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Childhood Heroes-Their Music

topical tom 04 Sep 09 - 02:39 PM
Acorn4 04 Sep 09 - 02:47 PM
Gibb Sahib 04 Sep 09 - 03:00 PM
kendall 04 Sep 09 - 08:53 PM
olddude 04 Sep 09 - 09:17 PM
Don Firth 04 Sep 09 - 10:52 PM
Beer 04 Sep 09 - 11:43 PM
katlaughing 04 Sep 09 - 11:51 PM
kendall 05 Sep 09 - 06:13 AM
topical tom 05 Sep 09 - 11:12 AM
kendall 05 Sep 09 - 11:25 AM
Geoff Wallis 05 Sep 09 - 12:26 PM
topical tom 07 Sep 09 - 07:23 AM
Tootler 07 Sep 09 - 02:42 PM
Joe_F 07 Sep 09 - 06:02 PM
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Subject: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: topical tom
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 02:39 PM

As a child I had several childhood heroes tied to music, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, and others. In this thread I am asking who were childhood heroes and what music is related directly or indirectly to them, i.e. songs sung by them or about them. Perhaps limit your choices to five or fewer if possible. Roy Rogers was one of my boyhood heroes and here is a song by Eric Bogle in tribute to him. BTW, heroines are acceptable as well!
Eric Bogle-"Front Row Cowboy".


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Acorn4
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 02:47 PM

The Lone Ranger and the William Tell Overture, though I don't think he actually sang on that one.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 03:00 PM

Charles Ives
Charlie Mingus
John Cage
Dead Kennedys
Fat Boys


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: kendall
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 08:53 PM

Gene Autry
Wilf Carter
Hank Snow


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: olddude
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 09:17 PM

Alex
you have good taste, Roy and Gene were mine for sure. I use to carry my dads broken guitar around and pretend I was Roy or Gene. Another (don't laugh) was Mitch Miller and the sing along gang


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Don Firth
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 10:52 PM

"Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear. . . ."

The run of children's radio programs and some adult programs back in the late 1930s and into the 1940s often featured classical music as their theme songs, along with other classical music behind the announcer as he set the scene for "this week's thrilling episode."

The theme song for "The Lone Ranger," everybody knows was the "galop" section of the overture to Rossini's opera, William Tell (definition of a "highbrow:" someone who can hear The William Tell Overture without automatically thinking of the Lone Ranger). Incidental music in the LR (backing the announcer's narrations) was Franz Liszt's Les Preludes. Very dramatic! "The Lone Ranger" was aired three times a week, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7:30 p.m. and ran a half-hour. Most shows told a complete adventure, but sometimes a monumental adventure might run for the whole week.

Between 5:00 and 6:00 p.m. on weekdays was a block of fifteen minute kids programs, such as "Little Orphan Annie," who, in her ramblings, managed to have all kinds of exciting adventures, "Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy," who traveled with another kid or two and his explorer uncle. "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century" had a bit of a run in this time slot,with Space Force Colonel Wilma Deering as his side-kick as they battled space pirate Killer Kane and his hench-girl friend, Ardala (Killer Kane was a stumble-bum, Ardala was the black-hearted brains of the pair). Then there was "The Phantom Pilot" and his sidekick, a tail-gunner with an Irish brogue, and later "Captain Midnight" who also had his entourage.

The entourage of many of these hero types generally consisted of a young (early teens) boy and girl, usually brother and sister, who where the niece and nephew of the main hero. The idea was to give the eagerly listening kids someone nearer their own age to identify with, but I think most kids were like me—we identified with the main hero.

"The Phantom Pilot's" theme song was "The Ride of the Valyries" from Wagner's opera Die Valkyrie, and all of the other programs used classical music from various sources as themes and incidental music. Can't remember who all used what at this late date, but hunkered down in front of the big console radio, I developed an early familiarity with and appreciation of a lot of classical music this way.

And "The Green Hornet." His theme song was (of course) Rimsky-Korsakov's "Flight of the Bumblebee." He had a Japanese houseboy and sidekick named Kato—who miraculously morphed into Filipino when World War II started.

Did you know that Britt Reid, the Green Hornet, was the great nephew of the Lone Ranger? The Lone Ranger was John Reid, the only survivor of a group of Texas Rangers who were sent out to capture the Cavandish Gang, but who rode into an ambush and got caught flat-footed. Then, this Indian, Tonto, came along, found the carnage, and discovered that one of the rangers, although badly wounded, was still alive. Tonto nursed him back to health, then Tonto and the "lone ranger," concealing his true identity behind a mask, went after the Cavandish Gang and brought them to justice. Then, the adventures went on from there. After some years worth of cleaning up crime in the Old West, the Long Ranger and Tonto were joined in their crime-fighting escapades by Dan Reid, John Reid's young nephew. Britt Reid (the Green Hornet) was Dan Reid's grandson. As a crusading, crime fighting newspaperman, Britt Reid, having heard stories about his great-uncle, created the persona of the Green Hornet.

Dramatic sounding classical music seemed to be the favorite for theme songs and incidental music for these shows. Exciting stuff!

Movies, too, back in the 1940s. "The Phantom of the Opera" (long before Andrew Lloyd Webber) with Claude Rains behind the mask and Nelson Eddy and Suzanna Foster providing the singing. "The Desert Song" (Romberg's operetta, complete with mysterious masked rebel leader, The Red Shadow (singer Dennis Morgan). "Song of Sheherezade" with Jean-Pierre Aumont as Russian composer Rimsky-Korsakov when he was a cadet in the Russian navy (true) having all kinds of hairy adventures when the training ship he was on stopped over in Morocco and the cadets were on shore leave, romancing the young Spanish dancer (Yvonne de Carlo) and getting into a bull-whip fight with fellow cadet, the snobbish Prince Mischetsky, while he composing reams of music. Far out "bio-pic," but all of the background music was by Rimsky-Korsakov. Very lush and dramatic stuff. Another movie intitled "Tonight We Sing" about impresario Sol Hurok, with well-known singers and dancers playing performers from a previous time, such as Ezio Pinza portraying Russian basso Fyeodor Chaliapin, Metropolitan Opera soprano Roberta Peters (cute little critter) as Elsa Valdine, ballerina Tamara Toumanova as Pavlova, others. . . .

I also heard Alan Lomax's folk music programs on "American School of the Air," along with both radio programs and movies with Burl Ives (before "Big Daddy," when he played a character much like himself and sang a lot—and Susan Reed.

I grew up on this stuff.

You remember radio, don't you? It was like television without pictures. You made the pictures yourself, in you imagination.

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Beer
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 11:43 PM

I still make those picture in my mind when i listen to hockey. hell i sure can't afford to go to a game.

Heroes? Well i have to go with Johnny Horton as my first singing hero. After that it gets to modern
Beer (adrien)


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: katlaughing
Date: 04 Sep 09 - 11:51 PM

Love that stuff, Don, only I don't remember hearing a lot on the radio in WY, but for Arthur Godfrey and Gunsmoke with Lionel Barrymore at Christmas in A Christmas Carol. I know my older siblings remember more, music-wise, than I do.

I can't think of any heroes from when I was little who were musical, except my mom and dad.:-) We didn't have a tv until the early 60s, I was too young to stay up for most radio programs, we had tons of live family music and LPs (really engaged our imaginations!), but I really can't think of one pretend hero. I didn't actually see Gene Autry, etc. until I was an adult and saw them on TCM and love them. We did watch Lawrence Welk, but no heroes there per se, and, yes, I really had fun singing along with Mitch Miller and the gang. Even Andy Griffith wasn't what I'd call a hero, even though I enjoyed his music.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: kendall
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 06:13 AM

Don, that trip down memory lane was great. You have an excellent memory.
I remember crap such as who were the announcers for the Lone Ranger?
John Slagle
Brace Beemer
Fred Foy


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: topical tom
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 11:12 AM

Thanks, Don, for that wonderful documentation of "those thrilling days of yesteryear".I remember listening with my ear to our old Deforest-Crosley six-tube radio and viewing in my mind's eye the dramatic actions in the old programmes. My ear was glued to the radio in order to preserve the battery life for as long as possible. Some of my other childhood "heroes" were Hopalong Cassidy, the Fat Man (anyone remember him? and Red Ryder. I don't recall any of the music related to those dramas, though.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: kendall
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 11:25 AM

One of my early heros was Randolph Scott. He didn't sing but his movies seemed to be a cut above the rest.
Talk about coincidence, I just turned the TV on and there was Randolph Scott! Haven't seen him in years.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Geoff Wallis
Date: 05 Sep 09 - 12:26 PM

Bert Weedon.

I'll get my coat.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: topical tom
Date: 07 Sep 09 - 07:23 AM

Refresh.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Tootler
Date: 07 Sep 09 - 02:42 PM

The Trumpet Hornpipe is associated in so many (UK) peoples' minds with Captain Pugwash that Capt. Pugwash has become an alternative name for the tune.


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Subject: RE: Childhood Heroes-Their Music
From: Joe_F
Date: 07 Sep 09 - 06:02 PM

Burl Ives.


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