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Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding

Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 03:18 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 03:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 06:06 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 07:19 PM
kendall 23 Sep 09 - 07:32 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 07:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 09:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 23 Sep 09 - 09:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Sep 09 - 01:55 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Sep 09 - 02:52 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Sep 09 - 10:54 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Sep 09 - 10:57 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Sep 09 - 10:58 PM
Snuffy 28 Sep 09 - 09:06 AM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Sep 09 - 02:28 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 03:18 PM

Lyr. Add: Three Dukes A-riding
Coll. Miss Burne, Shropshire, 1891
A match-making game (so classed by the Opies)

Here come three dukes a-riding,
A-riding, a-riding;
Here come three duks a-riding,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

What is your good will, sirs?
Will, sirs? will, sirs?
What is your good will, sirs?
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

Our good will is to marry,
To marry, marry;
Our good will is to marry,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

Marry one of us, sirs,
Us, sirs, us, sirs;
Marry one of us, sirs,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

You're all too black and greasy, [or dirty]
Greasy, greasy;
You're all too black and greasy,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

We're good enough for you, sirs,
You, sirs, you, sirs;
We're good enough for you, sirs,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

You're all as stiff as pokers,
Pokers, pokers;
You're all as stiff as pokers,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

We can bend as much as you, sirs,
You, sirs, you, sirs;
We can bend as much as you, sirs,
With a rancy, tancy, tay!

Through the kitchen and down the hall,
I choose the fairest of you all;
The fairest one that I can see
Is pretty Miss -------, walk with me.

A typical match-making game. The greasy, (dirty) verses have floated into other, non-match-making games and songs (example- "Johnny Cookoo).

Madeley, Salop (*Miss Burne), 1891. With musical score. Tunes are given for three other variants (Lanarkshire, Norfolk, Isle of Man)
Listed as the authority; Alice B. Gomme, "The Traditional Games of England, Scotland, and Ireland," vol. 2, 1894, 1898; 1984 edition by Thames and Hudson, University Press, Oxford.

The suitors may be three kings, three sailors, three bachelors, three jews, soldiers, etc., or a combination.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Three sailors
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 03:39 PM

Lyr. Add: Three Sailors
Match-making game, London, coll. A. B. Gomme.

Here come three sailors, three by three,
To court your daughter, a fair lady [ladee)
Can we have a lodging here, here, here?
Can we have a lodging here?

Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake,
Here are three sailors we can't take;
You cannot have a lodging here, here, here,
You cannot have a lodging here.

Here come three soldiers, three by three,
To court your daughter, a fair lady;
Can we have a lodging here, here, here?
Can we have a lodging here?

Sleep, sleep, daughter, do not wake,
Here are three soldiers we can't take; etc.

Here come three kings three by three,
To court your daughter, a fair lady;
Can we have a lodging here, here, here?
Can we have a lodging here?

Wake, wake, daughter, do not sleep,
Here come three kings that we can take;
You can have a lodging here, here, here,
You can have a lodging here.

Here's my daughter, safe and sound,
And in her pocket one hundred pound,
On her finger no gay gold ring,
I'm sure she's not fit to walk with a king.

With musical score. Tune for last two verses differs from the preceeding.
Tinkers, sweeps, blacksmiths, tailors, bakers, etc., may be substituted. Gomme suggests that it is a later game than "Three Dukes" or "Three Knights.
In a peculiar form, the three kings become three robbers.

Alice B. Gomme, The Traditional Games of England, Scotland, and Ireland, vol. 2.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 06:06 PM

Early Scottish rhyme:

Lyr. Add: A dis, a dis, a green grass (first line)

A dis, a dis, a green grass,
a did, a dis, a dis;
Come all ye pretty fair maids,
And dance along with us.

For we are going a-roving,
A-roving in this land;
We'll take this pretty fair maid,
We'll take her by the hand.

Ye shall get a duke, my dear,
And ye shall get a drake;
And ye shall get a young prince,
A young prince for your sake.

And if this young prince chance to die,
Ye shall get another;
The bells will ring, and the birds will sing,
And we'll all clap hands together.

No tune given.
Chambers, R., "Popular Rhymes of Scotland." New ed. 1870 (1st ed. 1842). Quoted in W. W. Newell, 1883, 1903, "Games and Songs of American Children," Dover edition, 1963.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Knights of Spain
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 07:19 PM

Lyr. Add: Knights of Spain
New York, 19th c.

Here come three lords out of Spain,
A-courting of your daughter Jane.

My daughter Jane is yet too young,
To be ruled by your flattering tongue.

Be she young or be she old,
'Tis for the price she may be sold.

So fare you well, my lady gay,
We must turn another way.

Turn back, turn back, you Spanish knight,
And scour your boots and spurs so bright.

My boots and spurs they cost you nought,
For in this land they were not bought.

Nor in this land will they be sold,
Either for silver or for gold.

So fare you well, mu lady gay,
We must turn another way.

Turn back, turn back, you Spanish Knight,
And choose the fairest in your sight.

I'll not take one nor two nor three,
But pray, Miss ------, walk with me.

The knight takes the girl by the hand, and marches off with her. Walking round the room, he returns, saying,

Here comes your daughter safe and sound,
In her pocket a thousand pound,

On her finger a gay gold ring,
I bring your daughter home again.

No tune given. W. W. Newell, "Games and songs of American Children."

One of a number of related games involving match-making.

Many other games; :Paper of Pins," "There She Stands," "The Widow with Daughters to Marry," "Green Grow the Rushes, O!," etc.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: kendall
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 07:32 PM

The three Dukes I first heard sung by my Grandmother when I was a small boy.
She sang it, "you're all too black and homely homely your'll all too black and homely ratsee tatsee tittie bow wow and a ratsee tatsee tee.


In those days black could have meant Moorish or dour. Who knows.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 07:40 PM

Or just plain dirty.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Here Comes Three Lawyers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 09:05 PM

Lyr. Add: Here Comes Three Lawyers
North Carolina, 20th c.

Here comes three lawyers, three lawyers we are,
A-courting your daughter, so rare and so fair.
Can we get lodgings here, oh here,
Can we get lodgings here?

This is my daughter that sits by my side,
And none of you lawyers can get her for a bride.
You cannot get lodgings here, oh here,
And you cannot get lodgings here.

We care nothing for your daughter and less for yourself.
I betcha five dollars I can better myself,
And we do not want lodgings here, oh here,
We do not want lodgings here.

(In acting it out, a lawyer carries a book, a merchant goods, a farmer corn, a pedlar a pack on the end of a stick.
The above is repeated for each, the last the pedlars).

This is my daughter that sits by my side,
And one of you pedlars can get her for a bride;
And you can get lodgings here, oh here,
And you can get lodgings here.

No tune provided.
MS notebook of Mrs Harold Glasscock, Raleigh, 1943, but from parents.
Frank C. Brown Coll. North Carolina Folklore, vol. 3, No. 68, Folk Songs from North Carolina, ed. H. M. Belden and A. P. Hudson, Duke Univ. Press, 1952.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 23 Sep 09 - 09:40 PM

Lyr. Add: Raz-Ma--Taz-A-Ma-Tee
Missouri, Coll. Mrs Marie Wilbur, Pineville, MO

Players form two parallel lines, boys in one row and girls in the other, about ten paces apart. The boy on the left advances with a peculiar skipping step, singing loudly:

Here comes a duke a-ridin',
a-ridin', a-ridin',
Here comes a duke a'ridin',
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

The boy returns to his place, and all the girls dance toward the boys' line as they sing:

What are you ridin' here for,
Here for, here for?
What are you ridin' here for?
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

The girls return to their former position and the next boy skips forward and sings:

I'm ridin' here to git married,
Married, married,
I'm ridin' here to git married,
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

As this second boy steps back into his line the girls all follow him, singing:

Choose one of us, sir,
Of us, sir, of us, sir,
Choose one of us, sir,
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

The next boy in line makes answer:

You're all too old an' ugly for me,
Too ugly for me, too ugly for me,
You're all too old an' ugly for me,
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

As the girls skip forward this time, they sing in a spirited fashion:

We're just as good as you are,
You are. you are,
We're just as good as you are,
The raz-mz-taz-a-ma-tee.

The next boy advances and chooses one of the girls, kneeling before her as he sings:

You're the fairest one I see,
One I see, one I see,
You're the fairest one I see,
The raz-ma-taz-a-ma-tee.

And with this he leads her back to the boys' line and the next boy becomes the "duke," so that the whole rigamarole is repeated until all of the girls have been chosen.

Tune provided.
Contributed June 13, 1925.
No. 551, Vance Randolph, 1980, "Ozark Folksongs," Revised ed., vol. III, Humorous and Play-Party Songs, Univ. Missouri Press.


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Hog Rovers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Sep 09 - 01:55 PM

Lyr. Add: Hog Rovers
20th c., Arkansas

"A boy and a girl sit side-by-side on a bench, while the other players form a circle about them. Two boys leave the circle and march around the couple on the bench, singing:

Hog rovers, hog rovers, hog rovers we are,
A-courtin' your daughter so neat and so fair,
Can we git lovin' here, oh here?
Can we git lovin' here?

The boy and girl on the bench pretend to confer, and then the boy sings out boldly:

This here is my daughter that sets on my knee,
We don't want no rovers in this family,
You cain't get no lovin' here, oh here,
You cain't git no lovin' here!

At this, two hog rovers glare at the seated couple and sing:

Care nothin' for your daughter, an' less for yourself,
We'll go a piece farther an' git on the shelf,
And we'll find lovin' there, oh there,
An' we'll find lovin' there!

Another whispered conference on the bench, and then the "father" replies:

This here is my daughter that sets by my side,
And Mister ------- can make her his bride,
When he brings Miss ------- here, oh here,
When he brings Miss ------- here.

The "hog rover" named hastens to escort Miss ------- from the outer circle to her new position on the bench, after which he is free to take the "daughter" as his own partner. The procedure goes on indefinitely, until all the players have "paired off.""

With brief musical score.
Miss. B. Plagens (contributor), 1924, says that "this game is really only a method of changing partners or "pairing off," and for that reason is often played first at an evening's entertainment."

No. 555, Humorous and Play Party Songs, vol. 3, Vance Randolph, "Ozark Folksongs," University Missouri Press.

Obviously related, although much changed, from "Dukes."


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Subject: Lyr. Add: Hog Drovers
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Sep 09 - 02:52 PM

"Hog Rovers" comes from "Hog Drovers" (swineherds). There are several variants. B. A. Botkin compares with the UK "Nine Daughters."

Lyr. Add: Hog Drovers

Hog drovers, hog drovers we are,
Come courting your daughter so rare and so fair.
Can we get lodging here, oh here?
Can we get lodging here?

Man sings:
This is my daughter that sets by my side,
And none of your hog drovers can have her for a bride,
And you can't get lodging here, oh here;
And you can't get lodging here.

Men hang heads and sing:
It's bread for your daughter and hay for yourself,
We'll go on a piece farther and better ourselves,
And we won't take lodging here, oh here;
We won't take lodging here.
(March off)

Two more men come up and sing:
Rich merchants, rich merchants, rich merchants we are,
A-courting your daughter so rich and so fair.
Can we get lodging here, oh here?
Can we get lodging here?

This is my daughter that sets by my side,
And one of you merchants can have her for bride,
By bringing another one here, oh here,
By bringing another one here.

Girl gets up, catches hands with one man. Man left chooses girl to sit by man in center and rich merchant is left alone. Girl in middle chooses man to march with him. Man and girl march around couple in middle, starting the circle. Same play is repeated with various occupations and results; for example:

Gold miners- accepted.
Cowboys- rejected. They sing at leaving:
"We've been through Arkansas and bettered ourselves."
Man sings on this occasion:
"This is my daughter that sets in my lap,
And none of you cowboys can take her from her pap."
Shool teacher- accepted.
Farmers- sometimes accepted, sometimes rejected.
Oil drillers- not accepted, etc.

Pearl Mobley, Love Co., Oklahoma, the contributor, said when boys were rejected, the circle jeered and teased them. She also said that they made up new verses all the time.

Version C; tune given for variant A.

B. A. Botkin, 1937, 1963, "The American Play-Party Song," Orig. University Studies Univ. Nebraska vol. 38 no. 1-4; Later Frederick Ungar, New York.


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Subject: Lyr Add: NUTS IN MAY
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Sep 09 - 10:54 PM

From Shropshire Folk-Lore: A Sheaf of Gleanings edited by Charlotte Sophia Burne from the collections of Georgina F. Jackson (London: Trübner & Co., 1883), page 516:


(i.) Nuts in May. The players form two rows facing each other, advancing and retiring alternately. They draw a boundary-line on the ground between them.

1st Party. 'Here we come gathering nuts in May,
Nuts in May, nuts in May!
Here we come gathering nuts in May,
On a cold and frosty morning!
2nd Party. And who have you come to gather away?
To gather away, to gather away, etc.
1st. We have come to gather Miss Maud away, etc.
2nd. And who will you send to fetch her away?
1st. We'll send Corny Rogers to fetch her away.'

(The two players named, stand with their feet touching the boundary-mark, and pull against each other, assisted by those behind, till the attacking party hart succeeded or failed in dragging the girl they ask for over to their side.)

?Wenlock, Condover, Ellesmere, Market Drayton.


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Subject: Lyr Add: THE KNIGHTS OUT OF SPAIN
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Sep 09 - 10:57 PM

Ibid. page 516:


(ii.) The Knights out of Spain. Three players (or sometimes only one) are chosen to represent the Knights; the rest, who must be an uneven number, stand in a row facing them, and the parties advance and retire alternately as before.

1st Party. 'Here comes Three Knights all out of Spain,
A-courting of your daughter Jane.
2nd Party. My daughter Jane she is too young,
She can't abide your flattering tongue.
1st. If she be young or she be old,
She for her beauty must lie sold.
2nd. Go back, go back, you Spanish Knight,
And rub your spurs till they are bright.
1st. My spurs are bright and richly wrought,
And in this town they were not bought,
And in this town they sha'n't be sold,
Neither for silver nor for gold.
2nd. Walk up the kitchen and down the hall,
And choose the fairest of us all.
1st. Madams, to you I bow and bend,
I take you for my dearest friend;
You are two beauties, I declare,
So come along with me, my dear.'

(The girl at each end of the long row goes over to the Knights, and the game is repeated with five, seven, etc., Knights. The last who is left takes the Knight's part in the next game. Thus at Edgmond: but in some places the Knights call one girl only by name each time.)

?Common.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HERE COMES THREE DUKES A-RIDING
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Sep 09 - 10:58 PM

Ibid. page 517:


(iii.) 'Here comes Three Dukes a-riding.' A variant of the last.

1st Party. 'Here comes Three Dukes a-riding, a-riding,
With a ransome dansome day!
2nd Party. Pray what is your intent, sirs, intent, sirs?
With a ransome dansome day!
1st. My intent is to marry, to marry!
2nd. Will you marry one of my daughters, my daughters?
1st. You are as stiff as pokers, as pokers!
2nd. We can bend like you, sir, like you, sir!
1st. You're all too black and too blowsy, too blowsy,*
For a dilly-dally officer!
2nd. Good enough for you, sir! for you, sir!
1st. If I must have any, I will have this,
So come along, my pretty miss!'

?Chirbury.

* A Lancashire version (1820-30) adds after this line, 'With your golden chains about your necks.' It was there acted with much energy, and gestures and tones of servility, scorn, etc. The burden evidently represented a flourish of trumpets:

'Here comes Three Dukes a-riding,
With a rancy tancy terry boy's horn!
Here comes Three Dukes a-riding,
With a rancy tancy tee!'

The concluding lines of the version in the text come from Ellesmere.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: Snuffy
Date: 28 Sep 09 - 09:06 AM

THREE DUKES (2)

Another version posted by me in August 2000

No less than nine Scottish versions are given as a single entry. This tune goes with the number 4 (Berwickshire) version, but will fit several others. I learned a slightly different version as a child from my mother, who was born on Tyneside in 1921, but her parents were of Scottish stock.

We are three Jews, we come from Spain,
To court upon your daughter Jane.

Our daughter Jane is far too young
To understand your noisy tongue.

SPOKEN:
Go away, Corkscrew.

Our name, our name is not Corkscrew,
We'll stamp our foot, and away we'll go.

Come back, come back, your coat is green,
And choose the fairest one you see.

The fairest one that I can see
Is [name here]. Come out to me.

SPOKEN:
I will not come.

The naughty girl, she won't come out,
She won't come out, she won't come out;
The naughty girl, she won't come out,
To join us in the dancing.

SPOKEN:
I will come.

Now we've got the lady out,
The lady out, the lady out,
Now we've got the lady out,
To join us in the dancing.

X: 67
T:Three Dukes (2)
M:6/4
L:1/8
Q:150
S:my mother
P:A5B2
A:Tyneside
N:filename[ THREDUK2
K:G
P:A
D2|
G2A2 B4- B2G2 |c2B2 A4- A2D2|
F2G2 A4- A2(GA)|B2A2 G4- G2 ||
P:B
M:6/8
D|
G2G G2B|d2B G2G|A2A A2G|F2E D2D|
G2G G2B|d2B G2G|A2A DEF|G3 G2 ||


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Duke(s) a-riding
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Sep 09 - 02:28 PM

Verses about a Jew were quite common.

Alice B. Gomme printed a verse from Forest of Dean, Gloucester:

Here comes a Jew a-riding,
With the ransom, tansom, tissimi, O!

And what is your will, sir?
etc.
Then pray take one of my daughters, etc.
They are all too black and browsy, etc.
They are good enough for you, sir, etc.
My house is lined with silver, etc.
But ours is lined with gold, sir, etc.
Then I'll take one of your daughters, etc.

Travelling pedlars, knife-sharpeners, etc., were often Jews or thought to be Jews, in 19th c. England

The number of different verses sung to the tunes of "Duke(s) is almost without limit.

The daughters also may be poor and shabby, dark as gipsies, too proudy, etc.

The 'naughty' verse comes also in this form (Gomme, from Kent):

O naughty maid! O naughty maid!
You won't come out to me?
You shall see a blackbird,
A blackbird and a swan;
You should see a nice young man
Persuading you to come.


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