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Pasquil's Palinodia

GUEST, Sminky 14 Aug 09 - 12:16 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Aug 09 - 01:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Aug 09 - 02:02 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Aug 09 - 02:44 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Aug 09 - 04:50 PM
GUEST, Sminky 18 Aug 09 - 04:52 AM
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Subject: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 12:16 PM

I keep coming across quotes from this poem of 1634, both online and in books. Here is a fragment lamenting the decline of traditional merry-making:


Happy the age, and harmlesse were the dayes,
(For then true love and amity was found,)
When every village did a May Pole raise,
And Whitson-ales and MAY-GAMES did abound:

And all the lusty yonkers, in a rout,
With merry lasses daunc'd the rod about,
Then Friendship to their banquets bid the guests,
And poore men far'd the better for their feasts.

The lords of castles, mannors, townes, and towers,
Rejoic'd when they beheld the farmer's flourish,
And would come downe unto the summer-bowers
To see the country-gallants dance the Morrice.

    *      *      *      *      *      *

But since the SUMMER POLES were overthrown,
And all good sports and merriments decay'd,
How times and men are chang'd, so well is knowne,
It were but labour lost if more were said.

    *      *      *      *      *      *

But I doe hope once more the day will come,
That you shall mount and pearch your cocks as high
As ere you did, and that the pipe and drum
Shall bid defiance to your enemy;

And that all fidlers, which in corners lurke,
And have been almost starv'd for want of worke,
Shall draw their crowds, and, at your exaltation,
Play many a fit of merry recreation.

And you, my native town, which was, of old,
(When as thy bonfires burn'd and May-poles stood,
And when thy wassail-cups were uncon-trol'd),
The summer bower of peace and neighbourhood.

Although, since these went down, thou lyst forlorn,
By factious schismes and humours overborne,
Some able hand I hope thy rod will raise.
That thou mayst see once more thy happy daies.


Search as I might, I've never come across the text in its entireity.

Can anyone help me out?


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Subject: RE: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 01:06 PM

Palinodia- an ode that hearkens back to something previous (also has been applied to other works, such as sculpture that is based on an earlier piece).
(I had to look that up)

I believe the poet you are looking for is Nicholas Breton. I am checking for his poems now.


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Subject: RE: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 02:02 PM

Found it! Incorrectly attrib. to Breton and others, but by Pasquil.
In a book with other items, following a long prose lamentation about London.

The 'poem' is extremely long, but contains the fragment you quote.

http://www.archive.org/stream/illustrationsofo01colliala/illustrationsofo01colliala_djvu.txt

Note: the typist used f for the old s, so watch words like castle, typed as caftle, etc. Also other errors.

Your excerpt starts at "The Pynte of Poetrie. 1 5

Then raign'd plaine honest meaning, and good will,
And neighbours tooke up points of difference:
In common lawes the Commons had no *(kill,
And publique feasts were Courts of Conscience.
Then one grave serjant at the Common pleas
Might well dispatch the motions at his ease,
And in his owne hands though he had the law,
Yet hardly had a clyent worth a straw.
* error?

Then lords of castles, mannors, townes and towers, etc-
This is the beginning of your fragment.

The poem is too long for Mudcat, I think.

"Illustrations of Old English Literature," edited by J. Payne Collier, vol. 1, privately printed.


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Subject: RE: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 02:44 PM

Your quoted fragment is based on "Pasquil's Palinodia, but is a later poem, author?
Also the poem begins at an earlier point than 1 5. The may pole is mentioned in 1 4 as well as later.
Interesting- quoting a bit:

Then lords of castles, mannors, townes, and towers,
Rejoyc'd when they beheld the farmers flourish;
And would come downe unto the summer-bowers
To see the country-gallants dance and morris;

And sometimes with his tennants handsome daughter
Would fall in liking, and espouse her after
Unto his serving-man; and for her portion
Bestow on him some farme, without extortion.

But since the sommer-poles were overthrowne,
And all good sports and merryments decay'd,
How times and men are chang'd so well is knowne,
And therefore He be silent; I hold
They will not mend although their faults be told,
Nor is it safe the spur-gal'd world to pricke;
For she's a lusty jade, and jades will kicke.

Alas, poore maypoles / what should be the cause
That you were almost banish'd from the earth?
You never were rebellious to the lawes;
Your greatest crime was harmlesse honest mirth:

What fell malignant spirit was there found,
To cast your tall Piramides to ground?
To be some envious nature it appears,
That men might fall together by the eares.

Some fierie zealous brother, full of spleene,
That all the world in his deepe wisdome scornes,
Could not endure the may-pole should be seene
To weare a cox-combe higher then his homes:
He tooke it for an idol I, and the feast
For sacrifice unto that painted beast;
Or for the wooden Trojan Asse of sinne,
By which the wicked merrie Greeks came in.

But I doe hope, once more the day will come
That you shall mount and pearch your cocks as high
As ere you did, and that the pipe and drum
Shall bid defiance to your enemy;
And that all Fidlers which in corners lurke,
And have beene almost starv'd for want of worke,
Shall drawe their crowds, and at your exaltation
Play many a fit of merry recreation.

etc. ....
[To which I say AMEN!]


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Subject: RE: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Aug 09 - 04:50 PM

Maypoles downed in the reign of Edward VI, but edict withdrawn in the reign of the restored Charles. Also a fragment of Palinodia, May Day 3.
"The Merrie Days of England; sketches of the Olden time," 1859, Edward McDermott.

Happy the age and harmlesse were the dayes
(For then true love and amity were found),
Wnen every village did a maypole raise,
And Whitsun ales and May games did abound.
And all the lusty yonkers in a rout,
With merry lasses daunced the rod about,
Then Friendship to their banquets bid the guests
And poore men fared the better for their feasts.

The lords of castles. manners*, townes, and towers
Rejoyced ...

*These typescripts error-ridden.

Online, www.archive.org.


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Subject: RE: Pasquil's Palinodia
From: GUEST, Sminky
Date: 18 Aug 09 - 04:52 AM

You've been busy while I've been away, Q!

Many thanks for your help.


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