Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Origins/Song Info: Lovely Glenshesk

In Mudcat MIDIs:
Bonnie Kellswater (from Taylor's Traditional Tunebook (compare with In Praise of the Glen))
In Praise of the Glen (from Sam Henry's Songs of the People, Page 195)
Kellswaterside (from ABC Tunefinder (compare with Lovely Glenshesk I))
Lovely Glenshesk (I) (from Sam Henry's Songs of the People, Page 165)


TradFan984 27 Jun 09 - 12:42 PM
Joe Offer 27 Jun 09 - 11:37 PM
Joe Offer 27 Jun 09 - 11:47 PM
Joe Offer 27 Jun 09 - 11:55 PM
Joe Offer 28 Jun 09 - 12:13 AM
Joe Offer 28 Jun 09 - 01:17 AM
GUEST,Donal 28 Jun 09 - 08:53 PM
GUEST,leeneia 29 Jun 09 - 09:02 AM
TradFan984 30 Jun 09 - 04:46 AM
GUEST 25 Jan 14 - 09:31 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: Lovely Glenshesk
From: TradFan984
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 12:42 PM

Hi everyone

It says in the Sam Henry collection that the song Lovely Glenshesk (In Praise of the Glen) is generally sung to a melody close to that of Bonnie Kellswater. Does anyone know is that the case when it is being sung today?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Lovely Glenshesk (I)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 11:37 PM

Oh, darn. I see it's the "In Praise of the Glen" song you wanted. I found three Glenshesk songs in Sam Henry's Songs of the People, so I guess it might be an idea to post all three for the sake of discussion.

Here's the first:

LOVELY GLENSHESK (I)

One fine summer's evening I was forced to my pen
To write down the praises of the top of the glen,
Where the small birds enchanted in every green tree,
Their songs of love practice to the highest degree.

Glenshesk, you're surrounded by hills dark and high,
And they who pass through say farewell with a sigh;
Fresh lakes and spring wells there, they shine calm and clear,
They were born to good fortune, had the luck to dwell here.

In you, sweet Glenshesk, I have dwelt since a boy,
Three miles from the Mairge and three from Armoy;
When Phoebus arises he there throws his beam,
It will grieve me far off for to mention your name.

My forefathers fought at the battle of Orra,
No wonder it grieves me to leave you tomorrow,
I'm leaving the country I love, without blame,
My fortune is nothing, M'Quillan's my name.


Sam Henry's Songs of the People, #H544: 5 May 1934. Page 165.
Source not given.

Click to Play (Lovely Glenshesk I)

Click to Play (Kellswaterside) (from Tunefinder)


Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Lovely Glenshesk (I)

DESCRIPTION: The singer has been "forced to my pen To write down the praises of the top of the glen." He tells of the birds and the hills of his home in Glenshesk, which he must leave tomorrow. His family has been there for generations; he grieves to depart
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1934 (Sam Henry collection)
KEYWORDS: home rambling
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (1 citation):
SHenry H544, pp. 165-166, "Lovely Glenshesk (I)" (1 text, 1 tune)
Roud #13476
Notes: The singer claims his family has been present in Glenshesk since the Battle of Orra. All I've been able to learn about this battle is that it took place in the sixteenth century. - RBW
File: HHH544

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2007 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: Lovely Glenshesk (II)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 11:47 PM

LOVELY GLENSHESK (II)

This evening I take my departure from the lovely town where I was bred,
My friends and relations are round me, which cause me salt tears for to shed
When I think that I'm going to leave you, never more for to see the old place,
I grieve for my old tender parents and the parting of you, lovely Glenshesk.

I am come to the age of discerning, I am taught for to keep the commands,
Every one gets their own gift, and feeling sends me to a far foreign land.
Like the bee I will go gather honey, though I wander to many a strange place;
No wonder it grieves me to leave you and part with you, lovely Glenshesk.

The Israelites they were in bondage and they murmured at their going away,
They would rather turn back to their burthens and work at them both night and day,
But Moses gave them the bright promise; alas, they did grieve and transgress.
No wonder it grieves me to leave you and part from you, lovely Glenshesk.

Farewell to you, hills and green valleys and ye woods that spontaneously spring,
Where the feathered tribes of all species and the cuckoo melodious does sing,
All these beauties I'm parting this evening and my sorrow I think no disgrace,
No wonder it grieves me to leave you and part from you, lovely Glenshesk.

Only Adam and Eve's disobedience, we all would be happy and free,
The serpent tempted Eve in the garden to eat of the forbidden tree;
We would never have to work at hard labour, we all would be happy and blessed.
I hope we'll avoid all temptations when far, far from lovely Glenshesk.

1.2: ... which causes me salt tears to shed [Dt]
2.2: ... gift and feeling, and feeling ... [Dt)
3.1: ... bondage, and murmured at going ... [Dt]
4.2: ... cuckoo melodiously sings, [Dt]
5.3: ... have to sweat at ... [Dt]


Sam Henry's Songs of the People, #H28a: "Two Ballycastle Songs," 24 May 1924. Page 194-195.

Source: Author John McCormick (Greenan, Culfeightrin)
Music: John Henry Macauley (Ballycastle)

Tune available on request, but it's a long one and I got lazy tonight.


And the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Lovely Glenshesk (II)

DESCRIPTION: "This evening I take my departure from the lovely town where I was bred"; he is bidding farewell to friends and relatives. Having come of age, he must go to "a far foreign land." He describes the temptations faced by humanity, and hopes to avoid them
AUTHOR: John McCormick (?)
EARLIEST DATE: 1924 (Sam Henry collection; tune collected 1905?)
KEYWORDS: emigration farewell
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (2 citations):
SHenry H28a, pp. 194-195, "Lovely Glenshesk (IIa)"; H547, pp. 195-196, "In Praise of the Glen" (2 texts, 2 tunes)
Tunney-SongsThunder, pp. 175-176, "Lovely Glenshesk" (1 text)

Roud #5281
Notes: The Biblical allusion, "The Israelites they were in bondage and they murmured at their going away," actually refers to a multitude of troubles during the Exodus; whenever the Israelites faced problems, or just decided they were tired of something, they "murmured" and talked about going back to Egypt.
A handful of examples: Exodus 14:10ff. (the people are afraid when pursued by Pharaoh); Exodus 16:2ff. (the people demand meat); Exodus 17:2ff. (the people want water); Numbers 11:4ff. (more demands for meat).
The story of the serpent tempting Eve is found in Genesis 3. - RBW
File: HHH028a

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2007 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: ADD: In Praise of the Glen
From: Joe Offer
Date: 27 Jun 09 - 11:55 PM

IN PRAISE OF THE GLEN

This evening I take my departure
From the lovely place where I was bred,
While my friends and relations flock round me,
Which causes my tears for to shed
When I think I am going to leave them
And never to stand in this place;
No wonder it grieves me to leave them
In the parting you, lovely Glenshesk.

I feel like the Hebrews in bondage
Who murmured at their going away,
And would rather turn back to their burdens
Which oppressed them by night and by day,
But Moses gave to them the promise
Of a land where their souls might find rest;
No wonder it grieves me to leave you
And part with you, lovely Glenshesk.

Farewell to you, Glenshesk sweet waters,
Sweet stream that does gently flow down,
And likewise to sweet Ballycastle,
A place of great fame and renown,
And to Knocklayde, the pride of old Ireland,
By nature a beautiful place;
No wonder it grieves me to leave you
In the parting you, lovely Glenshesk.

My full name it is John M'Cormick,
I have penned these few verses in rhyme,
And I hope that we'll all meet in glory,
In happiness ever to shine.
I hope that we all meet in glory.
Too much of your time I did waste,
So give me your blessing this evening,
And a long, long farewell to Glenshesk.


Sam Henry's Songs of the People, #H547: 26 May 1934. Page 195-196.

Source: not given
Music: "The Lover's Curse"

Click to Play (In Praise of the Glen)

Click to Play (Bonnie Kellswater) (from Taylor's Traditional Tunebook)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Info: Lovely Glenshesk
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 12:13 AM

There's one more, Glenshesk Waterside, but I already put the scanner away and I need time to type tunes. Manybe later.

Glenshesk Waterside, The

DESCRIPTION: The singer recalls wandering along the Glenshesk water, but now he must sadly depart. He wishes he were still there, "But fate proposes I must go, in foreign lands abide." He describes all the things he won't see again
AUTHOR: P. C. J. McAuley (?)
EARLIEST DATE: 1924 (Sam Henry collection)
KEYWORDS: emigration homesickness
FOUND IN: Ireland
REFERENCES (1 citation):
SHenry H19a, p. 194, "The Glenshesk Waterside" (1 text, 2 tunes, one a corrected version of the other)
Roud #9510
CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "Scarborough Settler's Lament" (theme) and references there
File: HHH019a

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2007 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Info: Lovely Glenshesk
From: Joe Offer
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 01:17 AM

This was fun, Tradfan. I've posted the tunes above. I think you'll find some interesting similarities.
-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins/Song Info: Lovely Glenshesk
From: GUEST,Donal
Date: 28 Jun 09 - 08:53 PM

According to Rev. George Hill's 'The MacDonnells of Antrim,' the battle of Aura (Orra) was fought
between the MacDonnells and the MacQuillans at a site near Ballycastle. The date is uncertain, but it was
towards the end of the 1550s.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins/Song Info: Lovely Glenshesk
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 29 Jun 09 - 09:02 AM

Thanks, Joe, for posting the tunes. I've downloaded 'Bonnie Kellswater' for future work. It may make a lovely dulcimer tune.

I see that it came from Contemplator's site. Thanks, Contemplator.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Origins/Song Info: Lovely Glenshesk
From: TradFan984
Date: 30 Jun 09 - 04:46 AM

Thanks very much for all your help it's much appreciated

TradFan984


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Music for Kellswater
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Jan 14 - 09:31 PM

Hi, Does anyone know where to find liner notes for Bonnie Kellswater? Thanks!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 19 July 12:44 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.