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The re-Imagined Village

Related threads:
BS: WalkaboutsVerse Anew (1193)
The Weekly Walkabout cum Talkabout (380)
The Weekly Walkabout (part 2.) (1465) (closed)
The Weekly Walkabout (273) (closed)
Walkaboutsverse (989) (closed)


GUEST,Secret Satan 01 Jan 14 - 04:20 PM
GUEST,CS 01 Jan 14 - 07:09 AM
GUEST,CS 01 Jan 14 - 06:25 AM
VirginiaTam 01 Jan 14 - 05:22 AM
GUEST 31 Dec 13 - 04:52 PM
GUEST,CS 31 Dec 13 - 04:31 PM
GUEST,CS 31 Dec 13 - 04:23 PM
VirginiaTam 28 Dec 13 - 04:32 AM
GUEST,Jack Blandiver 27 Dec 13 - 04:58 AM
GUEST,CS 26 Dec 13 - 01:57 PM
GUEST,Miss Kilningur 27 Nov 12 - 04:48 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 26 Nov 12 - 06:02 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Nov 12 - 06:55 AM
GUEST,Miss Kilningur 25 Nov 12 - 04:53 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 23 Nov 12 - 07:17 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Nov 12 - 05:54 PM
GUEST,Blandiver 22 Nov 12 - 06:54 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Nov 12 - 04:49 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Nov 12 - 03:47 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Nov 12 - 03:41 PM
Stringsinger 22 Nov 12 - 10:53 AM
GUEST,CS 21 Nov 12 - 01:08 PM
GUEST,Eliza 21 Nov 12 - 12:52 PM
GUEST,CS 21 Nov 12 - 12:46 PM
GUEST,Eliza 21 Nov 12 - 12:24 PM
GUEST,CS 20 Nov 12 - 05:13 PM
GUEST,Eliza 20 Nov 12 - 05:00 PM
GUEST,Blandiver 20 Nov 12 - 04:51 AM
GUEST,Big Al Whittle 19 Nov 12 - 07:04 AM
GUEST 19 Nov 12 - 05:12 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 18 Nov 12 - 06:45 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Nov 12 - 06:27 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 17 Nov 12 - 07:32 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 17 Nov 12 - 08:21 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 17 Nov 12 - 06:38 AM
GUEST,CS 16 Nov 12 - 08:19 PM
GUEST,Blandiver 16 Nov 12 - 07:36 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Nov 12 - 05:59 PM
GUEST,CS 16 Nov 12 - 05:01 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Nov 12 - 04:44 PM
GUEST,Blandiver 16 Nov 12 - 10:58 AM
GUEST,CS 16 Nov 12 - 10:23 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 16 Nov 12 - 08:37 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Nov 12 - 07:39 AM
GUEST,CS 16 Nov 12 - 06:40 AM
theleveller 16 Nov 12 - 06:17 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 16 Nov 12 - 05:44 AM
GUEST,A Mysterious Stranger 16 Nov 12 - 05:26 AM
GUEST 16 Nov 12 - 05:16 AM
GUEST,Blandiver 16 Nov 12 - 03:50 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 15 Aug 10 - 08:37 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 15 Aug 10 - 06:31 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 15 Aug 10 - 04:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 10 - 05:17 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 10 - 05:28 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 14 Aug 10 - 04:51 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 13 Aug 10 - 06:45 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Aug 10 - 05:35 PM
Smokey. 13 Aug 10 - 05:19 PM
Joe Offer 13 Aug 10 - 05:16 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Aug 10 - 05:07 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 13 Aug 10 - 04:04 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 13 Aug 10 - 03:33 PM
Stu 03 Aug 10 - 04:50 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 02 Aug 10 - 03:49 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 10 - 01:01 PM
Stu 02 Aug 10 - 12:51 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 10 - 12:16 PM
Stu 02 Aug 10 - 09:32 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 02 Aug 10 - 09:28 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 10 - 08:44 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Aug 10 - 06:12 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 10 - 05:29 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Aug 10 - 05:35 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 10 - 03:12 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Aug 10 - 03:01 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 10 - 02:27 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 10 - 02:18 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 01 Aug 10 - 04:55 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 10 - 01:56 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 01 Jul 10 - 01:41 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 10 - 12:32 PM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 01 Jul 10 - 11:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 10 - 10:00 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Jul 10 - 09:55 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 10 - 09:40 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Jul 10 - 09:18 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 01 Jul 10 - 08:35 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 29 Jun 10 - 01:04 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jun 10 - 11:05 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Jun 10 - 05:08 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 25 Jun 10 - 01:43 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Jun 10 - 12:51 PM
VirginiaTam 25 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Jun 10 - 06:39 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Jun 10 - 06:33 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 25 Jun 10 - 04:16 AM
VirginiaTam 24 Jun 10 - 04:03 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 03:52 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 10 - 03:39 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 03:33 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Jun 10 - 02:32 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Jun 10 - 02:15 PM
GUEST,S O'P (Astrray) 24 Jun 10 - 09:06 AM
GUEST 24 Jun 10 - 08:47 AM
Darowyn 24 Jun 10 - 06:02 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 21 Jun 10 - 09:48 AM
Jack Blandiver 21 Jun 10 - 09:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Feb 10 - 09:20 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Jan 10 - 08:11 AM
VirginiaTam 02 Jan 10 - 06:06 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jan 10 - 04:52 AM
GUEST,Remote Control Freak 01 Jan 10 - 04:08 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Dec 09 - 05:48 AM
theleveller 05 Dec 09 - 12:00 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Dec 09 - 09:46 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Dec 09 - 09:39 AM
theleveller 05 Dec 09 - 09:16 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Dec 09 - 06:59 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Dec 09 - 02:54 PM
theleveller 04 Dec 09 - 10:47 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Dec 09 - 10:21 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Dec 09 - 10:16 AM
theleveller 04 Dec 09 - 10:15 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Dec 09 - 08:55 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Dec 09 - 12:00 PM
Jack Blandiver 03 Dec 09 - 08:49 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Nov 09 - 07:42 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 20 Nov 09 - 02:09 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 20 Nov 09 - 12:54 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 20 Nov 09 - 12:43 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 20 Nov 09 - 12:02 PM
theleveller 20 Nov 09 - 09:41 AM
theleveller 20 Nov 09 - 09:28 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 20 Nov 09 - 08:13 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 19 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Nov 09 - 12:07 PM
Jack Blandiver 19 Nov 09 - 11:37 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 19 Nov 09 - 10:45 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Nov 09 - 10:17 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 19 Nov 09 - 10:09 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Nov 09 - 09:12 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 19 Nov 09 - 09:04 AM
Jack Blandiver 19 Nov 09 - 08:14 AM
theleveller 19 Nov 09 - 07:39 AM
Smedley 19 Nov 09 - 07:21 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 19 Nov 09 - 07:12 AM
Jack Blandiver 19 Nov 09 - 06:05 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Nov 09 - 05:26 AM
mandotim 19 Nov 09 - 05:21 AM
Jack Blandiver 19 Nov 09 - 03:36 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Nov 09 - 05:19 PM
Darowyn 18 Nov 09 - 01:31 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 18 Nov 09 - 01:24 PM
Jack Blandiver 18 Nov 09 - 01:20 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Nov 09 - 12:35 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 18 Nov 09 - 11:31 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 18 Nov 09 - 10:44 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 18 Nov 09 - 10:31 AM
GUEST 17 Nov 09 - 07:02 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 16 Nov 09 - 10:12 AM
Jack Blandiver 16 Nov 09 - 07:31 AM
Stu 07 Nov 09 - 05:45 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 07 Nov 09 - 04:48 AM
theleveller 06 Nov 09 - 12:11 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Nov 09 - 11:23 AM
theleveller 06 Nov 09 - 11:06 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Nov 09 - 10:12 AM
theleveller 06 Nov 09 - 09:53 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Nov 09 - 09:43 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Nov 09 - 08:47 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Nov 09 - 06:33 AM
Stu 06 Nov 09 - 05:39 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Nov 09 - 04:46 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Nov 09 - 10:10 AM
Sailor Ron 05 Nov 09 - 09:48 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Nov 09 - 09:26 AM
theleveller 05 Nov 09 - 08:29 AM
theleveller 05 Nov 09 - 08:20 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Nov 09 - 08:15 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Nov 09 - 07:56 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 09 Oct 09 - 11:03 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Oct 09 - 06:35 AM
GUEST 01 Sep 09 - 11:26 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Sep 09 - 11:06 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Sep 09 - 04:47 AM
Jack Campin 31 Aug 09 - 07:08 PM
Jack Blandiver 31 Aug 09 - 06:54 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 28 Aug 09 - 03:32 PM
theleveller 27 Aug 09 - 12:03 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 27 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM
theleveller 27 Aug 09 - 11:06 AM
theleveller 27 Aug 09 - 11:02 AM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 27 Aug 09 - 09:54 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM
GUEST,Ed 27 Aug 09 - 07:48 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Aug 09 - 07:36 AM
Will Fly 27 Aug 09 - 07:07 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Aug 09 - 04:31 AM
Jack Blandiver 27 Aug 09 - 04:10 AM
Sailor Ron 27 Aug 09 - 03:56 AM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 26 Aug 09 - 05:58 PM
Jack Blandiver 26 Aug 09 - 12:11 PM
Will Fly 26 Aug 09 - 11:30 AM
Jack Blandiver 26 Aug 09 - 07:10 AM
Stu 26 Aug 09 - 05:46 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 26 Aug 09 - 05:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 26 Aug 09 - 05:18 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 26 Aug 09 - 04:59 AM
Jack Blandiver 26 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM
mandotim 26 Aug 09 - 04:04 AM
theleveller 26 Aug 09 - 03:43 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 06:04 PM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 05:50 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 25 Aug 09 - 05:46 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 05:38 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 25 Aug 09 - 05:31 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 05:22 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 25 Aug 09 - 02:39 PM
mandotim 25 Aug 09 - 02:19 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 25 Aug 09 - 01:44 PM
Jack Campin 25 Aug 09 - 01:34 PM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 01:12 PM
Jack Campin 25 Aug 09 - 12:55 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 12:34 PM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 11:27 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 11:18 AM
mandotim 25 Aug 09 - 11:10 AM
theleveller 25 Aug 09 - 10:52 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 10:46 AM
Jack Campin 25 Aug 09 - 10:40 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 10:14 AM
mandotim 25 Aug 09 - 10:11 AM
Stu 25 Aug 09 - 10:02 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 09:50 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 09:41 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 09:32 AM
mandotim 25 Aug 09 - 09:24 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 09:21 AM
theleveller 25 Aug 09 - 08:59 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 08:49 AM
Jack Campin 25 Aug 09 - 08:43 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 08:08 AM
Will Fly 25 Aug 09 - 08:03 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 07:47 AM
Will Fly 25 Aug 09 - 07:31 AM
Will Fly 25 Aug 09 - 07:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 06:40 AM
Sailor Ron 25 Aug 09 - 06:36 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 06:29 AM
Jack Campin 25 Aug 09 - 06:25 AM
Sailor Ron 25 Aug 09 - 06:21 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 06:19 AM
s&r 25 Aug 09 - 06:11 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 05:56 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 05:53 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 05:10 AM
Jack Blandiver 25 Aug 09 - 04:43 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 04:28 AM
Sailor Ron 25 Aug 09 - 03:48 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 25 Aug 09 - 03:37 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 06:11 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 24 Aug 09 - 04:50 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Aug 09 - 04:44 PM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 03:43 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 24 Aug 09 - 03:24 PM
Jack Campin 24 Aug 09 - 03:15 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 24 Aug 09 - 03:14 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Aug 09 - 02:59 PM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 02:41 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 24 Aug 09 - 01:54 PM
Will Fly 24 Aug 09 - 01:53 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Aug 09 - 01:19 PM
Will Fly 24 Aug 09 - 11:20 AM
Sailor Ron 24 Aug 09 - 10:49 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 07:59 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 24 Aug 09 - 06:50 AM
mandotim 24 Aug 09 - 06:50 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 06:27 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 06:26 AM
mandotim 24 Aug 09 - 06:09 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Aug 09 - 06:04 AM
Jack Blandiver 24 Aug 09 - 05:42 AM
s&r 24 Aug 09 - 04:49 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 24 Aug 09 - 04:36 AM
Jack Blandiver 23 Aug 09 - 05:20 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Aug 09 - 04:18 PM
theleveller 23 Aug 09 - 04:12 PM
theleveller 23 Aug 09 - 03:59 PM
Jack Blandiver 23 Aug 09 - 02:32 PM
GUEST,Sedayne (Astray) (S O'P) 23 Aug 09 - 09:18 AM
Jack Campin 23 Aug 09 - 08:22 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Aug 09 - 07:51 AM
Jack Blandiver 23 Aug 09 - 07:04 AM
theleveller 23 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 23 Aug 09 - 04:42 AM
Jack Blandiver 23 Aug 09 - 04:21 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 22 Aug 09 - 01:45 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Aug 09 - 12:12 PM
Stu 21 Aug 09 - 10:31 AM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 21 Aug 09 - 10:02 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Aug 09 - 08:19 AM
Will Fly 21 Aug 09 - 05:28 AM
theleveller 21 Aug 09 - 04:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 21 Aug 09 - 04:17 AM
Stu 21 Aug 09 - 04:11 AM
Will Fly 21 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM
theleveller 21 Aug 09 - 03:19 AM
GUEST,Sugarfoot Jack out and about 20 Aug 09 - 06:03 AM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 19 Aug 09 - 02:32 PM
Will Fly 19 Aug 09 - 02:23 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 19 Aug 09 - 02:06 PM
Ruth Archer 19 Aug 09 - 08:26 AM
s&r 19 Aug 09 - 08:22 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Aug 09 - 08:02 AM
theleveller 19 Aug 09 - 06:26 AM
theleveller 19 Aug 09 - 06:13 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM
theleveller 19 Aug 09 - 05:02 AM
Stu 19 Aug 09 - 04:38 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 19 Aug 09 - 04:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 19 Aug 09 - 03:00 AM
Will Fly 18 Aug 09 - 06:17 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 18 Aug 09 - 02:50 PM
theleveller 18 Aug 09 - 02:46 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 18 Aug 09 - 02:23 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 02:18 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 18 Aug 09 - 01:56 PM
s&r 18 Aug 09 - 01:55 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 01:34 PM
Will Fly 18 Aug 09 - 01:16 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 01:04 PM
Ruth Archer 18 Aug 09 - 10:06 AM
Stu 18 Aug 09 - 10:00 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 09:12 AM
theleveller 18 Aug 09 - 06:36 AM
Sailor Ron 18 Aug 09 - 06:17 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 05:50 AM
Ruth Archer 18 Aug 09 - 05:25 AM
theleveller 18 Aug 09 - 05:25 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 18 Aug 09 - 05:18 AM
Ruth Archer 18 Aug 09 - 04:45 AM
Jack Blandiver 18 Aug 09 - 04:19 AM
theleveller 18 Aug 09 - 03:31 AM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 05:52 PM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 05:14 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 17 Aug 09 - 04:49 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 17 Aug 09 - 04:46 PM
Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive) 17 Aug 09 - 04:16 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 17 Aug 09 - 04:06 PM
theleveller 17 Aug 09 - 03:33 PM
Will Fly 17 Aug 09 - 02:12 PM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 10:37 AM
theleveller 17 Aug 09 - 09:19 AM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 08:13 AM
theleveller 17 Aug 09 - 07:09 AM
theleveller 17 Aug 09 - 06:22 AM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 05:35 AM
theleveller 17 Aug 09 - 05:05 AM
Jack Blandiver 17 Aug 09 - 05:04 AM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 06:23 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Aug 09 - 04:27 PM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 02:36 PM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 02:33 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Aug 09 - 12:26 PM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Aug 09 - 08:03 AM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 05:03 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 16 Aug 09 - 04:35 AM
Jack Blandiver 16 Aug 09 - 04:17 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 15 Aug 09 - 12:58 PM
theleveller 15 Aug 09 - 11:49 AM
theleveller 15 Aug 09 - 11:29 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Aug 09 - 10:17 AM
theleveller 15 Aug 09 - 10:08 AM
theleveller 15 Aug 09 - 09:36 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Aug 09 - 07:41 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 15 Aug 09 - 05:12 AM
theleveller 15 Aug 09 - 04:55 AM
Jack Blandiver 15 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 09 - 04:33 PM
Jack Blandiver 14 Aug 09 - 03:51 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 09 - 01:37 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 14 Aug 09 - 01:25 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 09 - 12:21 PM
Jack Blandiver 14 Aug 09 - 12:09 PM
theleveller 14 Aug 09 - 11:53 AM
theleveller 14 Aug 09 - 08:17 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 09 - 07:28 AM
Jack Blandiver 14 Aug 09 - 07:17 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 14 Aug 09 - 06:58 AM
Ruth Archer 14 Aug 09 - 06:40 AM
Jack Blandiver 14 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM
theleveller 14 Aug 09 - 05:59 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 13 Aug 09 - 02:20 PM
theleveller 13 Aug 09 - 03:46 AM
theleveller 13 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM
Jack Blandiver 13 Aug 09 - 02:55 AM
theleveller 12 Aug 09 - 11:38 AM
Jack Blandiver 12 Aug 09 - 10:29 AM
theleveller 12 Aug 09 - 09:44 AM
Jack Blandiver 12 Aug 09 - 09:10 AM
Jack Blandiver 12 Aug 09 - 08:45 AM
theleveller 12 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM
Jack Blandiver 12 Aug 09 - 06:41 AM
Stu 11 Aug 09 - 07:24 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 11 Aug 09 - 07:17 AM
Jack Blandiver 11 Aug 09 - 06:44 AM
s&r 11 Aug 09 - 04:13 AM
Sailor Ron 11 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM
Jack Blandiver 11 Aug 09 - 03:01 AM
Ross Campbell 10 Aug 09 - 07:29 PM
Phil Edwards 10 Aug 09 - 05:22 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Aug 09 - 05:14 PM
Ross Campbell 10 Aug 09 - 04:55 PM
Jack Blandiver 10 Aug 09 - 03:19 PM
theleveller 10 Aug 09 - 02:34 PM
Jack Blandiver 10 Aug 09 - 02:18 PM
Jack Blandiver 10 Aug 09 - 01:29 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Aug 09 - 01:01 PM
theleveller 10 Aug 09 - 08:19 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Aug 09 - 04:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Aug 09 - 04:43 AM
Will Fly 08 Aug 09 - 05:43 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 08 Aug 09 - 04:32 PM
Jack Blandiver 07 Aug 09 - 03:14 PM
Will Fly 07 Aug 09 - 01:07 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 07 Aug 09 - 12:55 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 07 Aug 09 - 12:33 PM
Jack Blandiver 07 Aug 09 - 12:24 PM
Will Fly 07 Aug 09 - 12:12 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 07 Aug 09 - 12:04 PM
Jack Blandiver 07 Aug 09 - 06:52 AM
Jack Blandiver 07 Aug 09 - 04:56 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 07 Aug 09 - 04:29 AM
Ross Campbell 06 Aug 09 - 09:52 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Aug 09 - 12:42 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Aug 09 - 12:25 PM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 10:04 AM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 08:35 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 08:26 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 07:57 AM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 07:52 AM
Spleen Cringe 06 Aug 09 - 07:44 AM
Spleen Cringe 06 Aug 09 - 07:42 AM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 07:12 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 06:49 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Aug 09 - 06:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 06:27 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Aug 09 - 06:18 AM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 06:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 06:05 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 06:03 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Aug 09 - 05:55 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 05:51 AM
s&r 06 Aug 09 - 05:38 AM
theleveller 06 Aug 09 - 05:24 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Aug 09 - 05:08 AM
Sailor Ron 06 Aug 09 - 04:51 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Aug 09 - 03:48 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 03:57 PM
Spleen Cringe 05 Aug 09 - 02:35 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Aug 09 - 12:10 PM
Stu 05 Aug 09 - 11:52 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 11:31 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 11:24 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 11:16 AM
Phil Edwards 05 Aug 09 - 10:32 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Aug 09 - 09:19 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Aug 09 - 09:17 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Aug 09 - 09:15 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 09:15 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 09:13 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Aug 09 - 09:03 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 08:51 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 08:51 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Aug 09 - 08:42 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Aug 09 - 08:09 AM
Phil Edwards 05 Aug 09 - 08:04 AM
Phil Edwards 05 Aug 09 - 07:58 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 07:12 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 07:03 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 06:57 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 06:43 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 05:48 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Aug 09 - 05:16 AM
theleveller 05 Aug 09 - 03:37 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Aug 09 - 12:33 PM
theleveller 04 Aug 09 - 11:21 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 09:11 AM
theleveller 04 Aug 09 - 07:47 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 07:33 AM
theleveller 04 Aug 09 - 07:18 AM
Sailor Ron 04 Aug 09 - 06:58 AM
Stu 04 Aug 09 - 06:56 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Aug 09 - 06:49 AM
Stu 04 Aug 09 - 06:22 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM
Will Fly 04 Aug 09 - 05:55 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Aug 09 - 05:52 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 05:51 AM
theleveller 04 Aug 09 - 05:49 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Aug 09 - 05:49 AM
Sailor Ron 04 Aug 09 - 05:44 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Aug 09 - 05:39 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 05:29 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 05:19 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Aug 09 - 05:08 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Aug 09 - 04:57 AM
Darowyn 04 Aug 09 - 04:25 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Aug 09 - 04:30 PM
Phil Edwards 03 Aug 09 - 04:19 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Aug 09 - 01:09 PM
Jack Blandiver 03 Aug 09 - 06:33 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Aug 09 - 06:30 AM
Phil Edwards 03 Aug 09 - 05:44 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Aug 09 - 05:28 AM
Sailor Ron 03 Aug 09 - 05:19 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Aug 09 - 05:28 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 09 - 03:12 PM
Jack Blandiver 02 Aug 09 - 01:32 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 09 - 12:19 PM
Stu 02 Aug 09 - 09:13 AM
Phil Edwards 02 Aug 09 - 07:04 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Aug 09 - 05:52 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Aug 09 - 05:38 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM
Spleen Cringe 01 Aug 09 - 07:08 PM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 07:01 PM
Phil Edwards 01 Aug 09 - 05:51 PM
Spleen Cringe 01 Aug 09 - 12:29 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 09:12 AM
Stu 01 Aug 09 - 08:56 AM
Phil Edwards 01 Aug 09 - 08:48 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Aug 09 - 07:09 AM
Stu 01 Aug 09 - 06:57 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 06:44 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 06:17 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 05:46 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 05:36 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 05:34 AM
Stu 01 Aug 09 - 05:23 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 04:56 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 04:51 AM
GUEST,Shimrod 01 Aug 09 - 04:40 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 04:36 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 04:22 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 04:12 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Aug 09 - 03:55 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM
Spleen Cringe 31 Jul 09 - 07:39 PM
Spleen Cringe 31 Jul 09 - 07:31 PM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 07:22 PM
Spleen Cringe 31 Jul 09 - 05:40 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Jul 09 - 04:52 PM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 04:01 PM
Spleen Cringe 31 Jul 09 - 01:35 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Jul 09 - 12:39 PM
Stu 31 Jul 09 - 10:41 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 10:12 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 10:08 AM
Stu 31 Jul 09 - 09:43 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 09:20 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 31 Jul 09 - 08:07 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 07:34 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 07:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Jul 09 - 06:28 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 31 Jul 09 - 05:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 31 Jul 09 - 04:44 AM
open mike 30 Jul 09 - 09:03 PM
glueman 30 Jul 09 - 04:32 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 Jul 09 - 03:15 PM
Spleen Cringe 30 Jul 09 - 02:33 PM
Stu 30 Jul 09 - 01:38 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 Jul 09 - 12:52 PM
Sailor Ron 30 Jul 09 - 11:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jul 09 - 07:42 AM
Stu 30 Jul 09 - 07:32 AM
Phil Edwards 30 Jul 09 - 06:22 AM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jul 09 - 05:03 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 Jul 09 - 04:25 AM
Phil Edwards 29 Jul 09 - 05:46 PM
glueman 29 Jul 09 - 05:42 PM
Sue Allan 29 Jul 09 - 05:33 PM
Spleen Cringe 29 Jul 09 - 05:20 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 04:44 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 04:33 PM
Sue Allan 29 Jul 09 - 04:24 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 04:03 PM
Spleen Cringe 29 Jul 09 - 03:49 PM
theleveller 29 Jul 09 - 03:45 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 03:03 PM
glueman 29 Jul 09 - 02:30 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 02:01 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 02:00 PM
glueman 29 Jul 09 - 01:59 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 29 Jul 09 - 01:58 PM
Jack Blandiver 29 Jul 09 - 01:45 PM
Stu 29 Jul 09 - 12:49 PM
glueman 29 Jul 09 - 12:45 PM
Jack Blandiver 29 Jul 09 - 12:35 PM
Jack Blandiver 29 Jul 09 - 12:33 PM
Stu 29 Jul 09 - 10:07 AM
Jack Blandiver 29 Jul 09 - 09:55 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 29 Jul 09 - 09:01 AM
theleveller 29 Jul 09 - 07:04 AM
Sailor Ron 29 Jul 09 - 06:14 AM
Jack Blandiver 29 Jul 09 - 05:22 AM
theleveller 29 Jul 09 - 05:17 AM
Sailor Ron 29 Jul 09 - 05:02 AM
Jack Blandiver 28 Jul 09 - 05:53 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 28 Jul 09 - 05:17 PM
theleveller 28 Jul 09 - 04:16 PM
Jack Blandiver 28 Jul 09 - 04:08 PM
theleveller 28 Jul 09 - 11:50 AM
Les from Hull 28 Jul 09 - 11:43 AM
Sue Allan 27 Jul 09 - 05:43 PM
Jack Blandiver 27 Jul 09 - 05:05 PM
Sue Allan 27 Jul 09 - 04:36 PM
Jack Blandiver 27 Jul 09 - 03:41 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 27 Jul 09 - 01:40 PM
Jack Blandiver 27 Jul 09 - 12:21 PM
Jack Blandiver 19 Jul 09 - 09:36 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 12:30 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Jul 09 - 12:17 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 10 Jul 09 - 11:21 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 11:17 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 10:49 AM
Stu 10 Jul 09 - 10:49 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 10 Jul 09 - 10:25 AM
glueman 10 Jul 09 - 10:15 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 10 Jul 09 - 09:56 AM
theleveller 10 Jul 09 - 07:16 AM
glueman 10 Jul 09 - 06:16 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 06:01 AM
glueman 10 Jul 09 - 05:21 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 05:14 AM
theleveller 10 Jul 09 - 05:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 10 Jul 09 - 04:54 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 10 Jul 09 - 02:58 AM
s&r 09 Jul 09 - 06:35 PM
s&r 09 Jul 09 - 06:27 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 05:47 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 09 Jul 09 - 04:51 PM
Spleen Cringe 09 Jul 09 - 04:46 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 09 Jul 09 - 04:34 PM
glueman 09 Jul 09 - 04:30 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 09 Jul 09 - 04:18 PM
glueman 09 Jul 09 - 04:17 PM
theleveller 09 Jul 09 - 04:08 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 09 Jul 09 - 02:36 PM
Jack Blandiver 09 Jul 09 - 02:21 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 02:14 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 09 Jul 09 - 02:02 PM
Stu 09 Jul 09 - 10:40 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Jul 09 - 09:10 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 09 Jul 09 - 07:57 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Jul 09 - 07:44 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 07:42 AM
Stu 09 Jul 09 - 07:01 AM
Will Fly 09 Jul 09 - 06:54 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 06:49 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Jul 09 - 06:35 AM
glueman 09 Jul 09 - 05:55 AM
glueman 09 Jul 09 - 05:52 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 05:52 AM
Jack Blandiver 09 Jul 09 - 05:33 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 09 Jul 09 - 05:00 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 08 Jul 09 - 06:02 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 08 Jul 09 - 05:51 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 08 Jul 09 - 03:47 PM
theleveller 08 Jul 09 - 12:17 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 08 Jul 09 - 12:06 PM
theleveller 08 Jul 09 - 12:01 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 08 Jul 09 - 11:46 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 08 Jul 09 - 11:06 AM
glueman 08 Jul 09 - 09:45 AM
Jack Blandiver 08 Jul 09 - 08:18 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 08 Jul 09 - 08:15 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 08 Jul 09 - 08:13 AM
glueman 08 Jul 09 - 08:05 AM
theleveller 08 Jul 09 - 07:50 AM
glueman 08 Jul 09 - 07:42 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 08 Jul 09 - 07:36 AM
glueman 08 Jul 09 - 07:19 AM
Sailor Ron 08 Jul 09 - 07:12 AM
Stu 08 Jul 09 - 06:08 AM
Stu 08 Jul 09 - 06:05 AM
Jack Blandiver 08 Jul 09 - 05:58 AM
GUEST,Ed 08 Jul 09 - 05:23 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 08 Jul 09 - 05:13 AM
Sailor Ron 08 Jul 09 - 05:12 AM
theleveller 08 Jul 09 - 05:04 AM
Stu 08 Jul 09 - 04:52 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 08 Jul 09 - 03:41 AM
theleveller 08 Jul 09 - 03:34 AM
Ross Campbell 07 Jul 09 - 05:28 PM
Jack Blandiver 07 Jul 09 - 02:57 PM
Will Fly 07 Jul 09 - 12:27 PM
GUEST, Sminky 07 Jul 09 - 12:11 PM
theleveller 07 Jul 09 - 11:15 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 07 Jul 09 - 11:09 AM
Jack Blandiver 07 Jul 09 - 08:32 AM
theleveller 07 Jul 09 - 08:17 AM
theleveller 07 Jul 09 - 08:06 AM
Jack Blandiver 07 Jul 09 - 08:06 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 07 Jul 09 - 07:45 AM
Jack Blandiver 07 Jul 09 - 06:22 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 07 Jul 09 - 06:22 AM
mandotim 07 Jul 09 - 05:55 AM
Jack Blandiver 07 Jul 09 - 04:50 AM
Spleen Cringe 06 Jul 09 - 06:19 PM
Jack Blandiver 06 Jul 09 - 05:39 PM
Jack Blandiver 06 Jul 09 - 05:25 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Jul 09 - 04:04 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 06 Jul 09 - 03:46 PM
Jack Blandiver 06 Jul 09 - 12:46 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 06 Jul 09 - 12:32 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Jul 09 - 12:25 PM
manitas_at_work 06 Jul 09 - 11:42 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 06 Jul 09 - 11:11 AM
Will Fly 06 Jul 09 - 10:02 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Jul 09 - 09:59 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 06 Jul 09 - 06:56 AM
theleveller 06 Jul 09 - 06:42 AM
Jack Blandiver 06 Jul 09 - 05:32 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 05:04 PM
theleveller 05 Jul 09 - 03:00 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Jul 09 - 12:46 PM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 12:28 PM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 12:25 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Jul 09 - 11:48 AM
s&r 05 Jul 09 - 11:03 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 05 Jul 09 - 09:15 AM
Paul Burke 05 Jul 09 - 09:04 AM
theleveller 05 Jul 09 - 08:44 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Jul 09 - 08:38 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 08:11 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 05 Jul 09 - 07:49 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 07:12 AM
manitas_at_work 05 Jul 09 - 06:45 AM
Jack Blandiver 05 Jul 09 - 06:10 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 05:28 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 04 Jul 09 - 04:21 PM
theleveller 04 Jul 09 - 04:18 PM
Gervase 04 Jul 09 - 03:25 PM
Will Fly 04 Jul 09 - 03:20 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 03:17 PM
Howard Jones 04 Jul 09 - 03:09 PM
Will Fly 04 Jul 09 - 01:46 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Jul 09 - 01:44 PM
Will Fly 04 Jul 09 - 01:30 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 01:19 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 01:10 PM
theleveller 04 Jul 09 - 12:41 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 12:40 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 04 Jul 09 - 12:31 PM
Spleen Cringe 04 Jul 09 - 12:22 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 04 Jul 09 - 12:06 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 11:52 AM
Jack Campin 04 Jul 09 - 11:45 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Jul 09 - 11:44 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 04 Jul 09 - 11:12 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 04 Jul 09 - 11:08 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 10:26 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 09:45 AM
Lizzie Cornish 1 04 Jul 09 - 09:37 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Jul 09 - 08:44 AM
Jack Blandiver 04 Jul 09 - 07:30 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 04 Jul 09 - 07:14 AM
Snuffy 04 Jul 09 - 07:08 AM
Phil Edwards 04 Jul 09 - 05:00 AM
GUEST,Jack Campin 04 Jul 09 - 04:56 AM
Will Fly 04 Jul 09 - 04:25 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 04:17 AM
Will Fly 04 Jul 09 - 04:03 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 02:38 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 04 Jul 09 - 02:26 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 06:49 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 03 Jul 09 - 03:21 PM
doc.tom 03 Jul 09 - 03:16 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 03 Jul 09 - 03:11 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Jul 09 - 02:08 PM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 01:56 PM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 01:07 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Jul 09 - 01:03 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Jul 09 - 12:41 PM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 12:35 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 03 Jul 09 - 12:32 PM
GUEST,Big Norman Voice 03 Jul 09 - 12:27 PM
Sailor Ron 03 Jul 09 - 12:14 PM
GUEST 03 Jul 09 - 12:09 PM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 11:36 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 03 Jul 09 - 11:25 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 11:20 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 11:14 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 11:12 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 11:08 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 11:04 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 10:58 AM
manitas_at_work 03 Jul 09 - 10:52 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 10:45 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 10:31 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 10:19 AM
Stu 03 Jul 09 - 10:01 AM
mandotim 03 Jul 09 - 09:51 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 03 Jul 09 - 09:31 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 09:10 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 09:04 AM
Stu 03 Jul 09 - 08:52 AM
Jack Campin 03 Jul 09 - 08:37 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 07:52 AM
Jack Campin 03 Jul 09 - 07:20 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 06:10 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 06:08 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 06:05 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 06:04 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 06:01 AM
Phil Edwards 03 Jul 09 - 06:00 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 05:56 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 05:51 AM
GUEST,Ed 03 Jul 09 - 05:45 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 05:35 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Jul 09 - 05:34 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 05:20 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 05:12 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 05:07 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 04:34 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 03 Jul 09 - 04:23 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 04:21 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 04:01 AM
mandotim 03 Jul 09 - 03:47 AM
theleveller 03 Jul 09 - 03:41 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 03:25 AM
Phil Edwards 03 Jul 09 - 03:15 AM
Will Fly 03 Jul 09 - 02:14 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 02 Jul 09 - 07:04 PM
Spleen Cringe 02 Jul 09 - 06:54 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 02 Jul 09 - 06:09 PM
Will Fly 02 Jul 09 - 05:52 PM
Phil Edwards 02 Jul 09 - 05:16 PM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 04:22 PM
GUEST,Sedayne (Astray) (S O'P) 02 Jul 09 - 03:04 PM
Phil Edwards 02 Jul 09 - 02:25 PM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 02:10 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 02 Jul 09 - 01:24 PM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 12:49 PM
s&r 02 Jul 09 - 12:27 PM
Stu 02 Jul 09 - 12:27 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 02 Jul 09 - 12:07 PM
s&r 02 Jul 09 - 12:01 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 02 Jul 09 - 11:51 AM
Rifleman (inactive) 02 Jul 09 - 11:50 AM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 11:35 AM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 11:34 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 02 Jul 09 - 11:22 AM
Frozen Gin (inactive) 02 Jul 09 - 11:08 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 10:53 AM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 10:06 AM
Stu 02 Jul 09 - 09:37 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 09:22 AM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 08:54 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 08:06 AM
theleveller 02 Jul 09 - 07:09 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 05:47 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 05:34 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 05:33 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Jul 09 - 05:13 AM
Will Fly 02 Jul 09 - 05:00 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 02 Jul 09 - 04:44 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Jul 09 - 04:40 AM
Will Fly 02 Jul 09 - 03:58 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 05:58 PM
Ed Pellow 01 Jul 09 - 05:09 PM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 11:09 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 09 - 09:50 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 09:42 AM
Will Fly 01 Jul 09 - 08:06 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 07:57 AM
Will Fly 01 Jul 09 - 07:56 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 07:51 AM
Will Fly 01 Jul 09 - 07:46 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 01 Jul 09 - 07:39 AM
folk1e 01 Jul 09 - 07:38 AM
Will Fly 01 Jul 09 - 07:36 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 06:01 AM
Will Fly 01 Jul 09 - 05:38 AM
Jack Blandiver 01 Jul 09 - 05:28 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 09 - 05:10 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 01 Jul 09 - 04:53 AM
Stu 01 Jul 09 - 03:58 AM
s&r 01 Jul 09 - 03:19 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 01 Jul 09 - 01:52 AM
Lizzie Cornish 1 30 Jun 09 - 06:15 PM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jun 09 - 06:02 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 Jun 09 - 05:58 PM
GUEST,mg 30 Jun 09 - 05:58 PM
Ruth Archer 30 Jun 09 - 05:53 PM
Dave Sutherland 30 Jun 09 - 05:47 PM
GUEST,Shimrod 30 Jun 09 - 05:45 PM
GUEST,leeneia 30 Jun 09 - 05:37 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 30 Jun 09 - 04:54 PM
Frozen Gin (inactive) 30 Jun 09 - 03:53 PM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jun 09 - 03:36 PM
BB 30 Jun 09 - 03:34 PM
Banjiman 30 Jun 09 - 02:41 PM
Will Fly 30 Jun 09 - 02:37 PM
Gervase 30 Jun 09 - 02:30 PM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jun 09 - 02:28 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 30 Jun 09 - 02:28 PM
Will Fly 30 Jun 09 - 02:20 PM
Ruth Archer 30 Jun 09 - 02:11 PM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 30 Jun 09 - 02:04 PM
Ruth Archer 30 Jun 09 - 02:00 PM
Will Fly 30 Jun 09 - 01:58 PM
Steve Gardham 30 Jun 09 - 01:40 PM
Jack Blandiver 30 Jun 09 - 12:35 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 30 Jun 09 - 12:20 PM
Amos 30 Jun 09 - 12:15 PM
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Jack Blandiver 30 Jun 09 - 12:07 PM
Rifleman (inactive) 30 Jun 09 - 11:59 AM
Ruth Archer 30 Jun 09 - 11:46 AM
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RoyH (Burl) 30 Jun 09 - 10:41 AM
doc.tom 30 Jun 09 - 08:30 AM
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Ruth Archer 30 Jun 09 - 07:55 AM
manitas_at_work 30 Jun 09 - 07:43 AM
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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Secret Satan
Date: 01 Jan 14 - 04:20 PM

Free for the Festive Duration : The Twelve Days of Christmas 1979​/​80 - '...music from the chambered winter tombs of hauntological folktronica...'


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 01 Jan 14 - 07:09 AM

In good re-Imagined tradition, I watched some nice British horror films this Xmas.

Mathew Hopkins Witchfinder General was good for atmosphere, and for seeing Hopkin's tramping ground in Suffolk villages like Lavenham. Lots of moody grass and woodland. The end was a bit crap. And the dumb blonde who decided to *stay in Lavenham* after the Witch burning episode was ridiculously infuriating.

I also watched Sean Bean's "Black Death" which wasn't a bad modern stab at recreating that classic British archaic horror / landscape vibe. Though it went a bit pants at the end as most horrors do and it borrowed too much from the Wicker Man. I'd have liked more 'real' paganism, or rather *absence of Christianity*, in so far as remote villages were typically ridiculed as 'pagan' not due to any conscious rejection of Christianity but merely ignorance concerning what all that latin and going to Church business was all about.

BBC's Tractate Middoth was entertaining but a bit lacking. The Ghoul was creepy but there could have been more 'mood'.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 01 Jan 14 - 06:25 AM

'Real fireworks' are most entertaining! Especially when choreographed along with some rousing Classical music such as the Round Table do. In fact I heard rumours that Bubba may have supplied the ones for this energetic display: Watch from 1:50 Just as a point of interest, does Bubba know that the colonies are no longer at war with the English? It can make going into the Gas station a little anxiety provoking at times..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 01 Jan 14 - 05:22 AM

Vovo de la Gator here.

Bubba sells fireworks down to the gas station. He/she (we still ain't sure which) has the legal ones out front. If y'all want them real fireworks the password is "The Rapture." There's a virtul powder magazine of 'em behind the retread tire store.   I know, I thought it was a bit blasphemous, but kids today. They got no respect.

Anyway the pyro playthings will all be on BOGOF sale come Thursday morning after New Year's. I expect there'll be a run. Make sure you ask for the proper Chinee ones. Half of them West Indian ones are real duds, though they make a nice smell and purty color smoke.

I git real hungry after they set off a few of those.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Dec 13 - 04:52 PM

More scarecrows XTC - Scarecrow People


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 31 Dec 13 - 04:31 PM

Nice Scarecrow Dance Jack!

I've been listening to Bright Pheobus recently, and though this hardly needs posting, I will as it's so beautiful - just wish it were more suitable for accapella.
If you click on this post Tam, do have a listen:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut9MhLq-tVs


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 31 Dec 13 - 04:23 PM

Despite the generous assistance provided by Bubba and Mme Alligator Sadly the Pinchlings was poorly attended this year, an impromptu committee meeting was held and the village council has determined that the improvident use by young people of 'internet networking' sites such as Facebark and Twooter are to blame.

In light of this information, Bubba has kindly offered to blow up the local telegraph poles - which apparently transmit this undesirable intrusion into local village life - next year in advance of the annual tradition.

For the most part the council have roundly supported this move. Though Mr Peewit of number 23 Orchid Drive, was rather concerned about the effect it would have on his 'personal' entertainments, he was assured that regularly scheduled dogging activities could if needed, be observed down at Bluebell Wood some twenty minutes from his home.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 28 Dec 13 - 04:32 AM

Vo vo de la gator ehre

Ahh.. me, but Drexel twas away a long time. He came home shortly afore Toussaint dragging in a large half-dead toad. I promptly popped it in the Royal Crown Cola ice box my nephew (name withheld) brung me from Bubba's gas station at junction of highways 610 and 10, near Gentilly.

That piece of equipment has been a real boon as I kin run it off the stolen lectric my nephew (name withheld) hooked up to my neighbour's pole or off the generator that runs on white lightnin'.

I store all sorts of goodies in that thar box. Got a possum, 7 river rats, and a couple of small gator tails in beside my Ben and Jerry's Caramel Sutra carton full of night crawlers.

I won't be bringing my nephew (name withheld) to the Pinchlings cuz he is a reall good lookin boy. Got's most of his teeth and the carbuncle on his neck has gone down to the size of a golf ball now. But he is too useful to me so he is stayin to home. So Bubba has offered to do body removal and my nephew (name withheld) will work at the gas station. Bubba has some black overalls if that's ok. But one shoulder strap was torn off by a rabid skunk last week.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Dec 13 - 04:58 AM

Yay! The re-Imagined Village Revisited!

Actually, that might explain this which was giving me ear-worm all yesterday, so much so that I tried playing it on the fiddle when got home:

Boxing Day Scarecrow Dance

Musicologists are cautious over its provenance, some saying that whilst it's undoubtedly part of the Morris Trad-geist, there are elements of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in there too, hence the scarecrow, presumably. There was a chorus collected too, it goes:

Have you seen the scarecrow?
Tatters & rags such a funny old show,
A lolloping, loping scarescrow
He sings 'Come along with me!'
He's coming down the road tonight
His tatters & rags all covered in shite
His ugly old face will give you a fright
He sings 'Give me some cake and tea!'


Pick the primal pagan bones out of that, Miss Kilnigur!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 26 Dec 13 - 01:57 PM

According to the rough copy of as yet unpublished January edition of the village magazine, an exceedingly annoyed elderly member of the re-Imagined village has complained to the BBC that their recent televised ghost story "The Tractate Middoth", is nothing more than a plagiaristic rip-off of an unfortunate family experience regarding an annoying old uncle who (quote) "insisted on not dying properly!"

The resident is said to be most perterbed at having " bothersom ghosts" stirred up by the Beeb, especially as he's had to invoke the assistance of the local priest in order to restrain the unwelcome ghoul!

On a brighter note, the annual initiatory Pinchlings featuring the healthy young men of the parish tied and bound, versus the Man in Black's toad poison darts, will commence at midnight! Be sure to bring your own toad! And body removal services.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Miss Kilningur
Date: 27 Nov 12 - 04:48 AM

It seems some of the village youth are taking Mr Blandiver's comments about electronic music to their hearts, though not in the stately, civilised sense of Master Tinkersmeadow with his Ondes Martenot, but rather something more obnoxiously feral.

I found this poster on the village hall noticeboard this morning, and was not in the least bit amused: Exhibit A

This has been removed and placed in a locked drawer in my office until the culprit/s come forward. Apart from anything else, space is very limited on the notice board so permission must be sought.

Miss Kilningur


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 26 Nov 12 - 06:02 AM

In all honesty, I can't see who in their right minds would prefer an English Concertina over an Ondes Marteno, especially for the accompaniment of Scotch Ballads. Indeed, I'd go one further and say the ideal instrument in this respect would a THEREMIN.

Patented in 1928 (the same year the Ondes Marteno was invented) the theremin would become one of the instruments of choice for legendary Northumbrian dance band-leader, trumpeter, percussionist, & early electonic music pioneer Fred Fauntleroy (obit. 1951). Indeed, Fred abandoned his celebrated musical saw on being gifted a theremin by then Lady Coldharbour, Letitia Wetherstone, at some point in the mid 1930s and used it thereafter at the Hallowe'en Balls at Coldharbour Castle where it could be heard to great effect on his renderings of such gruesome epics as Tam Lin, King Henry and The Witch Mother.

Whilst Fred never played the Ondes Marteno himself, he acquired one for his piano player (Guy Zance) and the two would provide eery electronic duets (to the accompanyment of several droning Northumbrian Smallpipes, various jungle drums & gamelan instruments) in the resonant pillar hall of Coldharbour whilst their aristocratic guests would process from their rooms in togas, smoke excessive amounts of marijuana and proceed to freak out in an orgy of dimly-lit pagan depravity in a scene more typical of 1960s San Francisco than 1930s Northumberland, though, in actuality, inspired by the debauched antics of Emperor Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, AKA Caligula, who was greatly revered by Aristocratic Northumbrian Mystics, Occultists, Gnostics, Devil Worshippers and Mithraic Pagans at the time.

Of course, both the Theremin and Ondes Marteno were unknown to Caligula, but had they been one can be assured he would have prefered their demonic & less-than homely timbres over the tediously insipid folksy honking of the English Concertina any day and seized upon both with great gusto. Just check this out:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdL-vbOwvL0


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Nov 12 - 06:55 AM

...Stop Press: the Tinkersmeadow's have put to pasture their over-the-border gig in the Village in favour of a strictly pipe and voice performance at their local SNP gathering; they will be replaced at EPFSTDS recital by the strictly unaccompanied singing of Fred Bare, followed by English country dancing to the homely timbres of English-concertinas and -flutes, AND tea.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Miss Kilningur
Date: 25 Nov 12 - 04:53 AM

Just to remind you that there will be a recital this afternoon in the village hall by Mr Cedric Blunt, the president of the English Parlour Folk Song and Tea Dance Society, who will be treating us to a genteel selection of edifying English Tradition songs collected from assorted sruffs, miscreants and ragmuffins and by means of sophistiticated arrangements on the pianoforte suitably scrubbed up to reveal their hidden depths and qualities.

Our regular members will be assured to know that whilst Mr Blunt collected his songs from the low life scum of the outlying estates and more impoverished regions of our village & its environs (including many tinkers, travellers, gypsy's, vagrants, and migrant farm workers) none of these people will actually be in attendance at the recital as we feel it would be detrimental to both their purity and dignity to be exposed to more genteel society.

There will be tea, cakes, buns, toffee and smelling salts available throughout the afternoon, especially as several of Mr Blunt's songs are described as being exciting portrayals of Authentic Country Life (such as The Fox Jumped Over the Parson's Peascod Patch and The Bonny Black Innocent Hare) whilst others are said to be betray their 'rather risque' origins. Songs such as Eh, Our Lucy's a One (in which a mother interrogates her naughty son over the whereabouts of his little sister's teddy bear) are described by Mr Blunt as being in all probability, deeply metaphorical in nature, likewise The Seeds of Lovely Nancy, whereas as others, such as How the Clever Parson Outwits the Stupid Fisherman and Pleasures His Fat Ugly Wife With a Cunning Cromer Crabfish Lubricated with Butter and Cheese and All, he confesses to being quite unnecessarily over-explicit.

As usual, there will be Country Dancing afterwards to the accompaniment of the Misses Tabatha and Melissa Tinkersmeadow on their delightful fiddles and after all that gay excitement, the afternoon will be rounded off by a recital of Scotch Ballads sung by the exquisite Miss Clarissa Tinkersmeadow accompanied by the ever popular Master Tom Tinkersmeadow on his Ondes Martenot.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 23 Nov 12 - 07:17 PM

All the good strong chorus clubs go for harmonies. At the Durham Club back in the day we revelled in pushing the envelope as far as we could. And some of uis still do! Most folk clubs we go to now do likewise - in fact in night 40 years o' folkin' I've never heard unison chorus singing, especially on Tyneside...

I suspect the Copper Family weren't unique; their influence went on the inspire other acapella harmony groups from the Young Tradition to the Watersons to the Wilsons to the various groups singing today in fine old style, be they Fisherman's Friends style chantey groups or the Young Uns. Then you've got that whole shape note thing Phil & Cath are involved with, which has echoes of the sort of thing you might hear around the pubs of Sheffield in the coming weeks. The Yorkshire Carolling tradition is an old one - and it extends beyond Yorkshire too - I knew old Durham miners who would play their harmonies from farm to farm on one string fiddles made from cigar boxes.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Nov 12 - 05:54 PM

True - sometimes the Coppers sing in two-part harmony.

I just watched the Choir of the Year comp. on the Beeb, where some sang in four parts.

I still say nearly all the time in folk-clubs folks simply double the melody/one-part harmony/no chords come the chorus.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 22 Nov 12 - 06:54 PM

Chorus singing is all about the harmonies. This is a very natural & traditional thing to do with English Folk Song. Go listen to some Copper Family:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQ9-uWXU4oU&feature=related

Is that not stirring to the yearnings of thy soul? It's not so easy for one person to do on their own though...

*

Xmas Lights, eh? I think Xmas Eve to Epiphany is sufficient, proper & correct, though we've still got stars, lights, sparkly stags & angels hanging off the rubber plant that have been there almost a year now - and a sparkly skeleton that's hung there since hallowe'en 2010 at least...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Nov 12 - 04:49 PM

When and who to switch the Village Christmas-LEDs on..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Nov 12 - 03:47 PM

P.S: my poem on "The 35th Morpeth Northumbrian Gathering" - http://www.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse/blog/459741254


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Nov 12 - 03:41 PM

"I don't understand any of the other stuff like there being no chords in English music.To me if someone sings a harmony, its a chord, isn't it?" (Big Al)...folks have tried to enlighten me on this before, but my experience is that when the chorus comes around, at a folk club, etc., others simply double the melody, which is not creating chords.

One exception I recall was, when singing "The Drunken Sailor" at a Morpeth Gathering, Benny Graham's choir added some more-sophisticated bits, which probably did involve the creation of chords - similar to classical choirs.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stringsinger
Date: 22 Nov 12 - 10:53 AM

The most notorious village was in the USSR, Potemkin, created to put on a good face of Russian life under Stalin. Today, it is referred to as a coverup village made to look good to visitors.

Disneyland, maybe?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 21 Nov 12 - 01:08 PM

I'm not surprised your husband is well received, all the African people I've met have been super friendly and talkative. Always ready to to laugh and to smile. I hear a lot of really dark stuff about aspects of African culture (violence against women being a prime example) yet it's hard to comprehend when you meet African men, as they can be exceedingly 'correct' about behaviour.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 21 Nov 12 - 12:52 PM

I have to say, CS that we've met not the slightest racism or avoidance here. On the contrary, folk have been super and welcoming to him. They seem to realy love him, and when he goes down to the papershop it's like a Royal Progress. He comes home much later, having chatted with about ten people en route.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 21 Nov 12 - 12:46 PM

I must confess Eliza that the first time I saw a non-white person in my old village, I actually did a double take. Yup, a proper, "Huh! Wha' tha'?" I was pretty embarrassed and wound my neck in sharpish. That was two or three years ago now and the long time exclusively white demographic has shifted very slightly but significantly since then. There is now a young Indian family (or so I presume from their dress) and a proper flash looking Black geezer in a shiny BMW with a 'The Only Way is Essex' orange skinned Mrs with a little toddler - possibly the first mixed race child the village has seen in it's entire history!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 21 Nov 12 - 12:24 PM

LOL CS, isn't it funny that every community has roughly the same types and situations? Sword attacks are rare though. Ten out of ten for that one. We were told of a couple of Chinese chaps who rented a house here (not ours) a few years ago. The stink of cannabis was overpowering, and the Police arrived. The Chinese wriggled out of a window and were away over the fields, never to be seen again. It was of course one of those cannabis farms with artificial lights and silver paper. The village wasn't cross at all, they were absolutely delighted with the shock and excitement. The fact they were Chinese made it all the more thrilling and exotic. I bet they're rather disappointed in my hubbie, he's terribly respectable, quiet and kind. Boring!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 20 Nov 12 - 05:13 PM

Ha, Eliza - I recognise that picture! I live in social housing and consequent of much experience with The Asbo's count myself pretty lucky these days to live next door to a gossipy old lady. Getting gossip out of me is like getting blood out of a stone, but yet she tries!

Mind you my own family have courted their fare share of Asbo Shameless plots too, I must say and no doubt my gossipy old lady would to hear some of the juicy tale I could tell!

So to village gossip: one I heard about the prior residents of our current house was that the bloke was done for attacking his Mrs with a sword, bit more dramatic than any of the tales I could tell involving sherry stealing down the local shop, police raids, getting lost in hedges and home grown pot plants..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 20 Nov 12 - 05:00 PM

I live in a small quite isolated village. Every village has its sterotypes. We have the scruffy family whose son is always causing upsets at school. He asked a dear little girl to suck something (it wasn't a sweeet) and was expelled forthwith. We all call them The Asbos. There's always an indomitable old man. Ours is ninety five and strides about like a youngster. There's the family whose garden is called The Yard and has a tractor, a trailer, a caravan, a pile of wood, a heap of broken concrete etc. Every village has at least one of those. There's the Sweet Old Lady, a widow, whose house and garden are immaculate. She wears a 'pinny' and puts her hair up in a bun. (Ours looks just like Betty on the Wonga ads. She even sounds just like her!) There's always a middle-aged lady whose huge dog does an enormous pile of poo in the same spot on the pavement each morning. And then there's my husband, the very black African with woolly hair. Hardly any villages have one of those!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 20 Nov 12 - 04:51 AM

Having lived in a number of villages I have to say I hate village life. And there's the key I suppose - for village life to work I reckon you have to be born to it, and everyone else as well. Having been born on a housing estate & lived in cities, where the only people I had anything to do with were immediate neighbours, friends and family, I have to say I do enjoy the anonymity of greater humanity who don't even know I exist let alone chose to concern myself with my business.

The Idyll remains as a yearning for simpler times, like folk music in a way. That said I would dearly love to live in an old house in the country entirely remote from other people. We do that when we go on holiday - where we can gaze at the skies & make as much noise as we like. But we're too used to local amenities, things like shops, supermarkets, regular buses, trams, trains, libraries, doctors, dentists, Subways, chemists, cinemas, Wetherspoons, Harvesters, hospitals, decent TV reception, wi-fi, land lines, gas and neighbours who would be there in a crisis, but leave you alone the rest of the time...   

That said, even though I lived on a housing estate for the first 17 years of my life, I think I'd rather live in a village. The worst village is preferable to that. For me it's either town / city life - or else totally remote in the middle of nowhere - and out with my gun in the morning!

*

No chords in English music? The pastoral English tradition is best examplified in rock 'n' roll's essentially modal nature, which really beefs up with chords & harmonies. Word is these guys are booked in The Village Hall for a Christmas residency:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WfoccRna6I


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Big Al Whittle
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 07:04 AM

I think its very nice that WAV thinks nice suff about England. I don't understand any of the other stuff like there being no chords in English music.To me if someone sings a harmony, its a chord, isn't it?

I've lived in villages most of my life - rural villages, mining villages, dormitory villages. there is a poetry there, but its as rich and complex as human life itself - not really a rural idyll.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Nov 12 - 05:12 AM

Did your village ever have a Fine Fare??


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 06:45 PM

Day after? I agree. Do they still have the Greggs Seconds Shop on Westgate Hill I wonder? All the day-old stuff ended up there at half-price. Great queues first thing in twe morning as I recall. I think it featured in Pravda under a headline bemoaning an impoverished north-east proletariat having queue for day-old bread... and cakes, pasties and pies.

Which reminds of the old joke (how your Tyneside dialect studies coming along?):

Geordie goes into Greggs, five minutes before closing. 'Whit can aa hev, pet?' he says, looking around the near-empty shelves.

'Whey - ye can hev a mince pie - or a meringue.'

'Nah,' says Geordie. 'Aa think yer reet. Aa'll hev the mince pie.'


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Nov 12 - 06:27 AM

Not yet - I have put sultanas in a sliced-bread sandwich, and, as said somewhere?! above, I have stuffed a stottie with chips. As with baguettes, stotties the day-after are best after a grilling, I think.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 17 Nov 12 - 07:32 PM

Have you ever tried that, WAV? I'd be very impressed if you have.

When I went to college on the Coast Road in 1977 my old mum used to do me a packed lunch with Greggs stotties filled with honey & Edam cheese. That's something I could happily try again actually... The other stotty use in my childhood was cut up as toast 'fingers' for boiled eggs, or simply toasted with lots of butter. Or with bacon. Or used as a 'pizza' base.

I still find it odd that whilst Greggs is now a national chain, they only do sotties in the North East. They're best fresh & warm from the shop in the Grainger Market...

Dear God - what I wouldn't give for one now!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 Nov 12 - 08:21 AM

...but that may send the Village bankrupt, if that chain of Australian-themed pubs sue...

t...so mince pies still tend to have suet in them, but there's certainly less meat than in the old days; and we could use vegetable shortening...

...or just stuff stotties with sultanas, vegan-margarine and jam?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 17 Nov 12 - 06:38 AM

'Local' is the acceptable face of capitalist monopoly; notice, like TESCO & ASDA, that the 'Local' Wetherspoons will always feature the history & lore of its locality. In Tewkesbury there's The Royal Hop Pole (one of my favourites)- all bending dark ancient timbers - and in Morecambe, of course, there's The Eric Bartholomew.

I wonder, what is the The Village Wetherspoons called??

I propose... The Walkabout.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 08:19 PM

Or how about mince pies cut from children's thighs? Wetherspoons certainly seems to attract it's fair share of the noisy little vermin, I'm sure a few could be quietly culled without anyone noticing, or it upsetting the balance of things overmuch.

As an aside, it suddenly strikes me that The Village represents a kind of repository for All Things Made and Unmade, All Things of Goo's Creation, Below Above, Beneath or in the Crevices, just so long as The Word 'local' is applied as a prefix, it makes it SO.

Past my bedtime...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 07:36 PM

The Xmas Goose will be fed on a strictly vegetarian diet, WAV - we'll make sure of that...

Vegan Mince Pies? Awkward: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mincemeat

Word is the festive menu at the local Wetherspoons this year is based on an old English version of The Boars Head Carol.

The Boar's head First
Porkington Mss #10, ab. 1460-70)

Hey, hey, hey, hey, the boar's head is armed gay!
The boar's head in hand I bring
With garland gay and (porttoryng)
I pray you all with me to sing

With hay...

Lords, knights and squires,
Persons, priests and vicars
The boar's head is the first mess

With hay..

The boar's head, as I you say
He takes his leave and goes his way
Soon after the 14th (theylffyt) day

With hay...

Then comes in the second course with (mekyll) pride
The cranes and the herons the bittern by the side,
The partridges and the plovers, the woodcock and the snipe,

With hay...

Larks in hot stew, ladies for to pick,
Good drink thereto, (lyeyvs) and fine,
Blwet of allmayn, romney and wine

With hay...

Good bread, all in wine, dare I well say,
The boar's head with mustard armed so gay,
Furmenty to pottage , with venison fine,
And the humbles of the cow, and all that ever comes in,
Capons I bake with the pieces of the roe,
Raisins of corrans, with other spices more....


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 05:59 PM

Over the centuries, mince pies have just about gone vegan, yes?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 05:01 PM

I did a chestnut and cashew roast as a part of our winter solstice meal last year - not quite vegan as there was an egg in it. Bit dry though, I shouldn't have bothered roasting the chestnuts myself, but just used ones tinned in brine.

The year prior I did chestnut pate en croute (not sure if the pastry was fully vegan mind you, as I bought it in) but that was too gooey - down with gooey! Down with too dry too. There must be a happy medium somewhere? Goose is the same, too greasy if you don't pierce and drain the fat off properly, too dry if you pierce and drain it too much.

I'm sure there's a fairy story that addresses this kind of dilema somewhere?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 04:44 PM

...se for the Village Christmas Dinner? And the vegan alternative, this year..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 10:58 AM

We believe in one Goo, the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all that is, seen and unseen.
We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of Goo, eternally begotten of the Father,
Goo from Goo, Light from Light, true Goo from true Goo,
.

Yeah, it has a nice ring to it!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 10:23 AM

News of the proposed outdoor Mass for the Sacred Unconceived Souls of Dead Sperm, has enraged members of 'Down with Goo'* ; the local radical atheist Darwinist cult, who - inspired by antics of the now world famous Russian art collective 'Pussy Riot' - are said to be planning a sacrilegious 'happening' intended to disrupt the Mass, if it goes ahead.







* An unfortunate typographical error resulted in a whole batch of pamphlets and t shirts printed by the fledgling radical Darwinist cult reading 'Goo' instead of 'God' - due to insufficient funds the cult decided that instead of the costly process of reprinting, they would instead adopt the new name - reasoning that the word Goo was as good as God, when referring to a non-something which didn't actually exist anyway.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 08:37 AM

You see? There's WAV proving his Traditional Credibility by still using Myspace. Respect!

Meanwhile in The Village...

Encouraged by a new wave of fundamentalist feeling in the Roman Catholic community, Father O'Flanaghan has announced that last week's amnesty on contraceptive devices was such a success it will be repeated this Sunday too. Once again The Special Box is to be situated in the narthex of The Sacred Heart, though Fr O'F is keen to point out that he doesn't want condoms if they've already been used.

For the especially contrite, an outdoor Mass for the Sacred Unconceived Souls of Dead Sperm will be held in the Presbytery Garden at dusk on the 5th of December. Before this, a clean-up operation in all the 'usual places' has been organised by The Catholic Mothers' League. As the sun goes down, the discarded sheaths will be ceremonially, and individually, layed by the women themselves into the flames of a 'Holy Fire' kindled from olive-wood from the Holy Land. Father O'Flanaghan is reported to be 'very excited' about this, though whether it gets the go-ahead from Health & Safety is another matter entirely.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 07:39 AM

...one size 7 and one size 9 for me (not that I ever bother buying 2 pairs of shoes), having been born that way near Didsbury Village - http://www.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse/blog/472829321


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,CS
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 06:40 AM

More on the incredibly rare to find The Magic Toyshop on IMDB:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097806/

And the equally rare find They Came from Somewhere Else:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0373632/reviews

No clickies this time


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 06:17 AM

Yes, I've got a weird foot - ever since Billy Snot ran over one with his bloody traction engine. It's so embarrassing having to go into shoe shops and ask for one size 9 and one size 27.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 05:44 AM

Two HTML click-links in a GUEST post??? I tell you, there are weird things afoot in The Village this morning.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,A Mysterious Stranger
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 05:26 AM

Sorry, me above - post wouldn't take with the 'from' box filled out...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 05:16 AM

A mystery resident of the re-Imagined village has recently stumbled onto a rare and long forgotten C4 series called 'They Came from Somewhere Else'. Certain strange similarities between the fictional Middleford and the very real re-Imagined village are so thought-provoking that she anonymously shares the series via the village web-site. The series quickly goes viral and soon everyone in the re-Imagined village begins to feel that something very queer indeed is going on..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxgGpL9zU3A

The same resident has also recently found a long out of print film adaptation of Angela Carter's 'The Magic Toyshop' and for no particular reason also shares this with her fellow residents.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-Z-PiBtfMw

Unfortunately, after the collective distress generated by 'They Came from Somewhere Else' everyone in the village is consoling themselves with hot cups of tea, buttered crumpets and back to back re-runs of Heartbeat starring that nice Nick Berry.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 12 - 03:50 AM

Through the mists of a freezing November morning, The re-Imagined Village materialises like Brigadoon. Make haste before it vanishes again...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 15 Aug 10 - 08:37 AM

Purcell was a bit of a folkie, adapting & arranging all sorts of traditional material - including Scottish stuff. He might have come up with original tune for Mad Tom of Bedlam which no one does anymore in favour of the new one. Not folk as such but it shiows the exgtent to which he was familiar with such things. Of course Purcell predates much of what we think of as being Traditional by 150 years, so the key traditions are still in place in Choral Evensong, only broken by the republican intermission.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 15 Aug 10 - 06:31 AM

Yes, S., I was among the visitors who filled the choir; and I nearly always catch Choral Evensong at 4 PM on Wednesday and/or Sunday - only ignoring the bits about the Catholic Church and the Queen.

Also, I heard the other day that Purcell was quite stongly influenced by the folk music around him.

(And as for policing, I'm not sure that each (base/cricket) ball has been played on it's merrits lately.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 15 Aug 10 - 04:30 AM

Where do you sit for Choral Evensong, WAV? For best results, sit in up the choir! Been a while since I was there myself of course, but should ever they be singing Purcell (etc.) I'd be sure to toddle along. Occasionally BBC Radio Three's Choral Evensong comes from Durham - worth listening out for which I'm sure you do!

Otherwise, I see we're still below the line here - and all because one righteous man in his Divinely Appointed Authority has decided he knows best! I love Mudcat for the decent folk who gather here, but find the invisible policing under the all seeing eye of our Holy Pontiff just as nauseating as the cultish adoration of Max going on elsewhere.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 10 - 05:17 PM

...wish there was more English song and dance, but, overall, a good day; and Choral Evensong at Durham Cathedral, as ever, was wonderful.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 10 - 05:28 AM

Via Village/Shank's pony and the train, I'm off on another folkie-excursion .


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 14 Aug 10 - 04:51 AM

Joe - PMs are the curse of Mudcat, which is why I stay logged out.

As a discussion, appreciation and celebration of the Folklore of the Folkscene in general this one belongs very much above the line.

I ask again, why was it moved?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 06:45 PM

Since its inception in July last year this thread has always been above the line, but tonight it takes a dive without a word of explanation from the powers that be.

What's up, Joe?
    I moved it. Please contact me by e-mail or personal message if you'd like to discuss the move. -Joe-


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 05:35 PM

Yes: in terms of verse I've been repetative (there are only 230 pieces in my collection, and I'm content with that, Smokey), but I did try to be topical, and the bits of prose I added were new; furthermore, I did leave it for a full 6 months of newbie-growth...nice to see a couple of newbies in THE village, anyway!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Smokey.
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 05:19 PM

Write some new ones, WAV. Don't stifle your creativity.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 05:16 PM

Oh, I know it is a silly thing, WAV....but I found you had posted one of the two ditties in the latest thread five times, and the other one eleven times. You're welcome to post, but only once. Feel free to post messages about revisions to locations of your poems, but one link to the index will do just fine, thankyouverymuch.
You have blatantly and repeatedly abused your posting privileges here, so I am taking action to ensure that you are now "contained." Your posts are welcome, as long as you don't post what you have posted before.
-Joe Offer, Forum Moderator-


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 05:07 PM

...pray let me say this: I heard a some of The Imagined Village's efforts on Radcliffe and Maconie (BBC), and didn't like it - aesthetically, as well as politically.

(And this: the silly thing is - I am allowed to restart one of the old WAV threads with a Daily Ditty, but they are full of broken links, as my old web-host collapsed. It seems to me that's no good for anyone, but, as you may have noticed, I'm not allowed to start a new one; thus, no-more Daily Ditties on Mudcat - even though, just before the latest was closed, a couple made it clear that they did, in a way, appreciate them.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 04:04 PM

I think the important thing right now is getting The David Franks Annex sorted out at the Rivington library, seeing as how he can't post on Mudcat without getting hung, drawn & quarted (or rather the Mudcat equivilent of bounced down, thread closed & deleted!) by The Inquistion. Free speech to The Village! Who are the warders? Who are the prisoners? Will we ever find out?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 13 Aug 10 - 03:33 PM

Gosh, the resident amateur folklorists of the re-Imagined village are all ears aprick at news of re-release of 'The Imagined Village'. While similarities have been murmured on, no-one actually knows for certain whether or not the eponymous "imagined" village has any relationship other than an incidental and 'poetic' association to the re-Imagined Lesser Rivington!
Gosh! How market-Gnostic can ya get? Read all about it here, in A Book!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 03 Aug 10 - 04:50 AM

I don't think it is. As is evidenced by the asterisk, I had intended to add a footnote to the effect it doesn't but as I wished it did, still sent off my subs. However, I was typing that post when I should have been working and so forgot to write the note. I actually stopped receiving the magazine when I first got married and we didn't have enough money to eat, let alone buy periodicals.

However, The Society of Ley Hunters does exist and seems to be carrying on the work in the same way. Paul Devereux is still working in the field, and though I respect him and his past work enormously I long ago stopped reading his books when he became convinced of the leys = spirit paths theory. I'm not sure that analogues from one cultures can always be applied so readily to another, and to my mind the whole theory didn't ring true. His appraisal of North and South American spirit lines is fascinating though, and whilst some coffin/spirit paths exist in our islands I don't think they are ley lines.

Nigel Pennick is still publishing and working in 'spiritual crafts', and he is still involved in many folkloric and traditional activities and is a wonderful author.

Apologies for the error!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 03:49 PM

Is The Ley Hunter still going?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 01:01 PM

Hmmm...so probably nothing magic in the mushrooms, then...how full was the moon?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 12:51 PM

He certainly claims to. As you can tell by his leathery, tanned integument he has spent many a day scouring the fields of the parish cataloging, observing, digging up and eating the various mycological delights he finds (although often he's not seen for a day or two after some of his trips, and when he finally emerges his reason for absence if cited as "an excess of one the four humours" or "an case of aggressive internal miasmatic aggregation" which is cured with the help of sennapods and plenty of fresh air (leaving the windows open).

Incidentally, there is a rumour originating amongst the regulars of The Fidgeting Badger that Mr.Burke-Bothwell was actually almost accosted by Farmer Evans's top ratter Snorkel, but Mr.Burke-Bothwell maintains the hairy quadruped he observed was growling, not purring and also it can't have been feline as cats bring on a distemper in him and he didn't have so much as a tickle up his olfactory passageways for the rest of the evening.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 12:16 PM

Hmmm...does Burke-Bothwell know his fungi, Jack?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 09:32 AM

I stopped by the post office this morning to send off my yearly subscription to The Ley Hunter* when I bumped into Mr. Burke-Brothwell and he had a curious tale to tell.

Last night he decided to partake of his usual evening perambulations around the heath (to aid the digestion of his dinner) during which he often indulges his passions for the collection and consumption of fungi and watching the hares that live in Nine Acre Field as they relax and play in the cool of the evening. It was getting dark he turned off the heath path and into the lane (he had spent some time excitedly excavating what he thought was a small summer truffle but turned out to be an oak gall from last year, albeit an uncommonly large one) and the overhanging trees made the way ahead darker and the air thicker. He was stopped in his tracks by what looked like two mall red lanterns glowing in the distance. As he approached (thinking they might be the lights of Mrs. Carr-Gomm's daughter-in-law Sissey's cottage) he became aware of a low menacing rumble, somewhere between a growl and a bark. Suddenly he was aware the lights were rushing towards him, surrounded by a black, amorphous shape that seemed almost to take form as it moved. Within a second it was upon him and he raised his cane to fend of the inevitable attack; the growl was by now a snarl, earthy and deep and full of malice.

Much to his shock, the attack never came; he was aware of a warm rush of air and the unmistakeable odour of wet fur and damp earth then . . . nothing. He lowered his cane and turned around, and ten yards beyond where he stood he saw, silhouetted against the last patch of dark blue sky visible at the heath end of the lane the unmistakeable outline of a large black dog with glowing eyes. The abomination paused for a second and then turned and headed into the trees and across the field, disappearing with a chilling howl into the woods on the far side.

Suffice to say Mr. Burke-Brothwell hurried straight home and locked the door after him, only then calling the station to let Constable Lynch know a large, dangerous animal was on the loose. Mr. Burke-Brothwell returned to the spot in the lane where he saw the animal (apparition?) this morning but could find no trace nor spoor of any creature with the exception of himself; his own footprints were clearly visible.

Mr. Burke-Brothwell thought he might curtail his evening outings for a while and stay in and watch back episodes of Arrested Development instead to "cheer myself up as I've been feeling a bit low recently".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 09:28 AM

Remembered graffiti from Jesmond baths changing rooms, circa 1973:

I took my lass,
to Jesmond baths,
And in the depths we swum,
Then diving down,
with my goggles on,
I gazed at her lovely bum.
But as I smiled in my scheming,
Out from there the bubbles came streaming...

She's forever blowing bubbles,
Shitty bubbles everywhere,
They stink so high,
Before my eye,
And with them my dreams they fade and die.
Bums are always smiling -
but I wish I'd looked elsewhere;
for she's forever blowing bubbles
Shitty bubbles everywhere!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 08:44 AM

You'd have to ask Trech, S. - I haven't swam, indoors or out, for donkey's years.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 06:12 AM

Are Heaton Baths still there, WAV? Seems many of the old ones are long gone, like Durham. In The Village the old Victorian municipal baths were replaced in 1962 by the new sports complex built on the Purgatory Fields which put paid to the Teanlowe Fire tradition before revivalist incomers had a chance to get their grubby hands on it. It was just about dead anyway, the custom being carried out by two brothers who took the ceremony to the Northern Territories of Australia (having emigrated on the proceeds of selling their ancestral land to developers) where, I believe, it flourishes as part of the annual Darwin Hallowe'en Celebrations.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 10 - 05:29 AM

RIV MEETNG NO. 665

Dot Angel apologises in advance for missing the next meeting, saying she has to see her Sisters.

Warren Trench, who is allergic to chlorine, wants the village-green wildlife pond extended into a bathing pond. He claims reeds will do all the filtering for us, and that one may even get one's toes tickled by a toad.

(I should add that, after returning from Heaton Town Baths recently, Trench did appear a tad like the said amphibian.)

Any other concerns, before we take a vote on this...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 05:35 PM

...you don't have to take the waters, CS.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 03:12 PM

"a fine cure for most of the above is surely an outing, from the RIV, to the beautiful Lancashire coastline...by bike, maybe..."

What, both SO'P's re-Iv ennui and the festering sores plus fleshy barnacles caused by my secret-lab experimental genetic virus?
Hmm, maybe so WAV.. But Lancashire? Well it's OK for cheese and for scallies, but it's not a sea cure now is it?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 03:01 PM

Reminded by the Beeb's golf-coverage today that a fine cure for most of the above is surely an outing, from the RIV, to the beautiful Lancashire coastline...by bike, maybe...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:27 PM

Meanwile the re-Iv coven is busily stuffing down iced buns at 'Ye Olde Cherry Bakewell Tea Shoppe' upon their annual ceremonial Lammas pilgrimage. The Cherry Bakewell has been famous for it's iced buns ever since Mrs. Prosser's young niece spotted a "spooky" likeness to Greek grain Goddess Demeter in the icing...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:18 PM

"Human Sacrifice notwithstanding, one wonders what are the main contruibuting factors to the general demographic around here, much less the prevailing mood of weary (and wearying) contentment."

Feh, nothing wearying about contentment!

But I guess we could have a plague or something to liven things up? Or even an outbreak of some new experimental virus that makes people's bits & pieces erupt and drop off before they die in hideous agony, which has been leaked from the heart of a top-secret underground new-world-order-conspiracy style laboratory?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 04:55 AM

1) I wake up somewhat hungover, though I did not drink last night; the first of August, which brings mutterings of Lammas and residual paganism which I'm most assured does not lurk in such - er - folklore, if folklore it is; and no more pagan than making love and the raising and felling of corn; the grinding mill and the baking of bread, all of which might be accounted for down the ages, and all of which we do today as a matter of course.

2) Yesterday, on an impromtu trip to Manchester, we saunted the Victorian Gothic glory of the Ryland's Library stiff necked at the dragon & green men bosses, and I admit to being moved to tears by the oldest gospel fragment anywhere in the world. I didn't even know this existed until I saw it - the celebrated Ryland's Library Papyrus P52, a fragment of the Gospel of St. John, circa 100-150CE.

3) Perhaps it is this experience which accounts for my mood today; or perhaps it is the McDonald's chocolate milkshake we had last night in the Trafford Centre foodhall with some choice bakes & flans from Muffin Break before driving home listening to Telepathe's Dance Mother album bought at Fopp earlier in the day. Impressive stuff it is too; bought after hearing it played in the shop whilst we were brousing; somewhere between Ladyhawke and Bat For Lashes with liberal doses of vintage Cocteau Twins and Kraftwerk thrown in for good measure...

4) Meanwhile in The Village... things seem quiet this morning although the Twelve Jolly Dons that passed my window earlier did so with a good deal more purpose than usual. Human Sacrifice notwithstanding, one wonders what are the main contruibuting factors to the general demographic around here, much less the prevailing mood of weary (and wearying) contentment. Later today I'll listen to Robin Williamson's Lammas, at least the original recording from Selected Writings 1980-81 which sings across the years like the Ryland's Library Papyrus...

summer of stubblefires and hemlocks
I'll stare from the low ground
till the stars twisting come in heaven's pool
till the dragon slayer loose
the kings's daughter that prophesies of autumn
and to a human song the sisters beside the well


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 01:56 PM

..."as big as pussy cats, in the quarter-master's store" when I was in the scouts.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 01:41 PM

Rats are the secret ingredient, WAV - as in: 'And if you was to walk through the bedrooms now, you'd see the ragged, mouldy bedclothes a-heaving and a-heaving like seas.'
'And a-heaving and a-heaving with what?' he says.
'Why, with the rats under 'em.'


See HERE for more...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 12:32 PM

...I wonder, then, if it's the 2nd or 3rd pint that does the trick?...or if apples ain't apples?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 11:30 AM

A quiet cider? Hmmmm...

I remember stumbling into Glastonbury for the first time at some point in 1984; we two vagabondian adventurers styling ourselves The New Moon Dance Band (aka The Newies) and heading for The Rifleman's where the landlord refused to sell me a pint of the local cider on account of my Geordie accent. The implication wasn't that I was too soft, just one had to work up to these things gradually. All I was bothered about was the accent; I couldn't believe people actually spoke like that in the real world, assuming Glastonbury to be the real world, but he seemed real enough to me even if he spoke like your archetypical yokel in a Two Ronnies sketch. Anyhoo, he served me a half and I supped it down to no ill effects, not least on the purse, as I recall it cost arounf 40p a pint back then. Delicious; in fact I doubted it contained any alcohol at all, and went for something stronger next time, like a bottle of Dog.

Scroll on a day or two; we'd fallen in with some merry travellers of the New Age camped up in an orchard someplace and enjoyed an odd time in benders which served as an education in New-Age culture which though seductive at first soon curdled into the instinctive revulsion I still feel some 26 years later. Thus all to The Rifleman's where by now my face was known to the landlord who was only too happy to serve me several pints of the stuff which basically meant that for an outlay of £1.20 I was three pints down and still convinced the stuff was essentially a soft drink with a pleasing fruity aftertaste. Then I stepped outside into the fresh air...

It was as if the entire universe embraced me in a synaptic explosion of full bodily orgasm, the upshot of which was that I flew up Glastonbury Tor and continued to float around the tower of St. Michael's whilst my companions huffed and puffed in my wake. Then I regaled them with The King of Ireland's Son in its 90-minute entirety before insisting they thread the Glastonbury Tor labyrinth in a merry dance with Raymond leading the merry throng with his pipe-and-tabor. Now, as with most things claimed about Glastonbury, the Tor Labyrinth doesn't actually exist, but let me tell you that it did that night – I could see it clear as day; the earth-energy as of a sacred serpent coiled in rings around the Mothering Pap of Ancient Avalon after which I remember nothing with any degree of clarity until the 25th of December 2007.

I'm sure Raymond could testify to all this, although being a more abstemious soul altogether I dare say he saw things a little differently to what I did. Needless to say I have not touched a drop of the stuff since, nor do I ever intend to.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 10:00 AM

...designed to kick thee on?...meadless, I enjoyed a quiet cider, by the way.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 09:55 AM

I've no idea WAV, but there was a lovely home-brew to be had from the beer tent called Kykeon?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 09:40 AM

...not sure what S. wet his whistle with?!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 09:18 AM

"also featured were Gnostic dance band"

Who were also selling highly popular psychadelic T's quothing:

Grace danceth.
I would pipe;
dance ye all!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 08:35 AM

So how was it for you? We put a total ban on Folk Music this year and all notions of Englishness were frowned upon as being way too bogus to bother about. Instead we turned our hearts to a celebration of those purely Traditional musics whose primary concerns are with human musical process. Featured artists included The Hemulen (with whom Sedayne guested in a blood curdling rendering of Child Owlet) and also featured were Gnostic dance band Dragon's Den - a track from their forthcoming album Supersonic Chthonics is currently available as a free secure download HERE.

So - Greetings from the Re-Imagined Village, the location of which is somewhere in the People's United Republic of the North Atlantic Islands (PURNAI) formerly known as England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Thus we are no longer English, Irish, Scottish or Welsh, but Purnaian Citizens of Planet Sol Tertius and our Culture is that which we live and breathe as creative human beings. We have no race, no ethnicity, no religion; all we have is our Corporeal Individuality in which we are united by the Beauty of our Myriad Diversity.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 01:04 PM

Sedayne better wet his whistle - tomorrow's the big day.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 11:05 AM

Eh, how sweet! That calls for a re-Iv anniversary party..

The re-Iv 'We Are One' Chill-Fest will be featuring Glasto veterans Sedayne V's Another Green World! Woo-hoo!
The assistant at the bakery has also been petitioning the re-Iv round table to book Caribou because she thinks their latest album Swim is top and has been playing Summer anthem Sun on repeat... But it's likely that local djembe and didge duo 'Crusty Vibes' will be playing instead. Eh!

Anyhay, "E's, Whizz & Weed" as always, will be provided by the ever accomidating landlord's daughter.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 05:08 PM

Cheers, CS - it's just about the RIV first anniversary too, so I think I'll kick-off with this reworked version of the atop post (vegetarian to vegan, I suppose; and a slight change of tune)...

Poem 101 of 230: JUST SUBSIST

(TUNE:

D F# G F# G A G G
D A A G F# G G G
D B B A G A G G
D A A G F# G G G
D A A G F# G G G -
i.e., each last-line repeated)

At times when I've had time to take,
    I've thought of a plot by a lake.
The place would be of fertile ground,
    With native flora all around.

The plot's dwelling would be basic -
    Well insulated, made of brick.
Plus, on this abode, there'd be built -
    Solar panels, kept at best tilt.

And, also tapping nature's hand,   
    Sails turning atop a stand.
Orchard and vines, for fruit and shade;
    Plus, in thin beds, vegetables laid.

Up at dawn, to use all sunlight -
    Farm by day, play and sing at night.
A spouse with me I'd not resist -
    In retirement, we'd just subsist.

(C) David Franks 2003
From http://walkaboutsverse.webs.com (e-scroll)
Or http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 01:43 PM

Brilliant!

After reviewing the fascinating Bertsongs thread on 'Mudcat Cafe Folk Forum' (an internet indulgence for some of the sadder members of the re-Iv's Green Man weekly singaround) it's been decided that there's to be a 'fake song' session, where regulars will compete in composing (and naturally enough singing) the most appalling trad-u-like folk song possible.

Points will be scored for anachronisms, worthy faux working-class* sentiment and 'ye olde' stylee grammatical contrivances!

A fabulous Crystal* Unicorn Tankard from the Shopping Channel will be the prize!


WAV's up first I think? :)




* some kind of resin


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 12:51 PM

I heard through the grape vine that Fotheringay refuses to cut his nails as his wife, before running out the door, squirrelled away somewhere his favourite pair of nail-clippers, which he'd use religously before each Saturday-cittern-club - he not being of the feather-plectrum old school.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM

mmm... vegetarians do taste better.... ;>)
Better than what? Better than squirrel pie, better than hedgehog falafels even, I'd hazard.

Has anyone seen my hornytoad, Drexel? He scampered off last night while I was brewing my tea and reading out loud.

"Listen at this Drexel....Nanny Ogg says according to Cut Me Own Throat Dibbler you can find a use for bits of an animal that the animal didn't know it had got. Says here that with enough fried onions and mustard people will eat anything. Drexel? DREXEL?!?!"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 06:39 AM

Elderly eccentric and social misfit Mr Billy 'Lord of the Rats' Fotheringay (67) was temporarily evicted from his council-owned cottage yesterday whilst workers came in to clean the place up following complaints from his neighbours. When asked to comment on his somewhat lax approach to domestic hygiene all Mr Fothingay had to say was "Nature abhors a vacuum."

He is currently resident at The Larches nursing home where staff hope to do something about his four-inch long fingernails and ghostly pallour, consequent on years of personal neglect and noctural habits. As his carer, Ethel Mortimer (53), said this morning "If he thinks he's sleeping around all day in his own filth he's got another thing coming. I don't mind him sleeping in a coffin (I'm as broadminded as the best of them) but he'll get clean sheets same as everyone else - and he'll be in bed long before midnight."

As Mr Fotheringay's neighbour, Mrs Angela Marx (62) explained "He was perfectly normal until his wife left him him in 1980 - although the trouble really started a few months later when he saw Werner Herzog's remake of Nosferatu which is when he started shaving his head, breeding rats, growing his fingernails and appearing at windows in the dead of night. All perfectly harmless really, but after 30 years we feel it's wearing a bit thin."

Otherwise, readers might like to note that the Annual Grey Squirrel Cull will take place this afternoon as advertised despite protests from those who regard it as a form of 'ethnic cleansing'. Truly a case of Polical Correctness gone mad perhaps? Either way, those wishing to participate should come suitably equipped to the village green around 1.30 for a 2.00 start. The traditional Squirrel Pie scamble will take place outside the RC church on Sunday 27th, which, like the church, is dedicated to Our Lady of Perpetual Help. As usual, a vegetarian alternative will be provided.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 06:33 AM

...we got enough "Game...Rogale" on Wimbledon's village greens yesterday!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 04:16 AM

"Otherwise, please note clog dancers of both sexes are still banned from the willow-licked riversides so as not to disturb the local wildfowl (the swans as especially sensitive) although fans of English folk cuisine will be pleased to note that stottie, chips and mead are available as a special on at least one village pub menu for the duration of the summer."

And not to forget of course the re-Imagined village Summer favourite: 'Game Pie Royale' (served with side salad, coleslaw and chips)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 04:03 PM

I've got to see the conjur man too,
I've got to see the conjur man too,
Because these gin house blues is campin' 'round my door,
I want to drive them off so they won't come back no more!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 03:52 PM

Winning poem in the latest Re-Iv parish mag:

It was!
A thing it

did
...That

Oh, Oops

(Anon)

Note: The winner being anonymous, can't receive their prize of elderflower champagne! So it will be raffled off next month.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 03:39 PM

...better than getting it stuck in the staples of some of those unRIVly magazines they sell these days!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 03:33 PM

It's fortunate for the re-Iv, notes Mr's Prosser to the Landlord's Daughter, that new resident inspector Frank Parker-Prodnose is so busy keeping his nose stuck in all those old books about folk songs!
For if he were to become too meddlesome in the day to day affairs of the village, well, something "unfortunate and inexplicable might well happen."

So far however, she notes with a satisfied air (as the Landord's Daughter allows her to sample something "quite special" recently in from Holland) Parker-Prodnose appears to be quite the ideal re-Iv resident!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 02:32 PM

...never given Glycyrrhiza glabra a go in my pottages.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 02:15 PM

REPOST of nameless Guests contribution here, just in-case mods get twitchy zapping ray-gun fingers ;-)

Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:47 AM

Ah post-modern memory!!!!
A long time back in this thread someone asked why licorice was known as Spanish and I couldn't find an answer...just in case anyone is still interested I think you will find that licorice root was known as Spanish root because although Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice root) is grown in England a great deal is still imported from Spain.
Fortunately, here in Wales we don't have to worry about the English village...its inhabitants have, I am told, bought up all our houses as holiday homes faster than we could burn them down! So "Brown-Wilkinson the 'Piwter" has replaced "Jones the Milk" but then "Jones the Milk" replaced "Llwyd Llefrith" and no doubt Llwyd replaced "Ug the Grunt" "and still the land remains"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,S O'P (Astrray)
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 09:06 AM

In Wikilore :

1) In Yorkshire and Lancashire it is colloquially known as Spanish, supposedly because Spanish monks grew liquorice root at Rievaulx Abbey near Thirsk.

2) Spain produces a rock hard, black, pure substance - Spanish licorice, which in the notyjh of the UK became abbreviated as "Spanish", and could be used sucked for ages. By cutting into small pieces, placing into a bottle of water - usually an empty Bandelion and Durdok bottle - and left to ferment for about a week, thus produced "spo" - a refreshing drink. The spanish was in small rolls with a flattened head holding the name of its producer, and each stick was about 6-8 cm long. (sic throughout)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 08:47 AM

Ah post-modern memory!!!!
A long time back in this thread someone asked why licorice was known as Spanish and I couldn't find an answer...just in case anyone is still interested I think you will find that licorice root was known as Spanish root because although Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice root) is grown in England a great deal is still imported from Spain.
Fortunately, here in Wales we don't have to worry about the English village...its inhabitants have, I am told, bought up all our houses as holiday homes faster than we could burn them down! So "Brown-Wilkinson the 'Piwter" has replaced "Jones the Milk" but then "Jones the Milk" replaced "Llwyd Llefrith" and no doubt Llwyd replaced "Ug the Grunt" "and still the land remains"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Darowyn
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 06:02 AM

A recent arrival in the village is retired Detective Chief inspector Frank Parker-Prodnose, known as Nosey of the Yard. He has moved into the delightful house on the Green called "Postman's Knock", which he bought on the proceeds of his latest book, "Who Drove the Car That Killed the Leader of the Pack?"
The DCI has been spending his retirement working tirelessly to expose the miscarriages of justice concealed within so many popular songs and stories. His cogent argument that Tommy, of "Tell Laura I Love Her" was murdered, is just the latest in his series of exposes of Rock and Roll cover ups.
Since moving into the village, he has turned his attention to Folk Songs. The case which has attracted his attention so far has been that of the unfortunate Matty Groves. A synopsis of his ideas follows.
MATTY GROVES WAS INNOCENT.

Little credibility can be given to the testimony of Lord Donald's wife, clearly a sexual predator of the worst kind, and the obvious discrepancies in the story must point the finger of suspicion.
1.        She propositions Matty when she must have been aware that "a servant ….was standing by and hearing what was said". 'Pas devant les domestiques' has been a motto of the aristocracy since Norman times.
2.        "Matty, he lay down and took a little sleep" Hardly the natural reaction of a young man at the peak of his sexual prowess. He was drugged.
3.        The curious case of Lady Donald's reply to "Who do you like the best of us?" The response could not have been more provocative, especially to a man already in a violent rage. Suspicious!
This is what really happened.
Divorce was not easy at that time, Lady Donald wanted her husband dead, but needed a fall guy. She hatched a plan with a trusted servant to entice Matty Groves to the Castle, drug him and put him in the Great Bed. When Lord Donald arrived, he behaved in a predictable way, but for some reason, the plan for the servant to stab him with Matty's pocket knife ( which had been swapped for Lord Donald's best sword) after Matty had been killed, went wrong.
Did the servant betray his mistress at the last moment?
Was there a counter plot between Lord Donald and the servant to allow Lord Donald to rid himself, justifiably, of a wife who was sure to bring scandal to the family?
There is circumstantial evidence for the latter theory.
Was not Lord Donald really saying,
"A Grave. A Grave, to put these lovers in. But bury my lady at the top, for that will confuse and contaminate the DNA evidence if such a thing becomes possible in the future" ?

A number of other files are already open.
"What did Mary Hamilton do?"
"The Third Sister and the Miller"
I'm sure there will be many others.
(Inspired by James Thurber's "The MacBeth Mystery"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 09:48 AM

"it has been reported that several ageing folk enthusiasts have been out in the woods all night a-conjuring summer in."

I was there! And right bloody windy and cold it was too.. Four of us stayed the distance till that dwindled to three then two, and I left the last of the party alone with her guitar at about 5am. What larks!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 09:30 AM

In the Re-Imagined Village it has been reported that several ageing folk enthusiasts have been out in the woods all night a-conjuring summer in. However, as for not telling the priest their plight, the Reverend James Clitheroe, 67, was one of their number and quite possibly the ringleader. Indeed, having invited the wrinkly revellers back to the vicarage afterwards (to listen to his newly remastered Incredible String Band CDs over a ceremonial breakfast of organic muesli washed down with steaming mugs of Barleycup) he then led them in sky-clad procession to the church, there to venerate the resident 14th-century Green Man (an archetype of our oneness with the earth) with a circle dance in the transept accompanied by suitably pagan sounds from the Garrigills Tom, 57, on his Pipe and Tabor, and Sheila, 55, on her English Concertina, who were joined on this occasion by their Down's Syndrome son, Taliesin, 13, on his Bowed Psaltery. Ironically, all were safely tucked up in bed before solstice point, which passed without incident at 11.28 GMT, although readers might note that tonight is a special Solstice Singers Night at the village Folk Club which now meets in the church hall having been soundly evicted from all three village pubs by the discerning landlords loyal to the cultural sensitivities of their locals.

Also this morning, Mrs Emelia Bowler, 55, reported evidence of a noctural blood sacrifice in the graveyard which on closer examination proved to a disturbed fox-kill. The presence of condoms, beer cans and roach-ends was deemed by an investigating police officer to be coincidental, although several villagers did report hearing the rhythmic blowing of vuvuzelas coming from the direction of the church yard in the wee hours of morning. As PC Carrington, 27, explained: "An anonymous source informs us that the vuvuzela is being used in place of the traditional hunting-horn by several illegal fox hunters, who naturally ply their trade under the cover of darkness, so as not to arouse suspicion that anything more serious than drunken revelry is afoot. Whether or not they continue to do so after the world cup remains to be seen, or, indeed, verified. Needless to say, we know who the chief culprits are but have yet to catch them red handed as it were. In this case, it seems, Bold Reynard was disturbed at his repast by the hunt, thus leaving the as yet unidentified carcass in the state in which it was discovered by Mrs Bowler."   

At 3.30 this afternoon Mr Ken Moor, 74, will be lecturing the WI on the folkloric provenance of the enduring 1,2 / 1,2,3 / 1,2,3,4 / 5,6 rhythm currently favoured by vuvuzela players in stirring call-and-response rallies the world over. He dates it to a Druidic Chant reported by the Roman historian Spiritus Canus, the nature of which put the heebie-jeebies up the invading Italians and almost halted their fateful assault on Anglesey. It is also found notated in ancient Gnostic scripture, and the notorious Lope de Aguirre (1510-61) reported hearing it played by remote Amazonian tribes during his ill-fated search for El Dorado. Indeed, following Mr Moor's lecture, there will be a special DVD presentation of Werner Herzog's Aguirre: Wrath of God (1972) in which the eponymous conquistador is portrayed by the late Klaus Kinski, and the memorable soundtrack composed and performed by Florian Fricke and his group Popol Vuh. This is the first of the WI's Herzog / Kinski season, culminating with Nosferatu (1979) to be screened on October 31st, after which the WI will featuring the films of Takeshi Kitano, beginning with a special screaning of Hanna-bi (1997) on November 5th.   

Otherwise, please note clog dancers of both sexes are still banned from the willow-licked riversides so as not to disturb the local wildfowl (the swans as especially sensitive) although fans of English folk cuisine will be pleased to note that stottie, chips and mead are available as a special on at least one village pub menu for the duration of the summer.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Feb 10 - 09:20 AM

Not long after finding English Folk music around 2004, I was lucky to catch a BBC TV documentary following Martin Carthy, and family, as he received an MBE, and was impressed by almost everything he/they had to say; thus, I could never have imagined the snippets of the Imagined Village I heard on Radcliffe and Macone (BBC Radio 2) last night - just after the BBC Folk Awards. Equally sad, in my opinion, is that, despite there being Scottish junior and senior folk-awards for a few years now, there is still no "English Folk Awards" (as I've said here).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 08:11 AM

Now that's a house! Virginia - we could do with one of those on the banks of our "gently flowing river, licked by weeping willows, and glided upon by mute swans" (opening post)...what a place to take afternoon tea!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 06:06 AM

Oh dear. I missed my chance at selling some

Horned toads from over the Gulf in Texas

at the Serpente Fayre. They make excellent pets, keeping the scorpions and tarantulas at bay.

I would have been there in a ankle length red patchwork coat

as Vo-Vo de la Gator (Grandmother of the Gator) from the

house on the Bayou


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 04:52 AM

That was me by the way, last night at the in-laws, avoiding Gavin and Stacey having just watched the final Dr Who instalment which was quite the worst thing I've seen in years. Anyway, a little drunk at the time but reading back through it I don't think it's so very bad at all really. In fact, I might just give it to Rapunzel later to see if she might come up with a tune...

That second line should be radiated.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Remote Control Freak
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 04:08 PM

New Year's Day in the Village by Timothy Phipps-Barton.

Hoisted plank
Ratiated;
I am with bone &
wept - bitterly
so bitterly

I saw three
demons; dog-heads;
dead-headed dreams
blood coughed
choughs hacking
on the gate

over there -
an umbrella hangs
and gathers
flaked and
feathered; like
a snake coiled

like an owl
sat by byres
howling in
choking winds
hail lashed in
obsolete winter

Christ was there
reborn in tatters
eyes clawed
blindness
new buds, ice-born

night falls;
she picks stars
from around the moon;
slips and stumbles,
spills
it all goes
sparkling
away


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 05:48 AM

A heated row began in the Pinky Out Tea Rooms, yesterday, between Mrs Stripe and Mrs George. Feathers flew when conversation moved from Channel crossings and greasing-up to which bird for Christmas.

Mrs Stripe finally saw red and stormed out when Mrs George exclaimed: "Your turkey would be as dry as sandpaper if it wasn't smothered in GOOSE fat."

Mrs Grey, manager of the Pinky Out, claims Mrs George, who has since been nicknamed "Mother Goose", then stepped too far with her final remark: "Don't forget to bring home the bacon, too, for your dry turkey!"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 12:00 PM

Thanks, Crow Sister. We could do this, which we'll be singing at the Kirkby Fleetham Folk Club Christmas Party next Saturday:

Jack and Jill

Yes, we're both a little SAD I'm afraid.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 09:46 AM

I've "Christmas Sung Simply" (me), and "The Holly and the Ivy" (E. trad.) on my myspace ; and, keeping out of the latest village-villain troubles, am trying to relearn a few others .


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 09:39 AM

Oh well Leveller - I'm sure the regulars aren't fussy! Anything'll do - we could always have an alternative antipodean special this year, where we sing Summery songs in shorts and t shirts to help cheer up the SAD sufferers.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 09:16 AM

I hope that Miss P doesn't do what she did last year when she got a fogettable member of the Hollyoaks cast to officially turn on her lights and blacked out the whole of the village. I suspect that will be the case as simply looking at the hotograh crashed my computer twice!

CS thanks for the invitation. I haven't put anything new on our myspace site for ages but hope to record some stuff over the holiday period. I'm afraid it won't be Christmassy, though, as we don't really do that sort of song (bit too cheerful for us Humbuggers!). Look forward to listening to yours, though.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Dec 09 - 06:59 AM

There's an advert posted in the parish mag:

"Christmas Singaround at the re-Imagined village Wyrm & Virgin inn!
With a mince pie and a glass of mulled wine on the house to all who sing"

No idea how many people actually follow this thread? But I think a handful at least, and some of us have YouTubes/MySpace stuff.

This weekend I will mostly be learning Christmassy type songs - when it's nearer to Xmas and I've put them up on my MySpace, I'll post a link to 'em up here.
Be nice if anyone else fancied sharing links to their online Christmassy type music too, by way of a virtual re-Iv Christmas singaround?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 02:54 PM

Ahh, village gossip also has it that the Prof. - a specialist in rare forms of lichen by day - has an evil alter-ego who works by night deep in his secret underground laboratory, performing all kinds of peculiar experiments on whatever it is he's got down there.

No-body in Buttercup Mews questions the screams and howls that emanate from deep within the the bowels of Dr. Jameson's semi-detached bungalow. For although he's a bit evil, as a genius and member of Mensa the neighbours generally tend to be understanding of his idiosyncrasies - plus the Dr. has also appeared both on Countdown and Eggheads!

But it is a blessed relief to the poor traumatised ears of Miss Pringle the school mistress (who unfortunately shares an adjoining wall with the doctor) now that he's "missing". Plus, she can now get her outdoor Christmas lights down from the loft.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 10:47 AM

To be honest, the Prof has only himself to blame. He insisted that the Yoofs tried out the new hallucinogenic substance he invented in order to cash in on the 'legal' drugs trade, now they're addicted and want the formula. They'll probably subject him to unspeakable tortures until they get it. I blame the recent screening of Mad Max 2 at the Lesser Rivington Community Centre for giving them the idea.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 10:21 AM

Oh dear!

The very latest village gossip seems to suggest that the re-Imagined village's feral youths (actually a bunch of boys and girls who live wild on a brown land site at the fringes of Lesser Rivington) have abducted the Prof!

After having broken into his house and bundled old Jameson into the back of a nicked motor (his own) late last night, the balaclavered youths proceeded to drive out of the village at dangerous speed. No-body knows for certain where they went (though everyone assumes Dr. J. has probably been securely tied up on one of the boughs of the great cedar tree, same as last year), but there seems a general complacency about finding him - at least until after Twelfth Night anyway when most of the inflatable Santa's will be safely back in the lofts of the good people of Lesser Rivington.

Anyway, after that unfortunate accident with the long bow and the regional school inspector in 2008, the wise villagers realise that to interfere with the young lads & lasses fun could be potentially fatal.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 10:16 AM

Word of that gets out they'll come a-carolling wearing asbestos mittens.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 10:15 AM

As founder of The Humbuggers, Christmas is banned at The Levels. Yuletide, however, will be celebrated with all due solemnity (i.e. none) with roast rib of local beef and a bowl of smoking Bishop ala Ebeneezer after his ghostly encounters. Any carol singers will be showered with red hot pennies from an upper window.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 08:55 AM

All a bit quiet in the village in the build up to Christmas; a few lights here and there, but nothing too tacky on the advice of the Community Association who have frowned heavily on such things. Even the residents of Rivington Lea have been asked to tone it down this year, but from the evidence thus far it seems unlikely. The 'trees have been up since early November, the kids are at fever pitch, and the late night Karoakes blare from house to house where huge Homer Simpson Santas bounce about in the chill winds and each house is ablaze in fierce competition to outdo those neighbouring.    Recommendations to the Community Association that such Luminos and attendant festivities be accommodated for their folkloric significance have been rejected by the members of the Folk Song, Morris & Mumming Side Committee, aka The Green Man's Morrice, who insist that theirs is the only genuine folklore on offer in Rivington and any association with the crass council house chavs is to be avoided altogether.

Last year Community Association chairperson and Mummer Dr Quentin Jameson, PhD. caused quite a stir when he ad-libbed a couplet to The Traditional words thus:

In comes I old Father Christmas.
Am I welcome or am I not?
I hope old Father Christmas will never be forgot
As Christmas comes but once a year
And when it comes it brings good cheer,
A pocketful of money and a cellar full of beer,
Roast beef, plum pudding and mince pies:
Who likes that any better than I?
But in these dark times, sees no one gives a toss;
I best be on my way before they nail me to a cross.


When asked who they were, he declined to comment, but it might be noted that Mr Jameson's name was mentioned in connection with a certain petition advising that Rivington become a Gated Community, with Rivington Lea most definitely without its boundaries. He is also instrumental in making sure that all Christmas decorations in the village comply with Traditional Folkloric Precedents - stating that external House Lights aren't proper folklore because they are shop bought. One wonders just which Santa will end up being nailed to a cross this year...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 12:00 PM

Manchester is my favourite City - of all those I've actually seen that is. It really knocks the spots off of smug Liverpool in any event - with all the ghastly mop-toppery 'Strawberry Fields' this and 'Cavern' that. Couple of years ago we were seriously considering moving to Manchester. But last few years have been quite messy with deaths and work commitments, and one thing and another, so those plans for a move went on hold - still restless and musing though. Quite honestly I doubt that I would ever feel really at home in any village (bar the re-Imagined one, which would suit me down to the ground) - but an historic market town might do us well. Especially if not *too* far from some kinda culturally diverse city.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 08:49 AM

Leaving the village for the city:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R_XX4q45FR8

I've lived my life in the valleys
I've lived my life on the hills
I've lived my life on alcohol
I've lived my life on pills
But it's called love
And it belongs to us
It's called love
And it's the only thing that's worth living for
It's called love
And it belongs to us
It's called love
Yes it's called love

Oh, love is found in the east and west
But when love is at home, it's the best
Love is the cure for every evil
Love is the air that supports the eagle
It's called love
And it's so un-cool
It's called love
And somehow it's become unmentionable
It's called love
And it belongs to every one of us
It's called love
And it cuts your life like a broken knife

Oh, it dies so quickly
It grows so slowly
But when it dies, it dies for good
It's called love
And it belongs to everyone but us...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 07:42 AM

..catnaps - yes/catnip - no, please: the last time it was introduced into the village, side-effects were catastrophic.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:09 PM

Ah, I seem to have taken fresh inspiration from this thread! Have even started re-reading it (though only so far as SO'P's reminiscences of "liquid Germolene" served with Big Mac's, as yet).

Earlier today me and Mr.Crow went hunting (unsuccessfully, though I've seen it before) for a local pub called "The Cats", which after failed local putterings in our wee banger I eventually hunted down on t'internet here: Scroll down to sixth 'cat' pub listed.

Now I'm not normally a fan of modern revised pub names (like "Frog and Ferrit" or "Slug and Pumpkin", but this one is so genuinely eccentric and charming (an extraordinarily large black cat figure sitting amidst the marigolds and dhalias out front, plus another more quietly perched on the roof) that it earns all due respect.

What's more I'd like to import it into the re-Iv, if no-body minds, and use it to house my late batty and also somewhat wayward, though highly hospitable (as is the Irish way) mother. She was the classic cat lady, always a battered roll-up hanging out the corner of her mouth, a hot cuppa tea dangerously dribbling streams of hot liquid onto the floor as she relentlessly chattered away. And she eternally housed local waifs and strays and general good-fer-nuthings - including psychotic cats that no-one else would dare touch with a barge pole. We all said she'd come into her prime at 80, but she died just over a year ago at fifty four (outliving both her parents by seven years.)

In the re-Iv however, Busy Lizzy (as she was known) will do what she always wanted to do, and will (almost) run The Cats as a mixture of B&B (where waifs and stray's will inevitably still take advantage of her hospitable nature - as she serves them bacon & eggs, and lamb & leek stew everyday for breakfast and tea) and cat rescue centre - where otherwise impossible creatures will be homed and successfully theraped by her own intuitive form of white witchery - however much they piss on the beds, scratch the furniture, shit in the vegetable patch, slaughter the neighbours prize carrier pigeons and generally terrorise the locals - and that's just the humans..

It was of course Busy Lizzy that gave the re-Iv Round Table their idea to hold an Official Illegal Rave, after regaling them with tales of the classic and celebrated Weeley Rock Festival of 1971 (not long before I was born).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:54 PM

...or only with some kind of handicap.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:43 PM

Just don't let Thing (and I knew TL's pic. was coming) enter the knife throwing event - that would be a lay down misere!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 12:02 PM

After this years annual Serpent Fayre went so splendidly well (despite the unfortunate demise of Mr. O' Houlihan, who it seems was ravaged to death by some unknown wild animal and had to be identified by his dental records) the village has been quite contentedly slowing down for Winter.

The recent autumnal winds have rendered the orchard tree's barren of their last remaining leaves, while local Mushrooming enthusiasts wander through Lesser Rivingtons woods foraging for Blewits, Chicken of the Woods and Amanita Muscaria (the latter once baked dry, is said my Mrs. Prosser to make a "delightful shamanic tea, ideal for Sabbats").

After excitement from the Serpent Fayre has finally died down, and the weather becomes increasingly chill (so much so that the WI Coven are compelled to don balaclavas and woolen mittens & scarves during their sky-clad rites around the Mother Stone) everyone feels a little wistful at the passing of Summer, so it is with much chatter and excitement that the latest news from the RIV chronicle is received in the village.

In fact - Oh Goody! - I've just read in my own copy (delivered a little late by Rev. Pete's wiry haired and rather wayward son "...but better late than a broken window", think I) that the re-Imagined village Round Table are planning to host a "Winter Warmer" event over the Solstice! Amongst other entertainments (including a tombola, raffle and knife throwing event), Tomlin has been booked to DJ an evening's Psy-Trance (a small add, including a grainy B&W photo of the ever-smiling Landlord's Daughter and "E's, Whizz & Acid can be purchased on the Door!" in bold type underneath).

The Round Table, keen to encourage the village's young people have advertised this years Solstice Winter Warmer as "The re-Imagined village's first official Illegal Rave: be there or be square!"

A couple of delapidated buses belonging to dreadlocked New-Age travelers have already parked up on the old Quire's land, but as the Squire is now a thoroughly friendly and egalitarian Gloucester Old Spot, no-body minds in the slightest.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 09:41 AM

What I forgot to mention is that I believe the first story to be true as I heard it "first hand" whilst I was employed as John Astin's stand-in. Here's the evidence:

Gomez stand-in


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 09:28 AM

Some say that the Mrs O'Houlihan's severed arm was buried in the    graveyard to await the rest of its owner at the appointed time but that, impatient for that moment to arrive, on moonlit nights it could be seen pushing out of the ground and walking through the village on search of its owner. Until, that is, a visiting American actor – one John Astin – caught sight of it and, after some negotiaton, persuaded the limb to accompany him back to the USA where it found fame in the role of Thing in The Addams Family.

Others, however, maintain that the owner pickled it in salt, pepper and vervain, dried it out, and now uses it like the infamous Hand of Glory, to maintain her anonymity while she performs nefarious night-time deeds in the houses of various residents of surrounding villages.

The truth of either of these legends will only be disproven when the owner herself is laid to rest – with or without her gruesome appendage.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:13 AM

The Adams family started-up shop yesterday - they have American accents, and there seems to be a lot of recycled Whitby-jet jewellery on offer..? (They don't need another hand.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 12:36 PM

"My hands aren't in the least bit artistic; they're rough and gnarled, rugged as any vagabond or woodsman thus giving testimony to a life of hard rural journeyman labour; soil-stained from the tatties and blistered by the plough; blood-stained from lamb-delivery and pig-slaughter; torn by both tooth and thorn; cut with both axe and bill-hook; leather-hard by the wind and the rain; cracked by the ice and the snow; fire burned at hearth and forge and still smarting from the strap and tawse of childhood...."

Blimey, sounds like a thoroughly terrible affliction to suffer from every day! Poor Mrs. SO'P..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 12:07 PM

It's actually the council who now own a second-hand shop on Dragon's Lane - to be managed by a Mr. and Mrs. Adams, and called "Yours for a Song."


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 11:37 AM

My hands aren't in the least bit artistic; they're rough and gnarled, rugged as any vagabond or woodsman thus giving testimony to a life of hard rural journeyman labour; soil-stained from the tatties and blistered by the plough; blood-stained from lamb-delivery and pig-slaughter; torn by both tooth and thorn; cut with both axe and bill-hook; leather-hard by the wind and the rain; cracked by the ice and the snow; fire burned at hearth and forge and still smarting from the strap and tawse of childhood....

Seamus Ennis had beautiful hands though, though maybe not quite as beautiful as his music:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF3fW4Nox9U


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 10:45 AM

Sorry, not me WaV!
Thanks for such a kindly fantasy tho', alway's happy to help a stranger.

Perhaps SO'P's elegantly musical and artistic hands may be available for ..what exactly was it again?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 10:17 AM

...you planning to lend them a hand, CS?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 10:09 AM

"the posh jewellers on Doors/Dragon's Lane, The Ring of Fire, has been sold off"

Well I doubt anyone's exactly exactly surprised WaV! Tsk, what on earth were they thinking! A posh jewellers in a village?

Hopefully the second-hand shop will do rather better.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 09:12 AM

The latest, RIV Chronicle, by the way, mentions that the posh jewellers on Doors/Dragon's Lane, The Ring of Fire, has been sold off to some kind of second-hand merchant - due to open before Christmas...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 09:04 AM

Directly after Sunday's dragon pie luncheon (please arrive by 11:30am at the latest as Reverend Pete will be giving a talk on Serpent Cults in Dravidian India) to be held in the caves below Worm Hill, Mrs. Proctors WI Coven have also promised to perform an artistic and 'tasteful' sky-clad theatrical dance piece in the village hall during the afternoon. Traditionally choreographed around the Ballad of the Laily Worm, providing a fresh twist this year will be backing music from newly formed D'n'B Ballading duo Dragonlines. Polly will also be providing body paint and glitter services to the otherwise naked dancing Coven ladies, though the stage paint and sparkles unfortunately seem to accentuate rather than diminish their un-ironed appearance.

Everyone hopes that there will not be a repeat fatality this year, but as Mrs Proctor says with usual her usual indomitable spirit "The show must go on!", before adding stoically "And of course, sacrifices must be made sometimes.." Mrs. O' is quietly praying to the BMV, that her aching arm be relieved of it's conjugal duties, and that the entirety of Mr. O' (rather than merely his abundant seed) might be deemed a fitting offering this year. Especially as liberal minded Lucia has it appears developed a keen interest in her husbands' ex-paramour this Summer, which also (thank Mary, Jesus and Joseph) means that Mrs. O' need not suffer the worry of any resulting unwanted pregnancies from their delightful trysts (which are conducted after hours every Tuesday and Thursday beneath the great yew in the abandoned Catholic Church's Graveyard.)

A self avowed "erotic gourmet", Lucia finds Mrs. O's stump "Quite beautiful!".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 08:14 AM

also has a wicked grin and an arm like a Blacksmith.

Mrs O'Houlihan - actually a great-granddaughter of legendary Irish Showman Turlough O'Carrageen - lost her right arm when an attempt at recreating one of her great-grandfather's more daring spectacles when horribly awry. Not the first to have lost a limb (and worse) in O'Carrageen's notorious Tumblesword, Mrs O' displays her stump with pride and has developed aforementioned arm like a Blacksmith through her dedication to tennis, weight-lifting, shot-putting, and keeping the boys in order, although it is said that her formidable arm is the result of the sort of conjugalities she provided for her husband having decided seven boys was more than enough - contraception being out of the question on account of their devout Catholicism. If not the actual result, then it must certainly come in handy assuaging Mr O'Houlihan's somewhat rampant carnal needs (five times a day in winter, eight in summer) the copious results of such exploits Mrs O' keeps in a large stone jar which she ceremonially pours into the hole of The Mother Stone of Rivington Ring on the night of the full moon by way of a sacred offering.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 07:39 AM

"The Lair of the White Worm which I haven't seen for too long" I have a first edition of the original Bram Stoker novel which I'll donate to the RIV lbrary - it has some wonderful illustrations.

Must rush now; I'll be back later.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Smedley
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 07:21 AM

I have nothing to add, just a pathetic craving to be the 800th post on a thread.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 07:12 AM

Dorothy Dodge, the cricket tea-lady has also commented that the paper-boy's Mother one Mrs O'Houlihan "an extremely handsome woman, with a formidable bosom", settled Irish traveler and Mum of seven strapping lads, also has a wicked grin and an arm like a Blacksmith. While the local trendy CofE vicar (who still likes to wear the beads he collected while trecking through India many years ago) has the most heathen, wild and wiry locks..

In other villages there would have been quite a scandal, but as this is the re-Imagined village the locals generally look indulgently upon the Vicar's liason. It is also fortunate that his wife Lucia (who he met in India while also buying beads shorty after she had been expelled from Cheltenham Ladies College) is a believer in polyamoury.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 06:05 AM

The Lair of The White Worm takes a similar approach to Folk Music as The Wicker Man:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDcWgbUrAzI

Maybe a double bill is in order???


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 05:26 AM

There's been complaints about the new bicycled paper-boy: last week, 3 cottages went without the RIV Chronicle; and 2 front windows were broken, plus one carton of soya; Dorothy Dodge, who has been cricket tea-lady for as long as anyone cares to remember, says he's as fit as the butcher's dog (which often seems to follow him round), but has a wicked smile, an arm like a blacksmith, and hair like Bob Willis.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 05:21 AM

The Lair of the White Worm; there's a blast from the past! Amanda Donohoe in vamp mode, Peter Capaldi and a very young Hugh Grant, when he was an actor. The opening tracking shot of the lair is actually Thor's Cave in the Manifold Valley, about half a mile from where I live. Perhaps we could hold our pie-eating feast in the cave?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 19 Nov 09 - 03:36 AM

Dragon Lines is the name of an experimental duo featuring hitherto unaccompanied folk song & ballad singer Polly Vaughan who's recently hooked up with young Drum & Bass turntable-wiz Tomlin to produce some quite stunning & darkly wyrd jams weaving beats, drones, loops and supernatural balladry. I hear they're performing tonight in on of the village pubs but I'm not sure which one as yet.

Interesting to note, for those who are concerned about such matters, that Drum & Bass originated in England. I was, & remain, especially fond of artists such as Photek, and detect his inspiration in the work of Tomlin.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 05:19 PM

Here be Dragon's Lane - we can simply rename Doors Lane, which runs behind the Early Doors Pub, toward Wormhill, where one can either soak in the view of our village green or, of course, dragon spot.

And we need to start re-learning our Early Doors carols, by the way.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Darowyn
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 01:31 PM

I'm not sure about Dragon's Line, but we used to live on Dragon's Lane (near Malvern).
I'm sure the Re-Im Village should have a lane with that name.
When very young, I lived with my family in Dragonby, which might be a good name for an imaginary village too
Cheers
Dave.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 01:24 PM

A vegan version? Yes I reckon WaV, especially as the Landlord's Daughter's best mate also happens to work at the village bakers.

Fortunately, it just so happens that the re-Imagined village's Serpent Fayre attracts all kinds of sandal wearing, tankard touting, oddballs and nutcutlets.. And so the village baker supplies these same regular curious incomers with a mighty healthy herby vegan version of Dragon Pie, baked by the Landord's Daughter's mate's own fair hand!

It's a mighty fine raised pie, made with a mix of whole-wheat and white flour, filled with all manner of savoury spiced goodies and topped with a delightful coil of pastry representing the local mythic-serpent. Those less inclined to seasonal Dragon Hunting might prefer spinach instead of the usual local greens, but otherwise the vegan version is just as good as the 'faux croc' (spicy turkey) filling found in the regular meaty version.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 01:20 PM

Ask Phil T. about his brother's legendary vegan dragon Xmas dinners, WAV - I narrowly missed out on one when we shared a flat at Brancepeth Castle a decade ago, preferring to spend the season with Rapunzel who was living at Worth Abbey at the time, where we feasted on non-vegan Lamb. We're having vegan dragon & pineapple curry tonight though, complete with vintage 78rpm poppadoms and peshwari naans.

The Guest below by the way was none other than our very own Sailor Ron, who rang last night to confirm the truth of most of what he wrote there, which ties in so beautifully with the young men bursting forth from blazing barrels having rolled down Copper's Fell. Uncanny.

Where there is a Worm Hill, invariably it stands on a Dragon Line, and there you will find it topped with a church of St Michael to s/lay it - as with Glastonbury Tor and St. Michael's Mount and all points in between. There are a few exceptions I can think of, like Worm Hill in Fatfield, one time home of the Lambton Worm, and Spindlestone Heugh in Northumberlanmd where the Laidley Worm has its lair. Worms and lairs! Now there's a cracking film - The Lair of the White Worm which I haven't seen for too long. Can someone arrange a showing at the village hall, please??


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 12:35 PM

...is there a vegan version of "Dragon Pie", please, CS?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 11:31 AM

Seeing as this is of course the re-Imagined village, can we please have a re-Imagine Wormhill? Where local amateur dowsers come to the pub that is probably at the bottom of it (wot's it called again) and have some local specially baked 'Dragon Pie' (I'll have to come up with a spicy recipe) and Snake-Bite?
It's a local tradition at the Serpent Fayre where of course there's folk music and stuff along with the Dragon Pies and Snake-Bite.

The pub has a small field where enthusiasts camp out and go Dragon Spotting after a few spliffs or mushrooms (in fact the hill itself is a great magic mushroom hunting location, especially in late Summer).
If there's no joy to be found on the hill however, the Landlords Daughter (had to), supplies this prime Skunk-Weed from seeds she gets by mail-order from the Netherlands that she grows in Dad's loft..

And of course there's always the regular Saturday Kurryoke Night to be relied upon for top entertainment. On Kurryoke Night during Serpent Fayre, it's fancy dress and the curry is extra firey, and only songs or bands that feature snakes are deemed appropriate..
Of course it tends to be a soft rock evening, but everyone still thoroughly enjoys themselves. Especially as everyone declares that the Landlords Daughter's harvest is top notch this year.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 10:44 AM

And here's a piccy of a stained glass window in the local church depicted the knight and dragon: Wormingford Worm
Though my guess by looking at the creature, it's probably a modern literal interpretation.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 18 Nov 09 - 10:31 AM

Interesting stuff Guest..

Further to serpents and dragons, at Wormingford in Essex, we have the story of how a pet crocodile was brought back from the crusades, escaped into the eponymous ford and started well, killing sheep and people and stuff basically. Apparently the villagers were so dismayed by the dragon that they started offering it virgins for tea in an attempt to mollify it's blood-lust (good old cosy rustics - echoes of TWM her methinks!). When the villagers eventually ran out of virgins, they called upon a knight to dispatch the beasty, which he duly did without too much fuss.

Later earth-mysteries have been appended to the original dragon-myth, and the hill is said to be home to a 'dragon line' that Smorg-like coils in slumber around the lonely hill-top. The location, is quite atmospheric, and even mildly forbidding. Though I've not visited it with dowsing rods myself, to see if a dragon really sleeps there.

I rather like to imagine, that if there wasn't a dragon *before* the villages started making their blood sacrifices, then there very probably was one afterwards... The village Church has some interesting stuff on the story anyhoo. Though I don't know if there are any village traditions associated to it.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 17 Nov 09 - 07:02 AM

In St. Margaret's chapel, within the parish church upon her feast day, it has been recorded, that a vuper's skin is left upon the feet of the statue of the saint, though this custom seems to have died out in the early 1800s, perhaps due to the then rector the Rev. James Calvin Grant D.D. hatred of anything that smacked at 'popery'. It has however been noted that in recent years colour drawings ofsnakes and/dragons have been left there. Though no one, as far as I know, will admit to revising this custom.
For those who do not know, St Margaret of Antioch [not to be confused with St. Margaret of Scotland] was swallowed by a serpant/dragon/crocodile, and used the pointed ent of her cross to piece its belly from the inside and so escape.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 16 Nov 09 - 10:12 AM

Aye, they're a hardy lot alright, the re-Imagined village lads and lasses! Far too cold and wet out there for me to dream of any kind of licentiousness or naked erupting youths, however charmingly Mithraic.

Mind you I suppose it beats hanging out at the re-Imagined village bus stop..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Nov 09 - 07:31 AM

St. Margaret's Day (November 16th) is marked by barrel rolling on Copper's Fell, Lesser Rivington, in which seven of the braver (and fitter) young adolescent men of the village are sealed naked in barrels which are then set on fire before being sent on their way down the steep hillside. An impressive spectacle, especially as the barrels are left to blaze at the bottom until the wood becomes brittle enough for said young men to burst naked from within in a gesture of Mithraic Rebirth. Teams of village girls are on hand with a herbal salve of witch-hazel, hyssop and lavender with which to rub on any burns thus incurred, though this practise in itself has developed a certain licentiousness far removed from its original intention.      

Otherwise, on this day:

* 1384 – Jadwiga is crowned King of Poland, although she is a woman.
* 1821 – American Old West: Missouri trader William Becknell arrives in Santa Fe, New Mexico over a route that became known as the Santa Fe Trail.
* 1938 – LSD is first synthesized by Swiss chemist Dr. Albert Hofmann at the Sandoz Laboratories in Basel, Switzerland.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 07 Nov 09 - 05:45 AM

Not sure if this is really a ghost story as I always thought it might be a genius loci, but here goes.

When our collie dog was younger my wife and I would often take turns walking her in Macclesfield Forest, a largely cultivated patch of woodland (mainly non-native softwoods with increasing patches of native broad-leaves) on the edge of the Peak District that occupies the head of a valley and affords quite spectacular views of this corner of England and in the far distance North Wales. The forest is dotted with derelict farms and criss-crossed by stone walls with the occasional leafy spring hidden in damp green corners.

After a walk one day I was heading down the hill back to the car with the dog trotting ahead when a few yards away in the forest a green mist, about the size of a person rose up in front of me. I kid you not, it lingered for a few minutes as I approached then dispersed. It was definitely green, and it was a warm day totally without the mists which cling to the trees some days. I wasn't unnerved, just dismayed. I went to the patch where the mist rose and there was nothing there but grass; I thought it could have been pollen but it was very localised and not a hint remained in the seconds it took me to get there. In truth, it simply didn't look like pollen and I've never seen anything like it in 15 years of walking around the local countryside on a daily basis.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 07 Nov 09 - 04:48 AM

Doug Pantry, a devout entomologist since his days at Eton, who steadfastly refuses to attend Bonfire Nights, sparked a right old row at the Early Doors pub the other night - he wants half our village green cordoned off for nothing but nettles. His only supporter was Nelly Beaton, who fancies nettle soup with...some kind of pie.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 12:11 PM

Ooooooh! CS, was there some sort of processional 'cursus' there in the past?

We had a strange experience whe we moved into our present house (a station house built un 1847). mrsleveller kept hearing the noise of heavy, laboured breathing (no, it wasn't me!)and we later found out that the husband of the lady we had bought the house from had died of asbestosis. A while later, while we were sat in the living room with some friends, she felt water dripping on her head and her hair got quite wet. There were no water pipes anywhere near or in the floor above and no damp patches on the ceiling. There haven't been any other happenings for quite a few years now so maybe our ghost just 'pissed off'. (No, seriously, it actually happened.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 11:23 AM

With all this talk of souls and purgatory, and general spookiness of the season, this might be an appropriate point of relating an anecdote of me & my bf testing our tent in the garden one night, just prior to setting off for a hiking holiday.

We were snug abed in our sleeping bags (for purely scientific research purposes of course) when in a drowsy state I "heard" the announcement like a train approaching a platform "Incoming!" then I experienced the most bizarre sensation of a stream of odd ghostly creatures dancing along through the tent, like the flotsam and jetsam of a child's imagination. This continued until another "announcement" was made (I can't recall the words) and the caravan of dancing spirit entities passed upon their journey..

In the morning when we awoke, my fella recounted to me this striking 'dream' he'd had in the night (which he wasn't really sure was a dream at all, or if he was awake) where a bizarre train of entities danced through the tent during the middle of the night...

We were both quite impressed that we'd both totally unexpectedly had a virtually identical experience! >cue twilight zone music<

Well.. it seems that my house being in direct line between a Church and a Beacon point, has (perhaps) by virtue of it's location what was once known as a 'ghost road' running through - where lost spirits would reputedly travel in procession from the graveyard upon certain nights...

Despite having camped in numerous graveyards over the years, neither of us have ever experienced the phenomena either before or since (though to be honest I've not had cause to camp in the garden since either). Can't recall what the date was either unfortunately, or I could check if it associated to a lighting of the beacon, but it remains for me one of those little fortean mysteries, which possibly connects in some fashion to our ancestors pragmatic folk-rites for the dead...

Any more 'ghost stories' for the re-Imagined village fortean archive?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 11:06 AM

hmmmmm...think I'll stick to woodies. Once, many years ago, I decided to make a rook pie and a shooting friend of mine gave me a sack full of rooks. You can only eat the breast meat so after hours of dissecting I ended up with about half a pound of meat and a big pile of corpses, which I put in the dustbin. Sometime later, a rumour got back to me that we were part of a satanic cult.....I wondered why we got such strange looks from the dustman.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 10:12 AM

Thing to remember with magpie is to hang it at least a week or so before marinading it in a half-decent Merlot. One for sorrow, two for joy; good with blackberries and mustard. For best results cook slow. I hear the eyes make an excellent caviare substitute, but you need rather a lot of them to get the effect.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 09:53 AM

Yes, good night. The boorsron were good but I'm still picking spines out of my teeth (nearly said 'pricks' there). The squirrels and pigeons were eaten in retaliation for them feeding on my apples and cobnuts. Just looking round for a magpie recipe (now that rooks are scarce).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 09:43 AM

And on the same page you might read the following (for Ron's benefit who knows a certain problem with links):

the custom prevailing among the Roman Catholics of lighting fires upon the hills on All Saints'night, the Eve of All Souls, scarcely needs explaining, fire being, even among the Pagans, an emblem of immortality, and well calculated to typify the ascent of the soul to heaven.
A correspondent of the same periodical (1788, vol. lviii. p. 602) alludes to a custom observed in some parts of the kingdom among the Papists, of illuminating some of their grounds upon the eve of All Souls, by bearing round them straw, or other fit materials, kindled into a blaze. This ceremony is called a Tinley, said to represent an emblematical lighting of souls out of purgatory.


*

Good night last night. All our hedgehogs were fresh roadkill by the way, not too mashed up. Shame to let the blighters go to waste!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 08:47 AM

I agree, S. - it's a good e-book; by the way, Guy Fawkes night, and soul-cakes, SJ, are at #0510 on the list of contents.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 06:33 AM

Thanks for that, CS - that's the rest of my day accounted for!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 05:39 AM

I missed the bonny! Anyone go Souling?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 06 Nov 09 - 04:46 AM

Hutton.. wish I could find it!
However rummaging in the re-Imagined village on-line library van, I did find:

British Popular Customs Present And Past - Customs, practices & rituals from the traditions & folklore of the British Isles.
Arranged According To The Calendar Days Of The Year.
By Rev T. F. Thiselton-dyer, M.A. Pembroke College, Oxon
Published By George Bell & Sons London Circa 1900


Which I thought was rather nice.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 10:10 AM

Consulting my handy copy of Hutton's Stations of the Sun I see that Samhaine's a bit bogus for the re-Imagined Village. Purgatory Field is real enough though, where the Teanlowe Fires were lit in direct consequence of the reformation which robbed us of that immediate link with the family dead.

Arriving late? Not a bit of it! Tonight we'll be looking forward to MARTINMASS which is Old Hollantide - 11th November - so get carving your neeps!

Hop-tu-naa – This is old Hollantide night:
Trolla-laa,– The moon shines bright.
Hop-tu-naa – Cock of the hens;
Trolla-laa –Supper of heifer;
Hop-tu-naa – Which heifer to kill?
Trolla-laa –The little speckled heifer.
Hop-tu-naa – The fore-quarter,
Trolla-laa – We'll put in the pot for you.
Hop-tu-naa – The little hind quarter,
Trolla-laa – Give to us, give to us.
Hop-tu-naa – I tasted the broth,
Trolla-laa – I scalded my tongue,
Hop-tu-naa – I went to the well,
Trolla-laa,– And drank my fill;
Hop-tu-naa – On my way back
Trolla-laa – I met a witch-cat;
Hop-tu-naa – The cat began to grin,
Trolla-laa – And I began to run.
Hop-tu-naa – Where did you run to?
Trolla-laa,– I ran to Scotland.
Hop-tu-naa – What were they doing there?
Trolla-laa,– Baking bannocks & roasting collops.
Hop-tu-naa – Trolla, laa!

If you are going to give us anything, give us it soon,
Or we'll be away by the light of the moon
Hop-tu-naa!


(Manx, from HERE - I might do this tonight actually, after all, there are strong links between the Isle of Man & Fleetwood; on a clear dear you can even see it from the Mount!)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 09:48 AM

The refugees from Poulton, driven out by parson & mayor, and newly arrived [late] for samaine in The Village have requested they may march round the bonfire carrying their Teanlowe Fires, and also request that the Village green be renamed Purgatory Field.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 09:26 AM

and I'll be bringing spatchcocked wood pigeons to grill and a selection of apples from my orchard.

That sounds just perfect! As chairman of this year's Bonfire Committee I've declared it a Guy-free Zone. Even as I speak an effigy of Gordon Brown is taking shape as part Miss Pringle's arts & crafts classes in the village school. There was discussion about burning the odd nationalist or two, but it's New Labour who've sold out the working classes thus allowing them to get as far as they have. Needless to say if they get any further we'll be off to New Zealand for sea, snakes & sunshine!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 08:29 AM

Oh, and I'll be bringing spatchcocked wood pigeons to grill and a selection of apples from my orchard.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 08:20 AM

"Anyone going to the Re-Imagined Village bonfire tonight?"

Depends who we're burning this year - hopefully not that nice man who tried to rid us of the king and his cronies. How about someone from the BNP or, failing that, a UKIP MEP - actually, I know just the person......


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 08:15 AM

Can't we just toast marshmallows, whilst singing Cob-a-Coaling..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Nov 09 - 07:56 AM

Anyone going to the Re-Imagined Village bonfire tonight? We're having a hedgehog-roast in the embers once it's died down a bit - cooked up in balls of clay in the traditional manner, with lots of ingans, neeps and taters. Yum yum! Mrs Prosser and her Coven from the WI have promised us a repeat demonstration of their sky-clad circle-dancing which proved so popular last year, though several elderly gentlemen weren't so sure. As Colonel Golightly said afterwards: "Don't know what they were wearing but they needed a damn good iron!"

See you there!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 09 Oct 09 - 11:03 AM

East Rivington Neighbourhood Watch
Newsletter October 2009

Since the shocking revelations of the gory murder of one Miss Lucinda Wan were lately revealed by police, reports of local events on the thread which is home to the re-imagined village of East Rivington, appeared to go suspiciously quiet for several weeks. A bearded homeless man, was however very recently observed loitering around the area, making sound recordings on a small hand-held electronic device. When questioned by a local interfering busybody, he claimed to be merely 'listening to curlews'. He was also observed in the company of a bare footed woman, with dreadfully "dirty toes", and worryingly, amongst a number of allegedly stolen items, she was also seen to be carrying a "sharp knife".

We have also received a number of phone-calls from residents concerned that the Man in the Moon has suddenly disappeared. On clear nights he is usually to be seen taking his regular constitutional stroll across the starry sky. Police are keen to question the bare-footed woman in connection with his disappearance. Local police are also keen to question NASA concerning the sudden disappearance.

Anyone with any further information on any of these matters, or indeed any other suspicious sightings in the re-Imagined village, should please contact "The re-Imagined village" thread directly.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 09 Oct 09 - 06:35 AM

And the only sound is the curlew's plaintive cry...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ws7jH6wNKN4

Now that's what I call music.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 11:26 AM

Jack, I'm quoting Steve Knightley, from the booklet notes for the Witness CD and it definitely says Chilean Cuatro

Charlotte Olivia Robertson
player of an English mandocello and an American guitar


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 11:06 AM

Lesser Rivington Murder Latest

It was announced earlier this afternoon that the legs and lower torso of a woman named as Miss Lucinda Wan were discovered in the cellar of the house owned by her brother George in the village of Lesser Rivington which has latterly become famous as the setting for the fantasy forum thread The re-Imagine Village. Such was the relationship between the wayward society siblings that the villagers didn't question their claims to be man and wife, however so reclusive and otherwise anti-social in their eccentricity.

Child

Forensic report that Miss Wan was some three months pregnant at the time of her brutal death at the hands of her brother George who was also the father of the child. A bloodied sword was discovered in the kitchen of the 17th century house, and presented to George earlier today whilst under questioning by the police. He is said to have thrice denied the murder of his sister, claiming the blood was the result of having lately despatched his horse, hound and hawk. Only on it being pointed out that the blood was too red, clear and indeed sweet to belong to any of these beasts, George finally confessed to Lucinda's murder.

Dismember

It seems the row overheard by neighbours in the early evening of the 31st of August was the result of Lucinda having told George that as a result of their ill-advised love-making she was presently carrying their child. In the ensuing fracas Mr Wan drew his sword, first decapitating Lucinda in a single blow, before proceeding to dismember her corpse. In his panic he disposed of the head somewhat rashly, the discovery of which lead to the present inquiry. When asked what he was going to do when his father found out about the unfortunate business, Mr Wan replied somewhat enigmatically that it was his intention was to "...sail the seas in a bottomless boat..." and that he wouldn't return until "...the sun and the moon danced on the hillside.". Police are confident that a plea of diminished responsibility on the grounds of insanity is most likely at this stage.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Sep 09 - 04:47 AM

Further Remains Discovered

Youngsters playing by the canal his morning made the rather horrific discovery of a human upper torso and arms caught up in the weeping willows on the bank-side opposite the public house known as The Siberian Khatru. Police reports say the remains are most definitely female, clothed as they were in a blue satin ball gown, severed below the rib-cage and with much of the neck remaining.

Single Blow

When asked if this morning's discovery is in any way connected to last night's gruesome assemblage on the village green, a spokesman said that it was very likely on account of the matching jewellery: earrings, necklace (still in situ on the torso) and bracelets. Also, the wounds to both head and body are consistent with a single blow from a heavy sharp blade, and a handbag was found containing a Chanel No 5 perfume bottle and an iPod containing music of a folk pop variety - including several songs from Show of Hands' controversial experimental gothic album Albion Sacrifice. Though the identity of the young woman had not yet officially been disclosed, it was announced earlier that a man is helping the police with their inquiries.

Unholy Row

A neighbour commented: "They're from off - George and Lucinda as we know 'em - they come up most weekends - keep themselves to themselves - always well dressed - flash car - Porsche 911 - very posh - suits and ball gowns - lots of drugs, champagne and you-know-what - at it all hours they are - making a right unholy row - a bit of a screamer she is - or was - assuming it's her. Poor thing. Not a picking on her either. Arrive on Friday night - leave on Sunday night - except on Blank Holidays when they leave on the Monday - not this Monday though - lots of shouting this Monday - yesterday. What time? Oh - around eightish I'd say - time they usually set off - great big bloody row it was - just like you see on Eastenders - which, come to think of it, we were watching at the time so that starts at eight on Mondays. Then it all went silent, which was nice for the final of Only Connect. See anything? No. Rainy night in with the telly - just glad of the peace and quiet."

No Surname

Search parties are out on this bright September morning scouring both the village and surrounding countryside in the hope of discovering the rest of the young lady believed be the aforementioned Lucinda, though no surname has as yet been announced. The youngsters who made the discovery (the grandchildren of a local couple, up from Birmingham for the Summer Holiday) were said to be delighted that their holidays had taken a turn for the better, considering life in the re-imagined village to be well tedious.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 31 Aug 09 - 07:08 PM

I thought Steve Knightley played a Puerto Rican cuatro? (It looked like mine in a publicity picture I now can't find on the web).   Is there such a thing as a Chilean one?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 31 Aug 09 - 06:54 PM

A rainy night in the village; a weary copper, one PC Bernie Cribbins (no relation) stumbles across something truly macabre in a Sainsbury's shopping bag left hanging from the bent-cane handle of a large old gamp driven into the green. The nearest Sainsbury's is over 40 miles away; he knows this because some of the weekenders do their shopping there en route to their holiday homes, causing comment amongst the villagers regarding the health of the local economy, in particular that of the village shop which could do with the custom - the village pub likewise, which is down on mead sales since the mysterious disappearance of one of its most valued customers.

Anyway, despite the traumas of very recent decapitation, the young lady looks rather tranquil, something of a smile playing about her crimson lips, parted to reveal a set of near perfect teeth. The tiara is not paste; the perfume is Chanel No 5; the make-up stunning; the long lustrous golden hair matted with blood. Also in the bag, an unopened tin of Sainsbury's Dandelion and Burdock, a Show of Hands CD, a box of chalks, and a DVD of the Will Hay film Old Bones of the River (1938). Waiting for the SOCOs to arrive, PC Cribbins chuckles to recall a joke in which a naked young woman is found tied to a railway track by a chap who unfastens her bonds, takes her home, cleans her up, providing a nice hot Radox bath, clean sheets and other such comforts in prelude to a night of passionate love-making. The punchline is not a pleasant one, but it is funny, and fitting, oh dear yes; there will be laughter tonight and no mistake.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 28 Aug 09 - 03:32 PM

Now here's a slice of England for you, courtesy of Show of Hands
the track The Falmouth Packet/Haul away Joe from their CD Witness was played on the following:

A Chilean Cuatro, an American Mandolin and German fiddle

driving along a Cornish sea chanty with Afro-Celt heartbeats
- An English Acoustic Eclectic Orchestra!

Thanks to Steve Knightley for the CD booklet notes.

Steve Knightley is an Englishman from Southampton, Hampshire

Charlotte Olivia Reynolds (Ms)
a very multicultural person


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 12:03 PM

"extreme disinfected hanky waver "

I read that first as 'extreme disaffected hanky waver'

BTW, the Folk Police inspector is called, appropriately, Maurice 'Hanky' Hancock.

If you happen to have a Public Hygiene Certificate you don't need to get the offically disinfected hankies - you can get a Morris Hanky Waver Waiver.

(I'll get me coat!)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM

"As a precaution against swine flu, the government has issued a directive to Morris teams that all hankies must have been laundered and disinfected by an approved source and must be taken from a sterile wrapping immediately before each performance. Anyone found with a bogie on their hanky will be barred from performing for five years."
- theleveller

That's snot funny *LOL*

Charlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)
extreme disinfected hanky waver


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 11:06 AM

...further, the Folk Police have formed the Morris Hanky Inspectorate to enforce this.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 11:02 AM

"extreme hanky waver"


As a precaution against swine flu, the government has issued a directive to Morris teams that all hankies must have been laundered and disinfected by an approved source and must be taken from a sterile wrapping immediately before each performance. Anyone found with a bogie on their hanky will be barred from performing for five years.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 09:54 AM

Suibhne O'Piobaireachd ,
There's alot of really great morris and rapper videos on Youtube including a rare bit with Chris Leslie, he of Fairport Convention and the Adderbury Morris actually dancing rather than playing the fiddle. Like John Kirkpatrick (Shropshire Bedlams/Martha Roden's Tuppenny Dish)Chris feels he's getting a bit long in the tooth for extreme hanky waving and bell ringing

Charlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)
extreme hanky waver


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM

It's a belter for sure, Ed - but for my true feelings see the dreaded Does Folk Exist? thread, where I call it up as Exhibit A in my post of 27 Aug 09 - 04:29 AM Mudcat Time which spawns some interesting chat thereafter.

*

Miss Maud Tamtimmerton celebrates her 100th birthday today with a reception tea in the church hall at 4.30pm. She was one of the dancers featured in the above linked footage filmed when she was a tender 20-years-old. Even now Maud regularly plays her taborers-pipe for the ladies Country Dancing Club, though no longer has the puff for her prized crumhorn, which hangs pride of place above the mantelpiece upon which are displayed her many trophies.

Robbed of her speech by a stroke last year, Maud was unavailable for comment, but gave us a tootle of London Pride on her tiny brass three-hole pipe with a girlish twinkle in her eye.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Ed
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 07:48 AM

A lovely, lovely film, Suibhne O'Piobaireachd

Thank you

Ed


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 07:36 AM

I think maybe it's because it was filmed outside; there is a lag in the synchronisation but I don't think it's dubbed.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 07:07 AM

What an interesting YouTube clip. The sound was amazingly good for 1929 when, even with new electrical recording techniques, most sound studios were enormously cumbersome affairs. I just wonder if the sound has been dubbed on after.

Anyway, great to see it.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 04:31 AM

I say you chaps, spiffing day for a spot of the old Rapper Dancing, what?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuqhEix8lGY


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 04:10 AM

We'll have to arrange a look one day, Ron - could be a nice project for the upcoming festivities actually...

I see WAV has been putting his hands all over things he knows nothing about,

Looks like the result of an auto-spamming device; WAV hasn't even looked at the page to see that the previous two comments are also his - albeit from previous years - the preceding one containing the same poem! So much for meaningful communication...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 27 Aug 09 - 03:56 AM

Preston. Don't forget the Harkness collection of broadsheet ballads, 100s of them, qwell worth a visit but ask in advance.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 05:58 PM

I see WAV has been putting his hands all over things he knows nothing about, elsewhere on the net Glorishears of Brummagem and subjecting them to what he calls poetry.

I'm embarrassed on behalf of the ladies, who truly are a very talent morris side, and they come from a city, not a rural "idyll"

Charlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 12:11 PM

(remember the pendulum?)

I've only known Preston for six years or so - and only intimately since we moved to The Fylde some two years ago. Naturally I assumed the Foucault's Pendulum was a new installation! It's still swinging, measuring the earth's spin as it does so, reminding one of our place in the cosmic scheme of things. Always a humbling, reverential experience, a meditation on pure materialistic wonder indeed. A reviewer once pointed out that when the Sun Ra Archestra swings, they do so like a Foucault's Pendulum. That's my groove right there - and it don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing!

Preston's Foucault's Pendulum


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 11:30 AM

My first job after leaving school was in Preston - in 1962 - and I travelled the 20 or so miles from Lancaster daily to that bus station you mention. The Harris Art Gallery was home to the Harris Library, Preston's Public Library, before it was merged with that of Lancashire C.C.

Derelicts on their way to snooze in the newspaper reading room were sprayed with DDT by the janitors in the large circular hall (remember the pendulum?). Us juniors on table tidying duty used to jolt the snoozers as we passed them, to wake them up. I did this one day and the old boy's teeth fell out on to the table - he was as dead as a doornail.

Interesting times. There was a lung in a large jar on display in the window of the Public Health Office. It was stained a dark brown and was supposed to be a disincentive to smoking. People used to stop in ones and twos to remark on it - Woodbines and Capstan Full Strength dangling from their lips...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 07:10 AM

And, the "Ribble's flow", etc. is not too far from the RIV topic of this thread.

Maybe not, but some original observations would have been more welcome. What else did you do in Preston? Did you check out the amazing breadth of stock at Action Records or the many fine English paintings in the Harris Art Gallery? Did you sample the Parched Peas from the vendors in the square or else marvel at the Market buildings and trestle stalls thereunder? Did you gawp in reverential awe at what is still the largest bus station in Europe, or else explore in the fragrant hush the antiquarian delights on offer at Halewoods? Proud Preston indeed! I love the place; we often head there of a weekend. It's also the location of The Moorbrook in which of a Friday night you can hear the finest folk music in the country - the Holy of Holies indeed.      

Chris Watson - Embleton Rookery (Embleton, Northumberland, England)

A classic! CS would love it! Though for Human League I'd go for Empire State Human.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 05:46 AM

For the rave:

Ulrich Schnauss - Far Away Trains Passing By

Stanley Holloway - Sam, Pick Up Thy Musket

Jethro Tull - Heavy Horses

The Human League - Do or Die

Paul Weller - Brushed

The Goons - I'm Walking Backwards For Christmas

Todd Dockstader - anything from Aerial #1 or #2

Rambling Syd Rumpo - The Drunker Nurker

Chris Watson - Embleton Rookery (Embleton, Northumberland, England)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 05:32 AM

S: You had just mentioned recording in a Preston music shop, with one of their instruments, and that poem came to mind.

And, the "Ribble's flow", etc. is not too far from the RIV topic of this thread.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 05:18 AM

WAV - you've already got a thread for your poetry. The feeling is that here you can write what you like as long as it doesn't include cutting & pasting from your Life's Work, or else linking to same.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 04:59 AM

Poem 122 of 230: PROUD PRESTON - AUTUMN 2000

Heavy autumnal rain
    Had surged the Ribble's flow
When I walked to and fro
    The foot-, motor- and train-
Bridges, that have allowed
    Many - some in combat -
To cross this river at
    A town justly self-proud.

From http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM

"Please post random musical selections for top volume listening (bring your own drugs and sloe gin). x "

My personal contribution in respect of The Season would by my MAUSOLEUM - August 2009 (alluded to below) which you can listen to HERE - AND my YORK MINSTER CHAPTER HOUSE - August 2009 which you can listen to HERE. Both are field recordings - the first recorded on 22-8-09 using a bass guitar in a Preston music shop, the second using two Jew's Harps in the Chapter House of York Minster on 20-8-09. Folk Music? Well they are to me, heart & soul. I don't suppose many here would agree but isn't that the pure vibrant joy of the thing?

Otherwise you can download Vivian Stanshall's classic Men Opening Unbrellas Ahead (1974) entirely gratis from HERE. Never been a CD re-issue...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 04:04 AM

Still waiting for an answer to my question at 2.19 pm yesterday...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 26 Aug 09 - 03:43 AM

"Please post random musical selections for top volume listening (bring your own drugs and sloe gin). x "

Now you're talking. A rousing rendition of Oysterband Bells of Rhymney should get things going, then gentle it down with Roddy Woomble's My Secret is my Silence. More Sloe Gin in your coffee? (Actually, mine's Damson Gin.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:04 PM

The English are not alone in having Folk as a fringe interest. We were on our third trip to Ireland before we found any Irish folk music. In Athy a pub landlady told us there was music all over the area, but none of the bloody diddley dlddley stuff. In Wales we have found music in pubs that is Pop - and none the worse for it. Don't know about Scotland.

I like and play folk music but not to the exclusion of other forms of music, and I think most people are the same.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:50 PM

how can you say that?

Because (and note this well) FOLK is only relevant to a TINY PROPORTION of the ENGLISH PEOPLE. To the VAST MAJORITY it is of NO RELEVANCE WHATSOEVER. Go study the nature & history of The Folk Revival. FOLK is a FALSE cultural CONSTRUCT - it is a FANTASY - it is NOT and NEVER HAS BEEN our own good culture, rather it is a MINUSCULE part of it - albeit REVIVED and of VERY LIMITED appeal. You might see this as a BAD THING; whereas I see it as a REALITY. The ENGLISH PEOPLE have their Own Good Culture, and, for the most part, IT DOES NOT INCLUDE FOLK MUSIC. Sorry, but that's just the way it is. My kids hate it; most of the people I know hate it; even I hate 78.6% of it.

If people like any aspect of FOLK, it is down to PERSONAL TASTE and not some FATUOUS CRUSADE to do with NATIONAL PRIDE. If it is, those people, like YOU, are SORELY MISTAKEN. FOLK MUSIC is about the people who play it and love it; it is NOTHING MORE nor indeed ANYTHING LESS than that. Thus do I say FOLK IS NOT OUR CULTURAL HERITAGE - any more than RAILWAY MODELLING or CROSS STITCHING is our cultural heritage. FOLK is a HOBBY - it is a FUN THING TO DO but only for that tiny proportion of the English people WHO LIKE IT. For those who don't like it FOLK is HELL ON EARTH.

So - like folk by all means, but DO NOT have the bare faced TEMERITY to assume THE ENGLISH PEOPLE are in ERROR for not sharing your PERSONAL TASTE.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:46 PM

Heh! No Rave yet then? Mmmm not very English is it?

I'm feeling verrrrry suspicious of this thread...
and will be WATCHING YOU.

GET WITH THE PROGRAMME fellow citizens! Demonstrate your eccentricity, elaborate your eclecticisism, detail your anarchic disrespect for law and order, dot your affectionate indulgence of inaffective same, prove your delight in Dahlias. Or you will, sadly be, EXTERMINATED! (in an amusingly ideosyncratic Aunty Beeb robot voice!)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:38 PM

This time I will copy/paste my words to save you going to another thread where S. has replied with the same point: Several people at the Durham Folk Party singarounds (which we have both enjoyed, S), including Jez Lowe, can play instruments but CHOOSE to sing unaccompanied. It's not a sin to agree with me on something.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:31 PM

what Suibhne O'Piobaireachd actually said was....

FOLK is NOT our Cultural Heritage - it is a MINORITY REVIVALIST HOBBY. In the KNOW? Bollocks! Folk is down to the individuals who do it & love it & enjoy it for what it is,

WAV took one single line, right out of context "FOLK is NOT our Cultural Heritage" and once more got on his English Nationalist nonsense high horse.

There were two collectors who definitely had classical training, Ralph Vaughan Williams and Percy Grainger.

Charlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:22 PM

"FOLK is NOT our Cultural Heritage" (S)...how can you say that? Trad. folk songs HAVE been passed down, in England, over several centuries, by the oral tradition, before being recorded and notated by, often classically-trained, song collectors.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 02:39 PM

Jayzus... this village needs a scalding coffee enema.
The resident herbalist prescribes a totally illegal early morning Rave!
Please post random musical selections for top volume listening (bring your own drugs and sloe gin). x


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 02:19 PM

That's fine, WAV, but it doesn't answer my question. You have frequently said in absolute terms that people of a particular culture should not perform music from another culture. If you had the power, how would you stop them? What measures would you take? Education merely encourages people to act in a particular way, with varying degrees of success. Your imagined world of each culture sticking rigidly to it's own mores and folkways implies that there must be a much greater degree of control. We have some fairly rigid rules in our culture, and these are generally enforced by legislation. Your approach is also rigid, and I would therefore like to know how you would enforce the rules. Oh and by the way; as demonstrated ad nauseam on this board, you don't play the flute, you play the recorder.
Now the academic bit; you have extrapolated from the attendance at a single event in one part of the UK, with no supporting evidence, and used this suspect data to make a wholly spurious link between the age profile in the room and the effect of a non-existent national education policy decision to 'explain' the decline of English folk music as a part of national culture. If I was peer reviewing this argument WAV, I'd be calling your alma mater in Australia and checking your alleged qualifications. I'd expect a better standard of academic rigour from my children when they were at secondary school. Surely you can see the huge holes in the logic?
Want to have another go at answering the question? I'm going out now to play music. It's American Bluegrass, and you can spend the evening condemning me if you like. I don't really care; I'll be playing to a pub full of urban English people, and chances are they'll be having a great time, not knowing how wrong they are to enjoy such alien music.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 01:44 PM

"Why?" Will - to do our bit in keeping our world nice and multicultural."
- WalkaboutsVerse

should have finished the quote off, WAV...but make sure that multiculturalism isn't in England doesn't infect the good old "English Tradition"...or something like that...
Well me and the band, using electric instriments and American guitars, rehearsed some music composed and played by Canadian musicians, now THAT'S what I call multiculturalism *LOL*

Oh and the vocals were handled in part by a Welshwoman..

Charlotte Olivia Robertson
(token N. American native)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 01:34 PM

The only problem was, I, at 43, was probably the youngest singer there - because this aspect of our cultural heritage is no longer given a fair go at our schools, etc.
At Durham you'll find a lot of very fine old singers who haven't been singing very long actually, largely thanks to Folkworks etc. They don't play instruments because they're not musicians! This has nothing to do with Tradition - so don't be fooled. I'm invariably a decade or more younger than any of them, but when it comes to Traditional Song I am a veritable veteran in their midst.


The book by Lajos Vargjas I was reading while recovering from my heart attack described a phenomenon I found rather surprising. He was talking about the transmission of Hungarian folksong in the years 1900-1950, mainly, but implied the same processes had been going on for several generations. This was an immensely vital song tradition with a vast corpus, so you'd expect it was passed on from old people to the young, right? Wrong. Almost all the songs in the repertoire were generationally specific. They were transmitted from one area to another, modified very fast, but between people of similar ages. Some kinds of song were considered inappropriate to sing if you were too young or too old for them, others drifted in or out of fashion. When you got old enough, you looked around for people a bit older and learned the songs appropriate for your age. These Hungarian peasants would have regarded the idea of teaching young-adult, middle-aged or old people's songs in schools as in appalling taste or just insane.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 01:12 PM

The only problem was, I, at 43, was probably the youngest singer there - because this aspect of our cultural heritage is no longer given a fair go at our schools, etc. (and, by employing those who KNOW, that's where I'd focus).

At Durham you'll find a lot of very fine old singers who haven't been singing very long actually, largely thanks to Folkworks etc. They don't play instruments because they're not musicians! This has nothing to do with Tradition - so don't be fooled. I'm invariably a decade or more younger than any of them, but when it comes to Traditional Song I am a veritable veteran in their midst. This is the Second-Life Wave of New Folkies - fine singers all & long may they thrive!

So - nothing to do with any shortcomings in schools & education; the fact is that Traditional English Folk Song is healthier now than it ever has been. Celebrate this fact, WAV - don't think it should be otherwise because that way lies Cultural Fascism. FOLK is NOT our Cultural Heritage - it is a MINORITY REVIVALIST HOBBY. In the KNOW? Bollocks! Folk is down to the individuals who do it & love it & enjoy it for what it is.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 12:55 PM

a Turkish G clarinet
Drool. Is it a metal one? A metal G Clarinet is about #3 on my wish-list presently


Yep. I got it about ten years ago in Mugla, it's the second one I've had. You can now get them from on-line retailers in Turkey quite easily - google "sol klarnet". The quality control has improved so you are unlikely to get a lemon (not true when I first got into it, you really had to shop around in person). Mine seems to have the brand name "Kor" but I don't think that means a lot.

Fabulously flexible instrument, and fits into a whisky presentation tin. (So do most clarinets, but my Peter Eaton B flat is a squeeze).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 12:34 PM

Mandotim: I'll try an example - 2 years ago, Sean and I were the only ones with musical instruments of any kind at the Saturday night Durham Folk Party singaround (I did an intro. with my English flute; and he used some electronic drone and his crwth, I think); I got the feeling/took a hint if you like, and left my flute in my bag this year, such that it was 100% unaccompanied singing this year - and very enjoyable, too. The only problem was, I, at 43, was probably the youngest singer there - because this aspect of our cultural heritage is no longer given a fair go at our schools, etc. (and, by employing those who KNOW, that's where I'd focus).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 11:27 AM

a Turkish G clarinet

Drool. Is it a metal one? A metal G Clarinet is about #3 on my wish-list presently, though I'm more than happy with my 1920s wooden simple-system Bb, high-pitch, wide bore, and a chalumeau register to die for - in fact, rarely do I use it for anything else.

As far as bass guitars go I'm saving up my pennies for a Fender Jazz; on the recording there I'm playing a cheap copy (with very crackly pots) that the proprietor offered me for well under £100! Not bad at all really but when my dream comes true it has to be the real thing. So that's #2 on my wish list...

#1 - Pontic Lyra
#4 - Wooden Garklein
#5 - SM57


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 11:18 AM

Alstonfield following a ceilidh on the Saturday for the First Responders. They've just boght a new response vehicle, and the ceilidh was to dedicate it.

Good fun.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 11:10 AM

Hey Stu; I live in the next valley to Dovedale, in a real, not Imagined Village! Where was the session? Sounds like a good do.
Tim


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:52 AM

"Have you read Evans-Pritchard on the Zulu culture, TL?"

No. I read The Washing of the Spears by Donald Morris and Shaka Zulu by E A Ritter while I was living in South Africa.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:46 AM

We had a wonderful session in Dovedale with flute guitar mandolin bouzouki octave fiddle Anglo concertina melodeon recorder melodeon and bodhran. An eclectic mix

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:40 AM

I'm currently giving very serious thought to buying an electric bass

Check out the Ashbory if you can find one - a tiny electric fretless, with weird fat translucent white plastic strings that look like roundworms. Lovely sound, highly portable, great value for money, and works great for music where you need microtones.

I could add that it's not the hardware that makes things English, but the software of culture. The Northumbrian Pipes, for example, may have originated on foreign shores, but the actual musical vocabulary is unique to the region [...]

I've found the Transylvanian double whistle (ikerfurulya) in A works great for Scottish pipe tunes. It's got a built-in drone.

The Highland pipes were an English invention, more than 500 years ago. Wouldn't be much music for them if the Scots hadn't seen the potential.

On Sunday I was playing mostly Scottish music in a session in Edinburgh. The instruments I used were the green plastic Yamaha recorder you can see in the photos on my website, a Turkish G clarinet, the ikerfurulya, G sopranino and G alto recorders made by Susato in North Carolina, an oud from Syria in classical Arabic tuning, and a washboard adapted by yours truly from one bought in Peebles a few years ago and which I think might possibly have been made in Scotland originally, using thimbles which might have been German or American. Nobody told me the result didn't sound Scottish.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:14 AM

I could add that it's not the hardware that makes things English, but the software of culture. The Northumbrian Pipes, for example, may have originated on foreign shores, but the actual musical vocabulary is unique to the region. The bass guitar may well have been invented in America, but it has found its place in many musics the world over, including England with the musicians I've mentioned and a lot more besides. The hardware of the Saxophone may well have been invented by a Belgian, but it was the African-American jazz musicians who give it a musical voice, which then goes out - England, Africa, Scandinavia, Scotland - and people find their own voices on the instrument, giving it the unique and diverse cultural flavours one finds in Jazz the world over.

Only WAV would suggest that only Belgians should play the Saxophone; only WAV would suggest that Jazz is an American music - purely because his only interest in music is as a means to justify his evil Fascist & Racist ideology. He refuses to take facts on board because to do would mean he'd have to change his embittered misanthropic world-view, the manifesto that is his wholly idiotic Life's Work, which to him operates as an absolute universal law. I don't know about a crippled intellect but it's certainly a twisted one - one that openly celebrates ignorance and refutes learning and ongoing development as being somehow contrary to the common good. Still, when you've got your head shoved as far up your own arse as WAV has, it must be difficult getting a clear view of things.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:11 AM

Quite right WAV, you shouldn't really answer a question with a question, unless of course you are trying to avoid answering. Yes, I do know how MacColl and others policed it; by having strict and inflexible rules and virtually ostracising anyone who failed to stay within those rules. It was on a very small scale, it didn't last, and proved so exclusive that there are those who argue that the policy did more harm than good to the cause of folk music.
Now back to the question, which wasn't about what MacColl did, it was about what you would do in your proposed world order. I say again; I'm genuinely interested in how you would go about this. You've always been very keen on regulating behaviour, usually citing the UN as your enforcing authority, but I'm not sure the UN would be keen on patrolling pubs late at night to check what sort of music is being played on which instruments, and I guess you would need some sort of local enforcement. How will this be funded? I assume you would need to legislate in some way; do you see playing the wrong music as a civil or criminal offence? What would the sanctions be? The evidence seems to be that regulations without sanctions are generally ignored completely, so I think you ought to be clear about what the penalties are for cultural infractions of the kind you seem so keen to stamp out.
Stu reckons that you will answer by referring to your website, but since I've read it all and not found any realistic and detailed answer, I think you probably need to come up with something new to answer these detailed questions. I look forward to your reply; I have a lot of other questions to follow.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 10:02 AM

Ever read Brave New World WAV?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 09:50 AM

bass guitar

I'm currently giving very serious thought to buying an electric bass, which is the first real instrument I played before going acoustic some thirty-two years ago. Over the years, however, I've indulged my bass needs (as it were) in music shops - as I did in a Preston on my birthday a few days ago when I took my Zoom H4 along and recorded an improvisation I'm calling Mausoleum 22-8-09 which you can listen to at The Ha-Ha Space. My idea is accompany Traditional Ballads with such music, though maybe not in folk clubs...

I'd say the bass guitar is a good deal more relevant to English Popular Culture than the Cittern ever was, or is, or is ever likely to be. Certainly more relevant to me anyway, and the musicians who inspired me by making this instrument truly English - namely Colin Hodgkinson, Hugh Hopper, Richard Sinclair, and Chris Squire - not to mention one or two Europeans, such as Jannik Topp, Bernard Paganotti, Peter Fromader...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 09:41 AM

Have you read Evans-Pritchard on the Zulu culture, TL?

And, we shouldn't answer a question with a question, Tim, but for something different from me, Stu, does anyone know how the 50s and 60s perform-your-own-culture folk-club organisers policed it?...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 09:32 AM

Bet you get a cut and paste or a link to his website...

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 09:24 AM

Just a thought WAV; let's suppose for a moment the world was as you would like it to be, and everyone only played the music from their own nation and culture; lets also suppose that you are in a position of authority in this world. What would you do if someone transgressed, and played music from somewhere else, perhaps on an instrument not on your list of approved ones? What would be the sanction or deterrent you would apply? I'm genuinely interested in how you would propose to ensure the survival of your monocultural idea in the face of human nature and free will.
This is a genuine question; I'd like to understand how you see the mechanics of your world view in operation.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 09:21 AM

I did suggest in a post some time ago that WAV was a computer program locked in a loop while attempting to prove that it was really a human being.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 08:59 AM

"He's locked in that boxful of fatuous stereotypes until he dies"

Sounds like a variation of the torture once practiced by the Zulus whereby a person was locked in a hut with a hungry jackal.

I like English instruments but play the ones that suit me best. So, I have an English cittern (Fylde), an Irish acoustic guitar (Lowden), an American electric guitar (Gibson) and mrsleveller plays a Yorkshire mandolin made by a Scot (Buchanan) and an English mandolin (Hathway) - plus other assorted whistles and recorders from god knows where.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 08:49 AM

"WAV ties the Union Jack to it and salutes." (Jack)...ridiculous - I try to be a positive English, NOT British, nationalist; as is "crippled intellect", etc. - check the summary of my CV just above.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 08:43 AM

I've just spent the morning playing the tune "Neil Gow's Lament For His Second Wife" on my violin, and playing the chords for it on my guitar.

Oh fuck - just realised that I'm an Englishman and that I shouldn't be playing a beautiful Scottish melody


It's basically Irish. Gow nicked the idea from an Irish song, "Kitty Tyrrell". Bizarrely, the Gows published the lament for the first time in the same collection as its original, so anybody playing through the book could see the connection. (They did the same thing with at least one other tune).

There's very little point in debating with someone so mentally incapable he thinks any instrument with "English" in its name must ipso facto *be* essentially English. For sure the recorder isn't in its place of origin - it seem to have been invented in the Ukraine or the Balkans, and was played all over Europe before we have any record of it in Britain. (The earliest mention of it in English is from Scotland). But because a handful of people called it English for a few years nearly 300 years ago, WAV ties the Union Jack to it and salutes. Why on earth would anybody want to treat the assertions of such a crippled intellect as something to refute? They're just pathology samples. He's probably got some variant of Asperger's syndrome - his brain runs on mechanical routines which nobody can change into genuine thought by any external input. He's locked in that boxful of fatuous stereotypes until he dies.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 08:08 AM

"Why?" Will - to do our bit in keeping our world nice and multicultural.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 08:03 AM

let's appreciate others but perform our own

Why? No sense in this whatever. You're flogging a dead horse, cock. Give it a rest.

Over and out.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 07:47 AM

Will, in my book, you are English and, as such, should enjoy, as I do, Scots playing their Scottish tunes, plus, as you are also a musician, playing English ones yourself - perhaps to be enjoyed by others, including Scots...

"There are more than enough good English songs, tunes and dances
(plus instruments) for anyone's lifetime – let's appreciate others but perform our own!" (here).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 07:31 AM

And I claim 700!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 07:30 AM

I've just spent the morning playing the tune "Neil Gow's Lament For His Second Wife" on my violin, and playing the chords for it on my guitar.

Oh fuck - just realised that I'm an Englishman and that I shouldn't be playing a beautiful Scottish melody or playing instruments that aren't English. Oh well, another avenue of fun closed to me.

Hey - hang on, though. I do have g-g-ggrandparents from Kinross in Scotland, and others from County Kildare in Ireland, plus some Dutch blood which came to Norfolk in the 16th century - and god knows what else from several hundred years before that - so it might be all right after all! Hurray!

See, WAV, how stupid you look with your nonsensical pronouncements as to what musicians should or shouldn't do?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:40 AM

...no they are mostly "INSTRUMENTS OF (OR CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH) AMERICA", Ron. If we are not American we should not Americanise but, rather, love our world being multicultural.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:36 AM

WAV, fair enough, you did say that, so can you add electric guitar,Wurlitzer organ, bass guitar and full drum kit with cymbals, as all closely associated with England [& English music].


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:29 AM

Ron - I posted "Instruments of (OR CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH) England".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:25 AM

I have a Ukulele instruction book from 1920 published in California at a time when Ukuleles were the fashion with Bright Young Things and Vaudevillian Entertainers on both sides of the pond.

Look up Janet Klein on YouTube for someone who's done a brilliant job of recreating the music of this era. I think she's one of the best early music performers around. I'd love to see her live.


The instrument that George Formby plays is, in fact, a Banjo Ukulele, an American invention by Keech, circa 1920, which became popular on account of it having a greater dynamic range than than the Ukulele.

Formby played both that and the wooden-body sort. I'm not sure the top-end wooden-body ones are such a good idea any more, koa wood is probably being harvested unsustainably to make them.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:21 AM

WAV, I take note of your list of "English" instruments, and yes you are right about one the stylaphone, however can you in all honesty state that any of the others were invented in England [concertina excepted]? As a version of bag pipes certainly the Northumbrian did evolve here, but you could add Cornish, single & double chanters, Westmorland, Lancashire, Herefordshire etc but the point is bagpipes were not invented in tis country, nor was the recorder.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:19 AM

In other words, Stu, you don't like positive English, Scottish, etc., nationalism.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 06:11 AM

Why on Earth is your degree of such importance to you WAV. I have met Sean, but only on a couple of occasions; I have never met you. So I judge you both on your postings. Sean is much better educated than you are, better read, and capable of a level of analytical thought that you could only dream of.

He doesn't need me to defend him, but I write as a disinterested observer (with a degree, several diplomas, several memberships of professional bodies, a couple of Fellowships, published author, professional musician...but so what - if my reasoning didn't hold water, all these would be as valueless as your degree and four tecnical certificates).

Regards Stu

PS hope you don't mind Sean


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:56 AM

I included "imagination" in your quote re. feather plectrums S; and, from memory, in the "Chords in folk" thread, doubling the melody with a cittern was mentioned.

You are all-over-the-place, again S - e.g., I HAVE argued here on Mudcat for a stronger MORE-DEMOCRATIC UN. Do you ever consider trying again to get a degree of some DISCIPLINE, instead of taking lazy cheap-shots at me?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:53 AM

your Racist concept of Cultural Ingenuity

Should be Cultural Indegeniety.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 05:10 AM

If George Formby knew better he would have been accompanying himself on an English cittern not an Hawaiian ukulele.

WAV - this has to be the most idiotic statement of yours yet, not to mention insulting to an entire tradition of English Music which still thrives to this day. Still, it makes a sort of sense for one obsessed with such a simple minded racist world-view, founded as it is on a glorification of ignorance, misinformation and downright rudeness.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 04:43 AM

"starling feathers" was from your good-self, in a post not far above.

Sorry, old bean - I'm afraid the post to which you refer was a rather fanciful spoof on my part, as ought to be obvious from the notion of musicians (or otherwise) sticking the pointy ends of starling feathers underneath their fingernails. For those who missed it: 18 Aug 09 - 04:19 AM. I must also point out that whilst this tradition most certainly does not survive in the Lancastrian towns I mentioned, the Barber Shop Cittern you speak of was indeed the ukulele of its day with a re-entrant tuning to facilitate the playing of chordal accompaniments to the songs of the day, some of which would have been, undoubtedly traditional. Hitherto an anathema in Wavlore (as you made quite clear in your Chords in Folk? thread of last year) you now seem to be telling us that chords are not only fine by you, but indeed part of Our Own Good Folk Traditional Culture. What gives?

isn't that a tad disrespectful of Hawaiians?

Didn't notice any Hawaiians in it actually - only a couple of dodgy Germans, which is par for the course in English films of the period. For more see Bell Bottom George. Otherwise you might like to read the WIKI entry for Ukulele in which we learn that the Ukulele is a 19th Century interpretation of an instrument brought to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants which then spread in popularity into America, and thence internationally. I have a Ukulele instruction book from 1920 published in California at a time when Ukuleles were the fashion with Bright Young Things and Vaudevillian Entertainers on both sides of the pond. The instrument that George Formby plays is, in fact, a Banjo Ukulele, an American invention by Keech, circa 1920, which became popular on account of it having a greater dynamic range than than the Ukulele. For more on this see Dennis Tailor's Banjo Ukulele site.

This potted history gives testimony to the sort of Cultural Process which is likely to make you itch rather as it gives the lie to your Racist concept of Cultural Ingenuity which, as a trained Anthropologist, you must know is a complete fallacy anyway. Things move, cross-pollinate, they come, they go, they thrive or they die. Personally I find it quite fascinating. No doubt you would like to have all Cultural Process Regulated by a Stronger Fascist UN, in which case the Portuguese would have never brought their small guitars to Hawaii in the first place.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 04:28 AM

Ron: If George Formby knew better he would have been accompanying himself on an English cittern not an Hawaiian ukulele.

"INSTRUMENTS OF (OR CLOSELY ASSOCIATED WITH) ENGLAND
Northumbrian Bagpipes (bellows blown), Leicestershire Bagpipes (mouth blown); English Concertina, Anglo Concertina, Duet Concertina (and important developments to – if not inventions of – other key-boards, such as piano and organ, have also occurred in England); Dital Harp/Harp-Lute, English Cittern; English Flageolet, Penny Whistle, Recorder/English Flute, Pipe and Tabor (old Morris accompaniment),
the Stylophone (a recent one), Brass, Bells (to some, England's national instrument), as well as Spoons.
(Footnote: during the Athens Olympics ceremonies, the Greeks, pleasingly, presented their bouzoukis: I wonder how-many of the above instruments - and dances - will be shown at the London Olympics..?)" (from here).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 03:48 AM

WAV,since when has George Formby been Hawaiian? Except for the concertina [& even that is debatable] I can't think of any instrument that is an English invention, can you? 'Cause if you can 'you're a better man than I am etc'.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 25 Aug 09 - 03:37 AM

"your English Cittern which is a figment of yuour malnourished imagination, starling feathers and all." (S)..."starling feathers" was from your good-self, in a post not far above.

"A rare slab of Vintage Englishness, ukulele & all" (S)...isn't that a tad disrespectful of Hawaiians?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:11 PM

How about telling me to leave England for another Walkabout, S - is that a "very English" thing, too?

No indeed - stick around, old fruit - only if you do, kindly do so with the open mind of the trained anthropologist; look, listen and (hopefully) learn.

...but "very English" - there's hope there, though...

There is hope for us all, WAV - even for the recalcitrant buffoon you portray yourself as in your writings. Were you to ony but humble yourself long enough to partake of the cultural wonders of the country in which you have chosen as your home - and what wonders they are! Infinite wonders which this thread has barely touched upon!

you may soon trade in that Welsh crwth of yours for an English cittern and a starling feather!..

Never presume to tell another person what they should, or indeed should not, be playing - you oppress my individual freedom by doing so. FYI, my Welsh Crwth is actually a hypothetical Medieval Northern-European bowed-lyre built for me, circa 1987, by a Canadian master harp-builder based in Inverness. It may be one-of-a-kind but it nevertheless exists - unlike your English Cittern which is a figment of your malnourished imagination, starling feathers and all. In our Fylde sets this year Rapunzel & I will be featuring several Traditional English Folk Songs with accompaniments arranged for 5-string banjo & crwth.

On watching Bell Bottom George just now, which we recorded earlier. A rare slab of Vintage Englishness, ukulele & all, and some choice old footage of Fleetwood to boot!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 04:50 PM

Did someone mention the crwth? I know I didn't
as I already said

YOU are not, in anyway, special, so get over yourself!

Charlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 04:44 PM

Beak - as you asked me not to call you by your first name (which I RESPECTED), I am NOT your "sunshine".

How about telling me to leave England for another Walkabout, S - is that a "very English" thing, too?...but "very English" - there's hope there, though...you may soon trade in that Welsh crwth of yours for an English cittern and a starling feather!...but then Beak may not be your "sunshine," either.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 03:43 PM

"dear boy" - delusion.

No. Dear Boy - a very English term of friendship as found in a certain sort of literature (Jeeves and Wooster etc.) along with Old Boy, Old Fruit, etc. Congrats on the achievements, WAV - but none of it qualifies you to pontificate upon matters you know nothing about.

Pip, pip!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 03:24 PM

Christmas cards, THE major component....well whatever you say, (glad you feel you can speak for the majority) the fax machine is irrelevant to the topic at hand.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 03:15 PM

Sorry none of the major components of Christmas are even remotely English (or British for that matter).

Christmas cards. Invented in England in 1843, the same year as the fax machine.

Surely for most people that's the major component of Christmas?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 03:14 PM

You're a snob, WAV, as snob as only a colonial can be. I've seen it before, someone trying to be more English than the English themselves.

Listen sunshine, and listen well, I for one couldn't give a rat's rear end about what qualifications you've got nor from whence they came, I couldn't care less how many countries you've visited (as opposed to actual explored, but that's another question for another day), sports, been there done that, ad ohhh look...plying the disabled card are we and how we triumphed over it...well....my late mother was in a wheelchair (a paraplegic) for most of her life, and she and we travelled, we played sports, and , you know what, she never had to justify what she did or didn't do because of or in spite of being in a wheelchair. I can't be bothered addressing the rest of your outrageous posting so I'll simply say this...

YOU are not, in anyway, special, so get over yourself!

Charlotte Olivia Roberstson (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 02:59 PM

"As for ultra-competitive - not in the slightest, dear boy." (S)...calling someone who worked hard for his 4 technical certificates and a degree in humanities, found his way, on a shoe-string, through about 40 countries, taught himself to read and write (at least, in simple letter-notation, above) music, placed in some folk-festival comps, and managed to play A-grade junior tennis and football having been born with a club-foot "dear boy" - delusion.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 02:41 PM

ultra-competitive to the point of recalcitrance

re·cal·ci·trant (r-kls-trnt)
adj.
Marked by stubborn resistance to and defiance of authority or guidance. See Synonyms at unruly. Wilfully disobedient [Latin re-[again] + calcitrare to kick]
n.
A recalcitrant person.
        1. recalcitrant - stubbornly resistant to authority or control; "a fractious animal that would not submit to the harness"; "a refractory child" fractious, refractory, disobedient - not obeying or complying with commands of those in authority; "disobedient children"
        2. recalcitrant - marked by stubborn resistance to authority; "the University suspended the most recalcitrant demonstrators" defiant, non-compliant - boldly resisting authority or an opposing force; "brought up to be aggressive and defiant"; "a defiant attitude"

etc.

*

WAV - in what possible sense of the word am I on the point of recalcitrance? What authority am I defying here? Who am I disobeying? I know you think you're the supreme dictator of Heaven and Earth but that's only in your own head - it isn't real.

As for ultra-competitive - not in the slightest, dear boy. What I want is for you to wise up to the glorious realities of English Culture and ditch the accumulated bullshit. I want you to enjoy your English citizenship and your repatriation; I want you to become one of us, to assimilate and to become assimilated. You're not going to do that by propagating divisive urban-mythology and tabloid lies about the suppression of our so-called Xmas Traditions (which aren't ours anyway) so as not to offend our ethnic minorities (who are ours in every sense of the word).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 01:54 PM

Sorry none of the major components of Christmas are even remotely English (or British for that matter). Mind you the English language itself in made up og god knows how many different languges.

WAV's view of England, if it's not English it doesn't belong in England,( one shouldn't play with it, sing it, or have anything to do with it) , whoops there goes alot of so-called "English traditions" As many now know, I'm not English, does this mean I need to go back where I came from WAV, is this what you're saying? I know that one your favoutite sayings is, "I love the world being multi-cultural, and England being part of that world". Let me add that YOU, WAV don't want any the world's multiculturalism in England, there's a name for that sort of attitude, but I can't quite remember what that name is.......

CHarlotte Olivia Robertson (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 01:53 PM

David, if you actually look at the facts of the matter - and not the urban myth - there have actually been no instances of Christmas celebrations being curtailed. None. If you can find factual evidence - post it here.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 01:19 PM

"traditional Christmas celebrations being curtailed, as they may offend some of the ethnic groups now living in England" (me)...given your response to this S., have you genuinely not heard news and current affairs debate on this matter over the last few years, or are you just being ultra-competitive to the point of recalcitrance?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 11:20 AM

I've had all these arguments with you before, David, and the sad thing is that you simply trot out the same stuff from your own writings time after time - feeding, in fact, on your self-penned inanities.

Here's a snapshot of English culture - 2009-style - from my 65th birthday bash in my local last night:

We had 12 musicians, including myself: (1) fiddle/flute/guitar/vocal (2) hammered dulcimer/vocal (3) small pipes/whistles/serpent (3) anglo concertinas (4) cajon (5) guitar/mandolin/vocal (6) vocal (7) keyboard (8) recorder (9) mandolin/fiddle (10) electric bass (11) keyboard (12) guitar/tenor guitar/mandolin/vocal.

The music ranged from French mazurkas, various English/Irish/Scottish jigs, reels, hornpipes, blues, 1920s & 30s songs, jazz, one Paul Simon song, polkas, Hank Williams, the Scissor Sisters and much besides. The pub was packed, with several of the guests dancing their socks off at the back of the pub and joining in the choruses of what they knew. A great time was had by all, and the atmosphere was electric.

That's English culture - with every item being performed with love and affection by those whose turn it was - and everyone got at least 3 bites of the cherry - and everyone joining in where appropriate and where possible. Why should any of this change because of the opinion of a mouldy fig who knows bugger all about any of it and can only see entertainment as a stratum of ideology - rather than just bloody good FUN?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 10:49 AM

Re"English culture. To quote the late Peter Bellamy " Ewan McCall spent all his life trying tp give 'folk music' back to THE PEOPLE, but THWE PEOPLE said "'sod off' we'd rather have Tom Jones!".
'nuff said.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 07:59 AM

the apathy and general disinterest of the English towards their own folk heritage

This is a bit of a moot point here, methinks. What is our own folk heritage? If it's that which takes place in the bucolic hinterlands once dreamed of by the well-to-do Ladies & Gentlemen of the EFDSS then it's hardly the wonder there is a complete disinterest in it on the part of the English people in general - and me in particular! Tailored for bourgeois sensibilities, it is a revivalist fantasy of something that barely made it into the 20th Century, only to be revived by way of a romantic volkish revisionist re-invention that is precisely the same recurring nightmare we find in WAV's wanklore and other even less savoury right-wing manifestos.

There is no English Folk Heritage other than that imagined by The Revival, and subsequently tailored for its disparate needs. In education it was a joke (recorders likewise); to the vast majority of the English people it is still a joke, but at least we no longer have to suffer its indignities at school. This isn't due to apathy on the part of the English people, it is simply because the English people have a living culture of their own, one that has been completely overlooked and, to a certain extent, disparaged by the Folk Revival. Call it English Popular Culture - which is alive and well - and you'll find it everywhere; in every county, in every city, every town, every village, every street and every home - we each and every one of us carry it in our hearts; a wondrous diversity inclusive of all ethnicities, derivations, origins and individuals - Folkies included!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:50 AM

"English country dancing and folk songs either no longer being taught at English schools or certainly far less than they were say half way through last century."

In what way, are immigrants to blame for the apathy and general disinterest of the English towards their own folk heritage, or indeed for what we choose to keep on the curriculum?

If anything I would suggest that many immigrant groups *lead by example* in terms of their maintenance within British culture of their own styles of music, song and dance. Take the much hated Paddies back in the fifties, of whom I'm descended (My cousin now runs an Irish dancing school in London): in the face of immense hostility ("a hammering"?) to their culture, they successfully maintained it, until ironically it has now been warmly embraced by an English generally apathetic to their own traditions.

If anything I suspect the recent revival of native interest in traditional English song and custom, has actually been born from English interest in equivalent Irish traditions.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:50 AM

WAV; almost all of our 'traditional' Christmas celebrations are imported anyway. Starters; Turkey (USA) Christmas trees (Germany) Christianity (the Middle East).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:27 AM

That was post 666 by the way...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:26 AM

off the top of my head - traditional Christmas celebrations being curtailed, as they may offend some of the ethnic groups now living in England.

Er - that's just a myth, WAV; if you can prove otherwise, please give evidence. And supposing it was true, are not those Ethnic Groups Now Living in England just as representative of an actual English Culture as the Imported Christmas Celebrations supposedly being suppressed for fear of causing offence? Or would you apply racist divisions on what actually constitutes English Culture? Obviously you do, otherwise you would not have written what you have. Thus do I call you a Racist. Your post here only serves to confirm that.

English country dancing and folk songs either no longer being taught at English schools or certainly far less than they were say half way through last century.

All the English Country Folk Dance & Song Shit taught in schools was tenth-rate revivalist Bowdlerised bourgeois bullshit anyway. English Culture - and Education - is better off without it.

So how are we suffering, WAV? Do tell!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: mandotim
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:09 AM

S O'P; that's one of the best posts I've seen on here. Bravo! (from one who has just been called 'stupid' by WAV on the Ashes thread.)
Tim


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 06:04 AM

"So tell us, WAV - how is English culture taking a hammering?" (S)...off the top of my head - traditional Christmas celebrations being curtailed, as they may offend some of the ethnic groups now living in England. English country dancing and folk songs either no longer being taught at English schools or certainly far less than they were say half way through last century.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 05:42 AM

It is you, S., not I who called a recorder made in Japan an "Engrish frute"

It was the saintly Don Firth who coined that one, WAV - in respect of the supreme irony of you calling your mass-produced Japanese-made plastic recorder an English Flute. Engrish is a linguistic phenomenon which celebrates the grammatical incongruities consequent upon Japanese attempts at translating their language into English. There are several books on the subject (at least one of which I own) and websites too, such as http://www.engrish.com/.   

and said he has friends who tell "racist jokes" at the pub.

If people let slip a few less-than PC remarks down at my local (see HERE for a recent example - and be sure pay special attention to my post of 10 Aug 09 - 10:20 AM) then that's by way of human frailty and colloquial waywardness. They don't go out of their way to publish and promote a vile racist ideology as you do. Far worse than any racist joke I've ever heard: England was a more English place 50 years ago. You said that, WAV - even worse, you believe it to be true.

And it is I not you who has enjoyed travelling, on a shoe-string, through about 40 countries

They say travel broadens the mind - so where did we go wrong with you I wonder?

and who achieved distinctions for anthropology at university.

And yet you persist in an anti-anthropological approach to cultural process by insisting human culture is regulated by a higher authority which you alone are privy to. Anthropology is the study and understanding of human culture, not the dictation and suppression of it. In all your posts here you would dictate and suppress the way people do things; in your published work likewise. What the hell school of anthropology is this? One that insists on mass compliance to an absolute cultural law along the lines of racial segregation and regulation... Now what what does that remind you of I wonder?

If you keep posting those false and defamatory remarks, I have to defend myself with such facts.

Nothing false in what I say, WAV as anyone reading your insane MESSAGES would conclude. Like I say, only a Racist and a Fascist would write such things; only a Racist and a Fascist would relentlessly promote them as a good way forward for humanity.

I note you never answer the points that are raised against you. You write English culture is taking a hammering and when people lose their culture society suffers, but you never explain how, or why, you just trot it out as being a self-evident absolute, which of course it isn't. So tell us, WAV - how is English culture taking a hammering? And in what way is society suffering as a result? What qualifies you to make such inhumane remarks, let alone publish them? And do you ever worry that if some racist thug read such inflammatory words they might then go out and act upon them? What then, WAV? You promote and advocate human suffering in the name of a highly idiosyncratic set of racially divisive ideological absolutes and yet you flinch at being called a Fascist and a Racist.

Try sticking to the argument.

Sorry, WAV - this is the argument.

The re-Imagined Village is a place where you might purge yourself of your absurd and alien misconceptions of English Culture and actually learn about the way things really are, rather than the way you want them to be. Think of it as purgatory - a place to listen and learn, to be cleansed of your vile conclusions which are in any case wholly and completely WRONG.

But please note: not once have I insulted you personally - on the contrary, I've supported you when things have turned personal on other threads. I respect you but question your ideology. Now, if you can, please answer the above points without resorting to further personal insults.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 04:49 AM

Proof by assertion is a logical fallacy in which a proposition is repeatedly restated regardless of contradiction. Sometimes this may be repeated until challenges dry up, at which point it is asserted as fact due to its not being contradicted (argumentum ad nauseam). In other cases its repetition may be cited as evidence of its truth

Thanks Wiki

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 24 Aug 09 - 04:36 AM

It is you, S., not I who called a recorder made in Japan an "Engrish frute" and said he has friends who tell "racist jokes" at the pub. And it is I not you who has enjoyed travelling, on a shoe-string, through about 40 countries, and who achieved distinctions for anthropology at university.

If you keep posting those false and defamatory remarks, I have to defend myself with such facts. Try sticking to the argument.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 05:20 PM

I only very occasionally do so, in defence,

You lash out with personal insults, rather than answer the points that have been raised. By your own writ (WAV MESSAGES) you are both a Fascist and a Racist - if you weren't, you wouldn't have written what you have, let alone persist in promoting it.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 04:18 PM

"you still drag it up" (S.)... I only very occasionally do so, in defence, when you go too far in your repeated false accusations, rather than sticking to what I've actually posted.

I often post on threads where I disagree with the argument, but, unlike you sometimes, that's what I always focus on - NOT name calling.

Fascism opposes democracy and socialism/communism; I am for democracy and, in a democratic way, have often criticized capitalism. It's quite likely you are playing on the fact that there has recently been anti-fascist threads (you used to repeatedly use "racism"), and this time you have even added "Absolutism".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 04:12 PM

"Swaledale's"

Ooops! Actually, non-possessive Swaledales. I hate jealous sheep.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 03:59 PM

"that there are those, like S., who lack formal education "

Now that really fucks me off WAV.Our fuckwit UKIP MEP, Godfrey Bloom, who lives in my village, wrote to the parish council about the attitude of "those people who live the other side of the tracks who do not have the benefit of a formal education....". This is the twat who thinks that women should stay at home and clean behind the fridge and that any organisation that employs women of child-bearing age is an idiot.

Yes, we are the people who live the wrong side of the tracks. As for formal education, well mine had been more autodidactic but mrsleveller has an first degree, an MA and a PGCE. She works for the Workers Education Association providing free courses for people who want to better themselves educationally.I may also point out that my grandfather, who left school at the age of 12, was the most well-read and intelligent person I have ever met and, despite never having any personal ambition, spent all his life working for the community and became chairman of the council, an early member of the Labour Party, a JP, a churchwarden, and sat on innumerable commitees. He never made a buck and ended his life in an almshouse but, even today, 20 years after his death at the age of 94, people speak of him with respect and affection.

So, basically, take your formal education and stick it up your arse.

Jack, hope the minor heart attack is not more than a minor inconvenience and the precursor to a long and healthy life.

Right, back to the second bottle of half-price Australian Merlot (made, no doubt, WAV, by sweaty feet of the descendants of British convicts who had no educatiuon whatsoever....mmmmmm!)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 02:32 PM

PS - Hope you're well soon, Jack!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Sedayne (Astray) (S O'P)
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 09:18 AM

who lack formal education

All I lack is a degree, WAV - I made it into Durham University to do a single honours Language & Linguistics degree but had to withdraw on account of serious illness. This you know, yet you still drag it up. We discuss here as equals, regardless of academic achievement; it is the wit, nous or otherwise of the individual that drives the discussion, not how many fork-lift certificates they've got. And for all your qualifications in Anthropology you haven't demonstrated any understanding of the subject whatsoever.

but are ultra-competitive and hate someone disagreeing with their world view; i.e., given an inch, he will take a mile.

My world-view is simply that every single one of us is entitled to the freedoms they were born to without their personal and cultural liberty being regulated by a higher authority - or in in your case would be higher authority - in the name of knowing what is best for them. Your world-view is a Fascist Absolutism that opposes such Cultural Realities and Individual Freedoms - and this world-view I oppose because you choose to publish and promote it. That your world-view is also founded on a complete lack of understanding of (and a total unwillingness to learn about) the things you write about is also cause for concern - forklift / anthropology qualifications notwithstanding.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Campin
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 08:22 AM

Just out of hospital (minor heart attack) where I spent some time reading a book which had a few comments relevant to the latest developments on this thread.

Bartok on folk music transgressing national boundaries


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 07:51 AM

S: it is you not I who resorted to calling a recorder, made in Japan, an "Engrish frute," and told us you have friends who make "racist jokes" at the pub. Among my Messages (above, times 3) and all else I've published, you will NOT find suchlike.

And clearly the problem with such "light-hearted stereotyping" (TL) is that there are those, like S., who lack formal education but are ultra-competitive and hate someone disagreeing with their world view; i.e., given an inch, he will take a mile.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 07:04 AM

Sorry WAV, I was forgetting, you're from Australia where human-ovine relationships are the norm. I'm teaching your grandmother to suck eggs here – or, rather, you grandfather to f**k sheep (TL) ...you have no problem with that S., but you have such a big problem with my calm polite criticism of our status quo that you resort to calling me a "fascist" and a "racist". I am, rather, an English repatriate, with a major in anthropology, who has enjoyed travelling through about 40 countries, and probably appreciates our world being multicultural as much as anyone on Earth.

I have no problem whatsoever with theleveller's quite reasonable response to your vile stance, WAV. As for you being calm and polite - who cares? Your ideas are as EVIL as they are just plain WRONG and if anyone doubts this they might peruse the Fascist and Racist tracts you maintain on-line in the form of your WAV MESSAGES.

No one but a Fascist and a Racist would ever write such things, let alone publish and promote them. Indeed, reading through all your other WAV MESSAGES it soon becomes evident that your only interest in folk music is to front your Fascist & Racist concepts of Culture. I'm not talking Xenophobia here, but a deep festering hatred of anything that doesn't comply with your frighteningly narrow misgivings and misunderstandings that you pass off as a good way forward for humanity.

Fascism is the suppression of individual liberty to one absolute law in the name of a Greater National & Cultural well-being with any amount of bogus Volkishness invariably thrown in for good measure. This is precisely what you believe. You have no interest in the glorious realities of what people are doing, only what they should be doing according to your bizarre alien misconception of what constitutes English Culture. This is Fascism, WAV - you are Fascist.

You are also racist because your concept of English Culture refuses to take into account the multiplicity of ethnicities that constitute that culture or yet the multiplicity of influences on which that culture is founded. You are racist because you continue to publish and promote dangerously inflammatory lies (see WAV MESSAGES) founded on your misgivings and misunderstandings regarding immigration and cultural process.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM

"Sorry WAV, I was forgetting, you're from Australia where human-ovine relationships are the norm."

Come on. WAV, it was just a bit of light-hearted stereotyping. As a Yorkshire person, it's one that I often get thrown at me (I just catch it an chuck it back) :)

BTW, I can introduce you to some very attractive Swaledale's I know.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 04:42 AM

"Sorry WAV, I was forgetting, you're from Australia where human-ovine relationships are the norm. I'm teaching your grandmother to suck eggs here – or, rather, you grandfather to f**k sheep." (TL)...you have no problem with that S., but you have such a big problem with my calm polite criticism of our status quo that you resort to calling me a "fascist" and a "racist". I am, rather, an English repatriate, with a major in anthropology, who has enjoyed travelling through about 40 countries, and probably appreciates our world being multicultural as much as anyone on Earth.

"Eh! Did someone poach the village fete's prize piglet??
One buggers off for a week and there's all sorts of village feuds going on! Gotta catch up with the re-imagined omnibus edition..." (CS)...probably predominantly peripatetic pannage.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 23 Aug 09 - 04:21 AM

Did someone poach the village fete's prize piglet?

I beginning to think WAV is the village fete's prize piglet; having broken out of his sty and escaped into various neighbouring threads where he's presently causing a lot of damage trying to infect the folk world with his vile racist virus. What could be worse than a fascist piglet drunk on the mead of his own self-righteousness going on the spree?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 22 Aug 09 - 01:45 PM

Eh! Did someone poach the village fete's prize piglet??
One buggers off for a week and there's all sorts of village feuds going on!

Gotta catch up with the re-imagined omnibus edition...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 12:12 PM

...can't get mead there, Sugarfoot, so I'll pop in AFTER a visit to The Mute Swan.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 10:31 AM

LOL! Love the pronunciation guide - I've been wondering how to say "English flute" in the style of Metal Mickey's psychotic older brother for donkeys.

I'm looking forward to hearing a rendition of The Kid on the Mountain on WAV's English Flute when we have the RIV session in The Flailing Gibbon (Fridays)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 10:02 AM

English flute:
The name used during the 18th century for the recorder in order to distinguish it from the transverse flute (orchestral), which was at that time called the German flute. There's somewhat of a difference between the recorder and the flute, so, please, WAV, give it a rest

need I say more.....?

Olivia Beak (Ms)- guitars electric and acoustic, mandocello.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 08:19 AM

...here, e.g., Will.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 05:28 AM

It's actually monthly, on the 2nd Sunday of the month, but this one will be a bit special. Mind you, a birthday every month would be quite something - or would I get blase about it.

English flute? No such instrument...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 04:30 AM

I think that should be a weekly event, Will.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 04:17 AM

...no English flutes?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 04:11 AM

I'll bring my Irish bouzouki then. As I'm learning whistle I'll bring that too.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM

Bouzoukis always welcome. Not so sure about banjos and bodhrans - well, OK, then. (How could I exclude my own tenor banjo?)

Being computerised, my recording deck will have an infinite number of channels - bring all the instruments (except citterns) and musicians you can muster, and we'll have an extended jam session running over several CDs.

Actually, I'm doing a very similar thing to this on Sunday next - for my 65th birthday - when nearly all the musicians I know and play with at sessions and in the band will be meeting for a massive bash in my local. Such is village life. Music starts at 8pm, and I'm expecting a fair selection of guitars, fiddles, melodeons, concertinas, mandolins, bass, cajon, whistles, small pipes - all playing a lovely mix of traditional stuff, blues, ragtime, jazz and anything you fancy.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 21 Aug 09 - 03:19 AM

"No f*ck*ng citterns!"

Will, I'd never have taken you for a citternist. OK, can I bring my 10-string, unison-tuned, short-neck bouzouki?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Sugarfoot Jack out and about
Date: 20 Aug 09 - 06:03 AM

Didn't mean to offend Ollie Beak - it was meant in jest! Never mind, you can't be all bad if you're decended from a Brummie.

I forgot gypsy too.

Bostin!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 02:32 PM

Imelda is used predominantly in places like Italy and Spain. It is derived from Germanic origins, from the name Irmenhild.

Nope definitely not English....oh dear...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 02:23 PM

"RI villagers may listen to Americans perform their rock - but not perform it, nor support, by way of recordings held, other English folk so doing."

What an interesting phrase. "RI villagers may ... not perform it". A fascinating insight into a thought process and a philosophy. Regardless of art, intuition, imagination, inclination, talent - "thou shalt not"...

One characteristic of a village - re-imagined or not - is that, ultimately, villagers are a law unto themselves and, not matter what the diktat, will do as they please. Anarchy of a very subtle sort reigns in villages, WAV - something that is utterly beyond your comprehension.

My recording studio is getting put together very efficiently indeed. I'm just preparing a notice to be nailed to the front door - a bit like Luther's 95 theses - which says: "No f*ck*ng citterns!"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 02:06 PM

"or maybe a mead, O.B. (Ms)..?
- WalkaboutsVerse
I only drink with friends, YOU don't even come close.

and Sugarfoot Jack, you missed the point, but after reading your rant, that's hardly surprising..oh god! and my dad has to share his Brummie heritage with the likes of you....


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 08:26 AM

And isn't Imelda an Irish name? Surely that won't do...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 08:22 AM

Is 'beaut' Australian slang?

Or even 'beaut.'.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 08:02 AM

...on the contrary, I only knew of such deeds from Jessica Lange's character in Rob Roy, TL. But another thing I heard, on the quiet from Imelda, is that, so keen was Jed's fetish at one time, he even wanted to rename the RIV "Wellin Garden Village."


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 06:26 AM

Sorry WAV, I was forgetting, you're from Australia where human-ovine relationships are the norm. I'm teaching your grandmother to suck eggs here – or, rather, you grandfather to f**k sheep.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 06:13 AM

Ahhh, maybe, WAV, but you know the old phrase: "a pair of wellies without a sheep, is like a bed without a sleep".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM

...Imelda, the beaut barmaid at the Mute Swan pub, mentioned, just quietly, old Jed had a secret fetish for wellies..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 05:02 AM

"I'm including a stonking great recording studio filled with all sorts of good gear"

Nice one, Will. Whipstaff will be booking a session.

Just a word to the wise - don't dig too deep in the cottage gardens. There were some strange rumours about what old Jed Sly used to get up to in the middle of the night (taps side of nose with finger).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 04:38 AM

"nice Anglo-Saxon Protestant types"

No offence, but feck right off.

I'm an Anglo-Celtic-Huguenot Pagan Marxist Republican Brummie Digger. As for Empire - it was all a capitalist sham, any idiot can see that.

Get it right.

George Harrison was a big fan up the Uke.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 04:32 AM

...or maybe a mead, O.B. (Ms)..?
To Will and Sean: George surely could have played his repertoire on an English cittern - thereby helping maintain an English tradition. I saw a documentary a few weeks ago where a native Hawaiian was acting as tour guide for a TV presenter and crew; while leading the walk he was nonchalantly, but impressively. playing a ukulele - thereby helping maintain an Hawaiian tradition.

And, accordingly, if you'll pardon the pun, overall, I think the follow is a good endeavour...

Poem 32 of 230: THE POLYNESIAN CULTURAL CENTRE

North, on the warm island of Oahu
    There's a really good place to see:
The Polynesian Cultural Centre -
    A centre linked by Christianity;
It's run by a broad-minded Christian group,
    Championing cultures while they preach.
I talked to a few of the kind members,
    And here's an abstract of their speech:

The employees are all uni. students,
    Labouring for their study and board;
They come from many Pacific islands,
    And are all believers in their Lord;
They are studying for varied degrees,
    And working at a number of jobs;
Some work as cultural entertainers,
    While others serve the tourist mobs.

I walked around for more than half a day,
    Then went to a skilled stage-show at night.
By day, the different island nations
    Do shows at their own cultural site;
There's good Tahitian cooking to be tried,
    Tamure dancing and hula, too.
Plus, at night, dramatic fire-walking,
    Drums and song, to name you but a few.

From http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 19 Aug 09 - 03:00 AM

The UKULELE will he the greater epitome of ENGLAND that the CITTERN ever could be - especially the non-existent Barbour Shop Citterns as dreamed of by our Hapless Repatriate.

Two names of utter and quintessential Englishness almost synonymous with the Ukulele : George Formby and Vivian Stanshall.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 06:17 PM

what if an English cittern orchestra could be "absolutely fabulous", Will?

Well, you see, this is the difference between you, David, and most of the 'Catters. If an "English cittern" orchestra, as you call it, sounded better than any other particular instrumental combination, then I'd support it on purely musical grounds. You, on the other hand, would support it on purely ideological grounds - regardless of musical quality - i.e. just because it fitted your idea of "Englishness". Big difference. Music matters more than ideology any day.

Anyway, I've bought up the 2 small cottages and I'm in the process of knocking them into one. I'm including a stonking great recording studio filled with all sorts of good gear, by the way.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 02:50 PM

I was merely commenting on WAV's visions of England, not this particular thread, which is eccentric, to say the least. I have to admit that I am not of the rural frame of mind, having lived in urban centres all my life, but for those who like it, go for it.

Olivia Beak (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 02:46 PM

"for well behaved citizens, nice Anglo-Saxon Protestant types, where everything is provided for you, the shop, the pub, the church, and all worked, directly or indirectly, for the lord of the manor,"

WHAT! I think you'll find that absolutely none of that applies in the RIV we (apart from WAV) have been creating!This village has been well and truly 'levelled' and is....well, eccentric, to say the least. Why not drop round for a few bottles and a couple of spliffs - I'll invite some of the neighbours?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 02:23 PM

Please don't infer (using my first name) that we are friends, we're not.
and one small thing (For what it's worth, I hate imperialism,)
I don't believe you.

Stand and Be Counted

Olivia Beak (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 02:18 PM

For what it's worth, I hate imperialism, Olivia.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 01:56 PM

"an English cittern orchestra could be "absolutely fabulous","
- WalkaboutsVerse
Sorry, sunshine, boring! Your vision of an ideal England (read a model England)isn't mine, and never ever will be.

Actually all this reminds me of those model villages set up by the local lord of the manor, for well behaved citizens, nice Anglo-Saxon Protestant types, where everything is provided for you, the shop, the pub, the church, and all worked, directly or indirectly, for the lord of the manor, (they all vote the same way as well, where the sun never sets on The Empire.

At least Ealing's vision of England had abit of grit to it

Stand and be Counted
Olivia Beak (Ms)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 01:55 PM

Ukulele is a Hawaiian name for a Portuguese instrument rather than an instrument from their own good culture.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 01:34 PM

The ukulele is Hawaiian, and what if an English cittern orchestra could be "absolutely fabulous", Will?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 01:16 PM

WAV - I've seen the Ukulele Orchestra of GB - and they are absolutely fabulous. The day good music is subordinated to some stupid kind of numbingly stupid and pointless orthodoxy is the day we all give up the musical ghost. Get a re-imagined life.:-)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 01:04 PM

Appearing tonight at the Proms should be an English Cittern Orchestra - NOT the Ukulele Orchestra of GB.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 10:06 AM

What was that? I was too busy erecting all these polytunnels in my garden.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 10:00 AM

"RI villagers may listen to Americans perform their rock - but not perform it, nor support, by way of recordings held, other English folk so doing."

Sorry I've been absent, but as soon as I read this I went off to listen to my Tom Waits albums and work out some accompaniments on my Irish Bouzouki, whistle and the shakey egg program on my iPhone.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 09:12 AM

...fine - but excluding veggies from the native-flora for native-fauna rule does need some qualification: in some cases, fair-trade may be better than going too far with our steps to grow veggies from other lands; e.g., do we want our RIV surrounded by glass/PVC constructions..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 06:36 AM

"can we plant cumin, curry leaves, chili, ginger, etc?"

I already grow garlic, chilies, coriander, fenugreek (methi), lemongrass and many other herbs. I often wondered if rice would grow in this country.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 06:17 AM

Concerning our diet in the RIV, as most of the 'curries' sold in Indian takaways/restaurants were invented in this country can we plant cumin, curry leaves, chili, ginger, etc? O and how about a paddy field? I saied for 10 years on Indian crewed ships and I can tell you that their curries bore v. little resembance to our 'shop' versions. Any news about the spagettiharvest?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 05:50 AM

...loss of native habitat IS a significant problem, and gardeners can do their bit - digging for native fauna - by planting local native species (link just above for more on this).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 05:25 AM

Well, that's convenient.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 05:25 AM

"I found out recently that the list of vegetables introduced to Britain by the Romans"

To say nothing of all the flower varieties introduced over the years - including many that make up the "traditional" cottage garden.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 05:18 AM

Yes Ruth, but it's been said (here, e.g.) that vegetables, herbs and other consumables should be excluded from the native-flora for native-fauna rule, in order to limit food miles, etc.

So starling - not albatross nor bittern for the trad plucking of a cittern , thanks, S. And TL - it's a polymer plectrum for 10 WIRE strings you mention, yes?

"you're the one who seems to think it's VERY english to play the cittern (personally I find it a very boring instrument), so you figure out what bird (whatever that means)"...No, no - haven't you heard the tongue-twister, Beak?...

Peter Piper placed aside his pipes and settled with his cittern.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 04:45 AM

I found out recently that the list of vegetables introduced to Britain by the Romans, and therefore not native, includes garlic, onions, shallots, leeks, cabbages, peas, celery, turnips, radishes, and asparagus. If the diet in the RIV consists only of native foods, and the gardens (including allotments) only host native species, the vegetarians are going to have a pretty boring diet, aren't they?

Oh - they also introduced apples and cherries. So that's pud done for.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 04:19 AM

The players of the Barber Shop Cittern actually used starling feathers, with the pointed end being pushed in hard beneath the fingernails so they might brush the strings with the soft ends. This being 17th century London, infection was common despite the liberal use of antiseptics with many players losing fingers, hands, arms, and in many cases lives in consequence of their somewhat perverse craft. It was the fashion for a time for many non-musical dilettantes to push feathers beneath their fingernails so as to impress the ladies that they too were musicianers. Seems this also enhanced a ladies pleasure in the bedroom (or more likely the back alley) though not without further risk of infection, which was pretty much par for the course in 17th century London.

Happily, the tradition of Barber Shop Citterns still exists in the Lancastrian towns of Preston (latterly a city), Blackpool and Lancaster, though these days the players use sellotape (that Durex to you, WAV) to affix the feathers to their finger tips. It is thrilling to hear their repertoires of Traditional English Folk Songs being self-accompanied by lustrous chordal polyphonies as they have been since the 16th century. This is facilitated by the Barber Shop Cittern's re-entrant tuning, similar to many modern 5-string banjo and ukulele tunings enabling chords to be played easily so the performer might concentrate on their singing.         

It is interesting to ponder the etymology of the word Cittern with respect of its place as an instrument of English Nationalism. Methinks if we removed all things & peoples of Foreign Origin from England there'd be little & no-one left.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 03:31 AM

"and that cittern...is it 5 times 2 (wire) strings...could I get a feather-plectrum for it - and what bird?"

It's a Fylde 10-string and it needs something a lot more robust than a feather to play it. I use a Jim Dunlop Delrin .71mm plectrum. In fact I use a lot, as it blunts the edges after about a week. This is not some polite traditional instrument, WAV; it's a modern concept, first thought up by Stephan Sobell, and it's a bit of a beast - perfect for the "psychfolk" stuff I like.

"(personally I find it a very boring instrument)"

Ollie, like any instrument, that rather depends how it's played.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 05:52 PM

Is this instruments difficult to get to grips with (I won't be so presumptious as to say "master")? It seems perfect for getting somehow to the heart of traditional folk song, and giving it a setting which emphasises a necessary other-world quality. I'm also fascinated by the left-hand/fingering/holding technique in which the instrument seems to float.

I bought mine very cheaply off Ebay three or four years ago to use for a series of nocturnal al-fresco winter woodland storytelling gigs having watched traditional Karadeniz Kemence players on YouTube. The ergonomics of the instrument are that you do play it dangling off the thumb, and can push it up to the floating horizontal. It's tuned in 4ths (EAD) so the finger positions are easy and it gives me pretty much any tune I ask of it. Problem is - getting a good one. Mine is exceptional amongst other cheap ones I've seen which tend to be pretty unplayable. The Turkish Karadeniz Kemence is more or less the same instrument as the Greek Pontic Lyra. I'm giving serious thought to progressing onto the Lyra, but it'll cost a lot more than the £20 I paid for my Black Sea Fiddle.

There is a nice site - http://www.kemence.com/ - with some fine instruments, though the maker seems very fond of jewels! I do like his four-string with the fiddle head; I often dream of a fourth string (thoughif you capo a violin it's possible to play it like a kemence, though you do get odd looks).   

I am no master (check out the traditional players / singers on YouTube; THIS ONE is an especial favourite!) but I took to the instrument like a duck to water. If you go to the SHIBBOLETH myspace page & listen to the track Terra Suum Oss you'll hear a duo improvisation recorded with percussionist Clive Powell when I'd had the instrument for a week. Thing is, whilst I've learned a lot of tunes & songs over the years, I don't think I actually play it now any better than I did back then!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 05:14 PM

Er - 600?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 04:49 PM

you're the one who seems to think it's VERY english to play the cittern (personally I find it a very boring instrument), so you figure out what bird (whatever that means)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 04:46 PM

...but what bird, JWO Beak?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jamming With Ollie Beak (inactive)
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 04:16 PM

"RI villagers may listen to Americans perform their rock - but not perform it, nor support, by way of recordings held, other English folk so doing."
- WalkaboutsVerse

one extremely good reason for not participating in this thread....
and I'll continue to listen to what I choose to listen to!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 04:06 PM

I'm interested in one of the cottages, TL - maybe a wildlife pond will do instead of a "lake", and a patch instead of a "plot"...and that cittern...is it 5 times 2 (wire) strings...could I get a feather-plectrum for it - and what bird?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 03:33 PM

Hi Will. Thinking of moving in? I'm sure you could imagine a very desireable property - especailly a it's rapidly becoming The Deserted Village (sorry, folks, are we boring you?)

SoP, thanks for the info. I managed to order a copy of The Bowed Harp for eight quid. This project ios getting really interesting. Like you, not bothered about autheticity, just the sound. I've worked out how to incorporate banjo 5th sting tuners in place of tuning posts which, in my experience, aren't totally stisfactory on the psaltery (aaaargh, I can hear the purists screaming). I'm also going to ask a guitar maker of my acquaintancde about the bracing of the face, thicknesses etc. One question though, if you'd be so kind - is the fishing line for frets tied around the neck or glued to the fretboard?

As to tuning, I'm considering the tuning I use on the cittern which, by and large, uses the 5th string as a drone.

Now then, Will, there's a lovely pair of labourers' cottages round the corner that I noticed are up for sale.......(don't listen the old wives' tales, they're very pleasnt).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 02:12 PM

I've not been participating in this thread, but I must really jump in here and pose a question about the Turkish Kemence which I've seen and heard on YouTube in two environments: there's the native Turkish environment which is interesting but a little beyond my old-fashioned ears; then there's the Suibhne O'Piobaireachd environment which - and I have to be honest here - I found absolutely fascinating.

Is this instruments difficult to get to grips with (I won't be so presumptious as to say "master")? It seems perfect for getting somehow to the heart of traditional folk song, and giving it a setting which emphasises a necessary other-world quality. I'm also fascinated by the left-hand/fingering/holding technique in which the instrument seems to float.

In passing, "Rivington" is a real village, and a very beautiful anc ancient one, at the foot of Rivington Pike (my stamping ground in the early 50s).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 10:37 AM

My crwth bridge is footed in the Welsh style and does just fine at right angles. No doubt there is a reason for the angled bridge, given that traditionally all the strings would have been bowed at the same time, a la John Cale's viola. This is what you find in other Northern-European bowed-lyes such as the talharp and jouhikko (which have stings of twisted horse-hair) though there the bridge arrangement is more straightforward. A good book to look out for is Otto Andersson's The Bowed Harp. I ordered my edition brand new in 1982 and got a first edition (1930) from the publishers (Reeves); not sure of its availability these days, or even if it made it into a second editon...

I use nylon classical guitar strings, with the un-wound strings buffed up with emery paper to facilitate bowing. The bow I've been using for the last 10 years is from a Chinese er-hu & works like a dream. For frets I use Drennan Specimen Plus 16lb nylon fishing line.

You might gather that I consider musical pragmatics to be of far greater importance than authenticity!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 09:19 AM

Thanks for that – I'm getting an idea now of how to proceed. I've got a pretty good indication of construction from the pictures on Michael J King's website and I'm thinking Sycamore and Spruce might be the right materials – the former should be resilient enough to take psaltery/zither tuning pegs and both are readily available. The idea of frets seems like a good idea and would mean the bridge will be at right angles to the strings rather than at an acute angle (presumably this made it easier for the bridge to rest on the face and back). Obviously, this will mean revising the soundhole positioning.

I'll have to draw up some plans and experiment a bit. I reckon this is going to be my winter project. No doubt the quiet peace of the RIV will be disturbed by loud and inventive expletives as I get it wrong.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 08:13 AM

My crwth was made back in 1987 by Tim Hobrough - thus pre-dating the current Crwth Revival by some years. Certainly it's a very different instrument to those you see these days, but it was good enough for Welsh traditional singer Suisan George (RIP) with whom I enjoyed a very memorable session at the Aust Festival in 1999. Basically, my crwth has medieval fiddle-frets (heresy!), and a slightly curved bridge (burn it!!) and it's five strings tuned concordantly in E & B. I see it more of a hypothetical early Northern European bowed-lyre than a crwth proper, as far as such instruments existed at all, but pedantry is the sad product of any revival - so CRWTH I must insist it is! That said, I like the crwths as played by Cas Muerig etc. and was actually planning to get one before The Black Sea Fiddle came into my life proving itself the ideal instrument for my particular approach to Folk, even more so than the crwth. The same Third Ear / C. Pegg influences apply of course, just that the Black Sea Fiddle (aka Karadeniz Kemence) is easier to play on the hoof & better for accompanying E. Trads, especially with an electronic Shruti Box drone, such as:
      
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3FRvTDWqnM

And a bit of Feral Tertius Auris on the crwth:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTQGXIu5QHA

There's a few revival crwths on YouTube too which are worth having a look at. There was even a Mudcat thread at one point on which I roundly ignored!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 07:09 AM

SoP, I'm fascinated by the crwth – can you tell me how it's tuned? I'd actually quite like to build one – is there anywhere I can get details of dimensions, scale length, etc? I once built a psaltery but it's such a sod to tune that it just stays on a shelf now.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 06:22 AM

I'd like to hear that, SoB - turn up the volume and blast it across the village.

I tuned my big Lowden down to Csus, which gives a fantastic bass C 'thunk' combined with fast pull-offs and hammer-ons on all strings, right up the fretboard. The effect I get has overtones of John Martyn - and then I just came across this description of what John did:

"Within the following year (1972) he discovered that by tuning the guitar low and using repeat echo he could play with and over his own guitar figures, and create bass and percussion".

I also had a go at my own version of Spencer the Rover – totally different to John's but nice sound, especially with mrsleveller playing eerie whistle over it.

The only problem is, if I want to play this in public, I have to lug a hugely heavy old valve amp around (which actually gave my father-in-law, who left it to me, a hernia).

BTW: Fylde cittern – nice! Got one myself.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 05:35 AM

Having recently inherited an old Fender Twin Reverb amp, I'm currently having a huge amount of fun playing my acoustic through it (even tried the cittern but the feedback is ear-splitting). Someone once described my style of playing as "psychfolk" and it sounds even more so when amplified and given lots of reverb.

Yeah! Love it! At least a bit of real folk! My wife bought a Roland Micro Cube the other day for her Purple Heart Daisyrock; lots of sweet FX, so she can get a real Cocteau Twins vibe going on her accompaniments. Two of the songs for the new Fylde show this year (DEMDYKE! - more of which anon) feature Rachel's Daisyrock in consort with Ross Campbell's Fylde Cittern and my Crwth (both unamplified) - the effect is, of course, utterly delicious!

I'm poised on buying an electric bass; not sure what yet, but I have a notion that the bass is not only my natural instrument but also the ideal thing for accompanying traditional folk songs. The set up will include a Micro Cube bass amp, a Line 1 Delay modeller, and a fuzz/wah pedal. The bass was my first instrument, but I haven't had one for years, although in music shops I often plug in a Precision and do my Janik Topp approximations much to the bafflement of the local kids & staff alike...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 05:05 AM

"I must admit much of my own crwth playing is inspired by the Third Ear Band, Carole Pegg & John Cale - so the folk process continues!"

It occured to me recently, when listeing to Mr Fox, that the way I play cittern has some of the patterns of Carole Pegg's Yorkshire style fiddle playing. The influence is definitely there, though probably subconscious. Having recently inherited an old Fender Twin Reverb amp, I'm currently having a huge amount of fun playing my acoustic through it (even tried the cittern but the feedback is ear-splitting). Someone once described my style of playing as "psychfolk" and it sounds even more so when amplified and given lots of reverb.

So, sorry WAV, but the Folk Police have no authority in the RIV - no-one's going to stop me rocking up Reynardine (of which, incidentally Gordon Tyrall does a mean version with really weird looped effects).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 17 Aug 09 - 05:04 AM

Feeling slightly more charitable this morning after my morning stroll through the deserted village. A few points to ponder before I pack up and get on my way myself; I rather fancy emigrating to Australia...

As I had to say to Jim Moray on the Sidders thread, S., "fascism" is opposed to democracy and socialism and, thus, I am opposed to it.   

You are a fascist in that you believe in one resolute authority (i.e. your own) in which every point contradicts the actual human reality of the situation. You see your ideal as being right whilst everyone else is wrong. There is nothing remotely democratic or socialist about this - on the contrary - thus you are, in truth, a Fascist who stamps his jack-booted Walkabout ignorance on the face of all human truth, culture, beauty & spirituality.

English folk who wish to perform more than the tune may venture into English classical music - with it's use of harmony and other more-sophisticated techniques.

All Classical Music is the consequence of musical developments that took place in cathedrals, churches, royal courts and universities throughout Europe since the Middle Ages. English Classical Music is but part of these very non-English influences and continues to be so to this day. If you accept an English Classical Music, you must also accept an English Jazz, an English Pop, and an English Rock.

Jazz, rock, and pop are American genres that have been copied by citizens of the above nations you mention - often to the detriment of their own trad forms and, thus, our multicultural world.

American Culture is a dynamic cross-fertilisation of the European and the African wherein new forms were created and fed back to their mother countries where they were further enhanced. To call Jazz, Rock and Pop American is to miss the point of 20th century popular musical history which is, in fact, Global, with many of the more significant innovations taking place outside America. And as for such things being detrimental to so-called trad-forms, even by the time the Bright Young Things of the 1920s were jitter-bugging to the Jazz Age, such trad. forms were long dead, as far as they were ever alive at all. Folk Music is a revivalist fantasy that was never Our Own Good Culture, thus it remains the irrelevance that is today. But hardly the wonder cultural fascists such as yourself latch onto it, WAV - tainting its quaint anachronistic charm with your vile racist philosophies. Oh, and the baby boomer Folk Revival, Folk Clubs and all was inspired by what was happening in America. It is no coincidence that Mudcat and The Digital Tradition are American.

In this way, nationalism with conquest is bad, but nationalism with eco-travel and fair-trade is good for humanity. (For more on this you may like to check my Messages.

You are mired in your nonsensical repetitions and rhetoric; you have made a prisoner of yourself, hemmed in by such Messages that are racist, fascistic, misanthropic, and just plain WRONG WRONG WRONG - as you've been told, over and over and over... You're a lost cause, WAV. This time I really do give up. Let me know when you've binned the lot, and then we might have something to work with.

S O'P


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 06:23 PM

WAV - I give up.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 04:27 PM

As I had to say to Jim Moray on the Sidders thread, S., "fascism" is opposed to democracy and socialism and, thus, I am opposed to it. English folk who wish to perform more than the tune may venture into English classical music - with it's use of harmony and other more-sophisticated techniques. Jazz, rock, and pop are American genres that have been copied by citizens of the above nations you mention - often to the detriment of their own trad forms and, thus, our multicultural world. In this way, nationalism with conquest is bad, but nationalism with eco-travel and fair-trade is good for humanity. (For more on this you may like to check my Messages.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 02:36 PM

PS - Jazz likewise: African-American, African, American, English, German, Scottish, Scandinavian, Saturnian, Ancient Egyptian...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 02:33 PM

RI villagers may listen to Americans perform their rock - but not perform it, nor support, by way of recordings held, other English folk so doing.

Know what? I've listened to far more English Rock than I ever have English folk and continue to do so. I'm reminded of an anecdote in which it fell to some Earnest Young Folkies to put English uber-traddy Peter Bellamy up after a gig. Arriving back at the flat they thought to impress him with their LPs of English Folk, but no sooner had the stylus hit the vinyl than Bellamy objects, insisting that they take it off forthwith and play some real music, like The Rolling Stones. I'm much the same actually - a lifetime immersed in British, German and French Rock Music (albeit of the Prog Variety); likewise British, Spanish, Italian (etc.) Early Classical Music (from Middle Ages to the Baroque), which, like Rock Music is truly Universal in its Myriad National Diversities.

Another day in the stocks for you, WAV - for spouting such inhumane and unrealistic fascistic crap. Anyone would think you enjoyed it...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 12:26 PM

With all due respect, S., the rock element (along with quite-dead Dorchester - facing east) should be removed; RI villagers may listen to Americans perform their rock - but not perform it, nor support, by way of recordings held, other English folk so doing.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM

On patriotic grounds, I move we remove the "rock" element.

Balls. Rock Music has a good deal more relevance to Our Own Good English Culture than Folky Folk Music will ever have. Rock is a real living music that appeals to a growing audience of millions - Folky Folk is a revivalist fantasy that appeals to a dwindling audience of hundreds. Rock, in other words, is our real Popular Folk Music which allows for a far greater creative expression and experience of Englishness than Folky Folk ever can.

Folky Folk bands like Mr Fox were only too aware of this, creating two stunningly idiosyncratic albums drawing on the sonic influences of traditional Yorkshire fiddle styles fused with that of the Third Ear Band and the Velvet Underground, which featured Welshman John Cale, whose iconic viola style was inspired by what the Welsh crwth might have sounded like at a time long before the current revival of that particular instrument. I must admit much of my own crwth playing is inspired by the Third Ear Band, Carole Pegg & John Cale - so the folk process continues!

As I said elsewhere, WAV - in your understanding of Music & Culture you are a kid with a toy boat who feels himself moved to advise seasoned shellbacks on their seamanship. Time you started to listen, and learn, and really appreciate the boundless wonders of the culture you claim to love but manifestly know so little about.

Here's some Third Ear Band, circa 1970, featuring an entirely acoustic quartet of oboe, violin, cello & percussion. It doesn't get any more English than this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TXiR3dOeSrU

*

Getting back to the subject of bells...

Some years ago I bought a heavy brass antique cow-bell in the Trading Post antiques centre in Wells nearby where we were staying at the time.

'Aha!' said the proprietor. ' - The bell that saved the cow!'
'Beg pardon, dear boy?' says I, always on my best down south.
'That bell saved a cow's life - least it did according to the old woman who brought it in - '

And so he went on to relate as provenance a tale set in the first world war, involving a French dairyman, many miles from the front line, and a group of hungry German soldiers wandering AWOL, one of whom took a shot at a cow with their last bullet which struck the bell that hung around the animal's neck. The cowherd first heard the shot, followed by the clang, and then saw the terrified animal running pell-mell across the pasture with a group of starving German soldiers running after it. All was resolved amicably; the soldiers were fed, and sent on their way, and the bell kept as a conversation piece, passed on through the family until it ended up in the Trading Post where I bought it for the paltry sum of five English pounds.

It now has pride of place in my own collection of World Animal Bells (Chamonix bells of various grades, Egyptian camel bells, wooden bells from Tibet & Eastern Europe etc. etc.) and I might often take it along on storytelling gigs to relate the tale of The Bell that Saved the Cow in prelude to The Cow that Ate the Piper.

At no point have I ever questioned the truth of the provenance; it is an artefact with a story attached and that's the only truth that matters as far as I'm concerned.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 08:03 AM

Re: "3.       Provision of a folk/rock record library.
Following the offer from several residents of donations of vinyl LPs by folk/rock combos Mr Fox, Albion Band, Steeleye Span and Fotheringay, it was agreed to allow redundant shelving in the Pornography and Jam Making sections of the village library (available as all the books have been purloined)to be used to house this collection."...On patriotic grounds, I move we remove the "rock" element.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 05:03 AM

PS - Nigel has found something rather wonderful watch this morning on You Tube, though Kylie, having called round for young Neil, looks on somewhat baffled...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x76CeJBbJs8


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 04:35 AM

...he certainly could wing-it on those bells, S.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 04:17 AM

Well, you're partly right there, WAV - as Old Mr Dorchester, the late Noel's late father, was a prominent campanologist in his day. Not only was he tirelessly involved in bell-ringing in the village church, but amassed the collection of over 3000 bells from all ages and cultures that still reside in the family home, currently occupied by Nigel, Fiona and Neil.

Few know about Noel Dorchester's foray into cannibalism, however so unwitting that foray might have been. His wife knew about the shipwreck incident, and how his life was saved by eating albatross - indeed it was a tale he dined out on many the time, and it was her idea that they should have the albatross on that fateful night by way of celebrating their 45th anniversary. In many ways it is easier for Mr Dorchester to allow the rumours of foul play to persist, rather than face the shame if the truth was to become known. Fowl play? Heaven knows she is a proud woman, despite her long standing affairs with the likes of Harry and Billy, aka The Yeddle Twins, two bits of rough she has been carrying on with since they were in Noel's employ (as gardeners and roadies) back in the late 1960s.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 12:58 PM

...either way, when Olde Dorchester stopped ringing our C of E's national instrument,
I knew he wasn't well -
after that, he wouldn't take a pew with anyone. :-(>


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 11:49 AM

Actually, I suspect that the answer may be a lot more sinister.I heard that he was once cast adrift in an open boat with two other people. After a deep sleep he awoke to find one of the others missing but the remaining man offered him some meat, saying that their companion had gone crazy and jumped overboard but that he had managed to catch an albatross and this was Noel's share.


When Noel later tasted the albatross in Madeira, he realised that the meat tasted nothing like that which he had eaten on the open boat.......


Anthropophogy is a terrible thing to live with.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 11:29 AM

"You're getting warm, but you won't find the answer in Coleridge. "

Monty Python?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM

3.55pm - Having dosed off whilst watching South Pacific, Mrs Poulton wakes suddenly on the sofa as though from a scratch. She looks in the front room mirror to find three parallel claw marks on her cheek, each yielding beads of blood.

3.57pm - Father James answers a call from a rather hysterical female from Rivington village. He is not in the least bit surprised at what she tells him and promises to be over after the racing.

Note: In researching that last bit, I've just switched on Channel 4 and I'm sitting here in a state of mesmerised delight at the ensuing images and atmosphere here on this rainy Saturday afternoon. Can there be anything more English than horse-racing? Anyway, it's finished now, so I dare say Father James will be on his way over to Rivington in his beloved Volvo, there to attend to Mrs Poulton's singular disturbance.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 10:17 AM

You're getting warm, but you won't find the answer in Coleridge.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 10:08 AM

"The burning question is - why would a man who has everything going for him (a noted fun guy indeed) wish to take his own life after tasting a mouthful of albatross flesh?"

Could the answer lie here?


"Are those her ribs through which the Sun
Did peer, as through a grate?
And is that Woman all her crew?
Is that a DEATH? and are there two?
Is DEATH that woman's mate?"


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 09:36 AM

Having touched on the ancient combined office of sexton and undertaker in the village, a little more explanation of this may be useful. New residents to the village are often curious as to why this office remains in the one family and why the services are performed free of charge. They are usually directed to the village library and to two books there. The first, by Digby Boneburier, Catchpole's father, is entitled Necrophilia for Dummies, and the second, a much lighter read by Catchpole himself, is called How Was It For You – Unanswered Questions About Necrophilia.

In actual fact, the office was granted by charter by Richard II following the Peasants' Revolt of 1381, for the disposal of the remains of those executed in the persecutions following the uprising. When pressed and plied with a substantial amount of Sneck Lifter beer, Catchpole will produce an ancient and very grubby document, which states that "…the holder shall be called, in name and title, Bone Buryer, and the office shall be past from father to sonne in perpertuitie. For the performance of this office neither gold nor silver shall be given but the holder may, in whatsoever way he may deem fitting, use for the sateing of his carnal lusts, the bodies of the deceased."

This may, some say, account for the great age to which many maiden ladies in the village live and also for their greeting to each other: "Ah see Boneburier an't 'ad thee yet".

On cold winter days when his services are most in demand, the cheerfull whistling of Mr Fox's The Hanged Man can be heard emanating from ever-deepening holes in the churchyard, and curious passersby will stop and wonder: who will Boneburier have in his bed tonight?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 07:41 AM

Hooray! The Kelly twins are opening their Subway today in what used to be Mr Prosser's Concertina Emporium. The opening offer is a 6" Sub + drink + cookie all for a quid. It is noticed old Mr Prosser is first in the queue...

Elsewhere meanwhile, on the advice of the Rev. Tugtodger, Mrs Poulton is trying to reach Father James McSweeney at the presbytery of Saint Mary's over in East Rivington. Father James however is out making the most of the good weather by flying his scale model Fokker Triplane (complete with web-cam) on Rivington Heath.

As she puts the phone down, Mrs Poulton catches sight of a cat jumping up on the television set. Of course there is no cat, but the antique pottery penguin on the TV falls off on to the shag-pile carpet, thankfully unharmed. At this point she changes her plans for the day and goes out to take advantage of the offers at the new Subway.

'I hear you're having a spot of bother, Mrs Poulton - '
'Bother, Mr Prosser? Well, you'd know al about that I'm sure - '
'Never any bother here, Mrs Poulton - least not that sort - '
'So why sell up to the Kelly brothers when business was booming?'
'Can't get the weasels, Mrs Poulton - not anymore - not the good ones - '
'I thought you had young Dorchester catching them for you?'
'Cleaned 'em out, pretty much - and the new houses don't help - best weasel's allus came from Peg's Yard - everyone knows that - '
'A weasel is a weasel, surely?'
'Not for concertina bellows it ain't, Mrs Poulton. So what about this 'ere ghost they're on about? Cat is it?'
'Need you ask?'
'Never thought of just - putting it back?'
'I'm not having dead animals in my house, Mr Prosser - and I'm not about to give in to - superstition and - witchcraft, which is what it amounts too.'
'Funny that, you being into all that folk singing and all - never had any folk singing in my day I must say - new fangled bit of nonsense so it is. Still - kept me in business these many years!'
'I fail to see what singing traditional folk songs has got to do with - dead cats.'
'Funny old ways, Mrs Poulton - funny old ways - or so they say.'
'Anyway - what are the sandwiches like?'
'They're better toasted - but avoid the chillies - '


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 05:12 AM

I know what the Cockneys will be saying re. Dorchester - someone's telling porky pies.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 04:55 AM

"With ref. to the resident plot-makers - we really aughta get to the village Murder sharpish dontcha think? It's a bit behindhand..."

Well, yes, but just bear in mind the effects on rural depopulation as witnessed in Midsomer.The only person who would be happy would be the village sexton, Catchpole Boneburier; "us Boneburiers has been putting folk underground for nigh on six centuries."

"The landlord at The Siberian Khatru"

Has the pub name changed? I thought it was The Evil Dreaming Eagle.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 15 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM

thinks it was fungi,

Maybe he's right at that given that Mr Noel Dorchester was not only the president of The Rivington Mycology Club but also editor of The Mycologist Monthly so if anyone would know to do it, then he would. Whilst the grisly details of Mr Dorchester's suicide have never been forthcoming, speculation amongst the villagers continues to be rife, as WAV suggests, with many suspecting foul play. The burning question is - why would a man who has everything going for him (a noted fun guy indeed) wish to take his own life after tasting a mouthful of albatross flesh?

Elsewhere - Mr Dorchester's grandson Neil is irritated to discover yet another packet of condoms in his jacket pocket. Who is putting them there? And for why? And what's that shit his father is playing down in the kitchen this morning?

One of these mysteries might be answered, for much to his delight Nigel Dorchester discovered a web-link where one might download And Now it is So Early entirely gratis. This little known album of Sydney Carter songs was recorded by Bob and Carol Pegg (with Mr Carter himself) at some point circa 1970/71 and represents something of a genuine curio in the canon of English Folk Rock. This is the link he used: http://rapidshare.com/files/175356188/sc-aniise.rar - which comes complete with full album graphics though being rar, Nigel found he had to download additional software before he could open the files. A minor inconvenience, because he can now enjoy this rare slab of vintage Wyrd which hitherto has existed only in rumour alone.

Meanwhile - Janice Poulton is making tidy for the arrival of the vicar, one Timothy Tugtodger, who is due at 10.00am...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 04:33 PM

Re. Dorchester's death, S., I heard otherwise: Eastwood's grave digger, Doug Green, thinks it was fungi, and wants to make bacon of our Village Squire.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 03:51 PM

Let's keep things in perspective here you chaps.

Mr Noel Dorchester committed suicide after taking a mouthful of the albatross served up in a restaurant whilst on holiday in Madeira. Prior to that he's been the happiest man alive - vivacious wife, even more vivacious lover, beautiful (if illegitimate) daughter, loving (if severely disabled) son, lively (if slightly manic) grandson etc. etc.

A tragic if somewhat baffling set of circumstances. Perhaps one you budding sleuths out there might provide a solution...

Meanwile, Nigel Dorchester is playing Mr Fox's The Gypsy very loud indeed whilst putting the finishing touches to his 00-scale model of Rivington Halt, circa 1935. Mendle is an especial favourite.

Elsewhere, the fastidious Mrs Janice Poulton is convinced that the breakage of a valuable piece of crockery (an identical piece was valued at £800 on a recent episode of The Antiques Roadshow) is due to poltergeist activity consequent on the discovery of a mummified cat in the wainscoting of their 17th century farm house.

Mr Peter Poulton is down at the Khatru with his mates for the Friday quiz unaware of the distress that his wife phoning the vicar for advice.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 01:37 PM

Ah yes, CS - we hadn't thought of that: how did Dorchester die?...messy inquest!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 01:25 PM

"Minutes of the ReImagined Village Parish Council Meeting

Present:
Sir Winford Toadstrangler-Gout (Chair)" [etceteras]

Lovely re-imagined gothic/surreal stuff Leveller. Have you been at the Mervyn Peake?

With ref. to the resident plot-makers - we really aughta get to the village Murder sharpish dontcha think? It's a bit behindhand...

Possible Murder Weapon: - strange funghi in the rabbit pie. Or is that too passe?
Hypnotised ninja fluffy Morris Dancers weilding err suffocating fluffy pompoms which emit a mysterious poison gas.
The village maypole (for shock village fete/Pagan style Christ sacrifice scene possibilities).
A deadly poisonous hybridised orchid, bred by local orchid fanatic/librarian/pyscho.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 12:21 PM

Furhter to this..."4.       Removal of Noel Dorchester from the Parish Council.
It was proposed that Mr Noel Dorchester be removed from the Parish Council on the grounds that he had been dead for over two years and was attracting an abundance of flies. Mr Dorchester was asked to leave the room while this was discussed but, as parts of him remained, a decision was put on hold."...Some six years ago, Dorthester told me, on the quiet, that he MUST face east.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 12:09 PM

How about Rivington? Then we get a reference to one of the more obscure Doo-Wop groups of the early 60s who actually came up with this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edYQiZxyw0I

The landlord at The Siberian Khatru keeps his gleaming vintage Rock-Ola Jukebox well stocked in this respect. Neil and Kylie might be seen jiving to such stuff most nights as WAV looks on muttering into his mead 'n' chips about Our Own Good English Culture whilst missing the point that this is Our Own Good English Culture... Rivington Soul Nights? You bet!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 11:53 AM

Just realised, the RIV hasn't got a name. How about:

Cattersholme
Folkhall
Bitter End
Little Giddy (with apologies to T S Elliot)

I'm sure others can come up with some better ones.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 08:17 AM

Minutes of the ReImagined Village Parish Council Meeting

Present:
Sir Winford Toadstrangler-Gout (Chair)
Lawrence Goatdung
Noel Dorchester (deceased)
Amelia Prickgroper
Rev. Warton Pederast
Lorrinda Nicelady
Will Knot (Parish Clerk)


Current Business.

1.        Installation of a ducking stool at the village pond.
It was agreed to provide the sum of £150 from parish funds for the construction on condition that its use be restricted to recreational purposes and that resulting witch-burning be confined to fund raising at the village fete.

2.        Dog fouling.
It was proposed that the owner of any dog caught fouling the pavements should have his or her nose rubbed in it. This was agreed unanimously.

3.        Provision of a folk/rock record library.
Following the offer from several residents of donations of vinyl LPs by folk/rock combos Mr Fox, Albion Band, Steeleye Span and Fotheringay, it was agreed to allow redundant shelving in the Pornography and Jam Making sections of the village library (available as all the books have been purloined)to be used to house this collection.

4.        Removal of Noel Dorchester from the Parish Council.
It was proposed that Mr Noel Dorchester be removed from the Parish Council on the grounds that he had been dead for over two years and was attracting an abundance of flies. Mr Dorchester was asked to leave the room while this was discussed but, as parts of him remained, a decision was put on hold.

5.        An increase in lycanthropic incidents.
Rev. Pederast drew the council's attention to recent activity following the full moon resulting in several sheep having their throats torn out, the discovery of the dismembered body of village postman, Ivor Parcelforyer, and deep claw marks in the church door. It was agreed to provide Mrs Barghest with a strong set of chains and instructions on how and when to apply them to her husband.

The Chairman suspended the meeting following an unpleasant incident involving a village resident, a rabbit pie and indecent pictures of an Australian pornographer.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 07:28 AM

I used to go in the Saturday singing comps and still go to the Saturday singaround, S., and thus haven't caught you yet - but I did notice the flyers and, as you say, hopefully next year...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 07:17 AM

Lady of Spain?

That sounds about right, Ruth. That advert still haunts my dreams - transcending the realms of the mere Surreal into those of pure Dada.

S., along with Taffy Thomas, is actually a busy regular at an important folk festival of the NE...

Never seen you at any of the Gathering storytelling sessions, WAV. For the last three years Taffy and I have done a two-hander in the Millennium Garden on the Saturday evening - the increasingly popular Twilight Tales, spooky tales & supernatural ballads complete with a blazing brazier of well-seasoned beech logs. Great fun! Maybe see you next year...

On the subject of worthy storytellers, I bought a copy of Bob Pegg's Folk on ebay the other day; if the vendor does his job it ought to be arriving in the post today, or maybe tomorrow. This, along with Bob Pegg's Rites and Riots, is one of Nigel Dorchester's favourite books.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 06:58 AM

More than one story teller in the RIV then - S., along with Taffy Thomas, is actually a busy regular at an important folk festival of the NE...

Poem 193 of 230: THE 35TH MORPETH NORTHUMBRIAN GATHERING – SPRING 2002

Toward Morpeth's Gathering,
    Either side of Great North Road,
Daffodils gleefully showed
    Their stalk-dressing flowering.

And then, at the Gathering,
    Another great flowering
Of English heritage, showed
    Through competitions that glowed
With competent folk-singing,
    Storytelling, bag-piping
(The small-pipes rapidly rode
    By hands, in staccato mode),
Clogdancing and stick-dressing:
    Things that are worth addressing.

From http://walkaboutsverse.741.com (e-scroll)
Or http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ruth Archer
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 06:40 AM

"Villa in Spain we adore you - we've waited twenty years for you (sung to a tune I couldn't name);"

Lady of Spain?


Lady of Spain, I adore you
Right from the night I first saw you
My heart has been yearning for you
What else could any heart do?
Lady of Spain, I'm appealing
Why should my lips be concealing
All that my eyes are revealing?
Lady of Spain, I love you

Night in Madrid, blue and tender
Spanish moon makes silver splendor
Music throbbing, plaintive sobbing notes of a guitar
While ardent caballeros serenade:

Lady of Spain, I adore you
Right from the night I first saw you
My heart has been yearning for you
What else could any heart do?
Lady of Spain, I'm appealing
Why should my lips be concealing
All that my eyes are revealing?
Lady of Spain, I love you


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM

12.10pm - Billy takes a rabbit pie round to Noel who is particular impressed by the decoration on the crust.

That should of course be Nigel who gets the pie. So who's Noel? Nigel's late father - Noel Dorchester, a very worthy man who frequently turns in his grave at the antics of his grandson Neil and his FM-dancing girlfriend Kylie, especially as Kylie is the love-child of Noel's affair with Annie... Oh dear! Will Annie tell Neil that his girlfriend is, in fact, his aunt? Or will she just keep slipping condoms into Neil's coat pocket when he hangs it up in the hall against her better judgement? After all, Neil is only 13, though at 15, Kylie is a good deal more worldly. Let's hope the poaching, FM-dancing and vandalism keep them happy...

It's a very fine pie anyway - decorated with cut-out pastry patterns of sun, moon, trees and bunnies, brushed o-er with egg white to give a nice folksy glaze. Whilst Nigel doesn't let his Muscular-Dystrophy get in the way of a normal life (his passion for the more obscure end early 70's folk rock notwithstanding) he does enjoy the sympathy it engenders in otherwise curmudgeonly old bastards like Billy and Mary, who had a son of their own once...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 05:59 AM

Sorry, it was Dr Dolittle, not Bedknobs and Broomsticks:

"Offended by the construction of a concrete dam built for a film production of Doctor Dolittle at Castle Coombe, Wiltshire, Fiennes and an SAS comrade demolished the dam (using explosives Fiennes had obtained for authorised demolitions, but which by dint of efficiency he had been able to save). Both fled, and Fiennes (who had recently completed a training course on evading dogs) escaped capture - but his comrade did not, and both were subsequently discharged from the SAS and returned to their regiments."


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 02:20 PM

I first saw the abovementioned film "Walkabout" a couple of years ago on TV here, TL - beautiful and powerful.

Now, you better tell us the damned-stream story...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 03:46 AM

Hey, that's a point. We could rent out the RIV as the perefct location for eccentric TV and cinema commercials.

BTW, has anyone heard the story about when Ranulph Fiennes dynamited the set of Bedknobs and Broomsticks because they had damned the stream in his local village where they were filming? Hilarious!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM

I do so agree with you SOP. The encapsulation of a story, a message, an idea and a sales pitch into 30 seconds is hard enough - to make it amusing and entertaining is an art form in itself.

Here's some of my favourites:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkBIIZcLmQQ&feature=PlayList&p=B2A52C2AEB4268EC&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=5


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 13 Aug 09 - 02:55 AM

TV commercials fascinate me as a genre; long after the death of the product they might remain encoded in the cultural & personal subconsciousness as vivid little vignettes evocative of an entire epoch. One of my all time - er - favourites consisted of two separate jingles: the first - Villa in Spain we adore you - we've waited twenty years for you (sung to a tune I couldn't name); and the second - Happiness, happiness, is the boat the we possess sung to Ken Dodd's theme tune. Whilst it's still Ken Dodd's theme tune, I'm think maybe I'm the only one alive that remember the surreal reconstruction that remains embedded in my brain some thirty years on...

Adverts can often be consummate reductions to the very essence of an Englishness that might otherwise remain all too elusive. Here's a couple:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr-lNUyuFWE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nXO_DS6XrM


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 11:38 AM

They were for Halifax Building Society - we created the big X theme when it was still a respectable organisation. I don't think I even have copies myself - if I do, they'll be on 35mm (well you wouldn't expect Nic to shoot on anything else!)

Don't forget that many of the most respected film makers started off as commercials directors. In the past I've worked with Alan Parker, Ridley Scott (his lady, Sandy Watson, was the TV producer at the agency where I worked), Richard Loncraine, Dick Lester and Gary Sherman (who was a great friend of mine).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 10:29 AM

Nic directed some TV commercials that I wrote in the early 1980s

Respect! Any on-line examples? There's a few classics on YouTube... One often hears of ex-prog musicianers doing music for adverts, with various former Soft Machine, Gentle Giant and (Lord Save Us!) Hatfield and the North members turning their talents to a less subtle form of market manipulation. I don't suppose...???


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 09:44 AM

That brings to mind the Jenny Agutter swimming sequence in Nic Roeg's 'Walkabout'.

Nic directed some TV commercials that I wrote in the early 1980s but, unfortunately, Jenny Agutter did not feature in them.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 09:10 AM

Cue The Maid of Australia - my preferred version would be Bellamy & Swarb, which would make a fine theme song for Abby Winters!

One day as I walked by them Oxborough Banks
Where the maids of Australia they play their wild pranks,
Down by a green bush I sat down to read
While the birds they sang sweetly in the bushes and trees
In the forests of happy Australia,
In the forests of happy Australia,
Where the maidens are handsome and gay.

And as I sat viewing this beautiful scene
All the birds they sang sweetly and the trees they were green,
A pretty fair damsel before me appeared
To the banks of the river she swiftly drew near
This daughter of happy Australia,
This daughter of happy Australia,
Where the maidens are handsome and gay.

Well she stripped stark naked, before me she stood
Just as naked as Venus that rose from the flood,
She blushed with confusion and smiling said she,
"These are the clothing that nature gave me
On the day I was born in Australia."
On the day I was born in Australia,
Where the maidens are handsome and gay

Well she plunged in the stream without fear or dread,
Her delicate limbs she extended and spread,
Her hair hung in ringlets her colour was black,
"Sir, you shall see how I float on me back
In the streams of me native Australia."
In the streams of me happy Australia,
Where the maidens are handsome and gay.

But growing tired of swimming she drew to the brink,
"Oh assistance kind sir, I'm afraid I shall sink."
I flew to her aid and took hold of her hand,
Her feet they did slip she fell back on the sand,
And I entered the bush of Australia,
And I entered the bush of Australia,
Where the maidens are handsome and gay.

We kissed and we cuddled in the highest of glee,
The fairest Australia me eyes they did see,
Long time on her bosom me head I did hide,
'Til the sun in the West it began to decline,
Then I left this fair maid of Australia,
Then I left this fair maid of Australia,
Just as the sun went down.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 08:45 AM

She's an Australian pornographer who facilitates a website in which ordinary young women (as oppose to porn models) freely, openly and shamelessly celebrate their sexuality in a variety of ways either solo, or in duos and groups. In the masturbation videos a girl is alone with the video camera. In the annals of internet porn I believe her approach is quite unique - refreshing certainly, age & BMI restrictions notwithstanding...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 08:33 AM

Who is Abby Winters?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 06:41 AM

Scenes from A Re-Imagined Village...

Mrs Dorchester tidies up the flowers on her husband's grave.

Mrs Dorchester's son Nigel downloads Abby Winters' masturbation videos to watch with his bi-sexual wife Fiona when she gets in from work.

Mrs Dorchester's grandson Neil relieves boredom of school holidays by shooting rabbits with his air rifle.

Mrs Dorchester's lover Harry is playing darts in the pub with his mate Billy, with whom Mrs Dorchester is also involved.

Billy's wife Mary lights a fag in back of the village shop and can't help but admire the elaborately obscene graffiti tag which wasn't there yesterday.

Mary's sister Janice is coming to the end of her daily two-hour housework routine.

Janice's husband Tom is out on his rounds, chuckling as he watches Mrs Dorchester's grandson through his binoculars.

Tom's mother Betty is wailing for a nurse.

Harry's wife Annie smiles pitifully at Mrs Dorchester as she passes her by in the cemetery.

Later, Annie places a single red rose on Mr Dorchester's grave.

Later still, Nigel receives a phone-call from Fiona and goes down the pub where he buys himself a pint and sits out by the canal watching as swans swim midst the weeping willows.

Later still, Neil goes down to the pub with a bag of rabbits for Billy and Mary. Billy slips him a fiver. Neil slinks off to watch Tom's daughter Kylie practising Fluffy Morris in the village hall.

Later still, Neil and Kylie cover the back wall of the village hall in the obscene graffiti images that cause a bit of a stir the following morning.

8.00am - Mrs Dorchester wonders who keeps leaving the single red rose on her husband's grave.

8.30am - Fiona tends to the needs of Tom's mother Betty in the nursing home, smiling to think of the fun she had last night whilst looking forward to watching the Abby Winters' masturbation videos after her shift.

9.00am - Nigel descends in stair-lift, and pushes himself into the kitchen where he listens to a Bob and Carole Pegg CD whilst making breakfast.

9.10am - He is joined by Neil and Kylie who, although a Fluffy Morris Dancer since the age of four, has never heard folk music before.

9.15am - Mary prepares the pastry whilst Billy skins and butchers the rabbits.

9.25am - Noel uploads mp3s of the Bob and Carole Pegg album onto Kylie's iPod.

11.43am - Harry pays a call on Mrs Dorchester.

12.10pm - Billy takes a rabbit pie round to Noel who is particular impressed by the decoration on the crust.

3.00pm - Kylie practices her dance moves whilst listening to Bob and Carole Pegg on her iPod.

3.02pm - Annie notices that the clock in the hall is five minutes fast.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 07:24 AM

It sort of works to 'Dashing Away with the Smoothing Iron'. Makes it all quite jolly in fact.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 07:17 AM

"WAV - in that phrase 'will' is a noun, not a verb."...thanks Pip, et al!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 06:44 AM

SOP, let us have a Latin Mass as well.

I'll give it a try, Ron - but it's a bugger to get the Latin Pater Noster to fit Butter and Cheese and All. Of course it can be done if you stress it in Plain Chant strophes thus:

Pater Noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum.
Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua,
sicut in caelo et in terra.
Panem nostrum quotidianum
da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis
debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus
debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem,
sed libera nos a malo. Amen.


Like it! All I need now is to find some monks...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 04:13 AM

Greek might be better Ron: WAV's misunderstanding of the English verb form used in the first section of the Lord's Prayer is not uncommon, and stems from unfamiliarity with the Greek 3rd person imperative (as used in 'Thy will be done')

It is often misunderstood; however there is a beautifully detailed explanation of it
here

It's a good justification of Greek and Latin studies in schools I think.

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM

SOP, let us have a Latin Mass as well.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 11 Aug 09 - 03:01 AM

your "Polynesian" totem is actually from Canada (British Columbia). You might find the letters "BOMA CANADA" on the plinth

Absolutely right - and I bet if we go to the museums I mentioned we might find their totem poles aren't Polynesian either. My confusion arises from one of the models of Jew's Harp made by master Hungarian trump-smith Zoltan Szilagyi which he calls a Polynesian Totem. I see the word totem and I immediately add the Polynesian prefix!

Thanks S. - but if it's thy/your kingdom, then it's thine/yours will be done, yes?

Looks like you've made the same mistake with the Lord's Prayer as I used to make when I was eight. Look at Pip's last post and all should become clear. The trick is, if it looks wrong to you then the fault is more likely to be thine rather than the texts.

So it's Thy will - i.e. The Will of God - be done. Not Thy - i.e. God's Holy Purpose - will be done. If in doubt, a more modern translation might make things a little clearer (this one from The English Language Liturgical Consultation):

    Our Father in heaven,
       hallowed be your name,
       your kingdom come,
       your will be done,
            on earth as in heaven.

    Give us today our daily bread.
    Forgive us our sins
       as we forgive those who sin against us.
    Save us from the time of trial
       and deliver us from evil.

    For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours
       now and for ever. Amen.


The Doxology notwithstanding, this could also be sung to Butter and Cheese and All. Actually the Doxology could be sung to the the A phrase, which would make more sense in the the Roman Catholic Liturgy which treats the Doxology as separate from the rest of the Pater Noster thus:

All: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.

Priest: Deliver us, Lord, from every evil, and grant us peace in our day. In your mercy keep us free from sin and protect us from all anxiety as we wait in joyful hope for the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

All: For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and forever.


I think that would work a treat actually. I will begin work on my Butter and Cheese Folk Mass right away! So see you all at the re-imagined Village RC Church for Vigil Mass on Saturday evening.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 07:29 PM

WAV - I've done mine and everybody else's already; thine will be done when I get around to it - but don't hold your breath.

Ross


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 05:22 PM

WAV - in that phrase 'will' is a noun, not a verb.

Thy: possessive pronoun, "belonging to you singular"
Will: noun, "what someone wants or wishes to happen"
Be: third person singular of the subjunctive mood of 'to be'
Done: past participle of 'to do'

"May what you want to happen be brought about".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 05:14 PM

Thanks S. - but if it's thy/your kingdom, then it's thine/yours will be done, yes?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 04:55 PM

S O'P - your "Polynesian" totem is actually from Canada (British Columbia). You might find the letters "BOMA CANADA" on the plinth. Here's one on eBay These coal-like carvings are resin copies of (usually) very detailed originals. Copies of soapstone originals of Inuit sculpture are also quite commonly found in flea-markets/car-boot sales. Though sold as tourist-trap souvenirs, some of them are quite beautiful.

For the village library (or the visiting library-van) I would suggest the following should be on the shelves -

The English Difference, Paul Jennings & John Gorham, Aurelia, 1974

"Anthology of articles and illustrations, affectionately chronicling the English character and way of life, edited by Jennings and Gorham. Other contributors include Michael Foreman and David Gentleman. Topics covered include travelling fairs, transport cafes, pantomime, brass bands, children's games, seaside towns, working men's clubs, the WI, allotments, pubs, heraldry, village fetes etc. Glossy colour illustrated boards." (Ripping Yarns review)

19 available at Abebooks (the above link takes you there) from £4 plus p&p - don't all rush at once!

Ross


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 03:19 PM

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name;
thy kingdom come; thy will be done
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses -
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.


You know, you could sing that to the tune of Butter and Cheese and All. You'd lose the repeat on the last line, but you could make up by repeating the last two lines.

Now, here's The re-Imagined Village Pater Noster Challenge - what other traditional folk melodies can you sing The Lord's Prayer to?

*

Billy Harrison was a great old cello player in the Yorkshire tradition; it's his tune (collected by Jim Eldon) that The Watersons sing While Shepherds Watched to.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 02:34 PM

"the first Mr Fox album was 1970."

Yeah, I was surprised when I read it - I assume that they recorded it before and only released it later.

As for cello players - there seems to be more about in folk these days, like Rachel McShane - and my 9-year old daughter.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 02:18 PM

Oh - thanks for that info TL; much appreciated, though obviously I gonked over Deniz - certainly sounds like her! Still can't be many cellos in folk music can there? My favourite was / is Ursula Smith who did some sublime things in the Third Ear Band (and played some demonic fiddle with them in a later incarnation) as well as COB. We once saw a girl from the Newcastle Folk Degree course doing a set as part of the Rising Stars / Kids from Fame nights at The Bridge maybe three or four years ago now who did some top stuff on cello too. I hope her star is still rising!

Back to matters Foxy - the first Mr Fox album was 1970. Just a thought as to the chronology, or rather the intent of He Came from the Mountains - or even And Now it is So Early...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 01:29 PM

in the Lord's Prayer, shouldn't it be "Thine (rather than "Thy") will be done"..?..

Absolutely not!

(I hope to record it chanted, soon.)

Where Cliff failed, WAV will succeed...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 01:01 PM

Before you do, The (Venerable) Leveller - in the Lord's Prayer, shouldn't it be "Thine (rather than "Thy") will be done"..?..(I hope to record it chanted, soon.)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 08:19 AM

OK, SOP, I have delved around in places thatcontain things that haven't seen the light of day for centuries and, like Beowulf, braved the dragon in my quest. The result? I've found my copy of He Came From the Mountains and here is the information you seek:

Bob Pegg - vocals, melodeon, whistle, guitar
Carole Pegg - vocalist, fiddle
Mike Lavelle - cello, flute
Nick Strutt - guitar, mandoline (sic)
Barry Lyons - bass guitar
Pete Wagstaff - drums
John Wyatt - flute (Rise Up Jock)
Andrew Massey - cello (Rise Up Jock)
Alan Eden - drums (Rise Up Jock)
Roger Knowles - guitar (Angeline)


Produced by Bill Leader
Recorded by Nic Kinsey at Livingston Studios

Recorded by Bob and Carole Pegg BEFORE they became Mr Fox (1971)

Right, going to have to venture back in there now to put it back before the dragon wakes and realises it's been taken.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 10 Aug 09 - 04:32 AM

And another thing...

Finally got round to listening to He Came from the Mountains and broke out in a cold sweat when track three came on. Not only Lord of the Dance, but the very same version of Lord of the Dance as played by one of our more folksy inclined teachers at school in 1972 when I was 10 or 11. Bloody hell! So I first heard Bob Pegg at school and hadn't even realised.

Anyone got musician details for the album? I suspect that's Claire Deniz on cello, as she also features on Bright Phoebus, though she's at her most glowing on the Strawbs' Dragonfly which has lately seen its first official appearance on CD...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 09 Aug 09 - 04:43 AM

Flee Market held on the platforms Tynemouth Metro Station where I'll be wearing my stylised Triple Hare pendant as a talisman to aid me in the search for choice gew-gaws of folkloric significance...

And very nice it was too, blazing sunshine under the Victorian awnings and any amount of aforementioned gew-gaws of folkloric interest, including:

Brass Durham Cathedral Sanctuary Knocker Ashtray. Asking price (AP): £2.00 / Haggled down to (HDT) : £1.50 / Folkloric Significance (FS) : The Medieval Sanctuary Knocker of Durham Cathedral has long been the Face of Durham, one of the iconic constants and symbolic of the sanctuary once offered by the church to various wrongdoers. It is also a fine piece of Romanesque metal work which in my young day was the real thing, it situ, though its place has been taken by a faultless facsimile, the original now residing in the Cathedral museum, or treasury. Consequently the Durham Door Knocker has enjoyed a place in the region's folklore for several centuries (see my opening blurb Here for a personal reminiscence) and has inspired any amount of brass souvenirs most of them, unsurprisingly, in the form of door-knockers. I've seen Sanctuary Knocker horse brasses and toasting forks, but until yesterday I'd never seen an ashtray before, though it amuses me to think of it being bought in Durham Cathedral, circa 1930, when smoking was, I believe, compulsory for everyone over the age of eleven.

Dolmetsh Dolomite Descant Recorder. AP: £3.50 / HDT : £1.00 (on account of slightly chipped mouthpiece) / FS: Where does one begin? Within WAV-lore alone the Recorder enjoys near-iconic status as The English Flute, revived as a Folk Instrument mass produced in Japan in fetching black & white shiny plastic. Long before that however, Arnold Dolmetsch was seduced into mass-producing affordable descants for purposes of education which became the bane of any child suffering an English Education between 1950 and 1980 making sure that recorders would be despised in perpetuity and forever associated with the reeking corridors of crumbling Victorian secondary modern schools haunted by sadistic pedagogues whose joy it was to inflict such culture upon them. I'm speaking of working class kids here, many of whom would ceremonially smash their Dolmetsch Descants upon leaving school - I have seen this done. The early ones were made from Dolomite, a patented shit-brown bakelite which goes soft if left in the sun, but they have a fine tone and a lower register chiff to die for. I'm sure it was that legendary Dolmetsch Dolomite Descant chiff that inspired the distinctive playing of Terry Wincott of The Amazing Blondel - one of the few recorded players, IMHO, to provide us with a taste of how the recorder might have sounded as a folk instrument in Ye Days of Yore. Needless to say I was wandering around Tynemouth yesterday playing the opening riff from Saxon Lady until Rapunzel threatened me with divorce.

Green Man Garden Ornament. AP: £2.50 / HDT : - / FS : Where does one start? Since the craze for all things green, The Post-Modern Green Man has become iconic of a non-folkloric figure which is an entirely modern invention. I see this as part of an Inner Yearning of a Humanity Dispossessed of the Soil and the Seasons; a yearning for Nature, for the Source, despite the fact that the Green Man image we're familiar with today was developed within pre-Reformation Roman Catholicism as a warning very much against nature. Ironic, huh?? Anyway, this has propagated any amount of entirely bogus Green Man gew-gaws, oracle cards, t-shirts, jewellery etc. etc. which I do collect - but only if the price is right, and the workmanship acceptable. Most Neo-Green Man are works of fantasy, modern interpretations rather than facsimiles of original carvings - and whilst I obviously prefer the latter, I do have a few modern GM, and now this one, which is one of the finest I've ever seen at a price that I did not question.

In the Wake of the Plaque : The Black Death and the World it Made - Norman F. Cantor (2001) AP: 50p / HDT: - / FS : I bought this book if only for the fine reproduction of the Dance of Death woodcut that I used to illustrate my TOTENTANZ page some years ago, which is worth 50p of anyone's money. However upon perusing its pages in the local Subway I see Chapter One is called All Fall Down and would have us believe that the children of 1500 were singing Ring Around the Rosies, the origin of which, is, of course, the symptoms of the bubonic plaque. Strange to find this classic piece of fakelore perpetuated in an otherwise scholastic context. I will explore further as time allows.

Polynesian Totem Pole. AP - 25p / HDT: - / FS : A six-inch resin cast gew-gaw of the sort of thing that'll be familiar to any visitor of the Royal Museum in Edinburgh, The World Museum in Liverpool, and The Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford. Not sure if its based on any actual prototype though, but it's a fetching piece that presently stands on my CD shelves alongside the various volumes of the VOTP CDs I've picked up in sales here and there over the years as I wouldn't pay full price for such things. One volume I even picked up at Tynemouth Flee Market! No such luck yesterday of course, but a happy day none the less.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 08 Aug 09 - 05:43 PM

..but is the spelling of "lily" silly, Will?!

Well... I coughed and, being very thorough, startled a chough flying to perch on a bough by the side of a lough near the borough of Houghton...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 08 Aug 09 - 04:32 PM

..but is the spelling of "lily" silly, Will?!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 03:14 PM

Lookat MyFace is a bluddy yawnish bore.

Maybe so, but no more than what goes on at your local Folk Club / Singaround - plus there is a level of real, meaningful & productive networking in there. I've got a lot of very positive stuff out of it myself. And where in the world could you go to hear the amazing sounds of D B Lolaq?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 01:07 PM

"lily pond", I think [pedant that I am]. Don't forget the Old Gits in their corner, by the way - all pedantic to a fault.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 12:55 PM

...high-speed fibre-optic broad-band for the RIV?...the pub by the village green serves Sunday roast?...the village green itself serves the local frogs, toads and newts with a nice lilly pond?...and, of a Saturday, S. and the like, with a Flee/"gew-gaws" market..?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 12:33 PM

Lookat MyFace is a bluddy yawnish bore.

All: "LOOK AT MEEEEE!!!",
or: "OH WE LURVE YOU...NOW LOOK AT MEEEEEEE!!!"

One of the main reasons I never bothered recreating an account myself.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 12:24 PM

so why the fuss, S?

No fuss, WAV just admiring the nerve really.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 12:12 PM

An old mate once reported seeing Mr Fox when they were down to the duo of Mr & Mrs Pegg in the final throes of marital strife barely able to keep from tearing each other apart on stage. He said it was one of the finest gigs he'd ever seen...

Shades of Richard and Linda Thompson on tour in the USA - their duetting on "The Dimming Of The Day" still gets me tingling every time I hear it.

A "Flee Market" sounds something that buggered-up stockbrokers should do. :-)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 12:04 PM

"Spam" (S)?...Yes, I still post an e.g. of my WalkaboutsVerse to myspace profiles (without any html), and allow others to do the same on my profile. Most are probably indifferent; occasionally, if you check my comments, I get thanks/requests for more; and, even more occasionally, someone, like you, lets me know they don't like it. And, as you must also know, many other comments on myspace are nothing more than "Thanks for the add" and suchlike; furthermore, it's quick and easy to delete any comments you don't want, anyway - so why the fuss, S?

Enjoy the Flee Market - next weekend is the Durham Gathering/Picnic by the way.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 06:52 AM

Yo, WAV - way to spam Bob Pegg's myspace page! Actually, most myspace comments these days tend to be spam so you're well in there, Bonny Lad! I still try and find something to say about the actual page I'm visiting rather than myself... You know - the personal touch rather than relentless spamming and self-promotion...

One day I went to the re-Imagined Village pub, a clog-dancer for to score;
I was gazing mellow at the willow-licked stream - when that lass she hit the floor!
My heart it lifted heavenward, her nimble clog-work for to see -
But more heavenly yet was the bounce of her chest,
So I reached for me Stottie and Mead and Chips and All,
Stottie and Mead and Chips and All!


Er - you want spam with that, WAV?

Meanwhile - off to Tyneside tomorrow for a family jaunt; hopefully we'll make it to the re-Imagined Village Flee Market held on the platforms Tynemouth Metro Station where I'll be wearing my stylised Triple Hare pendant as a talisman to aid me in the search for choice gew-gaws of folkloric significance...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 04:56 AM

Burning my copy off as I write; I will listen to it over a late breakfast & subsequent domestic chores throughout the day. Thanks to my benefactor for the enlightenment.

An old mate once reported seeing Mr Fox when they were down to the duo of Mr & Mrs Pegg in the final throes of marital strife barely able to keep from tearing each other apart on stage. He said it was one of the finest gigs he'd ever seen...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 07 Aug 09 - 04:29 AM

Thanks, Ross, for putting me onto those lyrics, and the precise work of Malcolm Douglas.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 09:52 PM

"He came from the mountain, and no-one saw him coming;
And some say he was walking, and some say he was running;
But I do believe (and I'm not known for lying)
That the only way that he could come was floating and flying."

Can't find the lyrics for this on the net. The album "He Came From the Mountain" isn't even mentioned on Bob Pegg's MySpace page .

For some reason (or none) this was going through my head a couple of weeks ago. The rest is in the record stacks somewhere.

You would also require Bob Pegg's calling-on song for the RIV Mummers' side:-

"Rise up, Jock and sing your song;
For the summer is short and the winter's long.
Then all join hands and form a chain
Till the leaves of springtime blooom again."

Original lyrics compared with DT version (Malcolm Douglas)

Ross


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 12:42 PM

No thanks, CS - I've neither car nor piston to repair!..what I do have for the RIV collection, though, is a fine Fellside tape called Voices: English traditional Songs, wherein many of the well-known 80s folkies each chose one E. trad., and sung it unaccompanied.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 12:25 PM

What a snuggery this wee thread has become! No idea why Joe's tolerated the non-musical content, but I'm not complaining! I reckon mods aughta link it with Will's Old Gits Corner.

SO'P yeah, I saw that Picasso glass painting film many Moons ago, when on Beeb 2 (prolly as part of some early morning improving and charmingly wooden late Seventies/early Eighties O.U. scheduling).

So, old O.U. progs. I mean the ones everyone used to laugh at with beardy men and Beckett-like stark white sets O.U. Prog. (before the Beeb decided to really 'enlighten' us poor dumb proles with uber exciting CGI, and bland but earnest totty in sexy secretary suits.) Eh, WaV, you need to research those.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 11:08 AM

"After Mr Fox broke up, and Pegg had recorded a rather forgettable
album with just Bob and Carole called He Came from the Mountains
(1971), the really good stuff started to appear."

Actually, although it's some time since I played it, I think it's rather good. It has never been released on CD.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 10:04 AM

Bob and Carole Pegg's He Came From the Mountains

Never heard that one. Any enlightenment in this respect would be most appreciated!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 08:35 AM

Well, if it's vinyl, I'll donate Pearls Before Swine's Balaklava, The Use of Ashes, and These Things Too; Bob and Carole Pegg's He Came From the Mountains; and the Topic sample, New Voices with the Waterson's first recordings.

Oh, and an Alex Campbell LP I bought for five bob on York station called, I think, Folk Session.

More albums may be forthcoming when I get a chance to look through them (early Johnny Winter, anyone?)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 08:26 AM

the complete works of Mr Fox and Bob Pegg

Does that include Ancient Maps? A singular piece of work and no mistake; The Ship Builder likewise. Bones is something of a classic, of course - worth the price of the Keeper of the Fire anthology alone! Still, a fiver for two disks stuffed the gunwhales with complete classic Pegg albums (Bob Pegg & Nick Strutt / The Ship Builder / Ancient Maps) plus assorted rarities, Bones, demos, session, and a worthy booklet of notes and images...

Only in it for the money? Hell, aren't we all!

Here's a clip from Bones: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWOnJCxHnEA


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 07:57 AM

the village record library.

A while back I listen my top ten folk albums Here which got me in a spot of bother over Just Another Diamond Day, which was entirely ruined by the mobile phone commercial. Things like that truly belong in the shadows!

I would say this has to be vinyl only, in which case I donate my copy of I Wish There Was No Prisons by Jim Eldon, which didn't make my earlier Top Ten because I regard it more as an ethnomusicological document of a fine Traditional Singer than I do mere Revival Folk Product...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 07:52 AM

"and the complete works of Mr Fox and Bob Pegg, of course!"

Of course!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 07:44 AM

Oh, and 500! (yah boo sucks, LF!)


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 07:42 AM

Pearls Before Swine's 'Balaklava' is definitely one for the village record library. Filed next to Forest's self titled debut and the follow up, "Full Circle" and Dr Strangely Strange's "Kip of the Serenes"... and the complete works of Mr Fox and Bob Pegg, of course!

Can we commission and exhibition by Lily Greenwood, too?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 07:12 AM

"Hieronymus Bosch is fabulous."

Funnily enough, I was playing Pearls Before Swine's 'Balaklava' earlier, which has The Triumph of Death as its cover illustration.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:49 AM

Never took to Picasso myself for some reason.

What got me into Picasso was an old film of him painting on glass; not sure if this the same one (I was only ten or so when I saw it) but it's still pretty neat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkRS3wDg1xU

Dig the organ music!

Otherwise, I'll see your Bosch and raise you a Brueghel, though that brings me back to Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry by the Brothers Limbourg (1385 – 1416) which knocks the spots off them both. Try this:

August


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:32 AM

Chagall is one of my favourite artists too. Never took to Picasso myself for some reason. Ernst & De Chirico I like. Especially De Chirico. Hieronymus Bosch is fabulous.

But my favourite artist by a long straw, is Louise Bourgeois. Managed to miss the Spider at Tate Modern, but her cages and organic psycho-sexual sculptures are quite utterly compelling.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:27 AM

If not a horse then maybe one of These?? Either one will do; in terms of Cultural Icons they both have a place in my heart!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:18 AM

Like both those, thanks; and, yes then, the RIV is on chalk land.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:08 AM

On the hill overlooking the RIV, we should cut out a white horse, like the one at Kilburn.

Maybe we can get an Arts Council grant for THAT.

kilburn white horse


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:05 AM

I couldn't find the "Hare and Moon,"

HERE


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 06:03 AM

Rolf Harris please

Respect!

We went to an exhibition of Rolf's work (also in Manchester) and were most impressed. I've still got the catalogues lying around here someplace - must dig them out. Of course we love his music too - Rachel & I are currently working up a version of Sun Arise for possible inclusion in the Big Sing at Fylde. Interesting that in Aboriginal mythology the sun is a female deity, hence fluttering her skirts. A lovely song with very deep traditional & spiritual roots...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PylJkN9FEoU


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 05:55 AM

"You know what it is yet?!"...no, TL - I couldn't find the "Hare and Moon," but enjoyed the others, thanks.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 05:51 AM

My three favourite artists: Paul Klee, Joan Miro and Marc Chagall. Wierdly, this has remained unchanged since I was thirteen. To this list I might add El Greco, Picasso, Waterhouse, Alfred Wallis, and a plethora of Renaissance painters (Titian is a dear delight) and anonymous medieval hands, such as the masters who produced The Luttrell and Macclesfield Psalters which remain joint #1 in my list of English painting. So full facsimiles in both the Church and Library I would imagine!

Loved the recent Holman Hunt exhibition in Manchester which fielded all three versions of Light of the World - my favourite being the one from the amazing brick-built chapel of Keble College in Oxford. Seen in situ the effect is quite unsettling. Nice to see Isabella and the Pot of Basil again; since moving from Tyneside (where she resides in the Laing Gallery in Newcastle) I've been missing her rather! You can almost smell the basil, much less the grisly contents of the pot...      

When it comes to contemporary English painting I regard the work of Vic Reeves as being somewhat quintessential. Better known for his TV comedy, Mr Reeves is a surrealist visionary in the great tradition. I think his Flight o' the Retard should be hanging on the chimney breast of the village pub, along with a complete set of his waterfowl, such as The Curlew.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: s&r
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 05:38 AM

Rolf Harris please

Stu


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 05:24 AM

I love the work of Andrew Waddington - especially his woodcuts. I've a print of his Hare and Moon on my wall.

andrew waddington


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 05:08 AM

...some Constables and Leightons, please.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 04:51 AM

Framed prints of A. Beardsly's 'Lisistrata', and a full size copy of Holman Hunt's 'Light of the world' in the church, you couldn't get more differnt works of art, but both in their own way superb. Ron


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 06 Aug 09 - 03:48 AM

Ever seen Arrested Development SO'P? Finest US sitcom ever in my (admittedly worthless) opinion.

Never heard of it, though I was a fan of the band and their curiously bucolic brad of hip-hop. Will check it out.

with signed copies of their old albums framed on the walls...

Next time we'll go to Cafe Marina just round the corner from us where the walls are floor to ceiling with signed photos of celebrities both major and minor who, it would seem, do B&B with Mine Hosts at the Cafe Marina during their Blackpool Season...

"Lady Arabella was dancing in a fantastic sort of way"

A favourite of mine occurs in Puck of Pook's Hill, with one of H R Millar's iconic illustrations captioned 'I know what sort o' man you be,' old Hobden grunted, groping for the potatoes. I'm sure this sort of thing inspired Edward Gorey, who wasn't English, nor even visited England (the nearest he got was the Hebrides!) and yet his work is infused with an Englishness that becomes typical, however so surreal his narratives.

So - Edward Gorey. Another name to check out.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 03:57 PM

"I'll donate my collection of early Rupert Bear annuals."

I'll also add my Teddy Tail Annuals and my huge collection of Blackie novels, mostly bought for 1d each from a TocH bookstall back in the early 70s (where, incidentally, I also found a slightly tatty first edition of Sketches by Boz, Second Series, illustrated by George Cruikshank, and a first edition of Bram Stoker's Lair of the White Worm with fantastic illustrations by an unnamed artist, with titles such as "Lady Arabella was dancing in a fantastic sort of way").


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 02:35 PM

I didn't wish to regurgitate the pie, chips, peas, gravy, bread (followed by treacle pudding & custard) I enjoyed with Spleen earlier.

I take this opportunity that to inform you that Suibhne didn't have a side order of random offal with his pie, but my august company. Grand pie and a grand day out. Cheers!

What I learned in Fleetwood #1: The re-imagined village caff definitely needs to be run by an ex-member of a show band, with signed copies of their old albums framed on the walls...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 12:10 PM

"residents being employed in the *least* suitable role imaginable." (CS)...NOT the village you-know-what for me, thanks, S. - but, frankly, your ditty did raise a smile.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 11:52 AM

Quentin Blake delightful illustrations are a must, as are Mervyn Peakes's intense, dark scrawlings. I would also suggest Kit Williams too, for beyond Masquerade are a wealth of his treasures to be discovered. Finally, don't forget Chris Foss, whose epic imaginings give a hint of the wonders the future could hold . . .

Ever seen Arrested Development SO'P? Finest US sitcom ever in my (admittedly worthless) opinion.

Forget mead, I'll have me cod roe and chips after night out on Luton's finest beer - the mighty Stella Artois.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 11:31 AM

Joseph Crawhall II (1821–1896) : Woodcuts.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 11:24 AM

PS - Both those links work just fine, CS. We watched the shite remake & were much depressed. We live in an era of top comedy from both sides of the pond (Ideal, Mighty Boosh, The IT Crowd, Flight of the Concords, Curb Your Enthiasm etc etc) so why fly in face of so resplendent a classic with this degrading shite? What they should do is go back and re-do the sit-coms that weren't funny; imagine Johnny Vegas et al breathing new life into On the Buses.

Oh, and the best English sit-com ever? Nightingales. No contest.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 11:16 AM

Now you've call on me to sing I'll see what I can do,
First I'll chant you a Walkabout then an E. Trad I'll give to you
I'll sing them unaccompanied, and I'll hold you all in thrawl,
And when I'm done I'll stuff my face,
With Stottie and Mead and Chips and All -
Stottie and Mead and Chips and All.

When first I came to England, I'll tell you the reason why,
It was to repatriate myself and my Aussie heritage to deny;
But the England I left as a babe is not there any more!
So I'll go and console myself
With Stottie and Mead and Chips and All -
Stottie and Mead and Chips and All.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 10:32 AM

I'm waiting for someone to record Stottie and Mead and Chips and All...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:19 AM

Weird... I wonder if this'll work:

model of residents being employed in the *least* suitable role imaginable. For myself then, I should run the village Neighbourhood Watch, which I loathe with a passion. Though indisputably the creation of an EVIL intelligence, the leaflets are nevertheless often a good excuse for a laugh: "suspicious (read 'swarthy') looking man, seen by bushes."


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:17 AM

Try again..
As for nominating roles in the re-I village, I rather like Reggie Perrins (another must see for re-patriots: The Fall and Rise

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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:15 AM

As for nominating roles in the re-I village, I rather like Reggie Perrins (another must see for re-patriots: The Fall and Rise

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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:15 AM

BTW, although not a Batchelor, I am, until the next village fete, the Keeper of the Peas.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:13 AM

Ha, ha. It'll be like the Smash aliens (remember them) when they pick up a potato and say "they must truly be a very primitive race".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 09:03 AM

"we must have the obligatory tin of processed peas that finds its way into every jumble sale and onto every tombola stall and has, at one time or another, been through the hands of every person in the village. Woe betide anyone who dare open it."

I reckon *that's* your village memory stone right there. Probably got the genetic fingerprints of every resident of the village going way back to err the dawn of villages. After the apocalyse, millenia will pass, then alien races far advanced of us lot (and via amazing future science methods) will find said can of peas and unlock the entire history of our wee village... They'll probably get it about as botched as WaV's own idea/ls. So when they clone us all and pop us in their re-imagined aliens cultures history zoo, it'll be just like it. Mead & chips and all.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 08:51 AM

On the subject of the jumble sale, we must have the obligatory tin of processed peas that finds its way into every jumble sale and onto every tombola stall and has, at one time or another, been through the hands of every person in the village. Woe betide anyone who dare open it.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 08:51 AM

early Rupert Bear annuals.

Alfred Bestall! One of the greats, though Mary Tourtell's earlier efforts are not without a certain charm. In this respect we must go back to Kate Greenaway, Randolph Caldecott (whose original books I collect avidly) and, of course, the great Arthur Rackham.

It occurs to me that our Hapless Rapatriate might not be familiar with any of these names; if not, WAV I urge you, seriously, take some time out and get yourself acquainted. To get you started, here's my re-uniting of Peter Bellamy's Fox Jumps Over the Parson's Gate (1970) with the Randolph Caldecott illustrations (1883) that inspired it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhQMsONIwng

Seeing theleveller's been so kind with his Rupert annuals, I'll donate my collection of Dudley D. Watkins - Oor Wullie, The Broons, Desperate Dan, Lord Snooty, random religious tracts et al! I will also donate my collection of books by Newcastle wood engraver & publisher Joseph Crawhall; a name but few seem to be aware of, though his work crops up in folkie contexts from time to time.

More names to look up, WAV! This is Life Education you're getting here; open your heart to it and you'll be as English as chips & curry sauce.

Frankly, TL, overall, I spend a lot more time with TV documentaries than books

For shame! Hardly the wonder you know so little of the country that gave you birth. See above! See above! Such wonders & enrichments await you - such as you would not believe...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 08:42 AM

I used to be a bit of a random dabbler with books, I liked to read 'findings' - oddments found at jumble sales or junk shops. In doing so I stumbled on all sorts of things I'd never have gone out of my way to read or indeed imagined enjoying. WaV would no doubt appreciate my donations of C.S. Lewis Christian but far more amusing than I would have guessed Screwtape Letters, and Churchills 6 volume WWII memoirs. Read so long ago I hardly recall reading now. These along with lots of other boxed up and now redundant stuff I fell into during my teens including Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky & Gorky - and various writings by Marx & Engels, Nieztsche, Hume & Descarte. Steiner, Swedenborg and Blavatsky, inter alia. All really tatty and dusty. Probably more suitable for the village jumble than the village library though..
So to the village jumble they go. We haven't mentioned the village jumble yet I think? At our annual jumble the Scouts put on homemade greasy burgers and tea. It's a proper day out!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 08:09 AM

Frankly, TL, overall, I spend a lot more time with TV documentaries than books, these days, but I think I'll borrow that one on the Levellers sometime.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 08:04 AM

I tend to linger on the threshold of Michell, but Eccentric Lives, Peculiar Notions is a fine book.

One erratum in the Graun obit: the magazine he founded in 1990 was the Cereologist. It changed its name to the Cerealogist some time later. It had a less high-flown rival, a mag called Cropwatcher; people said at the time that it ought to change its name in the same way.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 07:58 AM

The novels of Rex Warner (all of 'em, but especially The Aerodrome) and the early poetry of W.H. Auden (before he went to America and started writing stuff he already understood). At least one edition of Tom Phillips' A Humument, and plenty of Arthur Machen. E.P. Thompson, The making of the English working class (even WAV can't object to that title), plus Whigs and Hunters, the Heavy Dancers and especially Writing by candlelight. John Berger, from when he used to write about art. Patrick Wright is a must, especially this one. Robert Aickman and Joan Aiken. Roger Deakin, but probably not Roger Deacon.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 07:12 AM

Or rather A E Housman.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 07:03 AM

Oh, and for WAV's edification, I'll lend my precious first edition of A E Houseman's 1933 Cambridge lecture, 'The Name and Nature of Poetry'.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 06:57 AM

"Can I - er - nominate myself in this respect"

Yes, of course - didn't realise we already had a resident stroyteller.

"So lets have a few more suggestions"

OK. I reckon there should be a copy of 'The History of The Levellers' by H L Brailsford, the complete works of John Cowper Powys, John Clare's poems, and I'll donate my collection of early Rupert Bear annuals.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 06:43 AM

I nominate Bob Pegg, ex of Mr Fox

Can I - er - nominate myself in this respect? Hell, it's worth a try... If not then I'd employ our very own Sailor Ron as full time local historian, ballad monger and storyteller.

Of course we'd have Bob's books in the library - Rites and Riots especially.

and, of course, donate one to the good RIV Library!

In which case it will be severely edited for the sake of the common good. If you will persist in your wholly erroneous conclusions and promoting such species lies (England culture is taking a hammering etc.) then so be it, but it strikes me that your time would be better spent reading some real books than reading your own stuff, much less promoting it.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 06:01 AM

As it happens, S., I'm actually in the process of making another batch of "Walkabouts: travels and conclusions in verse" (second edition - with simple letter-notation tunes included) paperbacks now. For what it's worth, the most difficult shoe-string task is trying to print my "shoe" onto 220/240 gram A4 card - for the cover. I shall then replace the one in my bag, the one in my lounge room (read annually), and, of course, donate one to the good RIV Library! (as I've done to about 50 other libraries). Otherwise, it's all free on the web as a kind of e-book and an e-scroll.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 05:48 AM

I hadn't realised John Michell had died – what a sad loss of another wonderful eccentric (in the best possible sense of the word). He and Janet and Colin Bord were early influences on me.

Anyway, how about a resident village storyteller to keep us amused on long winter evenings with "tales that keep children from play and old men from the chimney corner"? I nominate Bob Pegg, ex of Mr Fox

bob pegg - storyteller


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 05:16 AM

RIP John Michel : Guardian Obit, 6th May 2009.

The re-Imagined Village library anyone? I mentioned elsewhere (Here) the book Earth Rites (1982) by Janet and Colin Board, who gave us a whole host of classic volumes on the topic of Earth Mysteries & Alt-Folklore - Mysterious Britain being the most well known. Whatever I might think of their wayward speculations, they have pride of place on my bookshelves alongside equally wayward volumes accumulated over the years, many more being lost along the way...

So lets have a few more suggestions. And what would we do with the inevitable donation of WAVs Life's Work???


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 05 Aug 09 - 03:37 AM

Yeah, CS, I'm all for that. I think I've got a couple of Paul Devereux's books somewhere (Places of Power?) and wasn't John Michell involved in the Dragon Project? (Don't you just love the wears he wears his scarf – cool!)

How about this for a project – we erect a "memory stone" where all the folk memories in the village are stored. People (probably under the influence of hallucinogenic substances) seek to imbue their memories into the stone purely through their mental (!!!!!) processes and others try to retrieve them. Sort of a cross between Reich's orgone accumulator and Sheldrake's morphic resonance. At the very least it would be a great opportunity for everyone to get stoned :0

We may even be able to get an Arts Council grant!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 12:33 PM

Further to our local ancient sites thought I'd propose the village curious odd-bods indulge in some dreaming experiments. Anyone know the Dragon Project? I love home-spun para-normal investigations like that. Particularly as I must confess a somewhat willful disinterest in what meagre and supposedly objective historical facts about these places science can reveal, when compared to the abundance of creative possibilities provided by what can be dreamed and imagined through more subjective and personal engagement.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 11:21 AM

I'm also a fan of Aubrey Burl - got a couple of his books whose titles for the moment escape me (Circles of Stone?) and I've been a Friend of Thornborough for some time. My interest isn't especially in the mystical stuff, more in why so much time and effort were expounded in their construction. More especially, for the last 30 years or so I've been fascinated by the power of human consciousness and it's origins and development.

Anyway, onto the Jew's Harp. I don't actually 'play' one - I just had a go on Dave's and haven't yet got around to buying one of my own, but thanks for reminding me. I like "thought scatterer" - bit like the reverse of a dream catcher!


Can't get on youtube to look at your films at work, but if you get the chance, go to Rudston - it's a wonderful place (but don't go past Willy Howe at midnight or the fairies might get you).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 09:11 AM

Just finished reading 'Inside the Neolithic Mind' by David Lewis-Williams and David Pearce

Never read it, but it sounds fascinating. I'm still a fan of Aubrey Burl in respect of such matters; he always manages to convey the essential humanity of the megaliths, not least in his rather luridly titled Rites of the Gods which maybe I ought to read again. It was reading Burl that got me out of Paganism actually, although his books still sit alongside less less considered volumes!

I like the notion of a culture creating monuments that were not only bigger than they were, but which formed order and pattern midst the malevolent chaos of the natural world. Another manifestation of Nature vs Nurture I suppose. I remember visiting Thornborough with an archaeologist friend and standing in the middle of the henge and having this impression of an artificial horizon, which in its day, of course, would have been completely level & regular. Awesome stuff. Nothing mystical either, just a fundamental human resonance.

I did a couple of films once by way of a backwards tribute to No-Budget / No-Age / New-Age Psychedelic megalithomania. Here's one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cym55hthWd4      

I love the Jew's Harp - had a couple of lessons from Dave Goulder recently.

More fundamental human resonance! What sort do you play? I've often thought of doing a Jew's Harp thread on Mudcat to discuss makers, types, and, of course the IoNAJHA!

In the re-Imagined Village (which, like Avebury, has been constructed within a massive henge and stone circle) every child would be schooled in Jew's Harp playing, and every adult too; we would have daily sessions in meditation, healing, counselling, marriage guidance, and general life-therapy all focussed on the cathartic qualities of the Jew's Harp, or Scacciapensieri as they call it in Italy - which literally translates as thought scatterer, or more properly care scatterer, for all cares are banished with a single twang!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 07:47 AM

"I've always been of the opinion that whatever it was that the megalith & henge builders were up to is a good deal more pragmatic than New Age sensibilities might allow for... "

I reckon that's true. Just finished reading 'Inside the Neolithic Mind' by David Lewis-Williams and David Pearce, which I found extremely interesting - although I didn't entirely agree about some of their conclusions on the nature of consciousness.

I love the Jew's Harp - had a couple of lessons from Dave Goulder recently.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 07:33 AM

singing appropriate songs.

Last time we were passing Boroughbridge we stopped off to pay our respects at The Devil's Arrows (2nd tallest??) and I couldn't stop singing The Trashmen's Surfin' Bird, which felt oddly appropriate, in my mind anyway. I did play some Jew's Harp there by way of a Sundoggy Style Vagabondian Vibrational Thang but I've always been of the opinion that whatever it was that the megalith & henge builders were up to is a good deal more pragmatic than New Age sensibilities might allow for...

A mate of mine is involved with the nwly created Sentry Circle which seems an interesting project...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 07:18 AM

"I might raise a standing stone at one end of the garden; a gritstone monolith to link earth and sky, a conduit for the spirit of the land, a beacon of wisdom and knowing."

Yes, definitely. I wrote a song called Stone about the tallest standing stone in England, which stands in the nearby village of Rudston on the Yorkshire Wolds. It's a place I visit regularly. The church has been built next to it and the graveyard surrounds it.

If we have a standing stone, we should have a cursus to walk around, as well, singing appropriate songs.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 06:58 AM

Sorry WAV but you've as much chance of being elected President of England [you may have notriced there's no such job] as I have ofwinning the best folk singer of the year award.
Name of the pub, how about "The Shantyman" with a painted sign of Johnnie Collins.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 06:56 AM

Well dressing would be a must. We could have near the spring next to the rag tree; all this within sight of the hill-figure of a dodman on the outskirts of the village (er, the surveryor rather than the snail. Mind you, on the other hand . . .).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 06:49 AM

In which case Sugarfoot, I reckon we aught to set about err 'liberating' the local sacred grove/holy spring/well/devils stone and the poor old White Lady from both, impersonation by and servitude to, such imported desert Gods and their usurping pantheons of demi-gods. WaV can have the local tennis clubhouse with its upright piano for services and preachings of immigrant deities in exchange for an ideally peaceful relinquishment of the local Church grounds (WaV, unlike us rowdy heathen lot, is not going to put up much of a fight). So that they may be returned to such honourings of their local rightful owners as villagers deem fitting. So mainly piss ups, dancing like nutters, smashing up the ancestors bones and similar such semi-shamanicy stuff. Hurrah, what larks!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 06:22 AM

"A "green pagan realm" (SJ) would entail close ties with native flora and fauna, yes?"

Almost certainly, but the whole garden will be dedicated as an act of worship to the ancient, unknowable gods and goddesses of our ancient ancestors. These are the gods of the wildwood and hedgerow, moor and fell, clough and beck and they are, like all people of the world, of the land and part of the land. The deep verdant green divinity of the native genius loci will be invoked in my small patch of earth and it will belong to no nation and no state; it will transcend the amoebic, myopic, materialistic mindsets of the ruling classes (no offence to the mighty amoeba!) and their lackey's; the beer will be good!

I might raise a standing stone at one end of the garden; a gritstone monolith to link earth and sky, a conduit for the spirit of the land, a beacon of wisdom and knowing. It will be a place of music and laughter (if it ever stops raining) and as we clear up the dog shit as it's laid no-one will step in anything nasty.

Not for me the imported desert gods of a far-off people, although I would welcome their presence of course as all would be welcome - the only requirement would be to come in a spirit of peace and tolerance. Diversity would be celebrated!

Failing that, I would probably repair to the village pub for a pint and a read of A Wonderful Life by Stephen J Gould, or perhaps Cosmos by Carl Sagan.

Did we decide on a name for the pub, or who the landlord might be?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 06:20 AM

Re. our Village Squire: "I'd like to nominate my pig." (TL)...Seconded!" (CS)...and (could be the wrong word) tripled - sorry Sailor Ron, I'm humbly running for President of the Republic of England.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Will Fly
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:55 AM

I have on my work desk a small, circular red button. If I press this button, all the tennis clubs in the world will simultaneously combust in an explosion which will give the earth's axis a kick up the arse which it certainly needs.

Why don't I press the button? Well, it's not from compassion for humanity, or from any possible regret for the mass murder of little snots. It's just that membership of my local tennis club when I was 16 gave me access to the old upright piano in the club house. That was where, on rainy days, when the club house was empty and I was bunking off school or holiday work or whatever, I used to sit and work out my first boogie-woogie left hand. And where I used to snog Shirley Howarth on empty, rain-sodden afternoons.

So, every time I'm tempted to press the button and destroy every tennis club in creation, I pause and think that there might be some other young chap - eager for boogie and innocent snoggery - who wouldn't be the same without the opportunity. I didn't, and don't give a shit about the tennis, but I just can't bring myself to press the button.

I also have another button, by the way, which will destroy every caravan in the world but, for some reason, the f*ck*er's broken.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:52 AM

"I'd like to nominate my pig."

Seconded!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:51 AM

We watched it when it was on the other night but I got distracted on the lap-top when I found out about the passing of Jimmy Forsyth. Rachel was well into it though & I got the gist... We're both big fans of righteous film violence.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: theleveller
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:49 AM

Have we done pigs yet? I definitely feel the need for a pig, but it has to be a rare breed. I suppose it ought to be a Middle White as that's the traditional Yorkshire cottage pig, but I love Gloucester Old Spots. I used to have a Gloucester Old Spots as a pet. When little, she slept with the dog in its basket but as she got bigger she was housed in a very commodious sty. This had to be vacated to make way for my parents and the pig went to live in the field, which she loved to dig up. A GOS could eat up the windfalls in my orchard and we could have great conversations (pigs are very intelligent).

"Now as all "good old villages" had a squire who should we nominate?"

I'd like to nominate my pig. Damn sight more intelligent than most so-called squires I've ever come across.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:49 AM

I haven't seen those 2, CS, and my pentium 2 (even with the maximum 512 RAM) struggles with youtube clips but, either way, I only "fight" using words - regardless of what S. has to say on occasions.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:44 AM

Now as all "good old villages" had a squire who should we nominate? WAV?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:39 AM

"Go knit us a tennis jumper with a nice large red V will you, CS"

Only if you're planning to blow up some big building a la V for Vendetta WAV. When I first saw this on our telly which is also dying, my jaw dropped at the pro anarcho-terrorist sentiments. Amazed the film makers got away with such barely veiled provocative commentary ("A building is a symbol, as is the act of destroying it. Symbols are given power by people. A symbol, in and of itself is powerless, but with enough people behind it, blowing up a building can change the world." etc.) after 9/11. Excellent wee film too IMO, but then I'm a right sucker for comic book stylee sci-fi dystopias. Sin City made in the same year, pips it though IMO.. Sin City


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:29 AM

Don't worry Suibhne, as a somewhat irritating friend of mine once said "If you can't change the situation, change your mind".

Your kind words are appreciated, though last night I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:19 AM

invited his confrontation

Maybe that should have been congregation..

*

WAV your lurid sexism grows ever more irritating and has no place in the village. It is highly recommended therefore that you get yourself what is termed in these parts as a life which you most certainly won't get by promoting such ill-conceived drivel as your Life's Work. You have come to the village for an education - kindly be so good as to empty your cup of ignorance, arrogance, prejudice and misconception and receive one or else we will summon the God of Spiders to devour you whole.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 05:08 AM

the purchase of a MASSIVE flat screen telly,

Our telly is quite big, but not flat-screen - a contingency plan is in place in the event of its demise; it's a Goodmans, bought in 2001, so it's only a matter of time really. It's size and prominence in our front room is a reflection of its importance in our lives, and though it never goes on before 7.00pm, we do have one of these hard-disk recording things in the freeview box that means we can catch those stay day-time classics as when they appear. This coming Friday, for example, it's A Gift for Heidi (1958) which gets two stars in the Radio Times who describe it rather sniffily (Never has Johanna Spyri's little Alpine orphan found herself so immersed in sticky sweetness as in this glutinous fable...) but I recall been utterly enchanted by it as a kid, thus do I record it for a rainy day. Other films recently recorded (and not yet watched) include the classic Hell Drivers (1957) and Cottage to Let (1941).

I hereby request that 'drinks and nibbles' 'coctail parties' 'wine bars' and 'tennis clubs' are all TOTALLY BANNED in the re-Imagined village. And anyone caught indulging in such aspirational behaviours promptly has their head sliced off.

I agree. I also suggest their heads go as display on spikes outside the Post Office, there to be mocked by village gossips as an example to other would-be transgressors. ("Eh, there's that Mrs Prosser - doesn't look so glamorous now does she? See? I told you it was filler and foundation...")

including a couple of lawn tennis courts for the gents, and a table tennis hall for the ladies

In my experience women make the best tennis players (my old pal Mandy has trophies to prove it) whilst men are the best at table-tennis (I believe the Tyler Bros are famed in this respect).

and on the eighth day, God created Evolution too that is...

The very essence of Evolution is random selection which leads with no sort of inevitability whatsoever to Human Kind. Now, if God created evolution, and Mankind is the crowning glory of His Creation deserving of Dominion etc., does this mean that there is, in fact, no such randomness and that God has been controlling the entire thing from the off? If not, how come God comes to favour humanity over, say, penguins? Or do they have their own Messiah too?

I was once invited to tell a wee story as part of a church service some years ago during which the vicar invited his confrontation to pray not just to the God of Mankind, but also the God of the Spiders, the God of the Stones and the God of the Trees. I got a bit freaked out about this, asking him afterwards if such wilful pantheistic animism was entirely compatible with his Christian faith...

No doubt WAV might enlighten us in this respect.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 04:57 AM

Go knit us a tennis jumper with a nice large red V will you, CS - ready for my hit at our PUBLIC lawn tennis courts (the ladies table tennis hall also being public, of course). And, for any newbies here, the reason for this division-of-recreation is the amount of strain lawn tennis puts on one's racket arm - Sue Barker, e.g., played with pain killers injected into her wrist.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Darowyn
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 04:25 AM

Don't worry Suibhne, as a somewhat irritating friend of mine once said "If you can't change the situation, change your mind".
You did not eat a Vol-au-vent, or even a Fly in the Wind, you ate a very small pie full of salad cream, and some other stuff, possibly a small shrimp.
Its provider may have had more middle class intentions, but it was just a tiny, open pie.
You have not been embourgeoised, if adopted French words are acceptable un the context, or if they are not, you can eat scraps from the squires table and still be a peasant.
Cheers,
Peasant and proud of it,
Dave


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 04 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM

"So here I am - violated by a vol-au-vent and feeling decidedly wierd..."

Absolutely ANY 'party food' from Iceland will make you ill (if they told you they were from M&S they were lying) - just watching the adverts makes me vomity. All vol-au-vonts live in freezing conditions in Iceland. In the old days Victorian collectors went to Iceland and harvested them as a rare delicacy for the elite, but since cultivation and mass production has ensured the egalitarian re-distribution of such aspirational foods, common people are also condemned to endure them. New Labour made it law. They won't make you posh of course, but they will make you look like a decidedly sad 'wannabe'. May I suggest you now ditch those tatty old volumes currently littering your shelves like some nit infested Oxfam shop, the purchase of a MASSIVE flat screen telly, and a discreet collection of never to be read/ever to be dusted leather bound 'classics' from some pricey bookclub on the back pages of RT.

I hereby request that 'drinks and nibbles' 'coctail parties' 'wine bars' and 'tennis clubs' are all TOTALLY BANNED in the re-Imagined village. And anyone caught indulging in such aspirational behaviours promptly has their head sliced off. I'll be there with my knitting..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 04:30 PM

Somehow or other I've managed to go through nigh on 48 years of life on planet earth without tasting a vol-au-vent - until tonight. Hitherto they were middle-class party food on TV sit-coms; a cultural fantasy which was forbidden to an ill-educated working class Geordie oik like myself. Now they are a refrigerated reality and a measure of what must be considered as a serious breach of the class-divide by way of unwitting embourgeoisment - I didn't even know what it was until it was scoffed. Being in polite company, fingers-down-the-throat was not an option; also, I didn't wish to regurgitate the pie, chips, peas, gravy, bread (followed by treacle pudding & custard) I enjoyed with Spleen earlier.

So here I am - violated by a vol-au-vent and feeling decidedly wierd...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 04:19 PM

a couple of lawn tennis courts for the gents, and a table tennis hall for the ladies

No, no, no, no, no, no, no!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 01:09 PM

Ah, yes, S., village sports and recreation: including a couple of lawn tennis courts for the gents, and a table tennis hall for the ladies, plus...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 06:33 AM

Two more No-WAVs: Cheese and Women's Tennis.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 06:30 AM

Not all bad, then.

I've always been an Anglo man myself; not that I've ever played one, but Peter Bellamy did, drones and all.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 05:44 AM

An English concertina in every home on pain of death.

Not all bad, then.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 05:28 AM

Boiled oats and, yes, American-like jam and peanut-butter on toast for me - plus coffee with soya juice/"milk".


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Sailor Ron
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 05:19 AM

No, Kellogs are American.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Aug 09 - 04:33 AM

In an idea world maybe,

Note the typo, which raises a certain pertinence perhaps, however so unwittingly, for even as I sit here looking out across Morecambe Bay to mountains of the Lake District on this quite beautiful morning (aren't they all?) I might ponder the nature of the idea, the ideal, and even the idyll, which I dare say this thread is to a certain extent; a series of such idylls, however so subjective, but all forming an objective totality in which we might reside content. To quote from Wiki (it won't happen again I promise you):

An idyll can... be a kind of painting, usually representing a pastor and his animals in a rural setting. They are depicted in a natural way, with the three components - man, animal and the environment - in a harmonious unity, preventing the picture from being either a landscape, or a genre, or just an image of an animal. Nature in this combination is presented in an unsophisticated, realistic fashion.

The subjects of such pictures are usually simple people living in uncivilised conditions, featuring naïvety in their thinking and yet leading a happy and cheerful life. The approach to the presentation is not humorous, but emotional, sometimes sentimental.


Food for thought perhaps even (all together now) on a Monday morning, but it was with such an idyll that WAV opened this thread which has proved to be an education for us all with life affecting consequences. For example, the drink of choice in Chez Sedayne right now is ice-cold cans of ASDA's Dandelion & Burdock.

Anyway, I think we've established that if ideal there is in the re-Imagined Village it is an all inclusive reality wherein we might celebrate a multiplicity of ideals in the one parish, just as ong as they remain positive - unlike WAVs Holy Law under which he'd have us cowering. No zoos. No immigration. No other music than E. Trads sung without accompaniment. An English concertina in every home on pain of death. Nothing that wasn't English. No other religion than Christianity. No other food but chips, stotty cake, rancid pottage and Kellog's Fruit & Fibre. No swearing. No Gay parenting. No fun.

Under such conditions you would find me living in the re-Imagined Council Estate celebrating a multiplicity of cultural & human realities that is our common cause; or else in the re-Imagined Small Seaside Town, such as the one in which I now reside, contentedly cosmopolitan in at least half of a utopian street-plan that suggests we focus on what matters most in life which, in the end, comes down to the basic necessities which are our right and entitlement anyway.

Now for breakfast.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 05:28 PM

Prickly? No way, WAV. And tree porcupines aren't all that prickly either; like me, they're totally blissed out & extend unto you peace, serenity, joy, respect & brotherhood in the realm of material existence. They, like me, will not, however, tolerate your self-serving bullshit which you'd really be better off without, or else keeping to yourself.

And we will have a zoo in the village; I love zoos; my wife and I are members of Blackpool Zoo as well as the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (Edinburgh Zoo basically, which gets us into Chester & Bristol Zoos too). In situ? In an idea world maybe, in which case there'd be no need for conservation in the first place.

Interesting in this respect is my on-line album project Jesus at the Zoo. Feel free to befriend.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 03:12 PM

Well, in a way, that's pertinent, S - you've been in a prickly mood ever since you missed Durham with that flu!...but spine-tingling performance (lament?) or no, I'm afraid we disagree re. zoos, too: no zoo in the village, please...

Poem 203 of 230: IN SITU

When faced with a critical view,
    A zoo's main raison d'être is -
The conservation of species;
    But this can be done in situ.

From http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 01:32 PM

Count Arthur Strong

We love him dearly & regard him as a national treasure.

A "green pagan realm" (SJ) would entail close ties with native flora and fauna, yes?

Which is pretty rich coming from someone who began this thread by waxing lingual about a non-native weeping willow. Your ecological concerns are sorely suspect given your other views on cultural and ethnic indigeneity, WAV.

Today in Blackpool Zoo I bought a bamboo whistle flute from the Philippines with I serenaded some North American Tree Porcupines. I believe they're living feral in some parts of the UK but seemed very content swaying in the wind & sun at the top of their tree.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 12:19 PM

A "green pagan realm" (SJ) would entail close ties with native flora and fauna, yes?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 09:13 AM

Stewart Lee - That sketch of the pope sitting on a fart cushion and then becoming bacon's Head IV might be the funniest thing I've seen on TV since . . . er, the previous funniest thing.

As it's Sunday I'm spending it in my garden (planting what the fup I like in my green pagan realm) listening to the radio. After years of the News Huddlines, Les Dawson, Roy Castle etc I fancy listening to something similarly gentle and amusing. Such choice! Round the Horne, The Navy Lark, Hanckock etc

Count Arthur Strong for me.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 07:04 AM

Reminds me of a line by Stewart Lee.

"What changed my mind about evolution was Richard Dawkins. Something as complex and intricate and beautiful as Richard Dawkins can't possibly have developed by pure chance! No, Richard Dawkins has been put there by God, to test us - like fossils. And facts."


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 05:52 AM

Can we keep this one rhetoric free, WAV? You've posted this stuff as many bloody times I could recite it backwards in my sleep. Any new thoughts? Fresh words? Observations? Each day a new day after all...

And for the millionth time God did not create evolution, no more than he created the principles of Atheism & Humanism of which our awareness of evolution is such a huge part. Remember what happened the last time you posted that on this thread? You had a day in the village stocks for the propagation of sentiments against the common good of mutually diverse humanity. Believe in God by all means, but if you can countenance the notion of such divinity (and the other ravings in The Bible) then stick to what it says in Genesis.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 05:38 AM

For what it's worth, I prefer your post-1992 way, S; and as for gardening in our verdant village...

"Green/eco-friendly gardening is native gardening, and vegetables, plus other consumables, should be the only exotic-flora we plant - as doing so can help limit food-miles, etc. By filling our other garden spaces with natives, we use less water and other resources, whilst aiding the native-fauna that, over the centuries, evolved with them. (Even high-nectar exotics, such as Buddleia, that are very attractive to SOME native-fauna, should be avoided, because they upset nature's/God's balance – God created evolution, too, that is.)

Our green gardens, with their vegies and natives, can be made still greener by the addition of compost heaps/bins; a wildlife pond – for native frogs, newts, and so on, rather than exotic goldfish; bee- and bird-boxes, plus carefully- selected feeders; rain- and grey-water vats; by growing everything organically - including thrifty home-propagation plus species-swapping; and by leaving some lush untidy patches, decaying branches, etc." (from here).


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Aug 09 - 03:54 AM

Ah, I sometimes wish I still took drugs...

I haven't touched anything since a few of us waded our way through several acres of high-grade home-grown sinsemilla circa 1992. A memorable evening in our beloved castle, which changed my thinking on such matters once and for all. Clean as a whistle ever since, yet much of my thinking remains thusly defined. In the re-Imagined Village, therefore, I would hope several lofts and greenhouses would be kitted out for production - and those anciently grazed sacred pastures pored over by the faithful for a more spiritual autumnal harvest by of the Primal Psilocybin Sacrament.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 07:08 PM

Ah, I sometimes wish I still took drugs...


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 07:01 PM

Cheesy Oatcakes

Two Folky Anagrams:

1) Cheeky Seacoast - neat, eh? Especially living so close to the cheekiest (and cheesiest) seacoast of them all. Passing through earlier this evening the various Hen Sides were out in force in all their bold rudery & wondrously glorious to behold as well; a heightened & transcendent sense of liveried misrule. And mildly threatening too. I like it. But then I love Blackpool.

Another film for our season: Funny Bones.

2) Ecstasy Hoecake - sounds vaguely hip & folky, if that's at all possible; never done E, though I once saw Martin Carthy in the aftermath of some very nice acid, circa 1984/5 - so not the best, just - nice. I remember he did the Third Man theme whilst ranting on about America. That was at The Bridge in Newcastle. Maybe I'm getting mixed up. Peter Bellamy smoked a lot of dope & was the coolest folkie I ever met.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 05:51 PM

Kenneth Spiers

I've often wondered whether Jon Boden's mate was related to the mediaevalist John Spiers (who waxed lyrical about the supposed pagan overtones of Gawain's antagonist the Green Knight). Now I've got another possible connection to wonder about!

All together now:

Cold!
Windy!
City!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Spleen Cringe
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 12:29 PM

I liked Brassed Off, hype notwithstanding. I insist we have a brass band, preferably dressed in pink and host an annual competition. And of course, what self-respecting village would not have the godlike genius that is Pete Postlethwaite propping up the bar of the village pub? Smoking or non-smoking? Whaddaya think?

And we have to have a rushcart!

And can we have scary night at the film club in the village hall? Straw Dogs? Witchfinder General?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 09:12 AM

Doc. Martins - I got my first pair at 15 or so I think and I painted wild flowers on them. My current pair are cherry red. If in a semi-punk frame of mind, they get teamed with fishnets - electric pink for preference. No, I haven't grown up..


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 08:56 AM

You're right - they were on Rough Trade rather than Two-Tone, and I think Kenneth Spiers must have had his finger in several pies. Such a long time ago - my memory must be on the blink!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Phil Edwards
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 08:48 AM

Ooh, Spizz. The band were a minor passion of mine. I've got all the singles (up to No Room) and even own a copy of Spiky Dream Flowers (although I admit I didn't buy it new). Never saw anything by them on Two-Tone, though - whenabouts was that?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 07:09 AM

A few of the above cakes I'm yet to try, but the Manchester tarts, mentioned by SC, are not - my late nan used to bake them of a weekend and, as a kid, I, of course, had to try them hot, by way of quality control. I think Lancashire folk have a good reputation for baking, and I'm not going to argue with that.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 06:57 AM

I love This is England. Just got my first pair of Dockers, age 42 and I shall wear them for the rest of my life (er, not the same pair). Although I was never a rude by, growing up in the far southern suburbs of Brum in the late 70's early 80s Two Tone was very dear to our hearts (I used to sit next to the sister of the lead singer of Spizz Energi (Where's Captain Kirk?) who were signed to the label so got lots of stickers etc straight from the record company. I was more of a rocker at heart really, but still love Two-Tone to this day.

Agree with SOP regarding the FWAAF and would include Notting Hill et al in with that particular bushel of bilge, although I can live with Brassed Off as I like Pete Posthlethwaite. For the Horror season perhaps we could start with Shaun of the Dead followed by Dog Soldiers and The Hole? Perhaps even weekly re-runs of Hammer House of Horror.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 06:44 AM

I liked Made in England up till the end where the plot goes a bit tits up and "here's the melodramatic morally improving end sequence" IMO.
Scum and Made in Britain are classics of that ilk though.

Apart from that, ditto your mutters above SO'P, I hate self-conscious affected English stuff.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 06:17 AM

MUTTER ALERT! MUTTER ALERT! MUTTER ALERT! MUTTER ALERT!

I'm not a great fan of Brassed off and The Full Monty because they were killed by the hype; if I'd come across them on a rainy afternoon on BBC2 things might have been different. And how can we take Robert Carlisle seriously as a Yorkshireman? This is Begbie for Christ's sake!

I don't much like Four Weddings and Funeral Either, though I might have done if they'd gone for the title proposed for the American which was (legend has it) Toffs on Heat. I've nothing against Andie McDowell - Groundhog Day is a firm favourite - but I resent mawkishness. I had to sit through Peter's Friends once and was, as a consequence, physically sick.

I don't get the Political Soapboxing of Amber Films either, however much I admire their no-budget aesthetic; too mired in rosy sentimentality and ruined by the shite acting of the ubiquitous (and eponymous?) leading lady, especially when we see her alongside real people.

I love Shane Meadows - his This is England is a very crucial piece of work.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 05:46 AM

Cheesy Oatcakes? Wasn't that a wholesome schoolboy game....


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 05:36 AM

Keep up Sugarfoot, I flagged up Werewolf in London & Withnail ages ago for the what village pub debate. I vote Slaughtered Lamb I think.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 05:34 AM

You'll be liking Tribe Called Quest Then.

Anyway Mr. Chips is now on hold.. Bluddy YouTube nostalgia hour innit!

Who Killed Jane
Straight Outta Compton
Gangsta Nation
And as loud as you like - Welcome to the Terrodome

I stole a Public Enemy target long sleeve t. off my fella many years back, it was my favourite top for ages. Until it fell off.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Stu
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 05:23 AM

Crikey, how did I forget Withnail and I?

Cheesy oatcakes anyone (off the Staffordshire/Cheshire variety of course)?


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:56 AM

Alien 4? Hell, we watched AVP - Requiem the other week; that's the AVP sequel, dig? Worse yet - AVP 3 is on its way!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:51 AM

Okay. 9.49 am. Just made my coffee, now I'm off up to work whilst Rapunzel doses through until noon. No urgency today on account of the rain, though later proposed excitements include shopping for a new toilet seat. I think we might go for This, Gentoos being our favourite...

Otherwise - I'll see your Mr Chips and raise you a Colonel Blimp.

*

Shit, man - just noticed this on You Tube as well, one of the coolest Summer grooves ever; Suliman's guest rap (in around 4.00) just melts...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mn-qn1yZGuU


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: GUEST,Shimrod
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:40 AM

Mention of the film 'Aliens 3' (an execrable film, in my opinion) reminds me of seeing 'Aliens 4' in a Warsaw hotel bedroom. The soundtrack had been dubbed into Polish and I had a slight fever at the time - an unrepeatable experience!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:36 AM

Coffee & browsing while waiting for my young man to raise his sleepy self this morn. And this threads just given me an excuse to revisit Goodbye, Mr. Chips which it seems you can watch all of on YouTube.


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:22 AM

Have a care there, CS - it's just gone nine in the fecking morning & the most I can think of at this ungodly hour is a slice of my Patented Porridge Turnover (which I no longer make as a dome BTW; since investing in a silicon loaf-cake thing which gives me oblongs...).

I will return to your links later in the day when I have more of stomach for them. And don't you just love the graphics of Food in England? That's how folk albums should look too; wholesome & homely!


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 04:12 AM

Here WAV, see the perfect page for any wannabe Englishman come foodie below:

If I buy 'cake' from the bakers, I always get those leaden bricks of sugar encrusted Bread Pudding. You can use leftovers to shore up your homes foundations. Or sometimes Lardy Cake which is a sweet yeast dough *folded* with crushed sugar lumps, currants and err lard oddly enough.

For my sins I also have Dorothy Hartley's (you couldn't make a name that that up) Food in England


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 03:55 AM

I see I'm not keeping up with the upbeat pace of things going on in the village here - but some late submissions for the village hall film club:

Entertaining Mr. Sloane
Nuts in May
And anything by Dennis Potter


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Subject: RE: The re-Imagined Village
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 01 Aug 09 - 03:42 AM

Sheffield synth-pop wonks the Human League also did a version of the Get Carter dee-dee music on their excellent 1982 album Dare.

Not being familiar with the works of the Human League (sadly I lost touch after Empire State Human), I mentioned this to my wife Rapunzel, who is very much in touch with the Human League. Off she goes to her vinyl shelf & pulls out a pristine copy of Dare - a classic piece of 1980s graphic design (which sadly so many Folk artistes would attempt to imitate with but frail irony) and soon the house is thrilling to the sublime synth-pop glories of another age. The great thing is Rapunzel was only eight-years-old when she bought this album! A true English sound and an instant icon of the shelf - along with Seamus Ennis's Bonny Bunch of Roses (which is how a folk album should look!), Peter Maxwell Davis' Eight songs for a Mad King and the first Back Door album with its iconic image of the Lion Inn on Blakey Ridge. Also in there is the Bananas single, recorde