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Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)

Q (Frank Staplin) 06 Jul 09 - 02:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Jul 09 - 02:00 PM
Goose Gander 07 Jul 09 - 03:16 PM
Jim Dixon 12 Jul 09 - 10:45 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Jul 09 - 01:24 PM
GUEST 01 Jul 12 - 10:51 PM
GUEST 01 Jul 12 - 10:55 PM
GUEST,Guest 19 Aug 12 - 08:00 PM
GUEST,Sennaya 01 Mar 14 - 04:08 PM
GUEST,JK23 01 Mar 14 - 10:17 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Mar 14 - 12:22 AM
Jim Dixon 03 Mar 14 - 07:46 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 06 Jul 09 - 02:06 PM

From long ago, I remember a ballad called "Curly Joe," about a cowboy's love for the daughter of a wealthy rancher of Spanish descent.
Here is one version, but I seem to remember hearing better; this one seems badly rewritten from memory. Perhaps someone will know of others, and a tune which I have forgotten. I would guess that it first appeared in a magazine or newspaper, c. 1890s.

Lyr. Add: CURLY JOE
Fife American Collection MS.

1
A mile below Blue Canyon on the lonely piñon trail,
Near the little town of *Sanctos, nestled in a quiet dale,
Is the grave of a young cowboy whose name is now unknown
Save by a few frontiersmen who call the spot their own.
2
He was as fine a rider as ever forked a steed,
He was brave and kind and generous, never did a dirty deed.
Curly Joe, the name he went by, was enough, none cared to know
If he ever had another, so they called him Curly Joe.
3
'Bout a mile from the Sanctos village lived an ex-grandee of Spain
And his daughter, bonny Enza, called the White Rose of the Plain.
Curly loved the high-born lassie since that time so long ago
When he found her on the mountains, lost and blinded by the snow.
4
But coquettish was fair Enza, 'tis a woman's foolish trait
That has blasted many a manhood like the harsh decrees of fate.
When pressed in earnest language, not flowery but sincere,
For an answer to his question she smiled and shed a tear.
5
When she answered, "Really, Joe boy, quite wearysome you grow.
Your sister, sir, forever, but your wife, no never, Joe."
Not another word was spoken, in a week poor Joe was dead,
Killed by a bucking bronco, or at least that's what they said.
6
For many a year the tombstone that marked this cowboy's grave
In quaint and curious language this prophetic warning gave:
"Never hope to win the daughter of the boss that owns the brand,
For I tried it and changed ranges to a far and better land."

*Santos?
Lyrics but no tune, Fife American Collection II, manuscript, (Utah State University); another (not seen) in "Idaho files, WPA Writers Project, Library of Congress."
The Fifes note, "It's schmaltzy as all get-out, but western folk have read, sung, recited and loved it through the first half of this century."

Austin & Alta Fife, 1970, "Ballads of the Grest West," p. 214, American West Publishing Co., Palo Alto, CA.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Jul 09 - 02:00 PM

refresh
Other versions?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: Goose Gander
Date: 07 Jul 09 - 03:16 PM

I'm finding stuff on Curly Joe Derita of the Three Stooges and that's about it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 12 Jul 09 - 10:45 PM

I tried searching in Google Books for several phrases from CURLY JOE. In addition to the sources mentioned above, I find it in one earlier journal:

Cornell 4-H Club Bulletin by New York State College of Agriculture, New York State College of Home Economics, nos. 13-57, 1925.

I didn't find any significant differences between the published text and the version posted above.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Jul 09 - 01:24 PM

Thanks, Jim. Doesn't look like there is much information out there.

Guest Pushyka- Say what? Can his font(?) be translated?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jul 12 - 10:51 PM

I just found out that my great grandfather was Joseph Woodall the cowboy featured in the old comic strip named "Heros are made not born" and was called cowboy curly. I'm trying to research on him- I was told he was a famous cowboy... I wonder if this song is about him?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: GUEST
Date: 01 Jul 12 - 10:55 PM

They lived near Swansea


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe (cowboy)
From: GUEST,Guest
Date: 19 Aug 12 - 08:00 PM

My Dad used to sing this song. The songbook is long gone, but I remember the tune well. It
s pretty schmalzy but lovable.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Curly Joe from Idaho
From: GUEST,Sennaya
Date: 01 Mar 14 - 04:08 PM

Sons of the Pioneers sang about Curly Joe from Idaho

http://youtu.be/92-QI87Hhco


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Subject: Lyr Add: CURLY JOE (from Marc Williams, 1929)
From: GUEST,JK23
Date: 01 Mar 14 - 10:17 PM

Curly Joe, with lyrics nearly matching those in Fife, was recorded by Marc Williams, "The Cowboy Crooner" in Dallas on 31 Oct. 1929, according to Tony Russell's "Country Music Records;" matrix: DAL-6743-A, and released on Brunswick 544, Panachord 25589.

Russell also notes Charles Baker as The Wyoming Cowboy recorded it on 15 Aug 1932 at Richmond, Indiana; matrix: 19448, and released on Champion 16737 and 45044; Melotone (Canadian) 45044, Minerva M-14044.

Williams' version is on Jasmine Records JASMCD 3534. Liner notes ascribe it to Rogers and Spencer (no first names).

Lyrics of that recording (to my ear) are:

'Bout a mile below Blue Canyon, on a lonely pinyon trail,
Near the little town of Santos, nestled in a quiet vale,
Is the grave of a young cowboy, whose name is now unknown,
Save by a few frontiersmen who call the place their own.

He was as fine a rider as ever forked a steed.
He was brave and kind and gen'rous, never did a dirty deed.
Curly Joe's the name he went by; 'twas enough; none cared to know
If he ever had another, so they called him Curly Joe.

'Bout a mile from Santos village lived an ex-grandee of fame
And his daughter Bonnie Enza, called the white rose of the plains.
Curly loved this high-born lassie, since a time long, long ago,
When he found her on the mountain, lost and blinded by the snow.

But coquettish was fair Enza; 'tis a woman's foolish trait
That has blasted many a manhood, like the harsh decrees of fate.
When he pressed in earnest language, not flowery but sincere,
For an answer to his question, she smiled and shed a tear.

Then she answered, "Really, Joe boy, quite wearisome you grow.
Your sister, sir, forever, but your wife, no, never, Joe."
Not another word was spoken; in a week poor Joe was dead,
Killed by a buckin' bronco, or at least that's what they said.

For many a year the tombstone that marked this cowboy's grave
In quaint and curious language, this prophetic warning gave:
"Never hope to win the daughter of the man who owns the brand,
For I tried it and changed ranges to a new and better land."


The tune is in 4/4, and each couplet follows a I-IV-V progression. Interestingly, the guitar prelude does two bars of I-vi-ii-V
The tune Williams sets it to is binary form. The song Pat Brady performs, "Curly Joe from Idaho," is a later construction, with a number of modernist passing chords (it is the Farr brothers, after all), and the story is akin to a Pecos Bill characterization.


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Subject: Lyr Add: CURLY JOE (from Rose Maddox, 1962)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Mar 14 - 12:22 AM

A different song with the same title:

CURLY JOE
Words, Rose Maddox; music, Carl Maddox, ©1962.
As recorded by Rose Maddox

1. I was born out in the country, but to the city I did go.
I fell in love with a dashing stranger; at first his name I did not know.

2. I met him in the park one evening as the sun was sinking low.
When I asked him what they called him, he smiled and said: "I'm Curly Joe."

3. Yes, his hair was dark and Curly and his eyes were all aglow.
In my dreams I'm always strolling hand in hand with Curly Joe.

4. My daddy said we could not marry; mother said I could not go.
Now all that's left are dreams and mem'ries of my darling Curly Joe.

[Repeat 3]


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Subject: Lyr Add: CURLY JOE FROM IDAHO (Spencer/Rogers)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Mar 14 - 07:46 AM

CURLY JOE FROM IDAHO
Words by Tim Spencer; music by Roy Rogers, ©1943.
As recorded by Sons of the Pioneers on "Sons of the Pioneers" (2007)

1. Let me tell you a tale of a gamblin' man, the roughest and toughest of all.
He was old Curly Joe from Idaho; he was rough and rugged and tall.
He was over six feet and as slim as a rail, and his eyes were as black as the night,
And when he cut loose, that ornery cayuse would always end up in a fight.

CHORUS: Oh, Curly Joe from Idaho, a ramblin' gamblin' rover,
He dealt from the bottom; he dealt from the top, but now his dealin' is over.

2. One night he stormed into Boot-Heel Saloon; he roared with a voice big and loud:
"Come on, ev'ryone; we're in for some fun; I'm buyin' the drinks for the crowd."
Now the gamblin' stopped while they all took a drink to the health of old Curly Joe.
He drank to content and over he went to the table that had the most dough.

3. He rested his arms on the table of green and asked for a passel of draw.
They dealt him a deuce, a trey, and a queen, the worst hand that he'd ever saw.
Then came two more cards: a four and a five; that left him needin' a six.
But they dealt him an eight; that ruined his straight; now he knew they were up to their tricks.

CHORUS

4. Then he asked for the deal and he picked up the cards, and rip! They fell in their places.
And then from the middle, the bottom and top, he dealt off those four fatal aces.
Now he knew at a glance he was a-bettin' his pants, so the dough he laid on the line,
And he said: "If you please, I'll just play these; I think this hand's mighty fine."

5. Now they made their bets and they spread their cards upon the table of green.
Then old Curly Joe raked over the dough; four aces were over four queens.
Then a shot rang out in old Boot-Heel Saloon; poor Curly fell to the floor.
He whispered and sighed: "Somebody has lied; four aces don't win anymore."

CHORUS


This thread has become a spam magnet. Don't despair, let a moderator know if you want to post again and it will be reopened. Now it is closed to discourage the trash postings. --mudelf


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