Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Trombones at sessions

The Vulgar Boatman 01 Oct 09 - 06:40 PM
Paul Burke 01 Oct 09 - 07:12 PM
Dave MacKenzie 01 Oct 09 - 07:16 PM
Paul Burke 01 Oct 09 - 07:34 PM
Dave MacKenzie 01 Oct 09 - 07:41 PM
Jack Campin 01 Oct 09 - 07:49 PM
Dave MacKenzie 01 Oct 09 - 07:52 PM
TheSnail 01 Oct 09 - 08:32 PM
Leadfingers 01 Oct 09 - 08:45 PM
meself 01 Oct 09 - 11:23 PM
M.Ted 02 Oct 09 - 01:56 AM
VirginiaTam 02 Oct 09 - 02:38 AM
GUEST,Mc Fat 02 Oct 09 - 03:10 AM
Valmai Goodyear 02 Oct 09 - 03:31 AM
greg stephens 02 Oct 09 - 04:15 AM
Acorn4 02 Oct 09 - 04:23 AM
Will Fly 02 Oct 09 - 04:38 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Oct 09 - 04:41 AM
GUEST,MC Fat (at work) 02 Oct 09 - 04:50 AM
Banjiman 02 Oct 09 - 04:51 AM
The Sandman 02 Oct 09 - 06:04 AM
banjoman 02 Oct 09 - 06:06 AM
Valmai Goodyear 02 Oct 09 - 06:10 AM
Leadfingers 02 Oct 09 - 06:14 AM
Terry McDonald 02 Oct 09 - 06:41 AM
Jack Blandiver 02 Oct 09 - 07:04 AM
Bat Goddess 02 Oct 09 - 07:52 AM
treewind 02 Oct 09 - 08:09 AM
treewind 02 Oct 09 - 08:32 AM
The Sandman 02 Oct 09 - 09:22 AM
blackpearl 02 Oct 09 - 09:30 AM
Les from Hull 02 Oct 09 - 10:01 AM
blackpearl 02 Oct 09 - 10:08 AM
Vic Smith 02 Oct 09 - 10:30 AM
treewind 02 Oct 09 - 10:43 AM
Stringsinger 02 Oct 09 - 12:49 PM
Stringsinger 02 Oct 09 - 01:02 PM
GUEST 02 Oct 09 - 01:03 PM
Bonzo3legs 02 Oct 09 - 01:32 PM
bubblyrat 02 Oct 09 - 01:59 PM
autoharper 02 Oct 09 - 03:19 PM
Les from Hull 02 Oct 09 - 05:29 PM
TheSnail 02 Oct 09 - 07:32 PM
Will Fly 03 Oct 09 - 03:44 AM
treewind 03 Oct 09 - 04:42 AM
TheSnail 03 Oct 09 - 04:53 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Oct 09 - 06:33 AM
Jack Campin 03 Oct 09 - 06:42 AM
Jack Blandiver 03 Oct 09 - 07:21 AM
Declan 04 Oct 09 - 05:51 AM
bubblyrat 04 Oct 09 - 04:47 PM
Valmai Goodyear 05 Oct 09 - 05:43 AM
Valmai Goodyear 07 Oct 09 - 06:51 AM
GUEST 07 Oct 09 - 11:23 AM
mandotim 07 Oct 09 - 12:59 PM
Valmai Goodyear 07 Oct 09 - 04:58 PM
Will Fly 08 Oct 09 - 03:17 AM
greg stephens 08 Oct 09 - 03:32 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Trombones at sessions
From: The Vulgar Boatman
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 06:40 PM

Can anybody explain to me why there is currently a rash of goddamn morons who think that a roomful of fiddlers, flutes and squeezebox players will be improved by the miscellaneous out-of-tune glissando fartings of a slush-pump? Or in last night's case, two slush-pumps. I used to like the trombone, but frankly this current practice is about as welcome as piles, which are, as we know, a pain in the arse and quite difficult to get rid of.
Here endeth the rant.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Paul Burke
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:12 PM

Ten years ago it was didgeridoos. I used to know a trombonist who could play along with the best in the diddleydiddley stuff. Sadly lost touch.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:16 PM

I don't know an instrument that hasn't been played badly (or at least inappropriately) at a session, apart from bagpipes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Paul Burke
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:34 PM

Too many negatives, Mr MacKenzie. I've known bagpipes played badly and iappropriately at sessions.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:41 PM

I've been lucky in my choice of pipers (of all denominations).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Campin
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:49 PM

I've seen a couple of trombones going cheap locally and was quite tempted. Unfortunately they were tenors, and a bass would make more sense in traditional music. (Ideally a bass in G to play in the usual folky keys - there should still be a supply of them out there).

Something that plays a good solid melodic bass line is much more of an asset to a session than one of those watchamacallits with six strings and a drawer-sized soundbox that sounds like a right-arm amputee trying to play a piano filled with porridge.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 07:52 PM

As a guitarist, I agree entirely with Jack.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: TheSnail
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 08:32 PM

I've seen a couple of trombones going cheap

Really?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Leadfingers
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 08:45 PM

I thought it was Budgies that went 'Cheep' !!



OK ! I've got my Hat AND my Coat !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: meself
Date: 01 Oct 09 - 11:23 PM

Was at a session once at which Rory MacLeod was playing trombone - and a splendid addition it was.

But then, that's Rory MacLeod.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: M.Ted
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 01:56 AM

I rather like the idea of the trombones, which, in the long past, were often played for dancing and such. In other parts of the world, brass instruments and reeds are still part of the mix--how do you feel about tubas?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 02:38 AM

Is it that community bands are suffering the same fate as some folk clubs? The membership is aging and so the organisation falls apart leaving a gaggle of homeless musicians shuffling off to other places to ply their music.

I have been at a session that had outstanding oboe and piccolo. Definitely an asset.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: GUEST,Mc Fat
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 03:10 AM

At the Coach in Uppermill during Saddleworth FF this year I took prt in n afternoon session where two stalwarts of the local jazz scene took part on trumpet and trombone and I thought it was double fabtastic. At times the trombone was just like having a good string bass player and the trumpet player was really iventive too


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 03:31 AM

We have an excellent session trombone player in Sussex in the person of Mel Stevens (author of French tune books for Mel Bay). I well remember the reaction of a blameless and self-effacing banjo player when Mel sat down quietly behind him in a full-blooded session and, in the banjo-player's words, lit the afterburners on the trombone. It must have been like dozing in the Channel in a rowing boat and waking up with a start to realise that the QE2 was trying to get past.

Mel also plays fiddle, melodeon, accordion and French bagpipes and is an asset on all of them.

Tubas and trombones are much like any other instrument in a session: fine if the player adjusts their speed and volume to the group, deadly otherwise. One of our local regulars, Derrick Hughes, has recently started deploying a serpent to great effect; it helps to keep the pulse steady, particularly in a long thin room (tee hee).

Half a dozen big brass jobs playing at once might be a problem, but I'll wait until I hear it happen before forming an opinion.

Valmai (Lewes)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: greg stephens
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:15 AM

The Boat Band played its celebratory annivesary conceret on WEdnesday with two trobones heavily featured. And personally, I thought it was great. But it was Dan Fox and Kate Barfield playing them. Like any instrument, they can be used wisely or stupidly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Acorn4
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:23 AM

Budgies only go cheap if they are on higher perches!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Will Fly
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:38 AM

Mel is a superb trombone player and, in answer to your anti-guitar rant (once again), Jack, I have to say that I play guitar at sessions and do so with appropriateness to the tunes at hand. This constant anti-guitar rant - without actually knowing players concerned - is stupid and boring. If your own experience has been poor in this area, tough luck, but it's not the same everywhere.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:41 AM

Interesting stuff. I prefer my brass muted - be it a Miles Davis trumpet, a Don Cherry pocket cornet, or a Tommy Dorsey trombone. Do these guys use mutes at all?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: GUEST,MC Fat (at work)
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:50 AM

The guy on the trumpet used the mute to good effecton one number it sounded like a harmonica


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Banjiman
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 04:51 AM

As a banjo player I encourage any instrument that deflects the flack from me!!!

Kate Barfield is tops though!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 06:04 AM

its nothing to do with the instrument[ever,ever ever].its the fucking player.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: banjoman
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 06:06 AM

Its a pity that all instruments in the hands of inept players who force themselves on sessions cant be regarded in the same way as the Mute Swan which only makes a noise when its about to die


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 06:10 AM

That must be its cygneture tune.

Valmai


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Leadfingers
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 06:14 AM

Had a guy turn up at The Newt with a Soprano Sax = He could play it OK , but WASNT lisstening to any one else and went off in a huff when it was suggested he LISTENED and didnt try to make EVERY one play the way he wanted


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Terry McDonald
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 06:41 AM

We had a soprano sax player turn up at Wimborne a couple of weeks ago (curved soprano, like a small alto)and although he could certainly play, he drowned everyone else out. On a positive point, he joined me on one of my songs but only played when I indicated that I wanted a solo from him. That worked well, but when he just joined in with other people, it didn't work at all. I was told last night that he'd joined the weekly Irish session at another pub and was told that 'not knowing the tune might be fine for jazz, it certainly didn't work for folk.' He left in a huff.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 07:04 AM

and was told that 'not knowing the tune might be fine for jazz, it certainly didn't work for folk.' He left in a huff.

With a comment like that he probably left in despair! What is it with folkies & improvisation anyway? Generally I avoid sessions like the plague, though we have a good one where improvisation is implicit throughout both in tunes and songs. Haven't see any trombones yet though!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 07:52 AM

We had a plastic, electronic saxophone for awhile.

(But that was another country and, besides, the bloke is dead."

Linn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: treewind
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 08:09 AM

"went off in a huff when it was suggested he LISTENED"
Good riddance then. You need neither that kind of musicianship (if you can call it that) nor that attitude in a session.

Re Valmai: I suppose you can have too many brass instruments, but they do seem to work well (and enjoy it) in pairs, if the players are any good. I've had the privilege of playing in a few sessions as well as the Pig Dyke Molly band and a ceilidh band with Dave Parker, who is a fabulous Sousaphone player, and also plays a lot of jazz so is equally likely to come up with The Gloucester Hornpipe or "on the Sunny Side of the Street" (yes, on a Sousa...). He usually gets together with Nick Barber on French Horn at some point in the Whittlesea Straw Bear weekend, with predictably magical results. A tuba and a trombone are a nice combination too.

When English Rebellion (which includes Nick Barber) recorded an album recently, on may of the tracks where he played horn he recorded two horn parts in harmony. It just works well like that.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: treewind
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 08:32 AM

...and slightly more on topic, it's not trombones particularly that are a nuisance: I think a reasonably accurate definition of the problem area is "any loud instrument in the hands of a player who doesn't know how to listen".

We actually had a trombone in the house, on hire for a few months while Mary was trying to decide whether she'd get on with it. Unfortunately she gave up the struggle, but I learned a lot about brass instruments in general and trombones in particular during that time.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: The Sandman
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 09:22 AM

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Suibhne O'Piobaireachd - PM
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 07:04 AM

and was told that 'not knowing the tune might be fine for jazz, it certainly didn't work for folk.' He left in a huff.

With a comment like that he probably left in despair! What is it with folkies & improvisation anyway? Generally I avoid sessions like the plague, though we have a good one where improvisation is implicit throughout both in tunes and songs. Haven't see any trombones yet though
quite,just look at some of the pillocks over on the www .session.org,a significant proportion of whom are aload of narrow mineded ignoramuses.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: blackpearl
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 09:30 AM

My sympathies go out to the person who had two trombones at their session. The odd one now and again is tolerable but two? And regularly?. It begs the question, which could be asked similarly of geetars, bowrawns, spoons, didges and so on ad nauseam, what would happen if no proper session instrument players (and by that I mean boxes flutes whistles and even fiddles) turned up and they were all left to their own "devices"? What terrible cacophony would be foisted upon the punters and barstaff?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Les from Hull
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 10:01 AM

The same could be said for any instrument at a session that is played too loudly or not sympathetically. People should realise that a session is a co-operative thing, not an opportunity to show how loud or fast you can play. The lead instruments have the tune, and the people playing the 'accompaniment' shouldn't be overwhelming them. On the subject of improvisation, I find that's OK if it's played behind the main tune, and not all the time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: blackpearl
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 10:08 AM

>The same could be said for any instrument at a session that is played too loudly or not sympathetically.
Hmmm...I dunno. I hear what you are saying but feel maybe that's a generalisation, ie, I think I'd rather hear a mediocre fiddle or flute player than a "good"(?) spoons player playing solo. Just a thought.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Vic Smith
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 10:30 AM

In a large session - and there were quite a number of musicians in a huge come-all-ye scratch band playing for dancing at a party in Barcombe recently, something bassy to help mark the tempo is a great asset with the role being taken alternately by the aforementioned Mel Stevens on trombone and Derrick Highes of serpent - lovely stuff!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: treewind
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 10:43 AM

"something bassy ... is a great asset"

One of the joys of taking a bass instrument to a session (I've done it with a cello sometimes) when you're the only bass instrument is that you can make so much difference to the sound. Also you can join in usefully even when you don't know the tune well, or at all.

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Stringsinger
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 12:49 PM

Not knowing the tune is fine for jazz. The best jazz musicians know their tunes thoroughly, that is from a melodic and harmonic standpoint with the right bass line as well.

The trombone is a beautiful instrument and in the hands of a skilled player can make an ensemble regardless of what it is come to life.

You might as well criticize squeeze boxes as wheeze boxes and fiddles as chicken scratching.
As the old cliche goes, "It's the player, not the instrument".

There are times when a rough sounding trombone sounds good as in a trad jazz band.
There are times when a wheezing accordian can sound plaintive.

Playing was is appropriate is more important than what instrument is being played.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Stringsinger
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 01:02 PM

For some reason my statement "Not knowing the tune is fine for jazz" was distorted.

It should read not knowing the tune is NOT fine for jazz.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: GUEST
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 01:03 PM

I think I'd be more concerned if someone turned up
with a Theramin
[and a 'play-in-one-day' booklet tucked in their trouser arse pocket].


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 01:32 PM

There is nothing more nausiating than a bunch of fiddles being played in a pub session I'm afraid.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: bubblyrat
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 01:59 PM

Like my dear cousin Will Fly, I too enjoy playing the guitar in "sessions",and am fed up with with the rantings of that instrument's detractors.Yes,I know that there are people out there whose abilities in that direction are both limited and questionable,but ,with practice,the guitar can make a valuable contribution ,in competent hands,to any "session",be it English,Irish, or even Mongolian (although I haven't actually tried that yet )--possibly.
         As to (as per thread title) trombones ? Well, I am well used to them,having played in Naval bands for 11 years,and find them quite agreeable (in the right hands),despite the constant danger of being lanced or impaled whilst counter-marching,BUT .....in inexperienced hands in a "Session" ?? Oh Dear !! I was having a LOVELY time in a pub in Bampton ( Devon) last autumn,until a woman produced a trombone on which she proceded to play raucous,un-musical BLASTS,to the consternation of ,well, me,if nobody else,so I left : it was AWFUL (and quite unnecessary !).And it sounds CRAP (usually) in Morris sides too ! UUghh !!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: autoharper
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 03:19 PM

"Never look at the trombones, it only encourages them."
- Richard Strauss (1864 - 1949)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Les from Hull
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 05:29 PM

Maybe I didn't make my point well enough, Blackpearl! There's room in sessions for everyone. I've played the melody on melodeon, harmonica or bouzouki, counter melodies on melodeon, harmonica or bouzouki, rhythm accompaniment on bouzouki or guitar, or the bass line on bass guitar. All I'm saying is that no one should drown out the tune, which is the basis or the session. And if people who are playing the tune can't hear the bloody tune then something's gone wrong. And if people don't know the tune, then they should play very quietly (or not at all) whether they are following the melody or providing some accompaniment.

And to further illustrate I will append 'The Spoons Murder' by the excellent Con O'Drisceoil.

In the tavern one night we were sitting -
I'm sure 'twas the last week in March -
From our drinks we were cautiously sipping
To ensure that our throats didn't parch.
We played music both lively and dacent
To bolster our spirits and hopes,
And we gazed at the females adjacent
And remarked on their curves and their slopes.

Till this gent wandered into the session
And decided to join in the tunes;
Without waiting to ask our permission
He took out a big pair of soup-spoons.
Our teeth in short time we were gritting
As he shook and he rattled his toys,
And the company's eardrums were splitting
With his ugly mechanical noise.

Hopping spoons off our heads to provoke us
He continued the music to kill;
Whether hornpipes, slow airs or Polkas
They all sounded like pneumatic drills.
Then he asked could we play any faster,
As his talent he wished to display,
With a grin on the face of the bastard
Like the cat when she teases her prey.

Our thoughts at this stage were quite bloody
And politely we asked him to quit;
We suggested s part of his body
Where those spoons might conveniently fit.
This monster we pestered and hounded,
We implored him with curses and tears,
But in vain our appeals they resounded
In the desert between his two ears.

When I went out the back on a mission,
He arrived as I finished my leak;
He says "This is a mighty fine session,
I think I'll come here every week".
When I heard this, with rage I was leppin',
And this torture no longer I'd take:
I looked 'round for a suitable weapon
To silence this damned rattlesnake.

Outside towards the yard I did sally
To find something to vanquish my foe:
I grabbed hold of a gentleman's Raleigh
With fifteen-speed gear and dynamo.
Then I battered this musical vandal
As I shouted with furious cries
"My dear man your last spoon you have handled,
Say your prayers and await your demise!"

With the bike I assailed my tormentor
As I swung in a frenzy of hate,
Till his bones and his skull were in splinters
And his health in a very poor state.
And when I was no longer able,
I forestalled any last minute hitch
By removing the gear-changing cable
And strangling that son-of-a-bitch.

At the end of my onslaught ferocious
I stood back and surveyed the scene;
The state of the place was atrocious,
Full of fragments of man and machine.
At the spoons-player's remains I was staring,
His condition was surely no joke,
For his nose was clogged with ball-bearings
And his left eye was pierced by a spoke.

At the sight I was feeling quite squeamish,
So I washed up and went back inside;
Then I drank a half gallon of Beamish,
As my throat in the struggle had dried.
Unpolluted by cutlery's clatter
The music was pleasant and sweet;
For the rest of the night nothing mattered
But the tunes and the tapping of feet.

At an inquest, the following September,
The coroner said "I conclude
The deceased by himself was dismembered
As no sign could be found of a feud.
And the evidence shows that the fact is,
As reported to me by the Guards
He indulged in the foolhardy practice
Of trick-cycling in public house yards".

So if you're desperately keen on percussion,
And to join in the tunes you can't wait;
Be you Irishman, German, or Russian,
Take a lesson from his awful fate.
If your spoons are the best silver-plated,
Or the humblest of cheap stainless steel,
When you play them abroad, you'll be hated,
So just keep them for eating your meals.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: TheSnail
Date: 02 Oct 09 - 07:32 PM

Now, the other night I took my wife down to a Music Hall.
And ever since that blooming night it has been her downfall.
She sat beside the bandsman, and he filled her with delight,
The fellow that played the trombone, he stole my wife that night.
    With his rum-she-ra-ra, rum-she-ra-ra, rum-she-ra-ra-day,
    The fellow that played the trombone, he stole my wife away,
    He pulled that long thing in and out, he made her feel so gay,
    He really tickled her fancy with his rum-she-ra-ra-day.

Now she said she liked his music, she'd go there every week,
I said it would be her downfall if she didn't stop her cheek,
She took no notice what I said, and when from time to time,
I stayed home and nursed the kids while him and her did shine.

Now the other night I woke and found she'd gone with all her clothes,
She'd gone with that bandsman, to a land where no-one knows,
But if ever I should find 'em, I'd spoil their honeymoon,
I'd smash his bloody instrument if I catched him playing a tune.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Will Fly
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 03:44 AM

Great song! Would "The end Of Me Old Cigar" be an appropriate tune for this?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: treewind
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 04:42 AM

nothing more nauseating than a bunch of fiddles
Again it depends on the players, but I think the fiddle is the instrument that benefits most from numbers. Exciting without overpowering, unlike the same number or melodeons or - well, anything else, really.

There must be a reason why it's the most numerous instrument in an orchestra.

Trouble with lots of fiddles together (sometimes) is they start playing tunes in A and there's no stopping them...

Anahata


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: TheSnail
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 04:53 AM

Will Fly

Great song! Would "The end Of Me Old Cigar" be an appropriate tune for this?

Another Will that we both know used to sing it about thirty years ago although he sometimes had to check who was in the room first.

Off to Tenterden.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 06:33 AM

Last night I dreamed of a session in which 76 trombonists were crammed in the back room of The Cumberland Arms in Byker playing endless Irish laments - a third of them carried the melody, a third of them approximated regulators, the rest played drones. This morning I'm drafting a letter of application to the Arts Council for funding to make this a reality. 76 Folk Trombones is the working title of my project. As well as playing in pubs, my idea is to tour Medieval English Cathedrals where the musicians will wander freely by way of an installation rather than a performance as such. The exception to this will be a Joyful Noise to the Lord Trombone Folk Mass at Paddy's Wigwam which will include Irish Dancers, Fluffy Morris and several community Drum Choirs with all the music taken from the Psalm Tones of Joseph Gelineau which will be sung by monks and laity alike.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Campin
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 06:42 AM

Massed trombones are a sort of community music form in some places. Look up Moravian trombone choirs.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Jack Blandiver
Date: 03 Oct 09 - 07:21 AM

A nice concept but the reality is about as interesting as the Ukulele Orchestra of GB - in other words, more muso tedium! Trombones are the instruments of Angels - like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GohBkHaHap8


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Declan
Date: 04 Oct 09 - 05:51 AM

I remember once when Rory McLeod (a name I haven't heard much lately) was visiting Dublin back in the 80s and produced a trombone in an Irish trad session in Hughes's pub.

A certain well know Cok bozouki player looked up, grinned, mumbled "That's f**king ridiculous" and put his head down and kept playing.

I quite enjoyed the trombone that night, but amn't generally that fond of them in sessions, but as has been said earlier, it always depends who's playing it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: bubblyrat
Date: 04 Oct 09 - 04:47 PM

What's a Cok bouzouki player ?? Sounds a bit louche to me !!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 05 Oct 09 - 05:43 AM

Will Fly and TheSnail:

The tune of the anti-trombonist song is very like The E Of My O C, but I don't think it's identical. The song is done occasionally by John Kirkpatrick and also by Dave Townsend (voice & English concertina) and Phil Humphries (trombone). It got a welcome outing from Melodeonboy at Tenterden Festival last Saturday.

The song powerfully reinforces the point made by several people on this thread that it's not the instrument itself which is objectionable, although the player may be.

Valmai


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 07 Oct 09 - 06:51 AM

I'm delighted to report that at the English tunes session last night at the John Harvey Tavern, Bear Yard, Lewes, East Sussex we had twenty musicians and rather more instruments, including a magnificent tuba owned and controlled by Mel Stevens. It was a great asset; you could see smiles lighting up everyone's face each time the tuba joined in with that sort of stately flatulence normally associated with a Morris Minor changing down.

The link maker is slow today so I'll just quote the John Harvey's website: http://www.johnharveytavern.co.uk/index.html. The session is on the first Tuesday evening of the month and anyone who fancies leading it is welcome to have a go - reply to me on this thread or PM me if you prefer.

Valmai


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Oct 09 - 11:23 AM

As a player of melodeons, banjo and various brass - bone, euphonium and occasionally tuba, I think it would be a sad day for english music when sessions did not have a mix of tune, rhythm and bass instruments - they all have their role to play in making great music - nowt worse than a room just full of melodeons, for example. That said, I do try and be sensitive to the rest of the room, like everyone else should. As for Irish music - not much room for brass there, in my humble opinion, except in perhaps specialised arrangements.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: mandotim
Date: 07 Oct 09 - 12:59 PM

I'm not sure if I've told this story before, but a trombone in a session was responsible for just about the funniest thing I've ever seen. Jolly Jock from Biggles' Wartime Band joined us for a bit of a session up in Tideswell, and brought his trombone as well as his usual ukulele. He was singing a comic song, and punctuating each verse with a burst of trombone. Suddenly, a pair of matched Jack Russell terriers came tearing into the room. They identified Jock as the source of the sound, and proceeded to leap into the air (alternating perfectly, one up, one down) trying to grab the slide of the trombone, presumably so they could drag it off and kill it. As soon as he stopped playing, they sat perfectly still, with heads on one side, looking quizzically at Jock. When he started again, they were off again, leaping at the trombone. Jock had to keep lifting the slide higher and higher to avoid the snapping jaws, and it looked for all the world like a perfectly choreographed dance routine. How he finished the song I'll never know, because the rest of the pub was helpless with laughter for the next ten minutes!
Tim


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 07 Oct 09 - 04:58 PM

Excellent story. Knick knack, paddywhack, give a dog a trombone ...

Valmai


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: Will Fly
Date: 08 Oct 09 - 03:17 AM

Tim, it's times like that when you regret not always having a camcorder with you!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Trombones at sessions
From: greg stephens
Date: 08 Oct 09 - 03:32 AM

Some dogs howl when people play melodeons. Who am I to say they are wrong?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 19 July 4:43 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.