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Pre-Historic Folk Music

Amos 25 Jun 09 - 12:30 PM
Jayto 25 Jun 09 - 12:42 PM
wysiwyg 25 Jun 09 - 12:49 PM
wysiwyg 25 Jun 09 - 12:49 PM
Ernest 25 Jun 09 - 12:53 PM
Jim Carroll 25 Jun 09 - 12:56 PM
Ernest 25 Jun 09 - 01:04 PM
GUEST, Sminky 25 Jun 09 - 01:09 PM
Jayto 25 Jun 09 - 01:16 PM
Ernest 25 Jun 09 - 01:18 PM
GUEST,Neil D 25 Jun 09 - 01:23 PM
Ernest 25 Jun 09 - 01:33 PM
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Subject: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Amos
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:30 PM

At least 35,000 years ago, in the depths of the last ice age, the sound of music filled a cave in what is now southwestern Germany, the same place and time early Homo sapiens were also carving the oldest known examples of figurative art in the world.
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Scientists say that this bone flute, found at Hohle Fels Cave in southwestern Germany, is at least 35,000 years old.

Music and sculpture — expressions of artistic creativity, it seems — were emerging in tandem among some of the first modern humans when they began spreading through Europe or soon thereafter.

Archaeologists Wednesday reported the discovery last fall of a bone flute and two fragments of ivory flutes that they said represented the earliest known flowering of music-making in Stone Age culture. They said the bone flute with five finger holes, found at Hohle Fels Cave in the hills west of Ulm, was "by far the most complete of the musical instruments so far recovered from the caves" in a region where pieces of other flutes have been turning up in recent years.

A three-hole flute carved from mammoth ivory was uncovered a few years ago at another cave, as well as two flutes made from the wing bones of a mute swan. In the same cave, archaeologists also found beautiful carvings of animals. But until now the artifacts appeared to be too rare and were not dated precisely enough to support wider interpretations of the early rise of music. The earliest solid evidence of musical instruments previously came from France and Austria, but dated much more recently than 30,000 years ago.

In an article published online by the journal Nature, Nicholas J. Conard of the University of Tübingen, in Germany, and colleagues wrote, "These finds demonstrate the presence of a well-established musical tradition at the time when modern humans colonized Europe."

Although radiocarbon dates earlier than 30,000 years ago can be imprecise, samples from the bones and associated material were tested independently by two laboratories, in England and Germany, using different methods. Scientists said the data agreed on ages of at least 35,000 years. ...




A sample of music played on a replica of the prehistoric flute can be found on The NEw York TImes story page.


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Jayto
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:42 PM

That is cool very very cool.I wonder what gigs paid back then and what they considered folk lol.
cya
JT


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: wysiwyg
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:49 PM

I believe the DVR is set to catch the repeat.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: wysiwyg
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:49 PM

Whoops, wrong thread.

~S~


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Ernest
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:53 PM

I bet the first thing the inventor heard was:

"This thing is not traditional....."

;0)
Ernest


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Jim Carroll
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 12:56 PM

"This thing is not traditional....."
Nope - I'll bet he heard some eejit say "I ain't never heard a horse sing".
Jim Carroll


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Ernest
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:04 PM

Interesting theory, Jim.

And now we can guess the extinction of the Neanderthal people was caused by a serious fight about the definition of "Folk"...

;0)
Ernest


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:09 PM

Maybe the definition is carved in stone somewhere.


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Jayto
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:16 PM

Just think how long he had to wait for the 1950's definition. Back then it was Mudcave Cafe where he argued the definition. I bet if we traced back theguy that made it was Pete Seeger's 20,00000000000000000000000000000th great grandfather. You know that stuff runs in the genes lol
jt


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Ernest
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:18 PM

You are probably thinking of the "54`Million B.C.-Definition"?

I guess that was what started the fight...

;0)
Ernest


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: GUEST,Neil D
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:23 PM

They didn't find a simple skin drum with that three-holed flute did they? I know Morris Dancing is a very old tradion and you always picture cavemen walking around with big sticks.


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Subject: RE: Pre-Historic Folk Music
From: Ernest
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 01:33 PM

Well Neil, for one the article spoke about a five hole flute, for second it wasn`t found in England and last but not least the people from that area have their own tradition called

Schwaebisch-Alemannische Fastnacht

Admittedly, it looks similar to Morris...

;0)
Ernest


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