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Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'

DigiTrad:
TO MORROW


Related threads:
(origins) Origin: I Want to Go to Morrow (Lew Sully, 1898) (29)
Lyr Req: To Morrow (County Mayo Irish Version) (11)


Charley Noble 03 Dec 09 - 10:22 AM
Charley Noble 03 Dec 09 - 11:56 AM
Charley Noble 03 Dec 09 - 05:13 PM
EBarnacle 03 Dec 09 - 06:43 PM
Charley Noble 03 Dec 09 - 07:11 PM
clueless don 04 Dec 09 - 09:33 AM
CapriUni 14 Sep 11 - 01:11 PM
Jack Campin 14 Sep 11 - 02:05 PM
Charley Noble 15 Sep 11 - 10:04 AM
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Subject: Origin of Traditional Tune "Train To Morrow'
From: Charley Noble
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 10:22 AM

No, I'm not interested in the lyrics in this thread, which have been tracked back in Mudcat threads to Lew Sully, 1898, and reworked later in 1957 by Bob Gibson et al. But the melody that Gibson uses seems like an Irish/Australian tune to me which I just can't quite place. I'd like to know if anyone has a clue where it came from because I'm planning to adapt an old Australian poem for singing and I'd like to provide a proper credit.

For some reason the town of "Killarney" pops up in my head but none of the songs I've found here have the right melody. There does seem to be some similarity to the verse melody of "I'm a Rover an' Seldom Sober" with the A-part of "Train to Morrow" but the B-part of this song seems unique.

Anyway, I would appreciate help.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: Charley Noble
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 11:56 AM

Maybe the tune is related to "Darling Nellie Gray," at least the A-part.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: Charley Noble
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 05:13 PM

Sounds as if what I've been looking for is "Rambling Rover" which is attributed to Andy Stewart but may well be a traditional tune.

Everything is better now!

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: EBarnacle
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 06:43 PM

Is this the same song/story as the train to Morrow will not be here until tomorrow,....etc? If so, ask Liam's Brother. I believe I have heard him do it.


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: Charley Noble
Date: 03 Dec 09 - 07:11 PM

Eric-

It's the same tune but it's not the lyrics that I'm after and it seems to me now that it's the tune of "Rambling Rover" that I was after for the A-Part, with the B-Part from "Train to Morrow."

Not to worry! But thanks for responding.

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: clueless don
Date: 04 Dec 09 - 09:33 AM

I suppose it depends on who is singing it. Whenever I have heard "To Morrow" sung, it was sung to the Irish tune "The Red-Haired Boy", which is the same tune to which "The Little Beggarman" is sung.

Don


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: CapriUni
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 01:11 PM

Whichever tune it is, it seems to be a common one for comic / satiric lyrics. I recently stumbled on Bob Harris's The Thing (YouTube video), and it wasn't until the lyrics to "To Morrow" superimposed themselves over the tune stuck in my head that I realized Lou Sully and Bob Harris had borrowed from the same source, with a tiny bit of variation between them.


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: Jack Campin
Date: 14 Sep 11 - 02:05 PM

It's most often known as "The Lincolnshire Poacher".


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Subject: RE: Origin of Traditional Tune 'To Morrow'
From: Charley Noble
Date: 15 Sep 11 - 10:04 AM

Thanks for the additional information; "The Lincolnshire Poacher" rings true.

I don't think "Little Beggarman/Red-Haired Boy" works at all, at least in terms of how I've heard it sung.

The old Australian poem I've adapted for singing is by Edwin J. Brady and is titled "Laying on the Screw," a stevedore tribute and it may be heard as a MP3 sample on my website: Click here for MP3 and lyrics

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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