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BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links

Bill D 13 Dec 09 - 11:49 AM
gnu 13 Dec 09 - 02:44 PM
Bill D 13 Dec 09 - 04:25 PM
gnu 13 Dec 09 - 05:05 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Dec 09 - 05:28 PM
Bat Goddess 13 Dec 09 - 06:04 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Dec 09 - 06:19 PM
Mrrzy 13 Dec 09 - 06:55 PM
frogprince 13 Dec 09 - 07:22 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 13 Dec 09 - 08:18 PM
Bill D 13 Dec 09 - 08:45 PM
GUEST,pattyClink 13 Dec 09 - 09:59 PM
the lemonade lady 14 Dec 09 - 05:26 AM
ard mhacha 14 Dec 09 - 06:05 AM
Crow Sister (off with the fairies) 14 Dec 09 - 06:28 AM
Bat Goddess 14 Dec 09 - 09:12 AM
GUEST,HiLo 14 Dec 09 - 09:45 AM
Bill D 14 Dec 09 - 02:32 PM
Bill D 14 Dec 09 - 02:40 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 14 Dec 09 - 03:27 PM

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Subject: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bill D
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 11:49 AM

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8394991.stm

"Scientists have discovered what they believe is a genetic cause of severe obesity in children.

The team concluded that the loss of a key segment of DNA can be to blame....."

--------------------------------------------------------------------

This is one of many new things we are learning about our pre-disposition to certain conditions.

Notice- in the article, it emphacizes tendencies,and pre-disposition, not certainties. I have read for years that the body 'sets' certain control mechanisims of metabolisim in childhood, so that it 'learns' to use calories more or less effeciently depending on practice.
This does seem to hold some hope for heading off some problems by childhood monitoring.

(I have said for years that I just one of the lucky ones who do NOT gain weight easily. Perhaps studies like this will eventually find better ways to help those who are not so fortunate.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: gnu
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 02:44 PM

It still won't stop those children who do not feel loved, for whatever reason, from finding solace in food. I have seen it over and over.

Saw it in two instances at a recent family gathering and it made me sad and a bit angry.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bill D
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 04:25 PM

*sigh*...yes, sadly true. But as more information becomes available and is TAUGHT, it may help more & more families to head off problems early.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: gnu
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 05:05 PM

I surely hope so BD... on whatever level. What I witnessed was truly saddening. Whether it is genetic or environment for whatever reason, it's good for all to be educated in all respects and move forward.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 05:28 PM

The Mayo Clinic site says simply-
"Although there are genetic and hormonal influences on body weight, the bottom line is that obesity occurs when you take in more calories than you can burn through exercise and normal daily activities."

Regardless of cause, a long term comittment is needed to watch what one eats and drinks.
Because the brain tends to override through setting a 'set point' that reduces metabolism and decreases activity, cutting calorie intake may not work. Medical supervision is necessary.

It is not an easy problem for those with genetic tendencies to obesity.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 06:04 PM

A problem, too, is high fructose corn syrup -- it interferes with the process that tells the brain that you are full and don't need to eat more. Besides seeing soda containers in just about everyone's hands these days, child or adult, HFCS is added to almost all processed foods.

About 10 years ago I applied to be in a study of the progeny of parents where one parent was of "normal" weight (and had no trouble maintaining it) and one parent struggled (more or less unsuccessfully) to keep the weight off. I was initially turned down; can't remember the reason. Then, when they finally decided to include me in the study, I couldn't be part of it because my father had just passed away.

I really wanted to be a part of the study so I could find out what the genetic influences are. My mother's family all were large people and my mother struggled to keep her weight down. Dad's family were disposed to being fairly lean and could eat anything without gaining weight. Of my siblings, I'm the "little" one -- and I'm "goddess-shaped"!

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 06:19 PM

Oh, lucky "goddess-shape." Ever made the cover of "Playboy?"

Seriously, I guess I was lucky since both sides were on the "Lean and hungry" side. But now that I am old and have arthritis, limiting activity, I have gained unwelcome pounds.
And my older son just sent me a kilo of Serrano ham and a kilo of Manchego cheese. And I love an omelet made with the ham and grated Manchego, or just slices of each with a croissant. And .....!


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Mrrzy
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 06:55 PM

Hey, there's only one link in that post!


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: frogprince
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 07:22 PM

I saw the stats a few months ago on how much corn syrup is being used in commercial food compared to just a few years ago. Don't remember specifics, but it's a high multiple.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 08:18 PM

Much nonsense- and a little sense- to effects of high fructose corn syrup.
Mayo Clinic-
"So far, research has yielded conflicting results about the effects of high-fructose corn syrup. For example, various early studies showed an association between increased consumption of sweetened beverages (many of which contained high-fructose corn syrup) and obesity. But recent research- some of which is supported by the beverage industry- suggests that high-fructose corn syrup isn't intrinsically less healthy than other sweeteners, nor is it the root cause of obesity."

Sodas, etc. "corn syrup and other sweeteners are high in calories and low in nutritional value. Regularly including these products in your diet has the potential to promote obesity- which in turn promotes conditions such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and coronory artery disease."

Mayoclinic.com, Nutrition and Healthy Eating. "High-fructose corn syrup: What are the concerns?"

The answer is moderation in using sugars.

Beet and cane sugar- 50%glucose, 50%fructose.
Corn syrup- 45% glucose, 55%fructose.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bill D
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 08:45 PM

"... isn't intrinsically less healthy than other sweeteners, ..."

"The answer is moderation in using sugars."

Not exactly.... I used to think that, but my wife has demonstrated on several occasions her susceptibility TO HFCs and her ability to discern them in certain products. Now, she is more sensitive than most, but they cause several unpleasant symptoms for her...depending on the % of HFCs. Does it affect her 'basic health'? I don't know...but it affects her comfort and causes quote.."a slight burning sensation right under the skin".. unquote. She tried to ignore it at first, but has since discovered that reaction upon eating something that she had no idea would have HFCs.

More & more research is being done, and the stories are too common to ignore, even though specific causes are not pinned down yet. Some manufacturers are reducing or eliminating HFCs, and that often requires a cost increase...which is NOT something they wish to do.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: GUEST,pattyClink
Date: 13 Dec 09 - 09:59 PM

Anybody interested in some good summaries of the research, there are 2 pieces of work I consider outstanding:

Dr. Robert Lustig, a leading edge pediatric endocrinologist with results of his and other studies: The Bitter Truth lecture

And Gary Taubes' book "Good Calories, Bad Calories" which is an exhaustive but engrossing book on what is and is not known about fat and fighting it, and no, it's not as simple as calories in, fat out.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: the lemonade lady
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 05:26 AM

So what it could be genetics, is that an excuse? Tax the fat!

Sal


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: ard mhacha
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 06:05 AM

Corn syrup?, try asking for that in my local grocer shops.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Crow Sister (off with the fairies)
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 06:28 AM

From my own experience of one seriously obese family, there is a definite inclination to place the blame *anywhere* but on eating too much. I've no idea if these people all had a gene, but they sure as hell ate an absolutely *vast* amount of food. And I'm not sure that feeling more confident when you say "it's my genes" can in any way help people to stop over-eating. I've witnessed this, and then heard the complaints about not being able to lose weight even though "I don't eat much". In this family, there is a complete failure to either recognise (warped perception?), or admit to (shame of?), the immense portion sizes, the second helpings, the puddings drowned in double cream, sandwiches made with half an inch thick slices of cheese, the sweets and biscuits routinely eaten throughout the day and during the evening, the doubled up take aways with large fries twice a week... and so-on. It's tragic as the young women are already morbidly obese - so where will they be in twenty years if they maintain the same eating habits they've learned from their parents in childhood?

For my own part, I know full well that I've got as fat as a very fat thing in the past year or so, from simply ingesting far more calories than my body needs - as a simple behavioural response to depression. Maybe I have a fat gene too, as I've always had to work at staying slim and now I'm not making the effort to eat healthily, I've turned into a fatso! Not really a surprise to me, considering my habits have changed and I know full well I've been more slack than I would if I really cared enough to make the same effort I used to. But I can't see that believing it might be my genetics, will help me when I finally start trying to shake all this excess lard off!


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 09:12 AM

The thing is, sweeteners of whatever kind are added -- mostly unnecessarily or definitely more than needed -- to just about everything you can buy in a grocery store.

About the only way to substantially reduce the amount of sweeteners (and sodium, but that's yet another subject) is to cook or bake everything from scratch using whole foods.

Linn


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: GUEST,HiLo
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 09:45 AM

I recently returned from a trip to America. One of the things I noticed while eating in restaurants was the huge quantities of food served for individual meals.I also observed an odd thing about attitudes toward food..it is either toxic or fuel...neither of which is culturally true..I don't think. Sugar is not toxic, nor is salt, or fat, in moderation , these things are are not bad for us. We simply need to eat less and regard food differently. As for genetics, many studies suggest that a very low proportion of obesity is the result of a genetic "disorder". However, it may be caused by a lifestyle "didorder"..eating too much.


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bill D
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 02:32 PM

My only point was...IF one has genetic disposition towards obesity AND 'sets' the body with bad eating habits, it can really be a problem. Therefore IF we understand that there really is such a thing as genetic links to obesity tendencies, it will at least allow the opportunity to begin controlling it early.

OBVIOUSLY, poor eating habits will make bad problems worse, and OF COURSE commercial products and portion sizes and fast-food joints make it even harder to cope.

Who knows...maybe the psychological tendencies to overindulge are also partly genetic? All *I* want to stress is that the more good scientific info we can get, the better chance we have to make good choices!


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Bill D
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 02:40 PM

"(and sodium, but that's yet another subject) "

well,maybe there IS hope...

Campbell Soup to cut SpaghettiOs sodium level


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Subject: RE: BS: Obesity & genetics - specific links
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 14 Dec 09 - 03:27 PM

Campbells has been good about providing both 'normal' and low salt soups, broths and other products. Both are on the store shelves; it is your choice.
If one compares the recommended daily salt limit against the salt content of processed and other foods the 'average' person eats, only rarely will the recommended limit be exceeded (people with diagnosed problems, of course should follow their physician's advice.

I don't like pops or sodas, so seldom drink them. There is little, or conflicting evidence about advantages of one sugar over another; until there is proven data, I won't worry about types. Individual doctors and dieticians may have a hair up their ass about certain substances; their opinions must be balanced against overall findings.

Bakeries here use mostly beet sugar, which is important economically to the province.


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