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BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.

McGrath of Harlow 20 Nov 09 - 01:19 PM
Matthew Edwards 20 Nov 09 - 01:37 PM
Jim Dixon 20 Nov 09 - 01:38 PM
Bob the Postman 20 Nov 09 - 01:40 PM
Bob the Postman 20 Nov 09 - 01:42 PM
McGrath of Harlow 20 Nov 09 - 01:47 PM
GUEST,leeneia 20 Nov 09 - 02:49 PM
Mrrzy 20 Nov 09 - 06:32 PM
McGrath of Harlow 20 Nov 09 - 07:26 PM
Beer 20 Nov 09 - 08:09 PM
Beer 20 Nov 09 - 08:12 PM
Dave Roberts 20 Nov 09 - 08:53 PM
Beer 20 Nov 09 - 09:30 PM
Ross Campbell 20 Nov 09 - 11:51 PM
MGM·Lion 21 Nov 09 - 01:14 AM
GUEST,leeneia 21 Nov 09 - 03:22 PM
Dave Roberts 21 Nov 09 - 06:06 PM
Peter T. 21 Nov 09 - 07:28 PM
Ross Campbell 21 Nov 09 - 08:33 PM
Ross Campbell 21 Nov 09 - 10:14 PM
Ross Campbell 21 Nov 09 - 11:44 PM
Dave Roberts 22 Nov 09 - 04:38 AM
Dave Roberts 22 Nov 09 - 07:37 AM
RangerSteve 22 Nov 09 - 01:31 PM
Dave Roberts 24 Nov 09 - 02:33 PM
McGrath of Harlow 24 Nov 09 - 03:51 PM
Donuel 24 Nov 09 - 03:51 PM
McGrath of Harlow 24 Nov 09 - 05:55 PM
McGrath of Harlow 24 Nov 09 - 05:57 PM
Dave Roberts 24 Nov 09 - 07:59 PM
GUEST,leeneia 24 Nov 09 - 08:52 PM
MGM·Lion 24 Nov 09 - 10:16 PM
Dave Roberts 25 Nov 09 - 06:42 AM
Smedley 25 Nov 09 - 07:18 AM
GUEST,Dáithí 25 Nov 09 - 07:38 AM
Murray MacLeod 25 Nov 09 - 04:32 PM
TRUBRIT 27 Nov 09 - 07:24 PM
Alice 27 Nov 09 - 07:54 PM
Mysha 28 Nov 09 - 04:18 PM
Murray MacLeod 29 Nov 09 - 05:25 AM
Valmai Goodyear 29 Nov 09 - 06:49 AM
RangerSteve 29 Nov 09 - 10:11 AM
Dave Roberts 29 Nov 09 - 04:50 PM
TRUBRIT 29 Nov 09 - 08:15 PM
Ross Campbell 29 Nov 09 - 10:06 PM
Ross Campbell 29 Nov 09 - 10:11 PM
Dave Roberts 30 Nov 09 - 06:50 AM
Mysha 30 Nov 09 - 12:49 PM
McGrath of Harlow 30 Nov 09 - 12:57 PM
Dave Roberts 30 Nov 09 - 01:51 PM
Mysha 30 Nov 09 - 05:07 PM
robomatic 30 Nov 09 - 10:01 PM
McGrath of Harlow 01 Dec 09 - 01:00 PM
TRUBRIT 02 Dec 09 - 10:34 PM
MGM·Lion 03 Dec 09 - 12:39 AM
TRUBRIT 18 Dec 09 - 08:11 PM
Alice 18 Dec 09 - 10:41 PM
Riginslinger 19 Dec 09 - 09:50 AM

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Subject: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:19 PM

I'm reading one of Wodehouse's later books - "Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin". He wrote it celebrate his 91st birthday, but it's as lively and fresh as anything he ever wrote.

Anyway at one point the hero, Monty Bodkin, is in a nightclub being advised by his employer on what to do if the place is raided by the police.

"But I soon learned the lesson that ought to be taght in the schools, and that is that when a bunch of flatfeet burst in with their uncouth cry of 'Everybody keep their seats please,' the thing to do is to iris out unobtrusively through the kitchen."..."It was no idle boast that Mr Llewellyn had made when he spoke of his skill at irising out through kitchens."

Excellent advice, I am, sure, and I am sure we should all take it too heart - but that word "iris" leapt out at me. It is clear enough what it means in general, but it's not a use of the word I have ever come across before, and I am sure that Wodehouse would have had some particular shade of meaning to it.

So has anyone anything to add to enlighten me?   Any other occurrences? Did he just make it up for the fun of it, or was it (or is it still) current in some circles?


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Matthew Edwards
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:37 PM

Are you too young to remember the way Looney Tunes used to end?

The "iris" of the camera lens closing on a scene is a term for a fade-out in films so P G Wodehouse would have found that a lovely metaphor for a graceful getaway.

Matthew


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:38 PM

From Cinema Craftsmanship: A Book for Photoplaywrights by Frances Taylor Patterson (New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1921), page 120:

The terms "Iris In" and "Iris Out" are used when the writer wishes the iris diaphragm manipulated for a certain effect. Irising is frequently used instead of the fade to indicate the completion of a scene sequence and the beginning of a new series of scenes. On the screen the effect is seen as a full frame gradually becoming encircled until it is a mere dot, or (for the iris in) a dot which becomes an ever-widening circle until it occupies the full frame. The iris cuts down the area of the picture on the screen, but not the amount of illumination upon the part of the picture shown. The fade is due to light control; the iris to space control. Irising is often called, and more properly, vignetting. The iris device consists of a series of curved movable blades placed in front of the lens of the camera. The iris is often used to call attention to a particular object which might otherwise escape emphasis, yet which is not of sufficient importance to warrant a close-up. If for instance at the end of a scene the writer wants to call the audience's attention to a ring, or a worn-out shoe, or a revolver on the floor, any of which might have a particular significance in the plot, he may add the words "Iris down to Ring," or "Iris down to Shoe," or "Iris down to Revolver." Very often a director will use the iris to focus the attention upon the face of the hero or heroine. The "iris" and "fade" are sometimes combined effectively.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:40 PM

It might refer to an effect used in early motion pictures, where a transition was indicated by closing the iris of the camera lens on one scene and opening it on another--rather like closing and opening the proscenium curtains on a stage play.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Bob the Postman
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:42 PM

The phone rang after I had typed the above but before I hit submit--and Matthew and Jim both got in ahead of me.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 01:47 PM

Well, that didn't take long. As I rather anticipated, it turns out that Wodehouse still retained an indimmed eye for the mot juste at 91.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 02:49 PM

This is most interesting. I'm glad to hear that there are other Wodehouse fans around.

In fact, just last week I picked up a Wodehouse novel at the Half-Price Bookstore, and the clerk told me that his things are popular. This came as a surprise to me, because the atmosphere in that store always seemed to say, "What are you doing here? You're too old for us!"

The man was the absolute master of the English sentence.

No doubt the term 'irising' was a holdover from his nightmare years in Hollywood, writing for films and dealing with studio magnates who seemed to be a cross between a gorilla and a tyrannosaurus rex.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 06:32 PM

I can read Wodehouse and hear the Looney Toones music, they mesh beautifully!

Thanks for the explanation, nice visual, eh?


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 07:26 PM

There was a clue, if I'd thought about it - Monty Bodkin's employer, with the expertise in "irising" is the head of a Hollywood film studio.

A good word anyway. A pity it's so obscure. It's an interesting thing how some jargon or slang terms manage to be understood widely, and others seem not to.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Beer
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:09 PM

So tell me. Anyone here collect his works? Or do you just like reading the books.
Beer (adrien)


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Beer
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:12 PM

Sorry I didn't finish my thought.

Is there a book of his that you are looking for?
ad.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 08:53 PM

PGW was, and probably always will be, unsurpassed as a writer of sparkling comedy. I collect the books on a modest scale, and have done since schooldays in the sixties, and I'm sure I've read 'Pearls, Girls and Monty Bodkin', but can't recall the 'irising' bit. Probably just advancing age.
Talking of which, I was brought up with a start recently when I read somewhere that that amiable old buffer Lord Emsworth of the Blandings stories, although seemingly in his dotage all through the saga, was actually supposed to be slightly younger than I am now. I think, if I recall correctly (and that's by no means certain) that his age was given as around fifty-six in one of the stories. But none of Wodehouse's characters ever aged, so Lord Emsworth was, presumably at that age throughout.
Probably just another of those signs of ageing, like policemen looking younger and modern pop music getting on your nerves.
It's lovely to know that P. G Wodehouse is as popular as ever. His writing never fails to cheer me up.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Beer
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 09:30 PM

Anyone interested in the following?. Free.........Just pay postage and handling


The Old Reliable
Do Butlers Burgle Banks?
Galahad at Blandings
Leave it to PSSMITH
Uneasy Money
A Gentleman of Leisure
Three Men and a Maid

I may have more but not sure. Will look further if interest is here.
Adrien


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 20 Nov 09 - 11:51 PM

Jeeves and Wooster with Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie airing currently on ITV3 (and ITV3+1) in UK - Saturday 21st, 7:00am, Sunday 22nd, 6:55am, Monday 23rd, 7:00pm.

Missed these on their original run, but they are regularly rerun on UK digital channels (Freeview). I have probably seen them all by now, but they are always worth another look.

I picked up on PG Wodehouse when I was about twelve, and devoured all I could find at the local library (well-stocked then - I wonder how many volumes they would have now?). There was an earlier TV adaptation which also seemed to transfer the books quite well. The Fry/Laurie series is masterly, with music and introductory artwork that absolutely fits the period.

Another author I discovered about that time was Compton Mackenzie, in his day as popular as Wodehouse. By contrast his "Monarch of the Glen" series of stories was gutted and butchered by the BBC. Potentially as distinctive as Wodehouse's work in humour and invention, Mackenzie's stories and characters are swamped by the modern setting and ridiculous plot twists.

Ross


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 01:14 AM

Drifting a bit — another writer of same period, with own distinctive style and way with a sentence [in his case invariable, indeed obsessive, use of historic present tense], whom I can still read with absolute pleasure, is the great Damon Runyon. I delight in such observations as: "The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that is the way to bet".


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 03:22 PM

"Talking of which, I was brought up with a start recently when I read somewhere that that amiable old buffer Lord Emsworth of the Blandings stories, although seemingly in his dotage all through the saga, was actually supposed to be slightly younger than I am now."

Don't worry, Dave. Emsworth's problems were not caused by age. He was born dreamy and woolly-headed. And no doubt growing up around Constance and Hermione made it all worse.

There is a story, however, in which Emsworth is called upon to defend a little girl from Angus McSomebody, the evil gardener. Finally his noodle-like spine stiffens and he comes to the rescue.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 06:06 PM

Ah yes! Lord Emsworth and The Girlfriend. I re-read that one quite recently. I think the gardener was called McAllister.
It's likely I always thought of Lord Emsworth as somewhat elderly because of the superb portrayal of the character by Sir Ralph Richardson. Certainly whenever I picture the Earl in my mind it's Sir Ralph I see.
And the adaptations of the Bertie Wooster stories that RossCampbell mentions must be the BBC series of the sixties starring Ian Carmichael and Dennis Price as Bertie and Jeeves. The programmes had a wonderful theme song, sung by Carmichael, called 'What would I do without Jeeves?'
But I agree that the Fry & Laurie version has to be the definitive one.
Incidentally, two other actors whose style fits Wodehouse's dialogue like a glove are Richard Briers and Jonathan Cecil.
Pip pip!


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Peter T.
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 07:28 PM

There was a contest somewhere (should revive it) which demanded that you apply Wodehousean language to some contemporary scene. One of the winners, if I recall correctly, had:

"Gosh," G.W. said, dropping the country. "Dashed awkward, eh, what?"
"Never mind, sir," shimmered Cheney, "Allow me. The exuberance of youth, sir."
"How do you know these things, Cheney," replied G.W., "Is it the fish, or the whosit you're always reading, the one with the name like one of those Italian cars?"
"Machievelli, sir," opined Cheney. "Let me just remove these broken bodies before the police arrive."


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 08:33 PM

Dave Roberts - "The World of Wooster" is indeed the very chap - opening titles on YouTube here. Can't find the song

Just watching this while I type - "Honoria Glossop Turns Up" (recorded earlier). Here's a clip:- Jeeves and Wooster - Puttin' on the Ritz .

Ross


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 10:14 PM

Jeeves and Wooster - title music (animated - and brilliantly!)


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 21 Nov 09 - 11:44 PM

Jeeves And Wooster - The Complete Collection [DVD] [1990] £12.98 for 23 episodes (inc free post and packing on Amazon.co.uk (but re-link through Mudcat!))

Ross


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 04:38 AM

Wow! Thanks for the Youtube link, Ross, and note the appreciative comments from Youtubers. It's interesting that someone should say that he considered Ian Carmichael a little old to be playing Bertie. My Dad used to say exactly the same thing. But I reckon Mr Carmichael has the last laugh here - up until a couple of years ago he was still making appearances on Yorkshire TV's 'The Royal' and looking remarkably youthful for his age.
Interesting too that those opening titles have an instrumental backing rather than the vocal version I remember so well. Could it be that the song was played over the closing titles?
Anyway, it so happens that I can remember the lyrics, so you can watch the show opening again, and imagine Ian Carmichael, in his fruity Bertie Wooster voice, singing the folowing to that excellent tune:

What would I do without you, Jeeves?
I'd get in the most frightful stew, Jeeves.
The day wouldn't start without you to wake me,
Respectfully shake me,
And proffer that perfect cup of tea you make me;
Who in the world would I call in
To winkle me out when I fall in
The terrible traps that destiny weaves
And all that sort of rot;
What would I do without Jeeves?

So why can I remember that and not remember where I left my glasses?...in my day....etc...etc....


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 07:37 AM

Just had a thought on those lyrics:

It's possible that 'wake me' and 'shake me' should be the other way round.

'respectfully wake me' sounds just slightly better.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: RangerSteve
Date: 22 Nov 09 - 01:31 PM

I bought a copy of "Leave it to Psmith" on a whim back in the late 60's. That chance encounter is another reason that I believe in a higher power. I've been hooked on Wodehouse ever since. No one has mentioned the Mr. Mulliner stories yet, so I'll put in my two cents here: If you haven't read them yet, do it as soon as possible.

My favorite line from one of the Blandings Castle stories, a description of a pig eating: "It was a plobby, wafflesome sound". I can't think of a better way to describe it.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 02:33 PM

I'm resurrecting this thread, because I think that some members of the Mudcat community might like to hear more about PGW and his life-enhancing writing.
What ho!


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 03:51 PM

I think Wodehouse must have invented Boris Johnson. And Spliffy Cameron for that matter.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Donuel
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 03:51 PM

Wooster and Jeeves are my favorite secret pleasure. They are simply jolly good fun but I think an outsider looking in for just a moment might get the wrong idea.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 05:55 PM

Why?


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 05:57 PM

I mean, the obvious implication is that you are a good egg, Donuel, and surely that's not wrong.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 07:59 PM

Tinkerty-tonk!


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 08:52 PM

Hi, RangerSteve. It so happens I bought a copy of 'Leave it to Psmith' last week. It contains the wonderful sentence.

He sidled up like a well-dressed sheep.

It's Freddie Threepwood, of course. Thank goodness he finally found happiness with an American dog-food heiress.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 24 Nov 09 - 10:16 PM

I think my favourite is in, I think, The Code Of The Woosters - the one with Sir Roderick Spode, fascist leader of the Blackshorts [not a typo: they had run out of shirt colours — "Footer bags ... bare knees ... how perfectly foul!"]

From memory: "A few idiots shout 'Heil Spode,' and you think it is the voice of the people. But what the voice of the people is really saying is, 'Just look at that frightful ass Spode swanking about in footer bags. Did you ever in all your puff see such a perfect perisher?'"


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 06:42 AM

Then there's the immortal:

'I turned to Aunt Agatha, whose demeanour
was now rather like that of one who, picking daisies on the railway,
has just caught the down express in the small of the back'.

(The Inimitable Jeeves)


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Smedley
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 07:18 AM

"He had suddenly become the wettest man in Worcestershire".

Can't recall the context (except that some character had just fallen into a lake) but twenty-odd years after reading this in a PGW story, it can still make me grin like a fool.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: GUEST,Dáithí
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 07:38 AM

..and my favourite excuse for missing a putt:

"He claimed to have been distracted by the roar of a butterfly in an adjacent meadow"

Sheer poetry!
D


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 25 Nov 09 - 04:32 PM

how simply spiffing to discover so many PGW fans on Mudcat.

I got hooked at the age of 12, and I think I have read pretty much the entire oeuvre since then.

I enjoyed all the novels, but I think his true genius lay in his mastery of the short story.

"The great hat mystery" is one of his all-time classics.

I seem to remember a quote (not necessarily from that story) along the lines of

"What a curse these social distinctions are. They ought to be abolished. I remember saying that to Karl Marx once, and he thought there might be an idea for a book in it."


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: TRUBRIT
Date: 27 Nov 09 - 07:24 PM

I started reading Wodehouse when I was about 11-- my dad was a huge fan and had tons of his books. My mum and my sister did not get it -- Daddy and I used to quote Wodehouse at each other during long drives 'She shivered like a jelly in a high wind ' -- describing, I think, an aunt......my favorite quote ever is Bertie of Sir Roderick Glossop -- can't remember it literally and too tired to look it up but on the lines of....'it has to give you a jaded opinion on mankind when you spend years sitting on the heads of your nearest and dearest before sending them off to the funny farm....'

And I LOIVE Roderick Spode -- bring on the silver cow creamers.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Alice
Date: 27 Nov 09 - 07:54 PM

I just want to add that I love PG Wodehouse and have a small collection of old hard-bound copies that I've picked up at second hand stores.

from Fish Preferred

"Oh, Hugo!" she said.
The arm became animated. It clutched her, drew her along the mouse-and-mildew scented floor. And time stood still.
Hugo was the first to break the silence.
"And to think that not so long ago I was wishing that a flash of lightning would strike me amidships!"
The aroma of mouse and mildew passed away.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Mysha
Date: 28 Nov 09 - 04:18 PM

Hi,

Another Psmith fan here. My parents and my grandparents had a a few of the butleresque books, but I never did more than just wonder about the titles.

Picked up "Psmith lost het op" second-hand in one of the many book-shops of Amsterdam. I occasionally picked up another Wodehouse since, and it's now a row of at least thirteen books (that's the count of the ones I can see from here). I don't know how many were published as Dutch pocket books, though, or for that matter, how many books he wrote in all. I've never read an English one, though, so some things may have been lost in translation. Eg. I can't recall any iris-ing.

This Compton Mackenzie, did he write books that the Monarch of the Glen TV-series was based on? I liked the series, but it had a bit of a "filter before use" quality, like there are little bits in it that don't belong there. I wonder what the books would be like.

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Murray MacLeod
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 05:25 AM

the thought of P G Wodehouse translated into Dutch makes the mind boggle.

"some things may have been lost in translation" could well be one of the great understatements of all time.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Valmai Goodyear
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 06:49 AM

Working with Guy Bolton and Jerome Kerne, PGW wrote the lyrics to songs for a lot of musical comedies. Does anyone know if the scores are extant? My appetite was whetted by an account in his joint autobiography with Bolton, 'Bring On The Girls'.

One show included a song about a successful American gangster in an expensive restaurant feeling nostalgic about his early days. It was called 'Tulip Time In Sing-Sing'. It has a rambling introductory verse which includes the couplet

'I overheard this mobster
Sitting sobbing in his lobster'

and the chorus includes

'Take me back, back, back
Give me lots of rocks to crack....'

I bet there are some PGW songs worth reviving.

Valmai


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: RangerSteve
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 10:11 AM

Valmai - Smithsonian Folkways has a CD of Wodehouse's show tunes.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 04:50 PM

I think the most famous Wodehouse song is 'Just My Bill'


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: TRUBRIT
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 08:15 PM

48 books in my library (without looking for the ones misfiled). Weekend Wodehous I am SURE has a translation ftom English to Dutch of an essay..........but I can't find it!!


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 10:06 PM

Mysha

Complete bibliography here for Compton Mackenzie:-

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/m/compton-mackenzie/

These five are the ones I think have "Monarch of the Glen" connections (same characters, locations, etc) :-

The Monarch of the Glen

Hunting the Fairies

The Rival Monster

Ben Nevis Goes East

The Stolen Soprano


Other humourous stories set in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland:-

Whisky Galore - filmed on Barra, Mackenzie's home for many years. Eriskay, further north, was the scene of the wartime wreck that inspired the story.

Tight Little Island - re-titling of Whisky Galore to go with the film's American release.

Rockets Galore

Keep the Home Guard Turning

The Highland Omnibus has Monarch of the Glen, Whisky Galore and The Rival Monster


You can link through the site to Abebooks for available copies. Sadly no links to banks, building societies or independent financial advisers to help you pay the sometimes serious prices. Still a few available for pocket-money, though. Good Luck!

Ross
(apologies for thread drift/hijacking).


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Ross Campbell
Date: 29 Nov 09 - 10:11 PM

To make amends for hi-jacking the thread in the last post:-

P G Wodehouse complete bibliography @ fantasticfiction.co.uk

Ross


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 06:50 AM

Talking of Compton Mackenzie, a few years ago I read his book 'Rogues and Vagabonds'. It was an object lesson in descriptive writing.
The story partly concerned a family which was in the firework manufacturing business, and the descriptions of the deep reds and greens and blues produced by various combinations of chemicals was so vivid that I can still picture them now.
Unfortunately the book had been packaged for the 'romantic fiction' market (the main plot involved some romantic tomfoolery or other) and had one of those lurid bodice-ripper covers.
People would look at me askance, as P G Wodehouse, would put it, when they saw me reading it.
But, like all Mckenzie's books, it was an example of masterly storytelling.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Mysha
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 12:49 PM

Hi,

Ross, thanks, I'll have a look how I can persuade some of those to travel my way.

Dave, can I say one word: "Dust jackets!" (Oh, that probably counts as two words in English.)

McGrath: I somewhat disagree about Diefje met verlos. It's still a good book, but the introduction doesn't work as well. I assume it's a sequel to a book that created this situation, but the link is not his best work. When things finally get rolling, however, ...

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 12:57 PM

Not his best book, but pretty good for 91. It's a sequel to The Luck of the Bodkins - I've no idea what that would be called in Dutch.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Dave Roberts
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 01:51 PM

Mysha,

Of course you can say 'dust jackets'! The book in question was a paperback, but I see what you're getting at.
Perhaps a sticky label with 'A Brief History Of Time' or 'War & Peace' or somesuch on it?


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Mysha
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 05:07 PM

Hi,

Well, now that we're on that subject: I had a class mate once, whose every schoolbook one could immediately recognise as being his property, since all his books were covered with newspapers. Cheap protection, available in quantity and it allowed him to jot down occasional thoughts in empty spots and later simply exchange the newspaper (or maybe he wrapped another layer around them, I don't know). I guess you could do the same, to completely hide the original artwork, plus it would give the lookers-on something to try and read as well.


Of course, in the vein of this thread, can I advise you to spread several newspaper pages out on your cluttered desk, when you do this. And only do this after you've just placed a small but important document there, I would have to insist on that. Then you should shift the pages around, with the book already on them, to detect the best fit, and when you've finally wrapped the book, you can throw the other papers in the basket without taking a second look at them, so you can leave in a hurry to catch the gardener you see outside your window, whom you mean to instruct regarding the bonfire you want lit next week.

Having done this, you should then have you plenty of reason to suspect the other members of your household, and especially the guests, of appropriating aforementioned small but important document, and to track their movements while at the same trying to avoid the person that needs to have access to it, or maybe making up excuses about its temporary absence. By the time you have eliminated all possible suspects, and have been forced to admit that you haven't got a clue as to its whereabouts, a gentle soul might help you remember the desk, the papers, and the paper basket, so you might discover that the basket has been emptied, and the gardener is just now using the papers to light the bonfire.

I have to warn you though, that after this utter failure, you'll be an easy target for your niece, the one you lend a book to a few days ago, who claims she can solve all your problems if only you will support her in doing something young and foolish, like marrying someone she loves.

Bye,
                                                                Mysha


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: robomatic
Date: 30 Nov 09 - 10:01 PM

Not too long ago I obtained the Jeeves & Wooster saga of Laurie & Fry. I'd watched most but not all of them on American Public Broadcasting, and aside from their intrinsic worth, just love watching Laurie do Bertie after an episode of "House". One lovely surprise was the pilot episode where Jeeves shows up to take over Wooster's life as he is coming to consciousness after a night of it and his first five speechless minutes of coming to grips with sobering reality while faced with Jeeves utter equanimity and powers of order had me helpless almost floor-bound, for the hilarity of the moment and the volumes not spoken of how a society regarded its own powers of order, behavior, and bounds of decorum. In the Jeeves look one can summon the entire British Empire looking at the world and saying softly "think you ever did any better?"


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 01 Dec 09 - 01:00 PM

Effortless superiority is the only sort worth having.


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: TRUBRIT
Date: 02 Dec 09 - 10:34 PM

I found the essay in Dutch -- it is in 'Weekend Wodehouse" published in '51 and reprinted in '53 (my edition - perhaps reprinted since then). The article is on P. 98 (my edition) titled "Good news from Denmark' but - of course - is in Danish so I have no idea what it says.

The quote I mangled in an earlier post referred to Roderick Glossop, janitor to the looney bin.

'......I mean constantly having to sit on people's heads while their nearest and dearest phone to the asylum to send round the wagon - does tend to make a chappie take what you might call a warped view of humanity.'

Love that man......


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 12:39 AM

NB Trubrit - I appreciate the blinkered view implied in yr choice of nickname: but please observe that Dutch & Danish are NOT the same language...


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: TRUBRIT
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 08:11 PM

And I KNOW that and I totally apologize - a slip of the typing finger -- very careless and thoughtless on my part.......


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Alice
Date: 18 Dec 09 - 10:41 PM

Beer, I collect them. I try to find the old hard bound copies. The most recently purchased one, though, must have tasted good to my late samoyed dog, as he chewed the binding, which almost made me cry!


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Subject: RE: BS: P.G.Wodehouse slang query.
From: Riginslinger
Date: 19 Dec 09 - 09:50 AM

That's a good idea, Alice. Where do you find them, used book stores, garage sales...?


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