I have a sneaky suspicion that he may not have been the nicest chap on the planet, but hey ho. And, for me, the Magic Flute is the perfect work of art (I'm not being original in saying that). But his quartets, quintets, later symphonies, all his operas of that last ten years and around ten of his piano concertos are miracles. And that Sinfonia Concertante. Give yourself ten minutes and listen to the finale of the Jupiter then tell me you haven't listened to sheer genius!


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