Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafesj

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


BS: Gardening 2010

Related thread:
BS: Composting (38)


katlaughing 31 Dec 09 - 05:37 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 31 Dec 09 - 06:00 PM
Bobert 31 Dec 09 - 06:09 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Dec 09 - 07:56 PM
LilyFestre 31 Dec 09 - 08:12 PM
Janie 31 Dec 09 - 08:14 PM
Janie 31 Dec 09 - 08:30 PM
katlaughing 31 Dec 09 - 11:26 PM
Darowyn 01 Jan 10 - 04:50 AM
LilyFestre 01 Jan 10 - 08:57 AM
maire-aine 01 Jan 10 - 09:02 AM
Maryrrf 01 Jan 10 - 11:04 AM
GUEST,Falco 01 Jan 10 - 12:10 PM
CarolC 01 Jan 10 - 01:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jan 10 - 05:48 PM
Richard Bridge 01 Jan 10 - 06:00 PM
Shanghaiceltic 01 Jan 10 - 06:31 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jan 10 - 04:04 PM
Janie 06 Mar 10 - 02:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Mar 10 - 02:42 PM
Janie 06 Mar 10 - 04:34 PM
maire-aine 06 Mar 10 - 05:30 PM
Maryrrf 06 Mar 10 - 05:33 PM
Bobert 06 Mar 10 - 05:35 PM
maeve 06 Mar 10 - 06:08 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Mar 10 - 01:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 07 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM
maeve 07 Mar 10 - 04:21 PM
Cuilionn 08 Mar 10 - 03:33 PM
Lizzie Cornish 1 08 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM
Janie 09 Mar 10 - 12:01 AM
Liz the Squeak 09 Mar 10 - 02:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 09 Mar 10 - 12:02 PM
mouldy 09 Mar 10 - 01:51 PM
Janie 13 Mar 10 - 12:49 AM
LadyJean 13 Mar 10 - 12:54 AM
Bobert 13 Mar 10 - 06:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 12:34 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 04:51 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 Mar 10 - 09:33 PM
Janie 15 Mar 10 - 01:17 AM
Alice 15 Mar 10 - 01:19 AM
Tinker 15 Mar 10 - 11:38 AM
Stilly River Sage 15 Mar 10 - 03:01 PM
Bobert 16 Mar 10 - 08:39 AM
maire-aine 18 Mar 10 - 03:59 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 Mar 10 - 04:17 PM
Bobert 26 Mar 10 - 04:40 PM
maeve 26 Mar 10 - 06:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM
maeve 27 Mar 10 - 06:22 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Mar 10 - 08:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Apr 10 - 01:30 PM
MMario 01 Apr 10 - 01:39 PM
Janie 01 Apr 10 - 03:48 PM
Bobert 01 Apr 10 - 07:38 PM
Janie 02 Apr 10 - 01:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Apr 10 - 02:31 PM
Janie 02 Apr 10 - 05:29 PM
Janie 04 Apr 10 - 12:06 AM
Janie 04 Apr 10 - 01:05 AM
Janie 04 Apr 10 - 01:07 AM
Bobert 04 Apr 10 - 07:54 AM
Joybell 05 Apr 10 - 01:26 AM
Bobert 05 Apr 10 - 07:52 AM
MMario 05 Apr 10 - 10:34 AM
Cuilionn 05 Apr 10 - 02:11 PM
gnu 05 Apr 10 - 02:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Apr 10 - 06:36 PM
Joybell 05 Apr 10 - 09:47 PM
Janie 05 Apr 10 - 11:02 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Apr 10 - 12:48 AM
Rapparee 06 Apr 10 - 05:35 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Apr 10 - 04:14 PM
Bobert 07 Apr 10 - 10:29 PM
Janie 07 Apr 10 - 11:23 PM
Janie 08 Apr 10 - 01:20 AM
Bobert 08 Apr 10 - 07:33 AM
Liz the Squeak 08 Apr 10 - 08:28 AM
Cuilionn 08 Apr 10 - 04:57 PM
Bobert 08 Apr 10 - 05:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Apr 10 - 01:46 AM
MMario 09 Apr 10 - 08:45 AM
maeve 09 Apr 10 - 09:24 AM
Janie 09 Apr 10 - 05:14 PM
Bobert 11 Apr 10 - 09:26 PM
Janie 12 Apr 10 - 12:33 AM
Bobert 12 Apr 10 - 08:26 AM
Bobert 12 Apr 10 - 08:54 PM
Janie 12 Apr 10 - 09:10 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Apr 10 - 12:48 AM
Bobert 17 Apr 10 - 09:27 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Apr 10 - 04:16 PM
Maryrrf 17 Apr 10 - 04:50 PM
Janie 17 Apr 10 - 05:59 PM
Bobert 17 Apr 10 - 08:13 PM
Janie 17 Apr 10 - 09:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 Apr 10 - 03:04 PM
Alice 18 Apr 10 - 03:13 PM
Janie 19 Apr 10 - 12:12 AM
Bobert 19 Apr 10 - 08:11 AM
Maryrrf 19 Apr 10 - 11:37 AM
Alice 19 Apr 10 - 12:19 PM
Janie 25 Apr 10 - 08:19 PM
Bobert 25 Apr 10 - 08:34 PM
maeve 25 Apr 10 - 08:43 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Apr 10 - 12:10 AM
MMario 26 Apr 10 - 11:57 AM
Maryrrf 01 May 10 - 11:25 AM
Bobert 01 May 10 - 08:16 PM
LadyJean 01 May 10 - 11:07 PM
wysiwyg 02 May 10 - 05:54 PM
Bobert 02 May 10 - 08:42 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 May 10 - 06:55 PM
Bobert 03 May 10 - 07:57 PM
Janie 03 May 10 - 11:22 PM
MMario 04 May 10 - 08:27 AM
Bobert 06 May 10 - 07:45 AM
maeve 06 May 10 - 08:28 AM
Stilly River Sage 06 May 10 - 08:31 AM
MMario 06 May 10 - 09:25 AM
Bobert 06 May 10 - 09:29 AM
MMario 06 May 10 - 09:30 AM
maeve 06 May 10 - 09:46 AM
maeve 06 May 10 - 10:23 AM
MMario 06 May 10 - 10:46 AM
maeve 06 May 10 - 11:03 AM
maeve 06 May 10 - 11:13 AM
Bobert 06 May 10 - 12:37 PM
maeve 06 May 10 - 01:25 PM
MMario 06 May 10 - 03:25 PM
Janie 06 May 10 - 03:48 PM
Bobert 09 May 10 - 08:33 AM
Stilly River Sage 09 May 10 - 07:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 May 10 - 10:03 PM
Janie 09 May 10 - 11:20 PM
Bonzo3legs 10 May 10 - 02:50 AM
Darowyn 10 May 10 - 04:31 AM
Bonzo3legs 10 May 10 - 07:37 AM
MMario 10 May 10 - 10:19 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 May 10 - 11:41 PM
Janie 11 May 10 - 12:10 AM
MMario 11 May 10 - 09:43 AM
SINSULL 11 May 10 - 10:13 AM
MMario 11 May 10 - 11:24 AM
Janie 11 May 10 - 11:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 May 10 - 11:55 PM
Janie 12 May 10 - 01:24 AM
MMario 12 May 10 - 09:23 AM
SINSULL 12 May 10 - 09:26 AM
MMario 12 May 10 - 10:05 AM
Stilly River Sage 12 May 10 - 12:23 PM
Janie 12 May 10 - 02:08 PM
Bobert 12 May 10 - 09:05 PM
MMario 13 May 10 - 10:12 AM
Stilly River Sage 13 May 10 - 11:52 AM
MMario 13 May 10 - 11:58 AM
Bobert 13 May 10 - 06:08 PM
Bobert 14 May 10 - 08:32 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 May 10 - 02:10 PM
Janie 14 May 10 - 06:16 PM
Stilly River Sage 14 May 10 - 07:03 PM
Janie 14 May 10 - 07:51 PM
Bobert 14 May 10 - 08:09 PM
Janie 14 May 10 - 08:29 PM
Bobert 15 May 10 - 08:13 AM
Janie 15 May 10 - 09:59 AM
Janie 15 May 10 - 06:26 PM
Janie 16 May 10 - 08:45 AM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 16 May 10 - 08:47 AM
Janie 16 May 10 - 08:56 AM
GUEST,mmario 16 May 10 - 01:02 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 May 10 - 12:42 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 May 10 - 02:21 PM
MMario 17 May 10 - 03:05 PM
Bobert 17 May 10 - 03:44 PM
Cuilionn 17 May 10 - 09:21 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 May 10 - 12:36 AM
gnu 18 May 10 - 03:12 PM
MMario 18 May 10 - 04:25 PM
Bobert 18 May 10 - 06:01 PM
Alice 18 May 10 - 06:23 PM
Bobert 18 May 10 - 07:34 PM
Janie 18 May 10 - 09:09 PM
Janie 18 May 10 - 10:45 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 May 10 - 12:41 AM
MMario 19 May 10 - 12:53 PM
SINSULL 20 May 10 - 10:06 AM
Cuilionn 20 May 10 - 10:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 20 May 10 - 11:37 AM
Bettynh 20 May 10 - 11:46 AM
Bobert 20 May 10 - 08:23 PM
Alice 20 May 10 - 09:41 PM
Bobert 20 May 10 - 10:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 May 10 - 12:33 AM
Janie 21 May 10 - 11:35 PM
Alice 22 May 10 - 12:30 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 May 10 - 01:29 AM
Bobert 22 May 10 - 08:23 PM
Alice 22 May 10 - 09:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 May 10 - 01:21 AM
Stilly River Sage 23 May 10 - 02:13 AM
GUEST,LynnT 23 May 10 - 07:45 AM
Cuilionn 23 May 10 - 07:47 AM
Bettynh 23 May 10 - 11:32 AM
gnu 23 May 10 - 03:59 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 23 May 10 - 05:07 PM
Alice 23 May 10 - 05:09 PM
Janie 23 May 10 - 09:14 PM
Janie 23 May 10 - 09:55 PM
Bobert 23 May 10 - 10:14 PM
Alice 23 May 10 - 11:01 PM
Janie 24 May 10 - 12:06 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 May 10 - 12:34 AM
Bobert 24 May 10 - 07:24 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 May 10 - 11:40 AM
Janie 24 May 10 - 09:05 PM
The Sandman 25 May 10 - 01:18 PM
Janie 25 May 10 - 01:54 PM
MMario 25 May 10 - 03:03 PM
gnu 25 May 10 - 03:20 PM
Bobert 25 May 10 - 07:53 PM
Janie 25 May 10 - 08:41 PM
MMario 27 May 10 - 08:58 AM
Janie 27 May 10 - 12:17 PM
Bobert 27 May 10 - 12:55 PM
Bettynh 27 May 10 - 01:13 PM
gnu 27 May 10 - 06:15 PM
Alice 27 May 10 - 06:30 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 May 10 - 06:54 PM
Janie 27 May 10 - 07:12 PM
Alice 27 May 10 - 11:58 PM
MMario 29 May 10 - 04:26 PM
Alice 29 May 10 - 04:31 PM
Alice 29 May 10 - 05:44 PM
MMario 29 May 10 - 05:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 May 10 - 06:11 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 May 10 - 09:50 PM
MMario 01 Jun 10 - 11:10 AM
Alice 01 Jun 10 - 11:39 AM
MMario 01 Jun 10 - 11:44 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jun 10 - 05:22 PM
Janie 01 Jun 10 - 06:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jun 10 - 12:15 PM
Bettynh 02 Jun 10 - 12:25 PM
Janie 02 Jun 10 - 10:00 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jun 10 - 02:36 AM
MMario 03 Jun 10 - 09:16 AM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jun 10 - 11:12 AM
Bettynh 03 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM
Alice 04 Jun 10 - 01:33 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jun 10 - 11:06 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jun 10 - 12:02 AM
Bobert 05 Jun 10 - 08:32 AM
Janie 05 Jun 10 - 09:23 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jun 10 - 11:20 AM
Alice 05 Jun 10 - 11:39 AM
Janie 06 Jun 10 - 02:41 PM
Alice 06 Jun 10 - 04:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 06 Jun 10 - 05:35 PM
Alice 06 Jun 10 - 07:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Jun 10 - 12:27 AM
Alice 07 Jun 10 - 11:42 AM
Bobert 07 Jun 10 - 12:57 PM
Alice 07 Jun 10 - 01:43 PM
Bettynh 07 Jun 10 - 02:33 PM
Janie 07 Jun 10 - 08:58 PM
Alice 07 Jun 10 - 09:39 PM
Maryrrf 07 Jun 10 - 10:23 PM
Janie 07 Jun 10 - 10:30 PM
MMario 08 Jun 10 - 11:58 AM
gnu 08 Jun 10 - 02:57 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 03:07 PM
Maryrrf 08 Jun 10 - 03:25 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 03:32 PM
gnu 08 Jun 10 - 03:35 PM
Maryrrf 08 Jun 10 - 04:09 PM
Janie 08 Jun 10 - 04:12 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 04:26 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 05:18 PM
Bobert 08 Jun 10 - 09:02 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 09:22 PM
Janie 08 Jun 10 - 10:22 PM
Janie 08 Jun 10 - 11:03 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM
Maryrrf 08 Jun 10 - 11:10 PM
Alice 08 Jun 10 - 11:12 PM
Maryrrf 08 Jun 10 - 11:36 PM
Alice 09 Jun 10 - 12:12 AM
Bobert 09 Jun 10 - 09:18 AM
Maryrrf 09 Jun 10 - 10:14 AM
Alice 09 Jun 10 - 01:49 PM
Alice 09 Jun 10 - 01:55 PM
Penny S. 09 Jun 10 - 05:24 PM
Bobert 10 Jun 10 - 08:15 AM
Alice 10 Jun 10 - 10:15 AM
Alice 10 Jun 10 - 10:18 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jun 10 - 01:17 PM
Alice 11 Jun 10 - 11:19 AM
Bobert 11 Jun 10 - 08:09 PM
Janie 12 Jun 10 - 06:28 AM
Bobert 12 Jun 10 - 08:20 AM
Janie 12 Jun 10 - 10:19 AM
MMario 12 Jun 10 - 10:29 AM
Alice 12 Jun 10 - 11:22 AM
Bobert 12 Jun 10 - 08:45 PM
Alice 12 Jun 10 - 08:59 PM
Janie 12 Jun 10 - 09:55 PM
Alice 12 Jun 10 - 11:01 PM
Alice 13 Jun 10 - 05:51 PM
Bobert 13 Jun 10 - 09:20 PM
Alice 14 Jun 10 - 01:59 AM
Stilly River Sage 14 Jun 10 - 11:52 PM
Janie 15 Jun 10 - 12:06 AM
Alice 15 Jun 10 - 05:10 PM
Alice 15 Jun 10 - 07:13 PM
Bobert 15 Jun 10 - 07:49 PM
Alice 15 Jun 10 - 08:12 PM
Janie 15 Jun 10 - 09:08 PM
Bobert 15 Jun 10 - 10:11 PM
Alice 15 Jun 10 - 10:36 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Jun 10 - 12:48 AM
MMario 16 Jun 10 - 09:39 AM
Stilly River Sage 16 Jun 10 - 10:37 AM
Bobert 16 Jun 10 - 12:40 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Jun 10 - 10:05 AM
MMario 17 Jun 10 - 10:11 AM
Alice 17 Jun 10 - 12:42 PM
Alice 17 Jun 10 - 12:59 PM
Bobert 17 Jun 10 - 02:45 PM
gnu 17 Jun 10 - 03:00 PM
MMario 17 Jun 10 - 03:33 PM
Alice 17 Jun 10 - 03:50 PM
Janie 17 Jun 10 - 11:10 PM
Stilly River Sage 18 Jun 10 - 12:09 AM
MMario 18 Jun 10 - 10:18 AM
GUEST 18 Jun 10 - 12:02 PM
MMario 18 Jun 10 - 12:12 PM
Bettynh 18 Jun 10 - 04:17 PM
Alice 18 Jun 10 - 04:25 PM
maire-aine 18 Jun 10 - 05:13 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Jun 10 - 12:06 AM
Alice 19 Jun 10 - 12:21 AM
Bobert 19 Jun 10 - 07:31 AM
Bettynh 19 Jun 10 - 10:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 19 Jun 10 - 12:10 PM
Alice 19 Jun 10 - 02:27 PM
Bettynh 19 Jun 10 - 02:59 PM
Alice 19 Jun 10 - 03:10 PM
maire-aine 19 Jun 10 - 03:24 PM
Joe Offer 19 Jun 10 - 04:11 PM
Alice 19 Jun 10 - 06:49 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Jun 10 - 06:53 PM
Bobert 19 Jun 10 - 07:49 PM
maeve 19 Jun 10 - 08:12 PM
Bobert 19 Jun 10 - 08:51 PM
katlaughing 19 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM
Bobert 19 Jun 10 - 11:12 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 12:02 AM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 12:15 AM
MMario 20 Jun 10 - 08:10 AM
Bobert 20 Jun 10 - 10:02 AM
Bettynh 20 Jun 10 - 12:26 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jun 10 - 01:05 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 01:10 PM
gnu 20 Jun 10 - 01:27 PM
MMario 20 Jun 10 - 01:33 PM
gnu 20 Jun 10 - 01:56 PM
Bettynh 20 Jun 10 - 02:17 PM
Bettynh 20 Jun 10 - 02:59 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 03:18 PM
Bobert 20 Jun 10 - 03:42 PM
katlaughing 20 Jun 10 - 04:05 PM
maire-aine 20 Jun 10 - 06:17 PM
Bobert 20 Jun 10 - 08:34 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 08:46 PM
maeve 20 Jun 10 - 08:59 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 09:33 PM
Alice 20 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jun 10 - 10:47 PM
maire-aine 21 Jun 10 - 12:25 AM
Bettynh 21 Jun 10 - 07:00 AM
Bobert 21 Jun 10 - 07:21 AM
maeve 21 Jun 10 - 07:54 AM
Alice 21 Jun 10 - 11:16 AM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jun 10 - 11:23 AM
Alice 21 Jun 10 - 11:30 AM
MMario 21 Jun 10 - 11:43 AM
Alice 21 Jun 10 - 11:51 AM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jun 10 - 01:28 PM
MMario 21 Jun 10 - 01:32 PM
Alice 21 Jun 10 - 01:39 PM
Janie 21 Jun 10 - 10:22 PM
Bobert 21 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM
GUEST,Cuilionn- no biscuit?! 22 Jun 10 - 09:07 AM
WalkaboutsVerse 22 Jun 10 - 09:37 AM
Alice 22 Jun 10 - 02:46 PM
Janie 22 Jun 10 - 02:57 PM
Janie 22 Jun 10 - 02:58 PM
Alice 22 Jun 10 - 09:06 PM
Janie 22 Jun 10 - 10:11 PM
Alice 22 Jun 10 - 10:17 PM
Bobert 22 Jun 10 - 10:41 PM
maeve 22 Jun 10 - 10:46 PM
maeve 22 Jun 10 - 10:52 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Jun 10 - 12:26 AM
Alice 23 Jun 10 - 01:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Jun 10 - 03:01 PM
Alice 23 Jun 10 - 05:31 PM
Alice 23 Jun 10 - 06:29 PM
Bobert 23 Jun 10 - 08:01 PM
Alice 23 Jun 10 - 10:01 PM
Janie 24 Jun 10 - 01:07 AM
Janie 24 Jun 10 - 01:21 AM
Janie 24 Jun 10 - 01:46 AM
Maryrrf 24 Jun 10 - 09:36 AM
Alice 24 Jun 10 - 11:37 AM
Bobert 24 Jun 10 - 05:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Jun 10 - 05:27 PM
GUEST 24 Jun 10 - 09:20 PM
Alice 24 Jun 10 - 09:25 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jun 10 - 12:10 AM
maire-aine 25 Jun 10 - 07:58 AM
MMario 25 Jun 10 - 09:27 AM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jun 10 - 10:20 AM
MMario 25 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM
Bobert 25 Jun 10 - 12:52 PM
Alice 25 Jun 10 - 01:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jun 10 - 08:48 PM
Alice 25 Jun 10 - 09:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jun 10 - 09:25 PM
Alice 25 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM
Janie 25 Jun 10 - 10:54 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Jun 10 - 01:06 PM
Alice 26 Jun 10 - 01:48 PM
Bobert 26 Jun 10 - 07:42 PM
TJO 26 Jun 10 - 07:53 PM
Alice 26 Jun 10 - 09:13 PM
Bobert 26 Jun 10 - 09:41 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Jun 10 - 10:47 PM
Alice 26 Jun 10 - 10:54 PM
Janie 27 Jun 10 - 01:29 AM
Stilly River Sage 27 Jun 10 - 07:28 AM
Bobert 27 Jun 10 - 07:55 AM
Guy Wolff 27 Jun 10 - 08:15 AM
Janie 27 Jun 10 - 10:27 AM
pdq 27 Jun 10 - 10:48 AM
Alice 27 Jun 10 - 12:11 PM
Alice 27 Jun 10 - 12:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Jun 10 - 07:28 PM
Janie 27 Jun 10 - 08:16 PM
Bobert 27 Jun 10 - 08:30 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Jun 10 - 12:26 AM
Janie 28 Jun 10 - 12:47 AM
Bobert 28 Jun 10 - 08:24 AM
Alice 28 Jun 10 - 11:54 AM
Stilly River Sage 28 Jun 10 - 05:45 PM
Janie 29 Jun 10 - 01:10 AM
Bobert 29 Jun 10 - 08:45 AM
maire-aine 29 Jun 10 - 02:54 PM
Alice 29 Jun 10 - 03:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Jun 10 - 06:03 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Jun 10 - 11:40 PM
Alice 30 Jun 10 - 06:36 PM
maeve 30 Jun 10 - 06:40 PM
Alice 30 Jun 10 - 06:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 30 Jun 10 - 09:39 PM
Alice 30 Jun 10 - 10:19 PM
Janie 01 Jul 10 - 12:52 AM
Janie 01 Jul 10 - 12:55 AM
Bobert 01 Jul 10 - 07:06 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Jul 10 - 12:06 PM
Alice 01 Jul 10 - 01:42 PM
Alice 01 Jul 10 - 07:09 PM
Bobert 01 Jul 10 - 07:45 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jul 10 - 05:47 PM
Alice 02 Jul 10 - 05:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jul 10 - 06:30 PM
Alice 02 Jul 10 - 06:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Jul 10 - 07:45 PM
Janie 02 Jul 10 - 10:19 PM
Alice 02 Jul 10 - 11:35 PM
Bobert 03 Jul 10 - 08:23 AM
Alice 03 Jul 10 - 11:52 AM
Stilly River Sage 03 Jul 10 - 12:47 PM
Alice 03 Jul 10 - 04:20 PM
Janie 04 Jul 10 - 10:23 AM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jul 10 - 11:46 AM
Bobert 04 Jul 10 - 12:13 PM
Bobert 04 Jul 10 - 12:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 04 Jul 10 - 12:40 PM
Alice 04 Jul 10 - 11:56 PM
Bobert 05 Jul 10 - 10:45 AM
Alice 05 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM
GUEST,Janie 05 Jul 10 - 03:32 PM
pdq 05 Jul 10 - 03:48 PM
Janie 05 Jul 10 - 08:12 PM
Bobert 05 Jul 10 - 09:10 PM
Bobert 05 Jul 10 - 09:11 PM
Janie 05 Jul 10 - 09:43 PM
maeve 05 Jul 10 - 09:53 PM
Bobert 05 Jul 10 - 10:06 PM
Janie 05 Jul 10 - 10:30 PM
Janie 05 Jul 10 - 10:33 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Jul 10 - 11:37 PM
Alice 05 Jul 10 - 11:43 PM
maire-aine 06 Jul 10 - 07:35 PM
Alice 06 Jul 10 - 07:58 PM
Bobert 06 Jul 10 - 09:14 PM
Janie 06 Jul 10 - 09:43 PM
Bobert 07 Jul 10 - 08:45 AM
Alice 07 Jul 10 - 12:35 PM
maeve 07 Jul 10 - 12:41 PM
Bobert 07 Jul 10 - 03:26 PM
maeve 07 Jul 10 - 03:41 PM
Alice 08 Jul 10 - 06:51 PM
maire-aine 08 Jul 10 - 10:05 PM
Bobert 08 Jul 10 - 10:34 PM
Janie 08 Jul 10 - 10:45 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Jul 10 - 12:20 AM
Bobert 09 Jul 10 - 07:59 AM
Bettynh 09 Jul 10 - 10:22 AM
MMario 09 Jul 10 - 10:23 AM
GUEST,Janie 09 Jul 10 - 11:16 AM
Bobert 09 Jul 10 - 11:28 AM
Stilly River Sage 09 Jul 10 - 12:30 PM
Alice 09 Jul 10 - 01:12 PM
Bettynh 09 Jul 10 - 02:40 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Jul 10 - 05:17 PM
Bobert 09 Jul 10 - 09:34 PM
Alice 09 Jul 10 - 11:46 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 10 - 12:46 AM
Bobert 10 Jul 10 - 07:44 AM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 10 - 02:20 PM
Alice 10 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM
Bobert 10 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 10 - 05:09 PM
Alice 10 Jul 10 - 05:25 PM
Janie 10 Jul 10 - 06:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 10 - 07:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 10 Jul 10 - 07:14 PM
Bobert 10 Jul 10 - 08:34 PM
Janie 10 Jul 10 - 10:02 PM
maeve 11 Jul 10 - 10:44 AM
Stilly River Sage 11 Jul 10 - 12:09 PM
Alice 11 Jul 10 - 12:28 PM
maeve 11 Jul 10 - 12:32 PM
gnu 11 Jul 10 - 01:34 PM
Darowyn 11 Jul 10 - 03:20 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Jul 10 - 05:18 PM
Bobert 11 Jul 10 - 08:56 PM
Alice 11 Jul 10 - 09:16 PM
Bobert 11 Jul 10 - 10:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Jul 10 - 10:21 AM
MMario 12 Jul 10 - 10:25 AM
Bobert 12 Jul 10 - 10:32 AM
Alice 12 Jul 10 - 01:46 PM
maeve 12 Jul 10 - 02:01 PM
Stilly River Sage 12 Jul 10 - 07:24 PM
Janie 12 Jul 10 - 11:59 PM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jul 10 - 01:00 AM
Janie 13 Jul 10 - 06:42 AM
Bobert 13 Jul 10 - 09:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 13 Jul 10 - 11:08 AM
gnu 13 Jul 10 - 02:28 PM
Bobert 13 Jul 10 - 03:06 PM
gnu 13 Jul 10 - 03:33 PM
maeve 13 Jul 10 - 05:07 PM
Bobert 13 Jul 10 - 06:18 PM
Janie 13 Jul 10 - 07:49 PM
Bobert 13 Jul 10 - 08:39 PM
Alice 13 Jul 10 - 08:56 PM
Janie 13 Jul 10 - 11:21 PM
Bobert 14 Jul 10 - 10:14 AM
Alice 15 Jul 10 - 09:55 PM
Alice 15 Jul 10 - 10:05 PM
Janie 15 Jul 10 - 10:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 16 Jul 10 - 01:19 AM
Stilly River Sage 16 Jul 10 - 03:19 PM
gnu 16 Jul 10 - 03:47 PM
Alice 16 Jul 10 - 04:40 PM
Janie 16 Jul 10 - 07:22 PM
Bobert 16 Jul 10 - 08:58 PM
Stilly River Sage 17 Jul 10 - 03:08 AM
Bettynh 18 Jul 10 - 10:49 AM
maire-aine 18 Jul 10 - 12:16 PM
Alice 18 Jul 10 - 12:31 PM
Bobert 18 Jul 10 - 12:49 PM
Stilly River Sage 19 Jul 10 - 12:23 AM
Janie 19 Jul 10 - 10:20 PM
Bobert 19 Jul 10 - 10:43 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Jul 10 - 01:51 AM
Bobert 20 Jul 10 - 07:51 AM
Alice 20 Jul 10 - 11:06 AM
Alice 20 Jul 10 - 02:32 PM
Alice 20 Jul 10 - 02:48 PM
Janie 21 Jul 10 - 01:49 AM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jul 10 - 02:15 PM
Bobert 21 Jul 10 - 02:30 PM
Alice 21 Jul 10 - 03:23 PM
maire-aine 21 Jul 10 - 09:29 PM
Alice 21 Jul 10 - 10:13 PM
Bobert 21 Jul 10 - 10:19 PM
Stilly River Sage 21 Jul 10 - 11:02 PM
Bettynh 22 Jul 10 - 09:34 AM
Alice 22 Jul 10 - 10:35 AM
gnu 22 Jul 10 - 11:01 AM
Alice 22 Jul 10 - 11:44 AM
Stilly River Sage 22 Jul 10 - 12:47 PM
Stilly River Sage 24 Jul 10 - 02:19 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Jul 10 - 02:00 PM
Stilly River Sage 26 Jul 10 - 11:55 AM
Bobert 30 Jul 10 - 12:54 PM
MMario 30 Jul 10 - 01:38 PM
GUEST,Janie 30 Jul 10 - 03:23 PM
MMario 30 Jul 10 - 04:18 PM
Stilly River Sage 30 Jul 10 - 04:33 PM
Janie 30 Jul 10 - 06:46 PM
gnu 30 Jul 10 - 07:04 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Jul 10 - 01:12 PM
gnu 31 Jul 10 - 02:14 PM
Janie 01 Aug 10 - 02:07 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 10 - 02:50 AM
gnu 01 Aug 10 - 06:35 AM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 10 - 11:25 AM
gnu 01 Aug 10 - 02:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 01 Aug 10 - 02:32 PM
Janie 01 Aug 10 - 02:46 PM
Alice 01 Aug 10 - 10:10 PM
Stilly River Sage 02 Aug 10 - 12:33 AM
Stilly River Sage 02 Aug 10 - 12:57 PM
Stilly River Sage 03 Aug 10 - 02:32 AM
MMario 04 Aug 10 - 08:40 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Aug 10 - 01:06 AM
MMario 05 Aug 10 - 09:21 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Aug 10 - 11:47 PM
Bettynh 06 Aug 10 - 08:54 AM
Stilly River Sage 06 Aug 10 - 10:26 AM
maire-aine 06 Aug 10 - 07:06 PM
Stilly River Sage 07 Aug 10 - 12:11 AM
Alice 08 Aug 10 - 12:09 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Aug 10 - 12:17 AM
Stilly River Sage 08 Aug 10 - 01:24 PM
gnu 08 Aug 10 - 01:27 PM
Bettynh 08 Aug 10 - 05:24 PM
Bobert 08 Aug 10 - 05:46 PM
gnu 08 Aug 10 - 06:14 PM
Alice 08 Aug 10 - 08:44 PM
maire-aine 08 Aug 10 - 09:19 PM
Bobert 08 Aug 10 - 09:26 PM
Alice 08 Aug 10 - 09:28 PM
Stilly River Sage 09 Aug 10 - 12:25 AM
GUEST,Rev. Goose 'Goof' Gander (ret.) 09 Aug 10 - 12:36 PM
Alice 09 Aug 10 - 12:46 PM
Bobert 09 Aug 10 - 01:08 PM
GUEST,Rev. Goose 'Goof' Gander (re-hired) 09 Aug 10 - 02:06 PM
gnu 09 Aug 10 - 03:07 PM
Alice 10 Aug 10 - 02:43 PM
gnu 10 Aug 10 - 02:52 PM
Alice 10 Aug 10 - 04:25 PM
gnu 10 Aug 10 - 06:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 11 Aug 10 - 01:14 AM
gnu 19 Aug 10 - 04:06 PM
Bobert 19 Aug 10 - 06:39 PM
gnu 19 Aug 10 - 08:34 PM
Bobert 19 Aug 10 - 09:25 PM
Bobert 19 Aug 10 - 09:26 PM
Bobert 21 Aug 10 - 09:22 AM
gnu 21 Aug 10 - 01:15 PM
Stilly River Sage 22 Aug 10 - 06:20 PM
Alice 22 Aug 10 - 07:22 PM
Bobert 22 Aug 10 - 07:32 PM
Bettynh 23 Aug 10 - 01:07 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Aug 10 - 02:13 PM
Bettynh 23 Aug 10 - 02:28 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Aug 10 - 07:22 PM
Bobert 23 Aug 10 - 07:30 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Aug 10 - 08:42 PM
GUEST,Goose Gander 23 Aug 10 - 10:21 PM
Bettynh 24 Aug 10 - 09:03 AM
Stilly River Sage 24 Aug 10 - 12:26 PM
Janie 25 Aug 10 - 12:22 AM
Stilly River Sage 25 Aug 10 - 11:05 AM
pdq 26 Aug 10 - 10:30 AM
Bobert 27 Aug 10 - 10:22 AM
pdq 27 Aug 10 - 12:00 PM
Maryrrf 27 Aug 10 - 01:57 PM
WalkaboutsVerse 28 Aug 10 - 10:14 AM
Stilly River Sage 17 Sep 10 - 01:20 PM
gnu 20 Oct 10 - 02:58 PM
pdq 20 Oct 10 - 03:14 PM
Stilly River Sage 20 Oct 10 - 08:26 PM
Bobert 20 Oct 10 - 08:35 PM
gnu 21 Oct 10 - 02:29 PM
MMario 21 Oct 10 - 02:48 PM
GUEST,Jon 21 Oct 10 - 03:20 PM
maeve 21 Oct 10 - 04:07 PM
GUEST,Jon 21 Oct 10 - 04:45 PM
maeve 21 Oct 10 - 05:00 PM
Rumncoke 22 Oct 10 - 04:48 PM
GUEST,Jon 22 Oct 10 - 05:01 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Oct 10 - 01:46 AM
Darowyn 27 Oct 10 - 04:05 AM
maeve 27 Oct 10 - 06:53 AM
Penny S. 27 Oct 10 - 08:59 AM
GUEST,Jon 27 Oct 10 - 09:34 AM
GUEST,Jon 27 Oct 10 - 09:57 AM
Penny S. 28 Oct 10 - 06:44 AM
GUEST,Jon 28 Oct 10 - 12:26 PM
Bobert 28 Oct 10 - 06:39 PM
Stilly River Sage 29 Oct 10 - 10:52 AM
GUEST,Jon 29 Oct 10 - 11:42 AM
Bobert 22 Nov 10 - 07:33 PM
maire-aine 22 Nov 10 - 08:30 PM
GUEST,Jon 22 Nov 10 - 09:32 PM
Janie 22 Nov 10 - 10:34 PM
Stilly River Sage 23 Nov 10 - 12:39 AM
GUEST,Jon 23 Nov 10 - 01:52 AM
GUEST,Jon 23 Nov 10 - 01:59 AM
GUEST,Jon 23 Nov 10 - 02:01 AM
Stilly River Sage 23 Nov 10 - 12:56 PM
Stilly River Sage 27 Nov 10 - 12:47 PM
Bobert 27 Nov 10 - 02:37 PM
Stilly River Sage 05 Dec 10 - 12:34 PM
Bobert 06 Dec 10 - 08:40 AM
maeve 06 Dec 10 - 10:16 AM
Bobert 06 Dec 10 - 11:12 AM
Stilly River Sage 06 Dec 10 - 11:38 AM
Bobert 06 Dec 10 - 01:02 PM
The Sandman 25 Dec 10 - 12:34 PM
Bobert 25 Dec 10 - 01:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 25 Dec 10 - 11:10 PM
maeve 25 Dec 10 - 11:55 PM
Bobert 26 Dec 10 - 10:29 AM
The Sandman 27 Dec 10 - 08:20 AM
Stilly River Sage 27 Dec 10 - 11:57 AM
The Sandman 27 Dec 10 - 12:55 PM
Stilly River Sage 28 Dec 10 - 11:50 AM
The Sandman 31 Dec 10 - 09:59 AM
Bobert 31 Dec 10 - 10:21 AM
Stilly River Sage 31 Dec 10 - 07:48 PM
maeve 31 Dec 10 - 08:10 PM
Stilly River Sage 31 Dec 10 - 09:27 PM
The Sandman 01 Jan 11 - 09:47 AM

Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:













Subject: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 05:37 PM

This coming year I want to have some Jolly Rancher Joker pansies. No one sells the plants around here, so I shall have to buy the seeds. I was looking at a website which sells them when I came across Cow-Pots, made from cow manure! Have any of you used them. I've used peat pots before, but these sound like a good thing.

Hope you regulars don't mind my starting this. The seeds were supposed to be started in Nov. for spring, so I figure I'd better get with it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 06:00 PM

I hope gardeners everywhere move toward the following native-gardening way...

"SUMMARY OF NATIVE-GARDENING TALK – 2009 THEORY-SLAM GIG

Green/eco-friendly gardening is native gardening, and vegetables, plus other consumables, should be the only exotic-flora we plant - as doing so can help limit food-miles, etc. By filling our other garden spaces with natives, we use less water and other resources, whilst aiding the native-fauna that, over the centuries, evolved with them. (Even high-nectar exotics, such as Buddleia, that are very attractive to SOME native-fauna, should be avoided, because they upset nature's/God's balance – God created evolution, too, that is.)

Our green gardens, with their vegies and natives, can be made still greener by the addition of compost heaps/bins; a wildlife pond – for native frogs, newts, and so on, rather than exotic goldfish; bee- and bird-boxes, plus carefully-selected feeders; rain- and grey-water vats; by growing everything organically - including thrifty home-propagation plus species-swapping; and by leaving some lush untidy patches, decaying branches, etc." (from here).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 06:09 PM

Well, we have a nice pile of seed catalogues that are pourin' in... We're gonna definately do those "Cherokee Purple" tomatoes again this year...

We have, ah geeze, around 300 various azalea cutting and seedlings growing in the potting shed... We keep heat on in there (45 degrees) and grow lights 24/7... Some of the native azaleas are going to be redish... Yea!!!... There are so many pink ones that it's nice to get some red ones... We have grown them from seed...

The veggie garden is all plowed under for the winter... I plowed it to 15 inches which is as deep as my plow will turn over earth... Looking for a great veggie year...

Just cut the last of the brocolli after our first snow... Had to shake the snow off to find the heads but they were yummy... Spinich and lettuce are under the snow now... We'll see how they fared when it melts...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 07:56 PM

I haven't gotten some of my winter stuff in. I still might, because it grows nicely into the spring.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LilyFestre
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:12 PM

The seed catalogs are pouring in here too. We had a large, productive garden last year and I'm looking forward to having another one! The only things I know for SURE that we will be growing are Nash green beans (bush beans) and Providence corn. We bought the corn from a local Amish farmer this past summer and it's the best corn I've ever had! Yukon Gold and Kennebunc potatoes are a must too.

In the meantime, I'm having fun looking at all the varieties and specs. I'm searching for poblano peppers....had great success with them the summer before last but haven't been able to find the seeds (or plants) since.

YAY SPRING!

Michelle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:14 PM

Kat, peat pots do just the same as cow pots, and are much, much less expensive. I don't know anything about the environmental impact of the production of peat pots. You would do just as well to use egg cartons, yoghurt containers, waxed milk cartons, or several layers of newspaper* folded into container shapes -in other words, recycle stuff that you have anyway and would either be throwing in the trash or into the recycle bin (if recycling is available in your area). Other than the newspaper*, which you can plant in the ground like you do with peat pots, the other containers can go into the recycle or trash bin after they have done their duty as seed-starting pots.

* Not sure about the composition of inks in newspaper anymore. Used to be concerns about heavy metals in the ink when used as grow pots or mulch. I might use newspaper pots to start non-edible plants in, but don't think I would use them for food crops, or plant the pot in the soil without doing some more research.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 08:30 PM

My very fav catalog is Johnny's Selected Seeds.

Very slowly working on putting together a small raised plot under the trees to plant ferns - using the soil and roots of the annuals I dumped from pots this fall as the base and will add some topsoil and compost.

Traditionally I have spent New Year's day planting spring bulbs, but I still don't have the beds ready. But I do have leaves piled high in one part sun area that I know will turn into a flower garden sooner or later. Need to add blood meal to it. Have figured out where to set up the grow light shelves for seed starting, for whenever I do get beds actually built for veggies.

One of these days....

Still have kale doing well in pots that I planted this spring:>)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 31 Dec 09 - 11:26 PM

Thanks, Janie!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Darowyn
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 04:50 AM

We have a new garden to set up and plant this year. The greenhouse is nearly ready to go into operation- you can't see through the glass for frost right now! I've built a small raised bed inside it that goes right down into the soil, and that will allow us to grow the more tender vegetables. We also have access to a strip of land beyond the back fence, between our garden and the Cows' field, and we are going to grow the root crops like potatoes, carrots, parsnips,beetroot etc there.
Still to do is the job of making the raised bed next to the greenhouse and garage for the salad crops and herbs. We also need to find somewhere to put the walnut tree, though there was an apple and a pear tree here already.
We made a front garden before the winter- it was just a mess of rolled hardcore for cars to park on before, but by the time we had planted all the plants we brought with us from the old place, it looks as if it will be fine. It's just a question of hoeing the weeds that have come in with the 12 tons of topsoil we put on there.
It's going to be a busy year. Can't wait to get started!
Cheers
Dave


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LilyFestre
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 08:57 AM

We're big fans of Johnny's Selected Seeds too and also Territorial Seeds. It looks like the only places we will be able to get Providence corn is from NESeeds or Seeds of Change.

Michelle


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 09:02 AM

The herbs in the planter on the porch are still doing well, although the basil is gone. I have to bring it inside occasionally.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 11:04 AM

The cold snap and snow finished off the lettuce, but I still have some kale (a little scraggly but edible) and the collards still look great. Also the parsley is just as green and healthy as it was before it was covered under a foot of snow. I've had navy beans, potatoes, carrots and assorted other odds and ends - celery, onions,a few tomatoes, etc (it was clean out the fridge day yesterday) simmering overnight in the crockpot, and just now went out and gathered generous amounts of kale, parsley and collards to add to the mix. It's looking like it will be just perfect for a quiet winter's day spent in the house.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Falco
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 12:10 PM

Just heard, Broadcaster John Cushnie, a regular panellist on Gardeners' Question Time, has died following a heart attack.


A lovely man.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: CarolC
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 01:04 PM

I'm experimenting with mini greenhouses made from sheep fencing (in an inverted U shape, like a quonset hut) with plastic over them. Right now I only have New Zealand spinach under one of them, and it did freeze when the temps went down into the 20s the other night (I will be covering it with a blanket tonight), but I plan to put some bubble wrap over them for insulation. I hope to be able to extend my growing season for some of the summer plants throughout the year this way. Our daytime temps are usually well above freezing, so the ground is usually warm enough for plant roots. My peppers, eggplants, and grape tomatoes were still growing and bearing until a few days before Christmas, so I have high hopes.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 05:48 PM

The last half-dozen green tomatoes from late November are pinkening and will end up in soup one of these days. We had BLTs last week from tomatoes that ripened late from this year's garden. As long as you're patient and have those ripening acrylic things (they help, anyway) the tomatoes will eventually ripen.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 06:00 PM

I am not, of course, really here (and I note one person who reportedly is anathema above) but I successfully germinated a number of brugmansia sanguineae, and I do look forward to seeing those scarlet (and toxic) flowers come late summer/early autumn.

I do remember the old saw that one only gets really interested in the sex life of plants and non-human animals once one loses a direct interest in the sex lives of humans.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Shanghaiceltic
Date: 01 Jan 10 - 06:31 PM

I have spent the last couple of days cutting down a leylandia type tree in the back garden. Bastard of a job as the tree roots seemed to go all the way to China. Got one more to go then we will get some sunshine in the garden. I started lopping the branches a couple of months back and a spider (white tip) that took offence in being evicted bit me on the arm. Gardening in Aus has its hazards...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jan 10 - 04:04 PM

We have a few warmer days finally (relative--40s, low 50s, is better than 20s) so I've been out working on bird feeders and taking down holiday lights. I have some trimming and planting to do also, but it's fairly quiet right now. I should try to get the next plank in to enlarge the amount of raised bed. I have a lot of dirt in the pickup for weight (and have needed it this year) but could use it and pick up some more while the weather is nice.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 02:04 PM

The hellebore are about to bloom. Gonna fertilize azaleas this weekend and use dormant oil spray on some of them. A friend stopped by and gave me two hydrangeas he had rooted - an oakleaf and a smooth hydrangea. Which reminds me, I pegged an unusually colored hydrangea over at Dani's last year. Best get over to her place and see if it is rooted and ready to dig up.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 02:42 PM

I mowed my front lawn last night. (I can feel it today.)

I've been transplanting strawberries in preparation for piling up some dirt and rearranging the beds; there will be more raised beds this year, to help with drainage. The rain last year really wiped out my eggplants, and were hard on the tomatoes for a while.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 04:34 PM

One of the things I've been trying to figure out is what parts of my yard might be considered part shade, and what parts full shade. Found a good suggestion in a book I recently purchased. Before making a decisions about what to plant and where, he suggests planting petunias in different spots. Where the petunias bloom heavily can be considered full sun. Where they bloom OK but not heavily, is partial sun, and where they bloom very sparsely or not at all, is full shade.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:30 PM

Snow is gone from most of the front yard, but still a lot left on the north side of the house. A few more days of sun, and the winter heaths (erica carnae) will be blooming.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:33 PM

Today I borrowed a rototiller and tilled the garden patch. Some of the collards from last year had actually survived the snow and cold, but they were pretty scraggly so I plowed them under. Next week I'll plant some lettuce, maybe some onions, carrots, etc and see how they do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 05:35 PM

Still pushin' snow around here but seeds are ordered and should be here when we get back from New Orleans on March 22nd...

Oh yeah??? Maybe I didn't mention the New Orleans trip but that is where this year's azalea society convention is being held...

Other than taht, looks like we still have between 6 and 12 inches of unmelted snow (depending on where it is) so I reckon it will be here for another few days and the deck off our bedroom gets no sun so I think that snow will be here in July...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 Mar 10 - 06:08 PM

There are beets, carrots, chard, kale, carrots, and romaine lettuce growing in my covered rows.

m


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 01:24 AM

The strawberries are going to be more prolific than last year, based on the number that have sprouted in the garden. I planted three plants last year and probably have (at least) three dozen from those this year. There are some old carrots to dig up or till in, and onions in the garden that will probably be the first green onions (scallions) I'll use this spring. The oregano is still there, but took a pretty bad hit from the cold over the winter, so I'll trim it back. And I have to keep trimming the broken or cracked branches on the rosemary, so it stays healthy. The snow we had last month was very heavy and squashed a lot of plants.

I put a couple of bowls of beer out in the garden plot tonight, to see if the snails are moving around yet.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM

No snails yet, so I might be able to put some bean seeds out and they could come up and get hardened before the snails become more active.

Rain today, good for the garden, and there are daffodils all over the place now.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 07 Mar 10 - 04:21 PM

In partial answer to a question Kat sent me; the veggies I listed are those I planted last September and October. I covered the experimental rows with hoops and fabric row cover with clear plastic over the whole thing.

They made it through the winter and the fire and the late winter rain, ice, snow, temps well below freezing and wind that occasionally tore the covers off. When I return to the home place, I will check to see if the sugar snap peas survived.

m


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 08 Mar 10 - 03:33 PM

Maeve--

So good to hear that your row-covered veggies survived! I've just planted some experiments myself: carrots and spinach in cold frames in the hoop house we rigged up in early December. I'm also putting some peas to soak tonight. With this crazy early Spring (and the extra layers of protection afforded by the hoop house & cold frames), I'm guessing I needn't wait for Patriot's Day to plant peas. If I'm wrong, well, at least I'll have learned something whilst making the attempt!

--Cuilionn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Lizzie Cornish 1
Date: 08 Mar 10 - 04:14 PM

I have daffadowndillies coming up in my garden. I've never had a garden with daffodils in, apart from in pots..but my new garden has them... :0)

Lily of the Valley too, I think, which remind me of my Dad, as they were one of his favourite, along with beautiful, bright dahlias...and his Peace Rose, how he loved that..

I'm reading Monty Don's 'My Roots' book at the moment, which is a collection of some of his newspaper articles. My goodness but he is SUCH an eloquent writer...and he writes in pictures, so much so that you can smell the earth, touch the frost and inhale the evening scent from the stocks...wonderful book!

The very beautiful, gentle and tender song...of love in a garden..
'Green Fingers' by Ian Lang on Ian's Myspace

And here's Monty, for those who've never heard of him before. He's a national treasure over here....Recently he had some mini-strokes, so has given up his gardening programmes, the physical ones anyway...He's just started some great programmes on the traditional crafts...

Monty on Youtube ' Around The World in 80 Gardens'


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 12:01 AM

Sweet Sis, she who is good at carpentry and has leftover plastic lumber from a new back porch, called this evening to say she has cut out the parts to build me a 3 x 9 and a 3x3 raised bed. Think I'm gonna ask her to stack the 3x3 on top of the 3x9 so have at least a small space with 10-12" of top soil. Between the clay, the rocks and the tree roots, can't do much digging down below the current soil surface.

She is such a willing blessing!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 02:51 AM

Frost over the weekend has severely damaged the crocuses I didn't even know were flowering until I saw them stretched out, limp and lifeless on the soil.... :-(

It's taken the new leaves off my arums too... but hopefully they'll survive and grow again.

Otherwise it's all just a big brown and green mush of things I need to clear away but can't because I'm still supposed to be 'taking things easy'... I hate being ill.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 12:02 PM

This morning's sunshine brought out my across-the-street neighbor to mulch some more leaves and tidy the yard. So we stood and visited for a while. That's another by-product of gardening--seeing your neighbors!

Daffodils all over the yard, but we're still impacted from the snow last month. I could see some damage with bugs in it on a juniper (after the snow weight broke the plant) so I'll go out later and trim out some of the middle of the shrub.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: mouldy
Date: 09 Mar 10 - 01:51 PM

I have decided to oust just about everything from the raised side bed on the sunny side of the garden, and just leave the minarette fruit trees and the roses in the main bed. (This is Plan A). Hopefully then, most of the garden (which isn't big) will be productive to some degree.

Rhubarb is pushing its way up, and I've noticed some chard poking its head up. Must be an ungerminated seed or two from last year. Have not decided if I'd plant spuds this year. Anyway, it's the big dig-up needed first. It's just that I hate the cold from the ground numbing my feet through the soles of my wellies, and I just know, given the "wonderful" soil in my garden, that I'll be walking back to the house 3 inches taller than I went out!

Andrea


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 12:49 AM

I forget, mouldy - where are you?


I am noticing that very few of the dogwoods in my yard have any flowerbuds on them this year. the tips where they occur look broken off.   Most of them are infected with Dogwood Anthracnose to some degree, and I have taken a couple of them down because of the extent of the disease, but I am not aware that it prevents bud formation. The tips where the buds should be are there, but no buds are evident on 3 of the trees, and are sparse on the others.

Any ideas?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LadyJean
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 12:54 AM

The snowdrops I planted last fall are up! And the crocuses are coming in. In that my yard was under two feet of snow last week, I think that's pretty good.
I have 8 lavender plants that the company I ordered them from sent two months before I wanted them. Any thoughts on keeping them alive until I can plant them? (Besides keeping the cats away. That's a given.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 06:05 AM

Once you see the bark at the trunk of the dogwood split and then fall completely off, it's a goner... My recipe for goners is Mr. Chainsaw follwed by Mr. Match... I donno... Maybe it's just me but I kinda think that burning diseased plants is the best way to prevent whatever is in 'um from gettin' in their neigbors...

Meanwhile, we'll be in N.O. by this evening for the annual azalea convention so I reckon we'll be buying several new plants (other than azaleas) over the next few days 'cause one thing I learned about plants is that there's always room for one more in the car...lol...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 12:34 AM

I started moving some dirt around in the bed that was new last year, in preparation for putting in planks along one side to raise part of it (it's on a slope--this will result in a terrace). I dug up some weeds and found a bunch of last year's carrots. If they're carrot sized and look like carrots but were in the ground for a really long time, do you think they'll be like carrots, or like wood? I started them from seed, so in theory they could have sprouted during the late fall or winter, but I know some of these carrot tops were out there in the bed all summer and fall. I just didn't need them so they stayed put. For now I've washed them, cut off the tops, and they're in the fridge. About 2 quarts.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 04:51 PM

This afternoon I started taking out a cactus that has proved to be a lot more work than I expected. I've made two trips to city hall to pick out boxes from the paper recycle bin to load up with the pads from this huge thing. I'm leaving a pretty pickly pear that grows from a single trunk, but this big sprawling thing can be so ugly when it is full of weeds that are almost impossible to get out of it.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 09:33 PM

I put a photo of the cactus filled boxes on my Facebook page. I ought to dig out the particulars for the Mudcat gardeners group and post it there, just to nudge that thing back to life again.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 01:17 AM

I have steadfastly resisted pressure from ex-hubby and son to plant prickly pear. My mind fills with passages from the journals of the Lewis & Clark expedition of the terrible effects of prickly pear spines on the feet of all of them as they moved up the Missouri River. Besides that, although it grows well enough here, it seems incongruous in a yard or garden on the NC Piedmont.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 01:19 AM

Good decision, Janie, you wouldn't want to deal with prickly pear in the garden. A real "pain" to weed around.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Tinker
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 11:38 AM

Just walked through the garden after the punishing winds and rain all weekend and we were truly blessed. There are a quite a few small branches to pick up once the precipitation finally ends and the sun comes out tomorrow. The daffodils have sprouted and buds are showing.

Slightly off topic our major damage was to the second floor ceiling where the horizontal rain forced it's way into the middle of the house! No water in the attic or on the 3rd floor. Seems to be drying up just fine, but a bit of a puzzler.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 03:01 PM

Weather is a huge factor on a gardening thread, Tinker!

I met the trash guys at the curb this morning. It was still dark and I sure didn't want them ruining their day by tangling with my cactus pads. They protested that they could do it, but I took care of the bags (knock one against a knee and spines would go through the plastic) and a couple of the open boxes. I know they were surprised, but I considered their taking that stuff without warning above and beyond their job description.

The remaining big plant out there is a spineless prickly pear that grows upright. I have some sharp native stuff that grows down on the ground and is usually covered with grass. That may come out, but since so much of it was destroyed in the prairie near us, I hate to completely get rid of it (I transplanted it from there before they scraped the earth bare). I don't know if there are specific regional differences in the types, but if I get rid of it in my yard, I'll place it somewhere that it can continue to grow uninterrupted on the remaining prairie area.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 16 Mar 10 - 08:39 AM

Another day of garden touring here in New Aww'leens... Went to three yesterday and came back with 7 nice azaleas and one nandina (maroon)...

Went to Buddy Lee's, hybridizer of the Encore (3 blooms per season) Azaleas and saw his operation... Got one of his newbies... NHot in the trad yet... Can't remember the name right off but everyone is sleeo deprived so memories ain't all that great...

Interesting how folks growing seasons are so different...

SRS is 2 months ahaed of us in the Mid-Atlantic...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 18 Mar 10 - 03:59 PM

It has been beautiful today, so I got out and raked leaves off of the heathers & heaths and the herb garden. Also trimmed off the old stems in the perennial border. The chives are up about 3-inches, and the thyme & oregano are doing well.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Mar 10 - 04:17 PM

This is the time of year when I take a break from work by stepping outside for a few minutes, and before long I have a pile of weeds somewhere. I just can't resist getting those fast growing spring grass weeds out of the beds before their roots are too tough to pull by hand.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 04:40 PM

Well, well, well...

Geeze... Looks as if winter might be on its way out so...

Cleaned up the asparagus patch yesterday and fertilized it... We'll add a few more plants this year...

Our spinich and kale survive nicely under the 60 inches of snow we got this past winter and so we weeeded around those two rows and fertilized...

Tomorrow is "seed day"...

Looks like next Friday will be the best day for "mergal" (morelle mushrooms) hunting... Coolish and wet for the next 3 days and then 60's... That's mushroom weather...

We're going to put in about 30 criptomeria raticans along a old fence row that we took out to install our deer fence but also have a contract to furnish and plant 40 for a guy in Ohio who is moving here and needs a screen on the land he had bought...

Picked up a couple native azaleas outside of Ashville last week so we are closing in on having at least one of each of "x number" that exist...

Chicken litter (manure) has gotten scarce because new regs are not requiring it be cleaned out after each flock but I have a line of some anyway...

Tractor needs some work on the control valve for the front bucket --- both had a hard winter!!!

We have a monster stump pile to burn (10 feet high 25 feet wide and about 60 feet long)... Reckon you be able to see it on the Sputnik website when I light it...

That's about it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 06:18 PM

Sounds good, Bobert.

We stopped by the home place yesterday after TL got out of work. While he worked on chainsaw repairs, I planted some more snap peas, spinach, sweet peas, and carrots (thanks, seed donors!) before fitting row cover and plastic film over hoops to shield them from the much colder and more seasonable weather we're experiencing now.

Narcissus 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation', dwarf iris 'Harmony', deep purple crocus, and several kinds of snowdrops are in bloom.

m


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM

I mowed the front today, and cleaned out the hay in the dogs' kennel, so I'll use their old hay in the garden to mulch around stuff. And this weekend comes a big push on the garden. I think we finally have time to plant several things. Next week come the tomatoes. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 27 Mar 10 - 06:22 PM

We picked up root stock and scions for apple, peach, apricot, plum, and pear trees. It's tree grafting time in Maine.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Mar 10 - 08:55 PM

I'm getting ready to do some major re-shaping of my garden this year. The drainage was horrible last time. I'll do little sloped mini-terraces, leaving myself a way to channel rainwater when needed.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 01:30 PM

I put up a new blog entry. Garden injuries feature this time. Watch your back!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 01:39 PM

I hope to start cleaning out the gardens this weekend; thought frost free date isn't for another month.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 03:48 PM

Sis is coming down next week with the raised bed frames she built for me, and her trailer so that we can haul some topsoil with which to fill them.

Mystery plant! Was out poking around counting the emerging tips of Solomon Seal this past weekend, when I noticed something beginning to come up in front of them (and still not out enough for me know what it is.) Scratched my head on that one for awhile, then a vague memory arose of quickly planting some plant or other just before hard frost that I had held all season in a pot,and decided I needed to get it somewhere, anywhere, in the ground if it was going to survive the winter.

Well, it appears it did survive, and I'll be really curious to see what manner of beast it is!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 01 Apr 10 - 07:38 PM

I love mystery plants... We have lots of them... Worst thing is that, yeah, we probably did plant them and then forgot about them...

Went mergal hunting this afternoon... Still too early... Came back with a dinner plate mound of beatiful moss for our little moss garden...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 02 Apr 10 - 01:46 PM

Mystery plant identified, and now, remembered. It is a miniature variegated hosta I planted last year in a planter with caladiums and inpatiens. I stuck it hurriedly in the ground when I emptied the planter after the first hard frost. It is still not unfurled, but loosened enough today for me to see the pale leaf border, which jogged my memory.

It's hot here today - 87 F. some of the azaleas are starting to bloom. All of those you gave me, Bobert, made it through the winter. Still fighting with insects on the first one you gave me. Hoping if I alternate insecticidal soap with all season dormant oil I can get them controlled well enough for the plant to thrive, instead of just survive.   It has lots of flower buds on it. Can't wait for it to bloom. Of the other two, the larger one which was a rooted cutting has flower buds on it. I thought the one P-vine had started from seed had died over the winter because all of the leaves turned brown. But it recently shed all of those leaves, and new buds are starting to leaf out!

Fiddleheads of Japanese Painted Fern and Ghost fern are up. Big-leafed hydrangea is nearly fully leafed out. Smooth hydrangea not far behind. The parents of my son's girlfriend a big gardeners and brought me another smooth hydrangea and a rooted shoot from an oak-leaf hydrangea.

No moola for potting soil, etc. just yet, so no lettuce and greens seeded. But since Annie is bringing down those raised beds and her trailer, maybe I can get something seeded in an actual garden bed this next week!

Got to pay bills, clean house, work on taxes today, but it is going to be a gorgeous several days and starting tomorrow, I'm headed for the yard and garden.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Apr 10 - 02:31 PM

I'm dying of this forced inactivity. I hurt my back last weekend, and rehurt it a few days later. Now I must let the muscles heal. We have rain this weekend, and that usually slows me down (but I'm from Washington State, where we don't stop our work for a little rain, so I'm having to adopt a Texas frame of mind!)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 02 Apr 10 - 05:29 PM

Oh no, Maggie!

I shall take this as a cautionary tale and be very careful with myself this week, as I am definitely out of shape from lack of gardening, digging and lifting for the past 18-24 months.

Two weekends ago I spent several hours at Coker Arboretum and the NC Botanical Gardens. Coker Arboretum is a small and very well planned Arboretum behind the planetarium on the old main campus at UNC-Chapel Hill. Too many exotic tree and shrub specimens for what I have in mind, and they have wells from which they irrigate quite freely, which I can not do. However, it was very inspiring from the standpoint of thinking about garden design under all the trees here. They have planted sweeps of hellebore foetida under the trees, that are just lovely, and will remain so well into summer.(expensive!)

I had not visited the NC Botanical gardens except in winter for many, many years. It is very strong on native plants, shrubs and trees, and is going to be very helpful to me in thinking about shrub selection to create an under-story of mostly native shrubs for better bird habitat, as well as a privacy screen. Some very appealing native hobble bush species really caught my eye. When I was there, trout lilies were blooming profusely, and the earliest trilliums were colored up. Lot's of blood root also. The may-apples were up and just unfurling their leaves.



I mentioned previously that Sis had taken down a diseased dogwood in the back yard last fall or winter. I'll have to wait until the oaks have completely leafed out to be sure, but I think taking down that tree is likely to result in enough sun for a sufficient little veggie garden in 3 raised beds, as well as borders for sun perennials. Maybe even some dahlias!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 04 Apr 10 - 12:06 AM

Something very strange going on with posts. There are definitely posts missing now that Stilly, Bobert and I made within the last few days, and that I previosly read. Mystery plants. Bobert's reply. Stilly's strained back muscles and my identification of the Mystery plant.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 04 Apr 10 - 01:05 AM

AND, the post I made after the last post above at 12:06 am is now missing, although it appeared after I hit submit.

That post commented that the posts between March 26 an April 2 reappeared after I submitted the 12:06 post. (scratching head in amazement.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 04 Apr 10 - 01:07 AM

What I originally intended to post before being sidetracked by the mysteriously disappearing/reappearing posts, was.....

Geez Louise - temps of 89 F are predicted for midweek.!

That ain't right or good.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 04 Apr 10 - 07:54 AM

Yeah, Janie... Hot as a three dollar pistol here, as well... I'm afraid that everything is gonna open and then get killed back with a late frost...

Tomorrow is a big day here fir us... My backhow guy is finally going to get all the stumps rounded up from our "pond field" and we can get that massive pile burning... It's so big that I'm going to make a donation to the volunteer fire department to come light it and babysit it until it seems under some level of control... Might have to wait for a little rain first...

Got some hard-to-find chicken manure yesterday to work into the asparagus bed... The poultry farmers only have to clean their houses out once a year now so litter is gettin' harder and harder to come by...

Meanwhile, Linten roses are blooming their little heads off... Some early azaleas are in bloom... The PJM I bough in Blowing Rock is beautiful and in full bloom...

Staked alot of stuff yesterday that got bent over from the snow...

OH yeah, big news... I have been looking at "utility vehicles" (UVs) for quite some time now and the Polaris came on sale in Harrisonburg with 3.9 financing so the P-Vine now has a new wheelbarrow with 4 wheels... Throw in a steering wheel and that makes 5... It was really time... It is close to 2/10's of a mile from the barn where we store all our planting material (pine fines, permitil, tools, etc.) to the new pond gardens and that's just too far for pushing a wheelbarrow up and down the hill... Of course, the Polaris came with a fat payment book but hey??? She's worth it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Joybell
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 01:26 AM

I've just come up with a term for gardeners like me. I am re-vegetating most of our 4 acres with local native plants but we have a vegetable garden that has non-invasive exotic flowers for the insects and birds and butterflies.
Anyway the local garden club calls my garden and "Easy-care Garden"!! :-) I wish. Otherwise I'm called a "Greenie" -- but that's a very broad term.
From now on I'm a "Habitat Gardener".
Cheers, Joy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 07:52 AM

Today is back-hoe day (hopefully) which will put us closer to bob-fire day...

Fertilized the asparagus last night... Looks as if we've got a nice crop comin' in allredy... Ate a couple stalks right outtta the garden...

Did alot of spring clean up and nd got my fountain cleaned, filled with water and working... It's 3 tiered and heavy...

Gotta go...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 10:34 AM

Last tuesday - frost on the ground and the car. Friday, Saturday, sunday - temps in the 80's.

Things are coming on like gangbusters and I am VERY afraid things will get killed by a late frost or snowstorm.

Frost free date isn't for six weeks or so!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 02:11 PM

Here in Southern Maine, our first daffodil bloomed on Easter-- and we heard our first Spring Peepers (frogs) night before last, coming home from a Passover Seder. It's an ecumenical gardening season!

In our hoop house, the kale is about four inches tall, chard is leafing out nicely, and mesclun lettuce mixes & brassicas have sprouted nicely. Yesterday's 80-degree (F) temps frizzled the tops of the spinach, but I think it'll survive if I'm careful about venting the not-so-cold frames.

The maple trees are covered with fat red buds and the sap run was finished long before "Maine Maple Sunday" so that all the sugarhouses had to boil plain water for demonstration purposes. Our peas were planted last week, weeks earlier than normal.

It's been so unseasonably warm here that everything is suddenly, crazily green. My gardener's heart doesn't know whether to rejoice or panic!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 02:39 PM

I had some baked potatoes that I just couldn't finish up so I cut the eyes for planting. Gonna be some tastey when I dig em up... and no cooking! Wish I'da thought of it years ago.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 06:36 PM

Slow to start here, but the injury has healed, so I'll be moving forward as time allows. A little trip will interfere soon, but I think I can arrange to have someone water the tomatoes while I'm away.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Joybell
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 09:47 PM

Maggie, I wish I could come and water your tomatoes for you. Bit far. Watching the seeds you sent me as they become little seedlings. I planted them just after Christmas but I think they are timing themselves to get serious by Spring. It's mid-Autumn/Fall here now so I'll protect them through the Winter.
Cheers, Joy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Apr 10 - 11:02 PM

93f today, 91 tomorrow and 89 on Wednesday. This does not sound like weather to sow lettuce seeds! And in the 80's where you are Leo?

Annie and the raised beds arrived late this afternoon! I'm all aflutter.

In this heat, the azaleas exploded overnight, and the tulips are having a shortened season. there are a few liitle patches here and there where the previous owner had planted tulips at some point in time, and they have repeated well over the last 2 springs. Unusual this far south for tulips to do well for more than one or two seasons.

She and I are headed for Asheville later in the week. I'd love to see Biltmore gardens, but don't want to pay the price. Will head for the NC Arboritum instead.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Apr 10 - 12:48 AM

I'm headed to Arizona for a couple of days later in the week. I hear the wildflowers are glorious this year. I wonder where I can pack the camera gear. Who needs clothes, right?

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Rapparee
Date: 06 Apr 10 - 05:35 PM

What gardening? We've had s**w every day for the last two weeks. It melts off but comes right back the next day.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Apr 10 - 04:14 PM

My first iris opened yesterday, and all of a sudden there are stalks all over the place. I'm afraid I'm going to miss much of the show by being out of town. At least the neighbors will enjoy it. I'll mow tomorrow so the place looks well-tended and not inviting to anyone casing the neighborhood.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Apr 10 - 10:29 PM

The tiller-man showed today and tilled up the veggie garden... So we got in a few seeds this evening (in the heat) and got it all set up- with little flags for where stuff is goin' to live this summer... Even tho it's 90 X 30 things are going to be tight... But we'll have everything we want... Seeds are up and in the barn with the azalea cuttings under grow lights.... I think this year's veggie garden is going to be the best ever... Quite a variety...

Meanwhile, I have gotten another massive landscaping job which will keep me occupied for the next month... Plants coming in from Pender Nursery outta Garner, NC tomorrow... Oh, everything is goin' to hurt tomorrow night...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 07 Apr 10 - 11:23 PM

Raised beds placed and filled with topsoil, plus enough left over to dump on the pile of composting leaves where I intend to eventually have a flower bed.

Finally some inspiration about design and lay out of beds for the side-rear yard where I get the most sun. Spaced out day lilies better (they were where I had my son heal them in when we moved, almost 2 years ago and moved the ginger lilies to a more sheltered location. Nobody mentioned above are in their permanent homes, but should grow well where they are , even if it takes a few years to get their permanent homes lined out and dug up.   Got the oak leaf hydrangea planted, where I think it will stay, at this point.   Still trying to decide where to plant the two azaleas from Bobert that are still in pots. They may live in pots another season. Am using the dirt dumped where I eventually hope to have a garden bed as a nursery bed for the present.

Pollen is the worst it has ever been, and I am having the worst allergy season I have had since I was in my early 20's. Oh well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 01:20 AM

Oops. Where I I had son heel them in....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 07:33 AM

Oh, geese... Reminds me that I owe the P-Vine a raised bed as soon as my tractor get's out of the repair shop...

BTW, I love raised bed plantings...

b~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 08:28 AM

The arums don't appear to have recovered - another sharp frost took the new growth off them and I can't get close to them to see if there is any life left.. time will tell.

Presently there are primroses, periwinkles, tulips, hyacinth and violets in bloom, with green buds and shoots appearing all over the rest of the garden.

I had some help with some major pruning last week so hopefully I'll have a bit more light and the pyrocantha will go back over the fence and not need its support pole much longer.

LTS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 04:57 PM

The robins are back and the daffodils opened on Easter! Yesterday broke a local record with a temp. of 84 degress F. Old record temp for this day of the year was...78 degrees, recorded in 1991. This global climate change/early Spring thing is really throwing my planting schedule.

Do any other New Englanders know if fiddleheads might be ready yet? Ours are far out in the woods and our neighbor usually beats me to 'em, but I just haven't had time to get all the way out there to check. I aim to harvest my fair share this year, if I can get them before he does!

--Cuilionn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 08 Apr 10 - 05:33 PM

As per usual, the P-Vine has gotten us (me) into yet another landscape job from Hell and today the truck arrived with all the stuff that is going to be planted and it's well over a hundred plants... Most of them a cryptomera radican (replaces leeland cypris as the screen plant of choice)... Let's see... 42 of them alone... Not looking forward to this job but, hey???

Got another dozen of so asparagus plants in today where we had some die (possibly voles)... Got potatoes in... Lettuce and spinich and beets in... Seedlings in the barn under light...

Still no mushrooms to be found... It's gonna be rainy tonight and cool tomorrow then up to 70 by Sunday... I'll go out Sunday evening and check again???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Apr 10 - 01:46 AM

I'm going to have to plant a few tomatoes in bigger pots and have the neighbor water them, I'm not ready to put them in beds yet. Am going to miss my irises in their peak. The blue ones are starting to open and there are shoots everywhere. It is like magic, isn't it, one day they're just leaves, the next there are these glorious flowers?

Got a new camera today, a small one to replace the little digital I use for garden photos that is not doing as many things as I'd like it to do. Like the one one, it will go in my shoulder bag. And this one can photograph the gnat's eyelash. Look out, bugs! (The older one, still functional and a great little camera, will go to Moonglow, who has an even older smaller camera right now. One day we'll all be up to speed, but for now, it's Reaganomics - trickle down.)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 09 Apr 10 - 08:45 AM

I've got daffies, primroses, hyacinths, scilla all blooming, the daylilies are up, the peonies are breaking leaf buds, the maples have started to leaf (but the oaks haven't) and I am actually ahead of the weeds for the moment!

That won't last, but it is nice to have happen occasionally.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 09 Apr 10 - 09:24 AM

Last fall's plantings are doing well. My first spring 2010 planting (lettuce, snap peas, spinach, sweet peas, and carrots) are all up and looking good.

Scilla, daffodils, primroses, pink violets, star magnolia, pulmonaria (pink, coral, cobalt blue, mingled blue and pink), and single bloodroot are stunning. Garden and wild plants are two or more weeks ahead of the usual season's growth. Maple syrup production here was thwarted by the high temperatures. Most farms that usually participate in "Maple Syrup Sunday" withdrew or boiled plain water.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 09 Apr 10 - 05:14 PM

I'm over in Asheville now with my sister. We spent the day in Pisgah National Forest, starting at Brevard, and climbing up to Mt. Pisgah (by car - not hiking), and stopped at every turn out we came to. Up high it is still quite early spring, but there were trout lilies and cut-leaf toothwort just starting to bloom, a beautiful small yellow violet that I was tempted to dig, and rattlesnake plantain with leaves just unfurling. At lower elevations along a creek or two, golden ragwort was blooming.

Tomorrow we are going to go spend a good portion of the day at the North Carolina Arboretum.

It was good to have a reprieve from tree pollen, but we are back down in Asheville now, and the coughing and drippy nose have started again. (whine.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 11 Apr 10 - 09:26 PM

First of all... Just east of Ashville (20 miles) there is a great little nursery called "Meadowbrook WeDu"... The P-Vine used to get their catalogs and from the cataloges one would think they were acres and acres but they aren't... Great stuff and great prices... We werr able to snag several native azaleas there for a song...

Been having lots of fun in the woods... First of all the "mergals" are coming up... Found 6 nice ones last evening... Allready halved and cleaned them and have them wrapped up in a moist paper towel in the refrigerator...

But lookin' for "mergals" also forces ya' to look at what elese is in them woods and I have also found a wild columbine which as a couple of bloom buds on it (can't wait to see what comes out) and a mystery plant... It looked like a jack-in-the-pulpiy at first but it had a bloom bud on a center stalk??? I donno... We'll know soon...

Went to the annual plant exchange in NoVa today with out azalea people... Took up Linten Rose, Iris (3 kinds), Hearts of Bustin, Pulminaria and came home with, ahhhhh, not alot... But it was fun...

I'm beginning my annual landscape-contract-from-Hell tomorrow... Over a hundred 3 to 5 gallon trees at a 15 acre site 20 miles north of there on the river... My back hurts just thinkin' about it...

Cutting asparagus and that's about it for ther veggie garden... We tilled in the spinich and kale that survived the winter and have started fresh rows...

Lotta azaleas in bloom... Lotta...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Apr 10 - 12:33 AM

Bobert, Ask the P-Vine iff'n I can borry you for a week or so. Eh?

The North Carolina Arboretum' gardens were beautifully designed, but as an aboretum, I found it disappointing. There is little emphasis on native plants or trees.    A lot of money has been poured into the facilities and the gardens, but it was more like a botanical garden than an arboretum. There are several miles of hiking trails through the surrounding forest, but no written guides or identification of the trees and other flora along the trails.   Although I know more than the average bear about understory plants and wildflowers in the woods of the East, I don't know trees all that well, and my knowledge of woodland plants is rusty. I was frustrated to see many emerging plants that I used to know could not recall (shoulda had my field guides with me.)

One real treat was to see trailing arbutus in bloom in several places along the trails we hiked. There were a number of shrubs in the heath family, mostly assorted hobble-bushes, that I would have liked to have been able to identify, as well as more than one species of native rhodies, and a number of different viburnums.

While I was gone, the solomon's seal grew 6 inches and is starting to bloom. Alternating insecticidal soap with dormant oil seems to be keeping the azalea lacebug in check. I used neem oil tonight instead of dormant oil, and have high hopes for this treatment.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 Apr 10 - 08:26 AM

I'd love to spend a week takin' orders from you, Janie, but I'm kinda booked up right now...

Have you been to the horticultural center at UNC-Charlotte??? Purdy nice place... Not all that big but lotta natives...

Yeah, insecticidal soap/oil is a great product this time of year... Lacebugs are the enemy... The azalea society is working on trying to find a better solution to them and pedal blight... That's the nice thing about tthe society... It's half gardeners and half scientists...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 Apr 10 - 08:54 PM

Planted lettuce and spinich this evening but before that had an hour to walk back in the woods and found another 9 "mergals"... We now have enough for a righteous serving!!! Also cut enough asparagus for another righteous serving!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Apr 10 - 09:10 PM

Ooh! I'm jealous!

Thinking about seeding a late crop of salad greens and onion sets for green onions Wednesday night, which is the only night I'm not working. Some folks are setting out tomatoes and basil. Chances of a late frost are probably pretty slim, but my experience is I don't gain much from planting warm season crops early if the soil is not yet good and warmed up. We had that one hot 3 days everyone in the East got last week, but otherwise night temps are still going to be in the high 40's to mid 50's and daytime highs not reaching the mid 70's until mid to late afternoon.

May nix seeding those cool season crops until I see what is going on with my Dad. Will prob'ly go to WV this weekend and it doesn't make sense to plant seeds that I can't keep watered everyday in what is shaping up to be a dry spring. I could probably get a brief crop of baby salad greens and certainly green onions even if I sow as late as the last week of April.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Apr 10 - 12:48 AM

Good thing we have a long growing season in Texas, because I'm getting started late again this year. I'll see tomorrow if all of my irises are out.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 09:27 AM

Update on The Mystery Plant" I found while hunting mushrooms: it's a "Pink Ladyslipper"!!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 04:16 PM

I have strawberries ripening! How nice! Not much else going on, though I am going to radically thin the oregano and dry what I pull, because I've run out of last year's supply.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 04:50 PM

I planted lettuce - simpson, romaine and mesclun about a month ago and it's almost ready to start harvesting for early salads. Also planted spring onions, radishes and carrots - but only the radishes seem to be doing well. Some of the kale and collards I planted last fall came up again, so I harvested and cooked a bunch of greens last week - mixed them with rice and they were yummy. Also mint and cilantro have come up from last year.   Some people are putting in tomatoes and squash, but I think I'd rather wait till May 1st when all danger of frost has passed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 05:59 PM

I'm up at my parents' in West virginia. Got their perennial border weeded and pinched their pansies for them. I always think of my grandmother when I'm out pinching back annual flowers. She always had beds full of pansies, petunias and snapdragons, and pots of geraniums all over the front porch. She loved them, but nothing seemed to offend her more than a annual bloom that showed any hint of getting ready to go to seed. Snap! Snap! Snap!

Also got their little raised veggie plot weeded and turned. Get to dig up some Single Apricot chrysanthemums to take home as Mom has decided to squeeze in some "Knock-out" roses. (It's shame, if you ask me, cuz there really isn't room for roses - but it ain't my yard *grin* I'm just the gardener.)

Sounds wonderful Mary. I don't know when I'm going to get to plant something in the beds Annie made for me - but the dirt and the beds will be there, ready whenever there is time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 08:13 PM

So much stuff happening here it's almost too hard to report it all...

First of all... We are in drought!!! That sucks... Whatever happened to "April Showers", anyway... We're having to move the oscillator all day from one bed to another but...

... we have lettuce, beets and spinich poking up...

Lots of azaleas in bloom (like hundreds)... My favorite, Komo Shekeboo bloomed today... But we are in the process of putting in some new beds and are going to start by moving as many "whites" into the beds as possible and then move the colors in... Whites should be 50% of any garden design according to Designer Bobert...

I went looking for "mergals" (morelles one last time for this season and found just enough to put in an omlet... The underbrush has gotten too high to find 'um for this year... Oh well...

Back to the "Pink Lady Slipper"... I was trying to find where I found that other one and did... I got down on the ground and started looking around and there were about 15 others that were just coming up... I carefully dug up the three that were definately in the logging road and brought them home... The others I'll keep my eye on over the next few weeks... The P-Vine looked them up in one of her books and it says that they are extremely rare so I guess we oughtta be happy to have these four... We'll plant them in our woods in an eara that best resemebles where I found them... I think they'll do just fine...

We also found a dicidious magnolia with bright yellow blooms at a local nursery... The P-Vine spoted it from the road and told me to "turn around"... The nursery got two of them in and he had just sold the other one that morning so the P-Vine used some of the money she keeps in her garden slush fund to buy it... Hooray...

The gardens are reallu shaping up and we hope that anyone here who is a gardener who is in the area will stop and take them all in...

(Janie???)

Well, that's bout it, for now...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 17 Apr 10 - 09:15 PM

Pink Lady Slippers, as I understand it Bobert, grow only in symbiotic relationship with tree roots - I think oak - and rarely, if ever, survive transplanting. Annie has a yard full of them, but has never been able to move them.

The Komo Shekeboo you gave me has been in bloom for about a week. It is looking much better now that I am alternating the soap and neem oil about every 10 days. Seems to be more vulnerable to the lace bugs than the other azaleas, but I think if I can get it well established this year (2nd in ground) it will be better able to sustain a little damage. The other 2 azaleas are still in pots and doing well. One (the tag in it has disappeared but it was the one P-vine started from a cutting, not seed, surprised me by setting a few blooms - a beautiful, very pale, soft pink. The solomon seal is thriving as are the hellebores. The white hellebore you gave me is my favorite - so pale creamy! Ferns are doing really well also.

I want so much to get up to see your place. It will happen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Apr 10 - 03:04 PM

Bobert, have you gotten a little digital camera yet? Now that you've been at that place for a while we need to get another look at it. Especially while these azaleas are in bloom!

I ate my first strawberry out of the garden this morning. Mostly I worked in a drizzle to remove a caked down pad of red oak tassles and live oak leaves from the street at the curb (neither tree grows in my yard--it all drifts in from neighbors). The mail carrier drives along the curb lane six days a week and compresses it, and the rain this weekend only cut a channel through it. I know the city will want it removed, so I went out with the hose and swept and tossed clumps on the lawn to mulch in, and washed some down the street and cleaned up next door so it wouldn't simply become their problem.

This week is the first opportunity I'll have to do some serious gardening. It's busy at the end of the semester, though, so I'll steal a little time when I can. I'm usually out there much earlier in the year, but we were doing all of the college applications and visits. My son has decided to go to the University of Arizona in Tucson, by the way. (During last week's trip I set up a visit with one of the guitar majors there, recommended by the dept. head. I think that was the tipping point. He'll probably end up some king of computer engineer, but he'll be a fabulous guitarist on the side!).

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 18 Apr 10 - 03:13 PM

Only a few frozen drifts of snow remain after a couple of the warmest days so far this year. A drift of icy snow that has been there since October still covers the flower beds on the north side of my house.

I found one daffodil that had bloomed yesterday and a few crocus. This has been the worst winter for heavy snow damage. The raspberry canes were almost completely broken down. Lots of pruning and clean up to do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 12:12 AM

Ah, Alice. Spring, inching its way into the northern Rockies, whether they like it or not, eh?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 08:11 AM

Well, after being here in Pine Grove Holler for 5 years we have been asked by a smallish group if theu could tour our gardens... They are coming this Wednesday... I wish it was next week but I'll take off from my landscaping job today and tomorrow and get the stuff planted that needs to be planted before the tour...

Spent yesterday in Charlottsville, Va. with the Azealea Society... We set up a booth at one of the stops of the "Charlottesville Historic Garden Tour" where other venders and associations were invited to participate... We were next to a booth that specialized in native wild flowers and they had a tray of them set up as a quiz... I reckon I surprised them by knowing them all!!! No, not the Latin names but the common names... We had a purdy good day, however, and sold about $700 worth of azalaes and got 2 new members (possibly 3) for our chapter... That was really more the goal than selling plants...

Opps!!! 8:10 and I gotta go...

Happy gardening!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 11:37 AM

A friend gave me six tomato plants (Rutgers variety) and some spring onions - so I went ahead and planted them. He put his in a week ago. I usually wait till May 1st, but figured what the heck, I'd give it a try. The mint is going crazy and I've been enjoying mint tea. I planted potatoes about a month ago, and some of them came up but it was very spotty. Lettuce will soon be ready!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 19 Apr 10 - 12:19 PM

We have a rule of thumb here: don't plant your garden or flower beds until after Memorial Day... and be ready to cover them for spring snow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 25 Apr 10 - 08:19 PM

Raising a bumper crop of oak seedlings this year. Just spent 2 hours grubbing them out of the little bit of garden beds I have, and the yard is full of them. That is one thing to consider with using shredded leaves for mulch - the thousands of acorns.

Gardening under trees is presenting some challenges that I simply had not considered. (The pecan sprouts where I used to live were real bears to dig out - much harder than the oaks - but exponentially fewer of them sprouted, as they required burying by the squirrels to germinate. I did not know how easily acorns germinate, and that they do so simply lying on top of the ground. Thinking more and more in terms of large swathes of natural areas around the perimeters of the front yard that I cover in mulch, add a few plantings to, and then let nature sow what it will.

stumbled across a baby snake - I think an Eastern Garter Snake, while mowing the other evening. With all the birdseed that gets scattered, I'm glad to have a snake or two to control rodents, even if they also get a few nestling birds. Had several black rat snakes at the other place, at least one of whom wintered in the crawl space. They followed the voles in that nearly wiped out a number of plants and bulbs before the snakes got them under control.

Not planting any ornamentals in pots, and not expecting to plant much in the ground this year (again), since I know I'll be out of town a lot on weekends to help with Dad - but am slowly pulling a design together and starting to take small steps in preparing beds for the future. Thinking very hard about time management, and struggling to consider that when I think about garden design and what to plant. It is hard to be practical:>)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 25 Apr 10 - 08:34 PM

This season's "landscape job from hell" is over... Whew... Right at 100 trees and shrubs...

We had our second tour yesterday morning... We were on our way out so we just left them to their own devices...

Also found sanke today... 6 foot blacksnake in the middle of the road... Usually, I don't mind grabbin' them but he was too big so I found a long branch and pushed him off to safety....

Planting under trees is hard... Trees are hogs... Ya' have to either do raised beds or dig large holes and put lots of pine fines in with the soil when you plant so the roots will get a good start before Meany Tree gets there... Don't get me wrong... I love my trees... But ya' gotta have some level of respect for their wants and needs...

Azaleas in bloom everywhere you look...

Went into the wooods this evening and found a few more "mergals" and also found a nice native azalea in bloom... Pink with fregrance... Cut a small portion offf that had 4 flowers in bloom and 2 getting ready to bloom and brought it home to the P-Vine... She was so excited... The Pink Lady Slippers are all doing just fine...

Pond is about dry... Gonna have to either gets some pigs to tamp the bottom down 'er somethin'???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 25 Apr 10 - 08:43 PM

We made a third harvest from the spinach and kale planted last October. Sweet peas, sugar snaps, baby spinach, carrots, beets, lettuce, and chard continue to grow well. Flowers in bloom today include: bloodroot (single and double), several kinds of pulmonaria/lungwort, various little bulbs, plum and shadblow trees, and cherries.

maeve
many kinds of primroses and daffodils, many colors of violets,


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Apr 10 - 12:10 AM

I'm getting planting in very late for here, but with our long growing season, it doesn't matter too much. I am finishing these raised beds, and as they look right I'll be planting. I put tomatoes on one so far, and need to add more soil and compost to a couple more. I have plans for two more after that, but those will happen in the next month. And the kitchen door garden needs attention. It's an all-volunteer operation right now--garlic, onion, oregano, coriander, basil. So I'm not complaining, but it needs some harvesting (the oregano) and some organization (the middle is kind of empty).

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 26 Apr 10 - 11:57 AM

It's been raining for three days - so I didn't get anything done this weekend.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 01 May 10 - 11:25 AM

I've mostly got the garden done, except for a patch where I'm going to plant herbs, which I'll do this afternoon. I've got lettuce, kale, collards and radishes which I'm harvesting now, and onions and potatoes which are growing nicely - I planted them in March. A couple of weeks ago I planted seven Rutgers tomatoes, and today I put in a couple of cherry and grape tomatoes, watermelon, cantaloupe, cucumbers, zucchini, yellow squash and snaps. Down at the farm where I buy my seedlings they didn't have any okra, so I'll pick up some today and plant it this afternoon, along with parsley, cilantro, dill, basil and maybe some sage and rosemary. It's all looking good! I planted a little less than last year (I had way too much) and spaced things out a bit more.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 01 May 10 - 08:16 PM

Well, the garden-tour-from-hell is coming up in about 10 days... It the North Carolina contingency of the Azalea Society and they will be here in force... So we're trying to get about 100 azaleas moved into a new bed in the pond field... Don't know why 'cuase as hot as it is all the blooms will be spent but that is the plan...

My pond is no offically dry!!! That sucks... I've been reading up on bentonite clay and looks like that is the answer... Sounds like hard work... But if I get it done before any major rains come then the pond should hold for years... But it sounds like the kinda stuff that is gonna require some younger backs...

No lettuce or sinich in the garden... We may have to replant... Not sure why it didn't come up... I know it dry but we've run the oscillator on it 3 times... That shoulda gotten it going???

I'm beat... And also have a bad summer head cold so after a day out in the sun working like a Trojan I really don't fell all that perky either...

But, ahppy gardening...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: LadyJean
Date: 01 May 10 - 11:07 PM

I've been trying to grow bushel gourds for 5 years. The first year I got a seed to germinate, planted the vine, then the gent who used to cut my lawn, I call him The Terminator, did for it, as he did for about $100 worth of plants and the solar lamps I put across the back.

The next year I couldn't convince a seed to germinate. The things take forever, IF they germinate, and that's a big if.

This year, a friend suggested I snip off the ends of the seeds or soak them. I did both. The seeds germinated. The plants died. Any mudcatters growing bushel gourds?

Otherwise, I am going to HAVE to start digging beds soon, and mow the lawn again. Then I get to clip my yew hedges, yet again. I dream of seeing the last of those hedges.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: wysiwyg
Date: 02 May 10 - 05:54 PM

Our garden plan this year is a 50' equivalent of two rows, all in earthbox-type containers and other vry large containers gathered in the last several years from FreeCycle. This will run along the chainlink in the new Dog World ("DW"), which is in full sun for 6+ hours per day.

Seedlinbg started include tomaters of several sorts, peppers, climbing peas, bush beans. There will be s'petunias tucked in for color.

Facing all this will be a nice sitting area under a shady tree. There will be some hanging pots on the front-facing side of DW as well-- portulaca.

And I have a yucca I am reviving to beak up and plant along the front face of DW, too.

~S~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 02 May 10 - 08:42 PM

I love yuccas, WYSuzie... They're purdy tough plants, have a nice shape and need very little attention...

My really big next job is to fix my run-off pond... It is dry... Should have 3 feet of water and fogs and all that but...

...going to read more on bentonite clay and make a plan...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 May 10 - 06:55 PM

I finished digging a big chunk of the garden on the other side of the driveway (this is it's third year, and after extending it a lot last year I've pushed it even further this year). So far tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, and some herbs and flowers planted. I have another chunk to dig and build up, but that will happen gradually and probably be ready for some fall stuff.

I've been picking about a pint a day of strawberries for the last couple of weeks. It's my tiny little square yard of berries, and it's funny how when neighbors stop by to say hello, the simple sight of fruit in the garden brings such a surprised and pleased reaction. We've all grown so far away from the earth, when growing fruit is a novelty.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 03 May 10 - 07:57 PM

Big day here in Pine Grove Holler... The stump pile in our pond field is now surrounded by the able people of the Satnley Voulenteer Fire Department and the flames are up to about 25 feet... Hooray!!! Another step closer to finally, after 5 years, having control of these 6 acres that will one day all be gardens of one sort or another...

Now, let me get back out there... Something to behold!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 03 May 10 - 11:22 PM

It is good to read what all ya'll are up to (or down to:>) in your gardens. Sister Annie jumped in when she was here at Mom & Dad's last week, and between the two of us we have their flower/shrub borders looking good. Dad planted tomatoes and onion sets as soon as I got the little raised bed veggie garden cleaned up and loosened, and Annie got a couple of bags of composted manure spread on them.

Dad, who has everything wrong with his spine from neck to tailbone that a doctor can put a name to, suffers from severe chronic pain, but continues to do as much work as he can in the yard and garden. We were at the hospital today for 5 hours for him to have a lung biopsy done under heavy sedation. He was fairly clear by the time we got him home. He snoozed in his recliner for an hour, then got his cane and walked over to chat with his neighbor while Mom and I fixed supper. I went out to call him a few minutes before supper was ready and found him bent double, leaning heavily on the cane, pinching pansies. I opened my mouth to raise a fuss as he laboriously and with obvious pain straightened up. We looked each other in the eye, I shut my mouth, and joined him to finish the job before helping him step up onto the porch and into the house to wash up for supper.

That pain is going to be there, whether he is bent over in the garden or not. The cancer, which at this point is something new to us and not part of the current pain, is going to be there, no matter what.

Let him pinch pansies to his heart's content.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 04 May 10 - 08:27 AM

Amen to that, Janie.

Yesterday I fiddle farted around, spread a little (very little) mulch; planted two containers of pansies (dark blue-purple, almost black) and brought home a wegilia that is currently on the porch but will get planted out ....the hole is dug. I'm satifsfied if I get anything constructive done after working all day and the two hours of commute.

I have some potatoes I am going to grow in containers that I need to get planted - and I should be receiving a parcel of plants from ups this week - a couple bushes and some daylilies if I remember correctly.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 May 10 - 07:45 AM

Bless you, dad... Pinch a few fir me, will ya'???

Lotta stuff happening here in "The Holler"... The North Carolina contingency of azalea nuts will be here next Wednesday so we are trying to get everything looking perky... Ain't easy as we are in a severe drought so if we're awake we're borrowing water from that big aqua-tank in the mountain (our well) to run the oscillators...

The stump pile has gotten a little cranky... 90% of every thing in it has burned but there are now about 5 of the largest stumps that are charred and don't want to give up the ship... I drive the drive the tractor in there and and use the bucket to turn them and they will burn for an hour or so and then just half smolder... Poured all my olf motor oil on 'um but that didn't do much good... Think I'll just let them burn until they won't and then take them one by one back in the woods (with the tractor) and let them live there...

Lettuce and soinch seeds just didn't sprout... Never had that happen... Gonna get some new ones... Maybe they had gone bad??? The 4 Pink Lady Slippers seem to like where I put them so we'll cross our fingers that they like it here... The soil and light are just about as close as to where I found them...

Gotta a "sport" on my Khomo Shekibo with a double flower??? Marked that branch and gonna take a cutting in late August and see what I get... If it does make doubles then ol' Bobert will have himseolf a new hybrid...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 08:28 AM

That sport sounds good, Bobert.

Will that azalea show have hardy azaleas like our native Roseshell (Rhododendron prinophyllum), shown here? I'm looking for an affordable source. Small plants are preferable.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 May 10 - 08:31 AM

I don't want to think what those stumps must look and smell like in your woods, Bobert.

I have a question for y'all. I bought tomatoes several weeks ago and kept them watered until I could plant, and I bought some more last weekend and they also went in the ground. These plants are about 12" tall and have fruit already. Some are more hunched over with fruit.

I don't usually get fruit this early on my tomato plants, though I've seen early flowers. Do you leave that early fruit or do you pinch it off to let the plant grow and become more robust before bearing fruit? I have some poblano pepper plants that were the last two in the garden store and kind of puny, and had each a 1" pepper that I picked off to give the plants a break. Those plants were only a few leaves, at least the tomatoes are better established. What do each of you do?

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 06 May 10 - 09:25 AM

I need to remember to take cuttings of my azaleas this year - I forgot last year.

I'd be interested in a source for Rhododendron prinophyllum as well...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 May 10 - 09:29 AM

Better in the woods than in our new gardens... There are a couple million acres back there and some rather nasty areas where nuthin' grows but nasty sticky bushes... I was thinkin' of takin' them one at a time and let them live with the sticky bushes... No one will ever see them because no one wants to go anywhere near them sticky bushes...

Prinophyllum is actaully one of the 17 native decidious azaleas that grow all over Virginia and North Carolina mountains... We have it growing at about 800 feet above us in the mountains... They are difficult to transplant but can be grown quite nicely from seed... There are some folks in Tennessee that grow lots of natives from seed... I'm not too sure if they ship but I do know they have a nursery... Where are you again, maeve???

As fir the tomatoes??? My thinking is that you'd not want to stress out a root system that is trying to develope itself without the addded strain of making fruit... I'd oinch them off, as well as any suckers, to give that plant a good root system to prodice some serious fruit later down the road...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 06 May 10 - 09:30 AM

And I got sidetracked reading other posts - why I logged into the thread was to say I wimped out yesterday and didn't do any garden work other then shopping.

bought a new red and a new yellow (!yellow!) rhody that should be hardy here...

It's frustrating how many are not.

Trying to track down sources for some of the hardier Dexter Hybrid rhodies as well - also hard. Found sources for SPECIMAN plants of many - but I can't afford to ship an 8 x 12 foot plant! (Even if I could afford to buy the thing)

So far have three new rhodies, tywo azaleas and a wegilia to plant. Holes dug for most of them 0- I just need to get the hoses attached so I can water them in situ - until then I keep them in the pots and water them at the house.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 09:46 AM

Midcoast Maine, Bobert. I had lots of R. prinophyllum when I lived in NH, but we only moved one transplant that bloomed for the first time last year; I'd like to establish a good sweep of them here in our woodland gardens. Young plants from seed would likely be good, due to the genetic diversity. I'm interested in any hardy azalea/rhody sort of plant but especially R. prino'.

I did find some intriguing plants at Eastern Plant Specialties, including Franklinia. I have a plant friend who thought he might have a few he could sell me this weekend at the FEDCO tree sale. I think I'll invest in an umbrella magnolia tree, too. I love magnolias.

Tomatoes, apples, anything of the sort I'd rather pinch off the early fruit on young plants and gain a healthy, more vigorous plant (as you said, SRS and Bobert.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 10:23 AM

MMario, I expect you've come across this discussion of Dexter hybrids along with sources http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/azalea/msg1110191412134.html, but there's the link just in case.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 06 May 10 - 10:46 AM

I just found Girard Nurseries...
http://www.girardnurseries.com/

and bought more then I should. 9 azaleas, 5 rhodies, and some other stuff....

my back is not going to thank me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 11:03 AM

Oh dear, that sounds wonderful back and all!

Take a look at the magnolias here: http://www.rarefindnursery.com/index.cfm/action/usersearch.htm


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 11:13 AM

Both sites have a wonderful selection and some very good prices. Too bad it's not possible to get what I'd like to.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 May 10 - 12:37 PM

maeve,

Google American Azalea Society and see if there is contact info for Jay and Lyndy Jackson in Tennessee... They raise thousands of natives from seed...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 06 May 10 - 01:25 PM

I did as you suggested, Bobert, and found them. That's a great resource, thank you!

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 06 May 10 - 03:25 PM

oh....oh my......I'm not sure that "Thank You" is exactly what I want to say; but WOW! I can get 25 plants /eedlings for about the same cost as ONE plant in one of the varieties I was looking for....

and following items off their page....

Summer flowering azaleas? Not only that, but summer flowering azaleas that are listed as being hardy in zone 4?

According to one site these started being introduced in the 1930's....so I would like to ask why today is the first time I've heard of them? Huh? Howcomewhy?

But the only nursery I've found so far doesn't ship to ny - luckily it is on the way to my parent's place.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 May 10 - 03:48 PM

Daggum' I love this thread. Great resources, maeve and Bobert.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 09 May 10 - 08:33 AM

Well, this weekend has been the "Blandy Plant Sale" at the State Ahboritum outside of Boyce, Va. and our chapter of the Azalea Society is doing our spring plant sale there... Sales have been a little down this year compared to other years but the weather has been lousy with 30-40 mph winds... We're on our way back up there today... The winds have subsided so maybe we'll do better???

I did, however, find a new-to-me plant that one of the other vendors was selling and, of course, had to have it... It's "Fire Line" Buckthorn (rhamnus frangula) that is a hybrid and, unlike the native buckthorns, is not invasive... It is a vertical (Columnal) plant that grows to 7 feet (2 feet wide) with thin, but thicky growing cut leaves... Nice plant that is just making it's way unto the scene... At least around these parts...

The P-Vine bought a native magnolia (tripetala umbrella) that had some kinda issues as a youngin with a severe twist at the base of the trunk... It's fine, just different... Kinda a Charlie Brown tree... Outta make for an interesting adult...

Gonna dig up a few things and take them to my mom for Mother's Day today while the P-Vine man's (women's) the plant sale...

Very dry here... I'd say 3/10s inch of rain in the last 5 week qualifies as a drought... Lotta oscillator moving...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 May 10 - 07:34 PM

I found the culprit--my strawberries are being attacked by a clever and persistent mockingbird. I'll hang a windsock on one of the spare shepherd's crooks (I'll offer bird food in the hanging seed container, not straight out of the garden!)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 May 10 - 10:03 PM

Grrrr . . . Mr. Mockingbird brings Mr. Cardinal along for the treat of fresh strawberries. I caught both of those buggers at work this afternoon! See how they repay my kindness of feeding them during the long snowy days of winter!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 09 May 10 - 11:20 PM

Dry here also, Bobert. How'd the garden tour go?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 10 May 10 - 02:50 AM

Some folks tie finished daffodils in a knot - why do they do this?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Darowyn
Date: 10 May 10 - 04:31 AM

Because the leaves become increasingly straggly as they gradually draw energy back into the bulb. If you cut them off for tidiness, you will probably have no flowers the following year, so some people tie them into a bundle. It's a compromise.
I dead-head the flowering stems and leave the leaves alone, because there are enough annual bedding plants to keep the borders full and colourful.
Cheers
Dave


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bonzo3legs
Date: 10 May 10 - 07:37 AM

Thanks, in fact we have a narrow flower bed just by the front of our house which never gets any sun, and consequently the daffodils left by the previous owners which still flower each year, eventually flop forward and look a mess. In the past I have just cut them at the root. This year I want to remove the bulbs and replant them in our back garden where they will get sun for at least part of the day, and hpefully stay vertical for longer, or maybe I should just start again with new bulbs??


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 10 May 10 - 10:19 AM

I have got to stop ordering plants on-line; for two reasons...

a) they always seem to arrive at an inconvenient time to deal with them

b) the charges sneak up on me...

But the good news is my bayberry bushes are leafing out. yeah!

We woke up to a white world on Sunday - this is after the wind saturday night blew over some outdoor furniture that hasn't blown over in two decades....

Had a pot of annuals almost go through the picture window - luckily it didn't quite make it.

But Sunday morning we had enough snow to cover the lawn and coat the cars; and though it disappeared pretty quickly we had flakes swirling around most of the morning.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 May 10 - 11:41 PM

I seem to manage to move daffodils almost any time. I have a pot full I dug up and have been letting dry out some, and have to figure out where I'm going to plant them. I started with a few, and of course, now have lots and lots of them. Every time I think I've moved them from a spot, more appear the next year. And I can't resist leaving there to finish flowering, and then a few of them disappear again. . .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 11 May 10 - 12:10 AM

I agree with Stilly about the daffs. Maybe best to wait until the leaves yellow, but I don't think it matters all that much when you dig and move them - but if the leaves haven't yet started yellowing, do not cut them off when you transplant.

If you leave the ones you have where they are, and continue to cut back the leaves while still green, the bulbs will suffer over time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 11 May 10 - 09:43 AM

yee-haw! I ordered some azaleas; what I thought said 3 to 3.5 inches; and pretty cheap; so I figured, okay, probably worth the wait as they will be more acclimated having grown a couple years in situ anyway....

and it turns out they were THREE 3.5 inch posts at the same price, which makes them outragesoulsy inexpensive and also means that I can lose 2/3rd of them and still end up with what I thought I was getting!

Also have some other shrubs coming...the ones I plugged in last fall from the same company are doing well, so I figure spring plantings shoudl do fine.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: SINSULL
Date: 11 May 10 - 10:13 AM

Advice, please.
Despite years of running a gardening program for children, I know very little - I did the grunt work and finances; others actually chose the crops and supervised the planting.

I have a tulip bed on one side of my house that is overgrown and at thi time of year overwhelmed with high grass and weeds. I want to dig them up, make a decent bed with mulch and disperse the tulips a bit better. When do I do it? How do I do it? And what else can go in there for color all spring and summer.
Thanks,
SINS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 11 May 10 - 11:24 AM

Back in "the day" Gramma T. used to dig her tulips up every year when it was warm enough to plant dahlias; the tulips then went into the shed to dry out *spread in single layers in carboard boxes) and the dahlias went into the garden. IN the fall, when fronst killed the tops of the dahlias, then the tulips got planted back as we dug the dahlias.

Major pita in my opinion.

Try to find some perennials that will co-exist wtith the tulips.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 11 May 10 - 11:15 PM

Grandma do that to have space, Leo? Otherwise, I think understand why she would lift the tulips.

Sins,

Dig up the tulips when the foliage is starting to fade so you still know where they are. Dig deep and wide around the clumps to try to avoid actually slicing into them. Once out of the ground, remove the soil from around the bulbs. Clean up the bed, replant the tulips, being sure to get them deep enough, and add bone meal to the planting holes. Mark where you planted them with sticks or something so that you don't dig them up again by accident when adding other plants to the bed.

No suggestions about what to plant for spring and summer color. My southern garden experience doesn't translate very well to Maine - especially when it comes to flowers and bloom times. Heat tolerance and length of season vs your longer summer daylight hours make for significant differences.   maeve would be a good one to consult.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 May 10 - 11:55 PM

My northern gardening experience is so long ago that it's childhood memories, mostly. We loved nasturtiums, a silly little flower, but they kept blooming as long as you picked them, they were great colors, and they loved the northern climate. I have never been able to grow them down here.

Flowers in the carnation family. Pinks. I haven't seen pinks in years, but they were a summer favorite at home. Geraniums did okay, and I'm sure some of the new ones would take the weather better than down here, even though they're supposed to work down here.

Ground cover like St. Johns Wart and Vinca did well. We had lots of lovely orchids (but those aren't for flower beds commingled with tulips. They're for great little shaded nooks that aren't disturbed.)

I'll root around in my brain (that mostly comes up with ferns and moss) and see if I remember any more.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 May 10 - 01:24 AM

Leo, It would be good if I proofread before I posted on occasion. I might even be coherent then.

What I meant to say/ask was....did your grandmother dig up the cold hardy tulips to make room for the non-cold hardy dahlias? Otherwise, I don't understand why she would dig up the tulips in late spring to replant in fall.   Although we are not supposed to be able to overwinter dahlias here, with a bit of mulch they generally are fine left in the ground year round in my little corner of the southern part of heaven. I understand they are not cold hardy in your neck of the woods, but the tulips would be.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 12 May 10 - 09:23 AM

Gramma was convinced that tulips had to be lifted every year. There was plenty of room to plant the dahlias around them; but Gramma insisted tulips MUST be dug. That's the way her mother did it and nothing would convince her that they could stay in the ground.

We had a neighbor who did the same thing; even though the tulips in our yard bloomed as well or better without being lifted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: SINSULL
Date: 12 May 10 - 09:26 AM

Thanks, Janie. Wish me luck.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 12 May 10 - 10:05 AM

My hosta order has shipped ; so tonight I dig holes....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 May 10 - 12:23 PM

Building up the compost in the back with more of the next door neighbor's leaves. And I tossed in the old dirt from various pots that have nothing growing in them now. I could build that dirt up again, but I might as well let it contribute to the compost bulk next year or two. I'll bring in new potting soil for the pots. I have lots of things I'd like to start from seed. I need more pots, though, quite a few broke last winter.

My next door neighbor put in a bunch of good looking hardwood mulch, bought for a reasonable price nearby, but I have a camper shell on my truck and they insist on loading with the loader, so I'm sure they won't let me pick up any without removing the top, and I'm not going to. My across the street neighbor has a pickup with not top, maybe we can work out a deal and make a trip for both of us.

It's early days yet in the garden, and new seeds haven't sprouted yet, but I have tomato voluteers coming up everywhere. If I left them alone I'd have a huge sea of tomatoes. I'll let some grow and transplant them when they're bigger. I've been thinking about putting in a plant at the curb for neighbors to pick from when they're out on their evening walks. Maybe this is the year to do that.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 May 10 - 02:08 PM

I think I am actually going to be home for the next couple of weeks and will get to garden some. I'm going to try "Mortagelifter" tomatoes, another heirloom that I can't think of right now, Sweet 100's and Sungold grape tomatoes. Will have to put up a small fence around the raised beds to keep the rabbits out - and am starting to have deer show up on occasion. Will also plant a couple of cukes, a summer squash of some kind, and may toss in some bush beans, though I won't have space for more than a mess or two of beans.

The basil did so well in pots last year that I'm tempted to grow it in pots again. However, by mid-summer the pots need watered daily and I'm not sure I'll be home enough to keep that up.

Lifted some single apricot mums from Mom & Dad's garden a few weeks ago. Just to get them in the ground, I had to plant them in one of raised beds - which I am reserving for veggies and herbs. Gonna move my perennial herbs into that bed, and replant the mums where the herbs were - hopefully this weekend.

Leo - you dun gone hog wild with the catalogs this year. Good on ya!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 May 10 - 09:05 PM

Janie, and others,

Well, my pudder has been down since last Sunday and today was tour an' pudder fix it men at the same time...

The tour went great... We are beat!!! The North Carolina people were blown away... Or, at least, that is what they said... Maybe it was the fine supper that the P-Vine had waitin' for them... One thing is fir sure, the P-Vine has definately cracked the upper ranks of the the North Carolina Azalea and Rhodo society folks...

I'm tired... Good to have a computer back but I think I'll just catch up with the "other threads" another time...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 13 May 10 - 10:12 AM

Janie - yes - went hog wild.

two of my orders which Had NOT notified me of shipping were on the porch last night - so I did indeed dig holes. I got Three rhodies, two spirea, a wegilia and some iris planted. dug more holes. unpacked a bunch of other stuff and sorted them out for more planting tonight.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 May 10 - 11:52 AM

Damn, Leo, with all of the stuff you've been planting all of these years, that property must look like a park!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 13 May 10 - 11:58 AM

The deer and other critters manage to eat almost as fast as we plant.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 May 10 - 06:08 PM

Two words, MMario: Liquid Fence...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 14 May 10 - 08:32 AM

Well, we had one of P-Vine's azalea chapter people down yesterday for what I hope is the last tour for awhile...

As for "Liquid Fence", MMario??? We have tried every concievable product and rememdy out there for deer, including hair, coyote pee, soap shavings, malorganite, and the other store bought priducts and found that this is the only product that works... You can buy it in concentrate (approx. $120 a gallon) or allready mixed... Yes, it is stinky but the stink goes away after a day or two leaving yer plants protected for up to 3 months or 4 inches of rain, whichever comes first...

We are going to play farm escapees today and visit a couple nurseries in and around Richmond... There is one great one called "The Great Big Greenhouse" which has alot of the newer stuff on the market...

Kinda lookin' for a "picea abies virgata" but always have my eyes open for unusual conifers to mix into the gardens...

Oh yeah, the reason we can get away is that we have had a glorius 7/10's of rain over the last 3 days... Horray...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 May 10 - 02:10 PM

I mowed and sprayed and trimmed today, and now it's raining. Let's hope this rain is a boost to the garden. I use the soaker hose and sprinkler, but it's never as good as a healthy rainfall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 14 May 10 - 06:16 PM

It is only the middle of May, and what little grass I have is turning brown. Some small chance of thunderstorms over the weekend.

Let's hope.



Bobert, the neem oil appears to have mastered the lacebugs for now. No new yellowing of leaves in 3 weeks now.

Gonna head out to Southern States first thing in the a.m. to get bonemeal and Fertrelle Tomato Tone. Then to Lowe's for some inexpensive but reasonably attractive garden trellises. Gonna try to dress up the beds by trellising the tomatoes as if they were ornamentals.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:03 PM

That sounds interesting! This year I had some small (about 5') of those hooks you can get for small lamps or plants in the garden (got them at a garage sale for $2 ea) and I put a couple of tomato cages side by side, with each doing kind of a garden Venn diagram with the post through the overlap. I'm hoping this will provide a stronger and larger cage to keep some more of my plants up off the ground.

I fertilized with corn gluten meal and dried molasses. And now that the rain has stopped, I'm going to apply my next batch of beneficial nematodes to knock out some of the fire ants and such.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:51 PM

Stilly,

More, please, about ants and nematodes. Although fire ants have been reported in the county for several years, I have yet to encounter them. I do, however, have huge anthills in the lawn and garden beds. Once I determined they were not fire ants, my approach was to ignore them, thinking that anything that loosened and aerated this heavy red clay was a positive. However, the nests are so extensive they create air pockets around the roots of plants and grass., and the large heaps of the anthills smother the grass.

Re: trellising the tomatoes. If the plants stay healthy, I am reasonably certain the cherry tomatoes will be attractive on a trellis. Not sure about the big guys. One very real glitch that I don't think I can overcome - the long raised bed is oriented north-south, parallel to the road, in the only space that gets close to 6 hours of sun when the trees are leafed out. Most sun is morning sun. the beds are shaded for most of the afternoon, then get another 1 to 1 1/2 hours of sun late in the afternoon. Because the total sun exposure is marginal for veggies, I can not allow the tomatoes to shade the rest of the plants from that last bit of afternoon sun. so the trellis will have to be oriented east-west. A bit of an aesthetic problem. As I type, I am finally accepting that I can either grow several tomato plants, and perhaps a little basil in the long bed, or I can limit myself to two tomatoes, and also plant a couple of summer squash, cukes and a few bush beans. The raised beds provide adequate space for a nice little spring and fall salad garden - but not for a diverse summer veggie ,garden.

Grrrrr.   I hate it when Mr. Reality strolls in and smacks me in the face.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 14 May 10 - 08:09 PM

Went to three nurseries today in or around Richmond... The first two??? Same old, same old... Then we stopped at Acre Acres in Montpelier, Va... Ya'll wouldn't belive this place... They have over a 100 Japaneses Maples hybrids and one price fits all... $32 fir a 3 gallon (3-6 ft plants)... We bought 4!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 14 May 10 - 08:29 PM

And don't ya' just hate it when your eyeballs don't line up, and you open an adjacent political thread instead of this one?

I've got whiplash. Who shall I sue?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 15 May 10 - 08:13 AM

I didn't do it!!!

BTW, folks, I've got a question???

It's about time for black raspberries to start coming in and the crows know it... They have been hangin' out waitin' to do their crow thing on the berries and we've tried a few things that didn't work out too well...

First, that small light weight netting isn't the answer... The plant grows thru it and then the stuff is hopelessly captured by the netting... I hate that nettin'!!! Second the crow go under it and peck away...

I've also used pie pans hung above the patch...

Any other ideas???

I'm going back to Wes Ginny today to play a large private party (200 people) and am takin' some 3 gallon pots and shovel and going back to some propert that we just sold but have permission to scavenge from before it is cleared for a new house... I know there are several white pines which would love to be outta those woods so maybe I'll save a few of them... Lots of stuff on a several lots I sold a few years ago that I know will one day be bulldozed so I'll check them out, too... Think it's gonna be fun...

I know that playin' will be fun... Takin' the entire arsenal... Drums, Lowebow, Back Porch slab geetar and a couple resonators... Gonna be a ggod plant day and a good music day, as well...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 May 10 - 09:59 AM

Sounds like a great way to spend a May Saturday!


Just back from Lowes and Southern States with a couple of trellises, basil, cilantro, chive and italian parsley plants, and cuke and zuke seeds. Already moved the oregano. The Mexican mint marigold did not come back and I couldn't find any more of it. Think I'll leave the rosemary where it is for now. Last year I planted were supposed to be one each of onion chives and garlic chives. They were mislabeled. The onion chives were actually garlic chives. I'm not sure what the one labeled garlic chives is, but is getting ready to bloom, so expect to soon find out. I'm wondering if it might be society garlic, although it did not die back over the winter, and I would have expected society garlic to have done so in zone 7.

Will have to go back out to buy stakes or rebar to better brace the trellises.

We did get a little shower overnight - just enough to raise the humidity. Will wait until sundown to start transplanting stuff, and to mow.

Rats. That means I have to go do housework now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 May 10 - 06:26 PM

Dang, my yard is a bear to mow - but it is done. 'Maters and herbs in. zuccini and cukes seeded. I might couldashoulda planted closer and planted more, at least in the two sections that are 12" deep, but just couldn't bring myself to do it, in spite of what the square foot gardening recommendations are.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 16 May 10 - 08:45 AM

Yea! Rain - lots of it overnight.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 16 May 10 - 08:47 AM

Hello! Here I am in the sunny Monadnock region. My house is (mostly) built and I am spending part of most every day creating a garden where once there was sheep pasture (100 years ago) and then unmanaged scrubby woodland. It was cleared last year, and abused with trucks and construction equipment all last year, and now I'm taking over and nurturing it like a mama with a newborn.

First I dug a lot of rich foresty soil and mixed it with manure, humus and peat moss.

I've put in 4 4x4 raised beds (my own adaptation of
square foot gardening) where I've planted lettuce sets, and seeds, spinach, pea, bean, beet and parsnip seeds, onion sets and seed potatoes. It's still too early for tomatoes and basil, but they're coming. I have an herb plot with thyme, tarragon, oregano and rosemary, (more herbs coming soon- especially my favorite, lavendar!) and have ground prepared for squash and melons.

I've dug a couple of plots for the perennials that have started pouring in- planted white and yellow flags, rosa rugosa and lilacs, have a spot for the forsythia, rhodies, sunflowers, nasturtiums, dahlias (which I've moved from garden to garden 4 times and they keep giving me glorious red blooms in August/Sept!). There are still piles of lumber where I want more lilac and 2 holly bushes in front of the house. We're building a porch and woodshed this summer, then I'll get going on those areas.

My long term goal is to create a feeling of sanctuary as you wind down our long driveway, inspired from my long-time friends at Seven Arrows Farm in Seekonk, Mass. First you turn off the road on to our wooded driveway lined with beech, maple, hemlock, birch and pine. Come up a rise and begin to see daffs, lupins, lilies or whatever's in season. Round the bend is the garden on the left, the house straight ahead. Buddhas, wind chimes, other sculptures, cairns, or special rocks are hidden in the trees. You'll know you're safe when you get here. That's my dream, and it's starting now.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 16 May 10 - 08:56 AM

Sounds very lovely, Animaterra.   Hope you will continue to share here as you work to bring your vision to fruition.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,mmario
Date: 16 May 10 - 01:02 PM

Yesterday I managed to plant the hosta order (ordered 8, got 15; potted a couple of the extras).

planted a bunch of seedling azaleas and small rhodies. took three to a friend and potted up a couple more as house gifts for a trip in june.

planted the lilacs, the wegielias, and the spireas. Now just the honeyberries and a couple more azaleas; Two japanese ferns and A SOLOMAN'S SEAL to go.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 May 10 - 12:42 AM

Janie, Bobert, whoever else has ant problem, and other critters (grubs, for instance) here are the instructions that came with the two packs of nematodes. Meant to put out in two applications a week apart (optimum - I went a lot longer because I was waiting for rain. It's easier than watering down before applying nematodes).

front page

back page

I think if you download each, you should be abel to read them fine.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 May 10 - 02:21 PM

Brought in some garlic last night. I don't have a huge bed of it, but I'm getting more every year--it's a local wild (escaped?) garlic, a hard-neck variety. I have a couple of good spots going now. Some of it was starting to show the brown tips on the foliage, so I brought it in. The rest can grow a bit longer. Some of them were quite large. Mmmmmm! They're hanging in bunches drying in the laundry room.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 17 May 10 - 03:05 PM

I have to decide where to plant my witch-hazel, or as one article I was reading called it:

"American winterbloom"

(and then proceeded to go into a long rant about common names being derogatory to ethnic groups - ignoring the fact that "Witch"hazel was originally wych-hazel - which means "hazel used for dowsing"

Anyway, can''t decide whether I want to put it on the north side of the southern leg of the driveway or the north side of the northern leg of the driveway; both sites face east with pretty dense shade to the west.

I think the south section - the north has bittersweet and forsythia; there really isn't anything at the south entrance.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 17 May 10 - 03:44 PM

Sounds like a wonderful dream, Animaterra... But if ya' stay at it you'll get there...

We finally made some sense of our vegetable garden yesterday... Replanted some spinich where nuthin' came up during the dry spell (dought) but now that we have rain things will probably do better...

Bought some ***bad*** straw for mulching 'cause we mulched the three rows of potatos and both woke up this morning with itchy welts allover our arms, necks and tummmies... Straw must have had a colony of "straw (hay) mites" in it... Grrrrrrrrr... Never had 'um but they show nuff can make life miserable fir a couple days...

But nice gentle rain fallin'... Hooray...

As fir nematodes??? Other then these mites I think we have a purdy good balance of good and bad bugs and I'm afarid to introduce anything that might throw that balance off...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 17 May 10 - 09:21 PM

Bobert: regarding the anti-bird netting: I'm trying the UK approach this year: instead of fencing birds/critters OUT, you use the netting to create a "fruit cage" to keep your plants IN. It's essentially a little fence/net room, big enough to stand up in, with stakes or some kind of frame on which the netting can be draped and then secured to form a roof and walls. Pollinators and harvest-folk can get in, but not wild hungry berry-munchers.

I plant to do this for my raspberry & blueberry patches. It's probably cost-prohibitive for a big spread, but our farmstead is quite small and our berry patches are only two years old, so it'll be easy to enclose them.

--Cuilionn, who has more trouble with berry-stealing chickens than any wild feathered theives!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 May 10 - 12:36 AM

I had to put up bird feeders to distract the bird theives from my strawberries. They were really going to town in them for a while.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 18 May 10 - 03:12 PM

Apple tree blossums! Hummingbirds soon!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 18 May 10 - 04:25 PM

Mainstream Rhodies (Roseum Elegans, I think) starting to bloom, funny the one on the right of the door is always a week or so before the one to the left of the door, and they are all of 10 feet apart, same variety, same age.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 18 May 10 - 06:01 PM

Yeah, Cuilionn, I've given serious thought to fencing in my berries like a room... I've seen a few articlesw and pics on that concept and think it's the bee's knees...

Lotta late bloomin' Rhoddies in bloom here, too...

Planted one of the 4 Japanese Maples today and sited two more...

Cold and damp here but supposed to be sunny and in the 80's Thursday and Friday... 'Bout time... We need to get the season goin'...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 18 May 10 - 06:23 PM

It is close enough to June that I took a chance and planted some things today - potatoes, bush peas and beans, and zucchini. Hopefully the snow will be only brief if it happens again.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 18 May 10 - 07:34 PM

The beans and potatoes won't mind but the zukes ain't gonna like the snow one bit...

Hopefully, yer past yer last snow...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 18 May 10 - 09:09 PM

Well, we wanted rain, and we got rain - 4 inches of it. And probably more over the next few days. Hope the seeds and new plants don't rot, as it is also cool.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 18 May 10 - 10:45 PM

Alice, I hope that high country is worth it:>)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 May 10 - 12:41 AM

Janie, did you see my post here? I scanned the front and back of the nematode instructions for you to take a look at. You can enlarge and read there onscreen, or you can download, etc.

Bobert, I don't think nematodes would hurt, even if you think everything is in balance. These are beneficial nematodes, and they might head off some problem that is looming.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 19 May 10 - 12:53 PM

*phew*   my computer just saved me from an impluse buy of about 200 daffie bulbs.

but it wouldn't let me "go to checkout" because I had cookies blocked for that site....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: SINSULL
Date: 20 May 10 - 10:06 AM

My tree is weeping. I looked for a madonna but found none. The trunk branches off into two trunks. At the separation point, water (I stuck my finger in it and it is water) is running out even though the weather is dry. Tree Man coming to take a look on Saturday. Am I about to lose my friend? She lost a huge branch two years ago in a Nor'easter. Took out half of a smaller tree and a fence.
SINS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 20 May 10 - 10:24 AM

Sinsull-- maybe you need to wassail your tree and sing it back to health? I wassail all my fruit trees when I plant them, then once or twice a year, particularly in extreme cold snaps or droughts. Don't know if it helps, but it makes ME feel better!

I sing the old "apple tree wassail" song, modifying it to fit the species.

Can't hurt...

On a totally different note (LA!), a lady from a local Japanese restaurant asked us if we could grow "Shiso" for them. They used to buy it from somebody at the farmers' market, but that vendor stopped growing it. I figured it wouldn't hurt to try, so I ordered a packet of Ao Shiso seeds from the Kitazawa Seed Co., an Asian-heirloom seed supplier in California. Of course, Maine ain't California--or Japan. Has anyone else grown this tasty Japanese herb, and do you have any tips on cultivation?

I figured we could start some in our hoop house and some in a raised bed outside, then just hang back and see how it does in the different conditions, but I'd ideally like to have enough of it to harvest and sell. (I wonder how many shiso leaves a Japanese restaurant goes through in a week?)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 May 10 - 11:37 AM

Good news on growing herbs for that restaurant! They'll earn brownie points from their locovore customers.

Mary, visit the Dirt Doctor's instructions called the "Sick Tree Treatment". It really does work.

Found a deceased immature tarantula on the walk near my side door this morning. I'm sure it wasn't there when I headed out. I was working in the garden over the weekend, digging garlic. I wonder if this little guy was injured and died or was somehow impacted by my digging? That's one reason I hate to disturb the soil once the garden is laid out and planted. So many beneficial critters live in there, if left alone.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 May 10 - 11:46 AM

Shiso, aka perilla


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 May 10 - 08:23 PM

Sins,

Cut away any dead braches and get some of that foam in a can and squirt it into any bad spots... Also feed it and airate the soil unerneath it... Also, take about a cup or two of dish detergent and several cans of beer... Mix all up in several gallons of water and water around the trunk out as far as the branches go...

Do not call a tree guy... They all are the same... They want to cut it down and give you a big bill...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 May 10 - 09:41 PM

Snow in the weather forecast.

I planted seeds, not bedding plants, so they will make it through the storm.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 May 10 - 10:15 PM

Snow sucks!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 May 10 - 12:33 AM

Bobert, snow just lies there, it doesn't suck . . .



okay, minds out of the gutter

I took the spray bottle with a mix of fertilizer and some BT and sprayed the plants that are most likely to be bothered by hornworms, caterpillars, and other worm creatures. I've picked a big honker hornworm up out of the garden already and today pulled a couple of brightly colored caterpillars out of the parsley, and a fuzzy one out of the strawberries. Last week on the Dirt Doctor's radio program he mentioned something I haven't been aware of--the BT breaks down quickly in sunlight, so it is best to put it out in the evening hours or at night. Gives it more time to be there when the critters are chomping.

Geez. This whole post could be X rated if you weren't all just good gardeners out there tilling and sowing seeds . . .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 21 May 10 - 11:35 PM

Related to gardening only to the extent that it involved being out in the yard -

Saw my first lightning bug of the season tonight!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 May 10 - 12:30 AM

It is so nice to be home 100% of the time!
If it isn't snowing or raining this weekend, I'm going to rebuild my compost bin!



Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 May 10 - 01:29 AM

I took a large syringe (purchased at my feed store) with a few CCs of water and Thuricide (Bacillus thuringensis) and injected it into my squash plant stems. As small as they are, a few leaves each, they are already rotting away because of the squash worm or borer or whatever. It's a moth larva, a caterpillar or worm, that gets inside and turns the stem to a pulpy yellow mess. Except BT injected into the stem stops them in their tracks and the plants can recover. I'll probably have to do this every week or so, to keep them alive. These worms are insidious--one day you have healthy plants, the next, you have a wilted heap of leaves.

Worms, be gone!

I transplanted several of the vitex seedlings sprouting in my garden, and pulled the rest like weeds. I also have a lot of tomato "weeds," plants that came back as volunteers. There must be hundreds of them out there. I'll transplant a few (I think they're cherry tomatoes, and I didn't buy any of those this year) and weed the rest. Odd predicament to be in, isn't it? Veggie weeds.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 22 May 10 - 08:23 PM

You won't believe this, Magz, but the P-Vine goes into the middle of her squash plants if she suspects a worm and takes a knike (yikes) to the stem and surgically removes them critters and then tapes up where she cut... Grosses me out but she seems to not be bothered one bit about it... But she saves the plants... Its amazing... Truely amazing...

We planted our pole and limas and squash seeds this mornin' and then get the heck off the farm for the afternoon... I mean, we been at it every day for the last teo weeks and just needed a little time away from it all...

Went to Woodstock, Va. (where I graduated high school, Massanutten Military Academy) and had lunch at the Woodstock Cafe... Then stopped at an old timey hardware store and found a nice oscillator for $20!!! It's the kind that broadcasts in a circular otion with 3 aluminum legs... Has a radius of 30 feet... Not bad fir $20... Plus the head is metal and not plastic...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 May 10 - 09:06 PM

It was snowing big white flakes when I got up this morning, which melted and then changed to rain, which then changed to hail, which then changed back to rain.
Building the new compost bin is on hold for a day or two.


alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 May 10 - 01:21 AM

Bobert, I've done the exact same surgery. It does work, but you have to get to the plant before the entire stem is yellow granular mush. Last year, they were gone before I realized the worms where there.

You have to make the cut lengthwise, along the stem, missing the plant's circulatory system.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 May 10 - 02:13 AM

I started digging a new bed this evening, down at the curb. I'll put down newspapers and mulch around the plants, to help keep weeds out. I'll have to water the area some in the morning, the soil is fairly compacted, but once it is broken up, and mulched leaves mixed in, it isn't bad.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,LynnT
Date: 23 May 10 - 07:45 AM

If anyone is in or near the DC area, I am clearing out a part-sun bed to make room for more interesting plants brought home from recent swaps & sales -- if anyone wants
- tall phlox (grown from seedlings, probably pink),
- Sweet William,
- tiger lilies,
- Golden Seal,
- catnip,
- cassia bushes,
- hosta plantagenaria,
- sedum Autumn Joy,
- lamb's ear,
- pink turtlehead
- lotsa other stuff,

come on by -- four people did yesterday, and there's still lots left. You can PM me at ltitle2003 at yahoo dot com.

Lynn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Cuilionn
Date: 23 May 10 - 07:47 AM

A belated thanks to Bettynh for the wonderful link/post about Shiso, aka Perilla. Thanks to you, I've not only found a potential cash crop, I've also apparently found a source for home-made soft drinks, anti-asthma medication, a cancer cure and tick repellent!!!

Seeds are going into the ground this morning!

--Cuilionn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 23 May 10 - 11:32 AM

Enjoy, Cuilionn. I've talked online to southern gardeners who call perilla a weed because it seeds itself everywhere. But last year I tried it and only got a few spindly plants (they were crowded in a pot to be fair). Keep them warm and watered for sure, and I wouldn't worry about them seeding around up here in the north.

I'm trying to limit my garden space, so I'm trying some edible ornamental beds. Garlic chives are everywhere anyway (they seed around and the flowers are welcome in August). I've got parsley and cabbages between the pansies and I'm about to plant basil beside the colchicum bulbs, to maybe hide the foliage as it dies back. My favorite basil is African Blue, which I can hold over winter in a big pot and take cuttings for spring. I haven't had luck with overwintering any other basils.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 23 May 10 - 03:59 PM

I have a tomatoe! It's about 2/3s the size of a small pea, but I have one.

Ahhh... I cheated. As my back is still not cooperating, I bought a potted Early Girl, Scotian and tiny tim. Lots of flowers. Here, according to my Gramma, tomatoes wouldn't even be planted until three days before the next full moon.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 23 May 10 - 05:07 PM

My neighbor came yesterday and dumped a load of sh*t on me- er, on my land, right next to the garden. I had a glorious morning today spreading much of it around, then threw caution to the wind and planted tomatoes BEFORE MEMORIAL DAY- simply Not Done in this region. And also planted squash, and sunflowers, and added marjoram and sage to my herb garden, and watered everything. Tomorrow I'll work some more on the flower garden- I've moved some glorious dahlia tubers from house to house through 5 moves in the past 10 years and now they will bless my (hopefully) permanent home.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 May 10 - 05:09 PM

No snow today! Woo hoo!

Building the compost heap.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 23 May 10 - 09:14 PM

Good on ya, Alice!

Your season may be short, but I bet it is glorious!

Dahlias! Of all the sun plants I left behind, it is the dahlias I miss the most. They were the queens and whores of my summer and fall garden. I love 'em.

For this part of the country, it has been a very moderate spring, temp. wise. Had been very, very dry, but the last week has seen a lot of rain, and probably more to come for the next few days. Was concerned that my cuke and zuccini seeds had rotted, but noticed a couple of cotyledon leaves of each emerging today, which is the earliest I would have expected to see them.

Not real happy with the topsoil I bought by the scoop to fill the raised beds. Too much clay. Hard to work compost into it because of clumps that can only be busted up by hand when the moisture content is just right. It would probably be ok on the ground, where I could run a tiller through it it.

The hydrangea macrophylla and hydrangea arborescens are both loving this rain. I have one arborescens that is a cultivar, but I don't know which cultivar - don't think it is Annabelle - and a friend gave me a start of the species found along edges throughout the east. Also don't know the variety of the macrophylla - it was also a pass along plant from a friend. It is compact and the blooms are not overly large. By the time all the blooms are full and mature, it will all be blue, but right now, some are blue, some are pink, and some are lavender.

Re: lightning bugs/fireflies. I was surprised several years ago when my southern California in-laws visited to learn that they do not have fireflies out there. Do you have them in Montana, Alice?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 23 May 10 - 09:55 PM

I am more aware than ever that not being able to commit to this piece of property is a major factor with respect to gardening.   It is not where I want to be. It is where it is immediately practical for me to be. I could learn to want to be here, but am hesitant to do so due to both family issues and concerns about employment stability. When I started serious work to create the garden in Hillsborough, I believed I would be there for the rest of my life.   I do not regret what I did there. I'm not sure I can do that again, however.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 23 May 10 - 10:14 PM

Yer a gardener, Janie... Ya' can't hide from that no matter where you are... Yeah, new gardens, old gardens, the next garden??? It's part of the deal... Nuthin' is forever except...

..gardening!!!

So make the best of it and, hey, no matter where you'll be when yer 88 you'll still be puttin' yer hands in the dirt... No way outta it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 May 10 - 11:01 PM

It is peaceful working in the garden. There are birds building nests all around.

No fireflies here, but lots of butterflies and dragonflies, just a little too cool yet for them to be about.



Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 24 May 10 - 12:06 AM

Thanks, Beaubear. I needed that.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 May 10 - 12:34 AM

Janie, find some lava sand to add to your soil--try a feed store. Greensense, I think, sells 40# bags. And some decomposed granite (I've found that in bags at Home Depot). They will help make the soil more approachable.

I dug a new bed, or at least, started that new bed over the weekend. I'm going to plant my gift to the neighborhood there, transplanted volunteer tomatoes. And probably some sunflowers, just to make that bed really pop. I love the way the ones that are growing in other parts of the yard now look.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 24 May 10 - 07:24 AM

Looks as if today may very well be the day for all the seedlings (6 varieties of tomatoes, 3 of pepper and 2 of eggplant) to come outta the potting shed to play with their buddies in the veggie garden... Actually we're kinda ahead of schedule this year since I've been home more...

The next real biggie is our pond... It has developed and leak and I'm in the process of learning everything I can about "bentonite clay", a product that when tilled into a dry pond makes for a good natural liner... When I first brought this up with an old farmer friend he said to put some hogs in the pond... I thought he was jokling but he wasn't... The hogs will pack the bottom down and prevent leakage... No hogs!!!... Clay... Gonna be a big job but it has to be done... Looks like I'm going to be in the bottom of the pond with the clay and my roto-tiller for a couple days!!!

Everything else here is absolutely beutiful... Never looked so good... The deer fence is the reason... We have had *zero* deer damage in out little 6 acres of paradise...

Gotta go...

Happy gardening, ya'll...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 May 10 - 11:40 AM

My goal is to make the front yard garden a real knockout this year. It's creeping down the hill steadily, and I'm moving some stuff down to the curb. I don't want to make it into the front page of the paper, or even the front page of the Life section - but I want to make it an example in general for folks who pass by the place. It's going to be evenings and weekends put into it still, but I'll get there eventually. Maybe by July or August I can have enough beds ready to put in a fall crop of stuff.

I was at Sam's Club the other day, behind a couple who had a basket full of boxes of produce--every single one of these items grows well in this part of Texas. I asked if they were shopping ahead of their garden producing enough to eat. They said their neighborhood association bans gardens. That they've managed to sneak a tomato into a hedge where no one has noticed it yet. That sounds damned unAmerican to me! No gardens? Probably no clothes lines, no solar panels, no whatever. Talk about anal thinking.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 24 May 10 - 09:05 PM

I'm new to ferns so did not know what to expect. Only have 3 - a ghost fern, a japanese painted fern, and what I think is ebony spleenwort, (the little single fronds I noticed in 3 places along the foundation of the house when I was grubbing out the ivy and liriope last year.) The g.f. and J.p.f. sent up a bunch of fiddleheads all at once a couple of months ago. To my surprise, both are continuing to send up fiddleheads, one or two at a time. With the rain we have had the past 8 days, I am seeing new fiddleheads everyday. I'm noticing that with ebony spleenwort, which is still in a pot, but doing very well. Apparently have bunches of fertile fronds that have come up, but haven't noticed any new sterile fronds.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: The Sandman
Date: 25 May 10 - 01:18 PM

a good time to plant japanese knotweed, this plant is used in chines medicine and is also edible


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 25 May 10 - 01:54 PM

Plant Japanese Knotweed? Who needs to plant it? Around these parts it is a very common, invasive weed.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 25 May 10 - 03:03 PM

japenese knotweed - one of the few things you are allowed to destroy on sight in NYS - that and purple loostrife.

Janie - I've got japanese painted ferns too; Ive started to develop a little bit of woodland garden and they seem to like it there.

An odd stretch of ground, I go from almost full sun to partial shade to full shade in the space of about six feet - which makes life interesting.

Received my daylily plants over the weekend - I ordered 7, they shipped 9 ;(two freebies) and I planted 34. Can't complain about that.

This place SAID they shipped iris through may - but none of the iris I ordered got shipped. So now they won't come until September or October.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 25 May 10 - 03:20 PM

Bobert... before you buy any bentonite, read up on how to use it. It can be a bit tricky.

As an engineer designing containment dykes, I never once spec'd that method associated with "tilling". I always spec'd the mats, but they are expensive and expensive to install. Of course, that was on large projects. You may find sommat available for a small scale project. And, as you won't have mechanical stress upon your pond liner, it may be the way to go.

Of course, I assume you are investigating all the options.

One of the problems with the "tilling" option is this. If you don't get the job don't right in just one small area, you will have to do the whole thing over because you will be looking for a needle in a hay stack. Actually, the needle would be easier to find.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 25 May 10 - 07:53 PM

Well, gn-z... The pond ain't all that big... Maybe 70 feet by 40 feet and tear-dropped shape... I've been readin' up on the clay and seems like I need 2 pounds per square foot... I think it'll work just fine... Better than letting four-legged critters into our gardens to do the job...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 25 May 10 - 08:41 PM

The hydrangea arborescens given to me by Son's g.f.'s father is still in the pot, and is blooming. It is not a cultivar, but the wild species. Subtle and beautiful. Not sure where I will site it. Not next to the arborescens cultivars.

I'm wondering if the quercifolia he gave me is also the wild species. It will not bloom this year, but is doing well where I planted it. He is going to be a wonderful garden resource - he loves native and species plants, and the gardens around their house are stunning. (Gonna have to talk him out of some of the hundreds of hellebores they have growing *grin*.

Neemed the azaleas, as the lacebugs are just starting to appear again. They are all doing well, Bobert - they have loved this coolish spring, and especially have loved all the rain we have had lately.

Had to lop off a branch or two from a dogwood - the squirrels had finally figured out how to let their weight carry the branches down so they can reach over and grab a handful of sunflower seeds from a "squirrel-proof" feeder - thus avoiding the spring that closes the feeder when a squirrel jumps on it. Took 'em two years - smart and persistent little blankity-blanks.

Last but not least, replaced several hose-end gaskets - they were leaking at every connector!

Last, but certainly not least, replaced a bunch of gaskets in hose connectors and fittings to stop leaks. The mosquitoes nearly carried away before I was done.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 27 May 10 - 08:58 AM

Crap - just lost a long post by hitting the wrong key somewhere; suffice it to say what I thought was dead is live; and I need to water.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 27 May 10 - 12:17 PM

Ah, another of those resurrection plants, eh?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 27 May 10 - 12:55 PM

Speaking of azaleas, Janie, the late bloomers are just coming in and many of them are from various "mis-labeled" cuttings so there are more than just a few surprises out there... One is very much like Komo Sheikibo but a real day-glow kinda purple/lavendar color... Also, a nice white "strap pedal" one that we are clueless about...

Magnolia is in bloom...

yesetrday was the big day... We finally got the stumps that rtefused to burn outta our pond field and we can now go about trying to get some fescue to grow (for now) to hold the soil from ending up in the pond...

Still too hot to put out our seedlings... Maybe Sunday...

Well, nap time and then back it it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 27 May 10 - 01:13 PM

We had a nice t-storm last night, so I'm headed out to the cemetary to plant the stones for this weekend. My parents and grandparents are together, and the upright stone is in full sun. I plant both sides of that stone, so two minigardens of annuals, probably petunias and maybe zinnias, and some gloriosa daisies for the late summer. My aunt planted sedums at either end of the stone, so I'll prune them back and fertilize, and they'll be bushlike by August. They've been there about 10 years and haven't grown too big yet.

My great-grandparents are in another cemetary, with the stone backed by a stone wall and in shade. Impatiens go there, and alyssum. The lily of the valley pops up wherever it can survive the lawnmower. There's lichen on that stone, and I haven't scrubbed it off. Eventually, it might cover the lettering, I suppose, but they say lichen only grows where there's clean air, and I kinda like seeing it there.

I keep meaning to go back in midsummer to collect irises from some of the overgrown graves. This year they'll be in full bloom for Memorial Day. I do like the single-color old-fashioned sort best.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 27 May 10 - 06:15 PM

Quite the windy day here... Mum's apple tree blossums were flying all over such that it minded me of snow at times. But, a much kinder and gentler snow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 27 May 10 - 06:30 PM

Too darn chilly and cloudy here. I'm getting impatient for better growing weather.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 May 10 - 06:54 PM

Worms, bugs, things that eat up or curl leaves are making their presence known. Found lace bugs on the eggplant, not sure what else. Some worms on the okra. I have a bottle of BT I bought last year that has stayed in the fridge. I will replace it next time I'm over at my favorite feed store - I'm not sure how long this stays viable. I know if I bought it at the garden center near here theirs sits on shelves in an extremely warm room, and they probably don't throw out anything if it gets old. My regular place sells enough to have some product turnover.

Sounds like thunder, but the storms in the area are to the east. Not sure if we'll get anything tonight. I watered with the soaker hoses this morning.

It is lovely. Tomato plants over the top of the cages now, several fruits in sight. Peppers are putting out fruit, basil is almost big enough to start pinching off leaves for my cooking. Mmmmm!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 27 May 10 - 07:12 PM

Arrrgh -post lost in cyberspace just now.

Bettynh, I can just picture you tending the plantings. Wish my departed loved ones were somewhere that allowed the same.

Although a couple of the cuke and zuccini seeds have sprouted, most have not. I think I will wait a few weeks, and plant again - our growing season is so long that most veggies planted at the beginning of the season poop-out or get eaten up by disease well before the first frost. Once the tomatoes really take off, I will also root a couple of suckers and plant them along about the end of June.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 27 May 10 - 11:58 PM

I had to make a temporary plastic covering over my little garden and tuck in a couple of hot water bottles to give the bedding plants a fighting chance over night. (big milk jugs full of hot water)

It's just not warming up enough this spring for things to grow... may have to make a more permanent plastic greenhouse.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 29 May 10 - 04:26 PM

Last shipment of plants for the "spring", I think, came in today. Ordered 8 , they shipped 9, I've planted 5 and have 10 left to plant....gotta love it~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 29 May 10 - 04:31 PM

Today was the first day without cold rain for some time, so I was able to plant more containers and turn the compost. Yay! None of the seeds have germinated. Just too cold lately. I planted more peas.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 29 May 10 - 05:44 PM

Another cold rain has started (feels like snow).
But I found another way to keep the tender pepper transplants warm.
I put a string of Christmas lights under the clear plastic tent greenhouse that I set up over the containers. Close to the garage, it was easy to reach an outlet with an extension cord.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 29 May 10 - 05:56 PM

Clever, Alice! I have to pot up some wine coloured myrtle. I should have done it last month, but I forgot.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 May 10 - 06:11 PM

Sounds cheerful, Alice. Here, it's in the 90s and I'm pacing myself as I work, trying to stay in shady areas of the yard. Making progress in weeding and putting down newspaper and mulch to keep some of the weeds out. I dug up chunks of oregano and gave to several neighbors to plant as groundcover (at the very least).

Some of my tomatoes have quite pronounced early blight, others don't. I sprayed hydrogen peroxide on them today, but I think I'm going to break down and get some of that Veggie Wash that is supposed to help kill it off or slow it down.

Back out to the yard. I've cooled off a bit. There is a noticeable smell of sweat and dirt on me this afternoon. I guess I should go roll around with the dogs, they should love me this way. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 May 10 - 09:50 PM

A neighbor and her small son were out walking their dog this evening. She paused to ask about the garden, was that eggplant I was growing? We talked gardening for about 20 minutes, with the short tour, promise of a small tree I'd dug out of a bed and put in a pot (vitex) and I'm sure she'll be another good candidate in the neighborhood for my extra eggplant. It seems if I don't plant many one year, because the last was so prolific, then I don't get enough. So this year I have several plants in, and it's like getting rid of zucchini when they're in season. My neighbors on either side don't eat them, but across the street a couple of them do, and now one more up the block. :)

I didn't finish anything today, but I suppose it's hard to say that gardening is ever completed. I working on the kitchen garden, weeded and then put down newspaper and mulch in areas where I'm not planting but I don't want it full of seedy weeds either. I don't plant crops right against the house since there was a termite treatment here years ago. I figure even though time has passed, I'll grow my veggies a couple of feet away from that contaminated zone.

I'm shaping the raised keyhole bed, I've put about 1/3 of the first row of rocks down, and filled in with mulch and weeds I dug up today to hold down a layer of newspaper. I'll get some top soil to fill it up with (I expect it to be 12 to 18 inches deep when complete) so the weeds at the bottom won't be a problem. I used scraps of mortar and old rocks and bricks from a big wall that was torn down years ago for the first row, but that probably won't be visible because the grass will grow a little ways up around it. I have some nicer stone I'll use in the next couple of layers. All of this was dumped at the back of the yard, and now I'm slowly hauling it into the front yard again.

I have peppers almost big enough to pick, the basil is now big enough to start pinching off leaves to use, I've been eating strawberries for weeks, and though there aren't many on there right now, the leaves are looking good and there are lots more flowers. The oregano needs to be trimmed back, it has all flowered. It comes back nicely after being cut back.

It's warm, typical Texas summer. I wore sunscreen because I knew I'd be out there all day. It seems to have worked. No crispy spots.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 11:10 AM

Had the hose running for about 10 hours yesterday; did a wee bit of gardening every time I went out to adjust it; too hot to do anything much more. Got a few more plants planted; I'm down to five daylilies and 8 primroses to plant. Started back weeding and mulching yesterday; deadheading tree peonies, etc.

Though they have been predicting rain left and right lately - we got only a wee sprinkle last night and not much more this morning. we need a good long soaking.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 11:39 AM

Did some edging yesterday. I have a long driveway and sidewalks with overgrown grass. edging tool

I never thought much about crisp edging around garden or flower beds until I read garden blog this weekend with nice photos of edge borders. As long as I had a barrier there or mulch to keep the grass/weeds away, I didn't bother with cutting an edge. My neighbor who has long passed away used to sit on a rolling stool he made and edge with a butcher knife along a foot wide flower border he would plant by all his sidewalks. It was his spring ritual.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 11:44 AM

Janie - I'm usually satisfied if one can tell approximately where the lawn ends and the garden begins.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 05:22 PM

We had one of those when I was a kid, and I've always thought they were a wonderful idea. I'm getting ready to put down some steel edging, but something like that, run a couple of inches in front of it every so often would sure make weeding easier. I get tired of restringing the trimmer because the edging often times breaks the strings off.

Getting to the high-90s today. I've been putting out heavier mulch around some of the beds.

Has any of you used Epsom salts in your garden? A friend sent this link to a blog. I don't believe the photos one way or the other, they could be taken any time. But have you tried it and does it help add micro nutrients, or cure gardening issues? I'll go check out the DirtDoctor.com also, but first-hand accounts are always useful.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jun 10 - 06:13 PM

Mom and Dad use epsom salts on their peonies - supposedly strengthens the stems. I haven't noticed it helpful for that, but it is a good source to correct magnesium deficiencies. Apparently a high potassium fertilizer can prevent plants from taking up magnesium in the soil, and the epsom salts can be used as a foliage spray.

I used it in my potted tomatoes last year as I thought I was seeing signs of magnesium deficiency. I apparently misdiagnosed the problem, because it did not help.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jun 10 - 12:15 PM

What does a magnesium deficiency look like?

I went out this morning and weeded then added extra mulch in some areas of the beds and around big plants. It's supposed to be in the mid-90s today and break 100 soon.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 02 Jun 10 - 12:25 PM

Magnesium deficiency in raspberries


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 02 Jun 10 - 10:00 PM

Thanks, Bettynh. Looks similar in tomatoes. In later stages, the bottom leaves yellow and die.

Apparently certain fruit-bearing plants (such as tomatoes, raspberries and blackberries, and apple trees) are especially sensitive to magnesium deficiencies. Seems that tomatoes are sensitive to a bunch of deficiencies. I had trouble with blossom-end rot for years. A local organic market gardener told me that the ph of our local soils makes it difficult for tomatoes to take up calcium, and told me to mix in a full cup of bone meal in the soil below the planting hole when I set out tomatoes. I took his advice, and have not had problems with blossom-end rot since then.

Talking about ph, I assumed the soil here is acid, as that is the norm in this region, and lordy knows I have bunches and bunches of oak trees and leaves, which I understood, perhaps incorrectly to contribute to acidity. The azaleas seem to do well enough, though I use an acid fertilizer around them. However, the soil is very rocky, and the rock is feldspar, some strains of which contribute to alkaline soil. (I can't find information about the local feldspar, at least not written so that I can understand it.) I noted in another post that some of the blooms on the mophead hydrangea I brought with me are pink and some are blue, a few are violet, and a few are mixed -and all are staying those ways as the colors deepen. both colors appear on both hemispheres of the shrub, but blue dominates on one side, and pink on the other. I speculate the over-all ph of the soil here is probably neutral, with micro-patches of higher and lower ph, and that where I have the macrophylla planted there is significant variation. I would think that if the soil was uniformly neutral where the root system is distributed, the variation in color would be equally distributed on the plant.

Opinions?   

Guess a soil test might be a good idea, eh?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jun 10 - 02:36 AM

My tomatoes that seem to be ailing are growing on raised beds made out of purchased top soil, mixed with bagged humus, and mixed with soil amendments. Perhaps I should try that epsom salt mix on them.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 03 Jun 10 - 09:16 AM

Finally got the rain they've been promiseing (threatening?) for a week...not enough, but some.

Down to three daylilies to plant.......


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jun 10 - 11:12 AM

Heavy rain last night. Lovely (except we were caught out in it).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 03 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM

When I hung out at AOL's gardening forum, I got to know Carolyn Male, a lovely lady completely obsessed with tomatoes (she literally wrote the book on heritage varieties). She strongly believed that blossom end rot of tomatoes was an uneven moisture problem. Her solution was better soil and lots of mulch.

Janie, is there a foundation, concrete walk, or concrete rubble anywhere near those hydrangeas? Even a few buried bricks with mortar will change the pH for a few feet in all directions. I have a campanula that will migrate 4 feet over a season to cuddle up to a concrete walkway. The only explanation I can think of is that it's seeking the lime.

Meanwhile I see the ants have been busy spreading my spiderworts. It's a reminder of the underground world around me.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 04 Jun 10 - 01:33 AM

interesting hanging basket garden


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jun 10 - 11:06 AM

The only reason I finally have more plants in my house is because my cats have died over the last two years. I miss the cats, but I'm not getting any more. (The cats both adopted me, after turning up on their own, so things can change, but I suspect on this end of the village the coyotes keep the population down. I think I heard such an event in the middle of the night last week - the howling anger at the coyote barking suddenly stopped. I wasn't able to get to the back door to wave my high intensity flashlight soon enough to scare them off.)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jun 10 - 12:02 AM

I did some contouring in the bed closest to the house, one where I've saved some space for late planting of smaller stuff. Onions, I think. I sprayed BT on various things in the garden. There were worms on the sunflowers. I don't plan to harvest them (the birds will enjoy them) but I don't need to feed the worms, thank you very much!

I picked two pink tomatoes. They'll be completely ripe in a couple of days. Summer is here! That old saying (or song lyric, whatever) is really right - there's nothing like home grown tomatoes (I know there is a mention of love in there also--it's sufficient for now to say that I love tomatoes!)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Jun 10 - 08:32 AM

Frankly, I love to get back to just gardening... The P-Vine has been at it all week because we've had help and the two fo them moved or planted (from pots) somewhere around 60 plants... Mostly native azaleas...

I, on the other hand, have been stuck hand raking out the rocks and debris in "the pond field" where over the last year we have taken down an old hog fence and 15 of so nasty locusts and dug out and burn the stumps... There are some jobs that are so big that if you allow yerself to examine just how much work there are going to be then you just say, "Heck with it" and don't do them... This has been one of those jobs but yesterday I finished the raking (took 5 days) and shoveling rocks and debris into the tractor bucket (dozens of times), putting down grass seed (fescue) and 30 bales of straw (still need about 3 or 4 more)... But, after taking a long shower to get the straw mites (most of them) off me I went out on the patio with a cold beer and watched as a nice gentle rain settled in and was thinkin'...

...thank you, Lord, that this unpleasant project is over and thank you for the gentle rain to hold the straw down and get the seed a little moisture...

Now maybe I can get back to real gardening...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jun 10 - 09:23 AM

We have had an abundance of rain the last several weeks, and for the most part, comfortable temperatures.

Have had enough rain over a long enough period that the grass has actually been able to suck up enough of it before the trees get it all. It has turned hot and muggy. I'm tempted to just mow the sunnier spots and leave the rest alone. The grass doesn't grow that tall under the trees, and right now it has kind of a lovely, soft, look to it. It might even be good for it to be allowed to grow and go to seed. (Or maybe I'm looking for an excuse to minimize sweating in this humidity:>)

Day lilies are in various stages of bloom or putting up scapes.   Mater's doing well, but way behind yours Stilly. A few green tomatoes on the cherries, but the Mortgage Lifter is just setting it's first blooms. Will fertilize today, and do something about the slugs starting in on the basil.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jun 10 - 11:20 AM

Bowls of beer, Janie. I think slugs and snails both will die happy in beer.

Supposed to hit 100 today. GOtta smear on the sunscreen and pace myself.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 05 Jun 10 - 11:39 AM

I don't recall if I posted the link to the garden weeder I use... the best garden tool ever!

Grampa's Weeder

You stand while you weed, push the tool over the center of the weed, step on a lever and tilt the handle... it closes over the weed root and pulls it out of the ground. Info about the inventor and photo of the tool is at the above link. It takes out those tap roots like thistles and dandelions. Easy!

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Jun 10 - 02:41 PM

Looks like a good'un Alice.

Bettynh, I forgot to add that he also referenced uneven watering. (although I have generally tended to be quite diligent about watering.)

Just got in from scrubbing all of the porch furniture now that tree-pollen time is well past. The furniture I have was passed down to me from my aunt - circa mid to late 60's. Can't find ready-made cushions to fit. No amount of scrubbing and hosing gets the cushions looking really clean anymore.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 06 Jun 10 - 04:20 PM

No rain so far today, so I was able to mow again (add to the compost) and plant a few more things in the garden.

In my short season, high mountain zone, only a greenhouse can really get pumpkins or melons to grow enough to ripen. I have my little makeshift clear plastic mini-greenhouse over pots of bell peppers, squash, pumpkin and now cantaloupe. All but the cantaloupe have flower buds. So exciting!


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 06 Jun 10 - 05:35 PM

I spent two hours this morning (and it was already hot) hauling tree branches out to the curb for bulky waste. I wish there was an affordable way to just chip all of this on the property and use it right here, but chippers that are big enough for some of my limbs are way too expensive and wouldn't get used enough to make it worth while. Maybe if we could persuade the village to buy one, and make the circuit of the neighborhoods?

Ripe tomatoes on my windowsill. It's getting close to BLT time!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 06 Jun 10 - 07:34 PM

SRS, you are lucky they will pick up branches!
A few years ago, our town stopped picking up any branch thicker than your thumb in order to save money. If you put smaller twigs and branches in a barrel by the trash can, they pick those up for city composting a couple times in the summer. Anything larger, each property owner is responsible for hauling to the landfill and paying for disposal.

Thunderstorms are moving in now, but I was able to mow the longest grass before the rain started. I also got another cantaloupe potted seedling at the local grocery store. They come from a supplier about a hundred miles away. I planted it under another makeshift clear plastic greenhouse.

June is my favorite month. The air here is perfumed with lilacs and apple blossoms and everything is brilliant green.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 12:27 AM

This is a quarterly pickup, scheduled in advance and you have a day or two to get the stuff out there (they front on junk piled at the curb for a long time, but I don't see them write tickets). Fort Worth has gone to a system where you can pile the stuff at the curb and call and they'll pick it up within a week or two. And you have only so many calls a year you can make. I live near the Fort Worth drop off point, and use the water bill from my ex, who lives in Ft Worth, to take stuff over. Mostly just household recycling, and I could take that anyway (neighboring towns can take their household stuff there), but the other bulky things, they want a water bill to prove you're entitled to use the facility.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 11:42 AM

Rained starting late yesterday and is still raining.
We have night time temps in the upper 30's, so everything is
growing veeeerrrryyyy ssllloooooowwwwlllyyyy.

But all the town and the mountains are brilliant green (except for the snow upon the peaks)!


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 12:57 PM

Another glorious 4/10s of an inch of rain here yesterday... That makes it 1.7 for the last week...

Last day before the last garden tour and we're zeroin' in on having things squared away enough to get away for a couple days afterwards...

Jeff, our helper, and I convinced the P-Vine that it's okay to use a weedeater in the woods gardens... Hooray!!! So I've been doing away with weeds at an astounding rate... Okay, I know that the weedeater doesn't dig them out but, hey, when ya' have this much garden ya' can't let "perfection be the enemy of the good"... Her finally seein' this is a major step for us... I mean, there are beds that do need actual weeding but not the entire garden... Like I said, "Hooray"...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 01:43 PM

Last year I had to have some commercial pruning done on some aspens. They are prone to a borer that kills them, so I had an arborist come and take out overgrown junipers and buggy aspens. They were chipped by the arborist and taken away, but I did continue to pile branches I pruned back in the alley by the trash can. I had at least 2 years of branches I'd pruned piling up there, and finally called the city to see why they had not yet picked up. Oh... they no longer do a pick up... that is when I found out I had to arrange for trucking it to the landfill myself. I called the arborist back and he added my branch pile to a load on his truck. He works at composting everything he can, so I was glad I could pay him to take the branch pile away rather than having to hire a trash company to take them to the landfill.

The local newspaper reported today that May was the coldest May we have had in 35 years... "temperatures ran 5 degrees below average. Early morning readings of 20 degrees on May 5 and 21 degrees on May 7 established new record lows for those dates".

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 02:33 PM

It seems we have the warmth you're wishing for, Alice. Father's Day is the traditional day for rose shows, but they're in full bloom now. So we're a full 2 weeks ahead. Local strawberries are ripe enough to sell in the stands, but not quite ready for pick-your-own.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 08:58 PM

Gnu shared a link on another thread about low-maintenance lawns (Canada) that had some very good information that I thought worth posting here. (Thanks, gnu!)

mixed plantings low-maintenance lawns

Not only do I like it, it is basically what I have, compliments of mother nature.   I do wish my front yard could handle more wear and foot traffic, but it is a delicate environment under all those trees.

As I was googling for images of some of the grasses and plants listed in table 1 of the article, I stumbled across ecolawn images.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 09:39 PM

Years ago I had Mother of Thyme and Yarrow escape from flower beds and spread through the lawn. I love the Thyme and encourage its growth throughout the lawn and hope it takes over more and more in the future. I'm not as crazy about the Yarrow, but it has spread through some areas and replaced the turf and I mow it along with the turf grass.

When the Mother of Thyme that is in a big patch of my front lawn blooms, I'll try to remember to take a pic and link to it.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 10:23 PM

I don't worry too much about grass, flowers and shrubs. I mow the grass and trim the shrubs when necessary, but my main enjoyment comes from the vegetable garden. The lettuce is starting to get a little bitter from the heat, although the romaine is still tasty. I'm still harvesting the collards and kale that I planted in early spring. The potatoes that I planted back in March are now yielding little tubers, so tonight I had new potatoes with collards and kale, fried with onions and curry powder. Delicious! Everything is looking good - tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini...all coming along nicely. I love summer! I posted pics on facebook - but here's a link.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 07 Jun 10 - 10:30 PM

Yum! The link went to a blank page superimposed on a pretty, light blue background and said "Kodak Merchandise." Could you try again? I loved seeing pictures of your veggie garden over the course of the season last year.

Amazingly, to this fern neophite, the japanese painted fern is still sending up fiddle-heads!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:58 AM

My potatoes need to be hilled - which since I am growing them in containers means dump in some more potting mix....

I've got several varieties of fingering potatoes, blue, purple, red, yellow and white; and some golden potatoes named "Esperanza" which I planted because that's the name of our street; Ditto another named "keuka Gold"


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 02:57 PM

Five 6" X 30" and one X 24" planters with 17 double impatiens. 13 more in seedling pots in two trays. Been keeping them near rhe garage in case of frosty nights (bad back) as the next full moon is June 26th and we could have frost up to 3 days after.

Yesterday afternoon, I transplated the 13 into hanging pots and I decided to put the long planters in the front flower bed... forecast for tonight pisses me off.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 03:07 PM

I'm growing potatoes in pots, too, MMario. I have been gradually hilling them up in the pots with the old decomposed needles from under a huge spruce tree in my back yard.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 03:25 PM

I'll try again on the link to my garden pics .


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 03:32 PM

Mary, great photos, good to see a healthy garden. Buddy is so CUTE!

I envy your longer season. If I can upload a few photos, I'll compare what a garden in high mountain Montana looks like on June 8.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 03:35 PM

Love the dog pic... and the tomatoes. Nice!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 04:09 PM

What I find truly amazing is the transformation that takes place during the month of May. These pics are from May 1st. . What a difference!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 04:12 PM

This time the link worked fine, Mary. Looks good! I think you have said before, but what are the approximate dimensions of your garden?


One thing that makes the thread so interesting is that we have such a diversity of climate zones represented that I get to read.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 04:26 PM

Taken June 8, Montana, elev. 4810 ft., laptop shots, spring garden so far

The quality is not great, as I just used the laptop to take some pictures of some of what has grown in the garden so far.

You can see how small my peppers and pumpkin are compared to Mary's. The potatoes are just small leaves that have grown up from seed potatoes.

All of my vegetables are in pots or wooden boxes. The space is small. I am using very large clear plastic bags suspended over some plants as mini-greenhouses to keep the garden from freezing at night.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 05:18 PM

I just updated that photo page with one from May when I was beginning to set up the pots and containers.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 09:02 PM

Wow, Alice... Yer way behind... Hope you actaully get somethin' to eat outta yer work...

Speakin' of eatin'... Picked a gallon of blackberries this afternoon after our last (HOORAY) garden tour... Some older folks gave us a contraption they bought about 40 years ago they never used that is for grinding the good stuff for making jam and it's got a cone shaped filter that catches the seeds... We'll try it in the morning and see what we get...

Them is some fine eatin' balckberries, tho... We've had cerial 3 of the last 4 days for breakfast just so we could top it off with them berries...

YummY!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 09:22 PM

My raspberries are just starting to show formation of tiny buds.


Up here in the Rocky Mountains, we have a narrow window of opportunity to grow and harvest. Isn't it ironic... where I live has incredibly rich, deep topsoil, but the season is very short. The valley here is extremely fertile. It used to be called the Little Egypt of America back around 1900. Wheat Montana

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 10:22 PM

On the other hand, Alice, I bet you can have salad greens and cool weather crops all summer long, while our cool weather crops are done by early to mid-May, bush beans have a short season because they stop bearing in the heat by early to mid-July, and other long season crops are struggling to survive the late summer diseases so common here where we have long, hot, droughty and humid summers.

I don't ever have ripe tomatoes and cukes at the same time I have salad greens.

Brings home what a big continent this is, when Stilly is sweltering, I'm enjoying a "cold front" with temps in the mid-80's, and Alice and gnu are still warding against a late frost.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:03 PM

Well, the mystery garlic appears to be good old fashioned garlic and not society garlic. The blooms are beautiful, though the foliage is not - ragged and bent. Guess I'll leave it alone, dig it in the fall, and if the bulbs are presentable, replant some of it to harvest next year.


Just saw a beautiful gray fox in the neighbor's yard. Thought it was a stray cat at first. Wonder if it is the same fox I saw off and on all last summer, but haven't seen since early last fall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM

Today on freecycle, someone in town was giving away California poppies... I got to the house too late to get any, but the story was that a moose had stepped all over them. Another aspect of gardening in the mountains ;-)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:10 PM

Janie, the dimensions of my garden are about 24' x 12'. We have a good long growing season here, but you're right about the heat and about not having salad greens, tomatoes and cucumbers at the same time. Speaking of tomatoes - I had my first tomatoes from the garden tonight. There were two little grape tomatoes that were ripe. They might have been better if I'd left them another day or so, but I couldn't resist. So I made a salad of some of the last of the romaine, dug a few baby carrots, added some dill, cilantro and parsley, and threw in the two little tomatoes along with some croutons, olives and homemade dressing. So I did get a little bit of lettuce and tomatoes together, but that lettuce will all bolt soon. Alice, it must be a challenge gardening with such a short season. Here if you plan it right, you can have a garden for most of the year. I plant salad greens in the fall and harvest into late January, then replant in early March and have lettuce, kale, swiss chard and collards till June - and in June the summer veggies like squash and tomatoes start to come in.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:12 PM

Ha! Speaking of lettuce.... I didn't plant any. Oh, well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 08 Jun 10 - 11:36 PM

You can probably plant it now, Alice. It grows fast! Try the mesclun, or the romaine.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 12:12 AM

Yes, I know.

I didn't think we'd eat lettuce fast enough to make it worth it (just 2 of us), but my son told me today that if I planted it, he would eat it. I am still unemployed, so I was being careful about how many seed packets I'd buy and what I really wanted to spend all this effort on to eat.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 09:18 AM

Nice thing about lettuce is that if you have a garden cenetr that seels 'um by weight that you can get 20 cents worth of lettuce seed to feed an army...

Rain here to day and we've decided to put off making jelly until tomorrow and we're heading back into the hills in Wes Ginny and poke around... Plus, after putting together the grinder/juicer cantraption discovered that it has to clamp on a table so I'm gonna have to rig up something out in the barn...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 10:14 AM

Oh dear, Alice, I didn't realize you were unemployed - sending good energy for another, better job. One packet of lettuce grows a lot, and it's easy to grow, as long as it doesn't get too hot. I have salads almost every night in the spring and early fall.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 01:49 PM

Yes, lettuce is almost too easy to grow :-) I get tired of salads quickly and it tends to end up in the compost.

I guess I like the challenge of using my small space to grow things that are going to take more care, like the cantaloupe.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 01:55 PM

Mary, the job prospects are not promising, but I am putting together designs for letterpress printing like wedding invitations to be printed by a local printer. I have a blog, but still need to get more designs finished to put up the actual ordering web site.

My Letterpress Prints

I'm done with being a traveling sales person. My doctor advised me to resign that job.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Penny S.
Date: 09 Jun 10 - 05:24 PM

I haven't been posting because of the half done jobs, and the jungle growth, and realising that I cannot get as much done as I wanted.

One early job was establishing a herb bed. There's a lot of slabs in my garden, and between the patio and the main area was a line of soil one slab wide. Also, the path across this was in a low part of the garden where water collects after rain. I made a new path with secure steps at the midpoint across the garden, and took up a couple of slabs to make a square. The visible soil in the garden is compacted clay with flints, but under the slabs was good, if clayey soil, which, mixed with the sand from beneath the slabs, and some spent mushroom compost is looking pretty good. The herbs have taken to it really well, things which were just marking time at the old place, or in pots, have shot up lushly and are doing really well.

In the damp bit, I have started a hole which will take the old cold water tank as a reservoir, but this is currently occupied by two courgette (zucchini) plants in pots and an angelica in pot, waiting to be planted out elsewhere. I'm toying with the idea of putting the courgettes on the mushroon compost heap before I go away, and not putting that into the ground until much later in the year.

Today I worked on about a square metre of the compacted clay, digging it over, putting the compost under it, and buidling it up with the spoil from the hole, as well as a bag of bought topsoil (there was a hole at the spot, for some reason, partly because of digging out a flowering currant, but that can't have left the size hole there.) I've planted out some celery pplants in it, and tomorrow they will be joined by some leeks.

I've three bags of potatoes, two growbags of tomatoes, and a tower of pots of strawberries. Already eaten the firts of those - one plant needs identifying though - it was too tart.

I'm not going to grow from seed this year, but will buy plants in for other crops. Getting the soil right will take too long. The plants already here are all a bit thuggy and takeover merchants. Comfrey, periwinkle, London Pride, forgetmenot, and a geranium. All doing so well that the ground elder from next door isn't getting a look in. I'm rehoming as much as I can, and converting the comfrey to fertiliser. Though the bumble bees are busy on it at the moment.

Penny


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 10 Jun 10 - 08:15 AM

Nice prints, Alice... If you can get ahold of enough domain names (I guess that is what they are called) then you'll get on Page One of Google... I don't know much about that stuff but my broghter is trying to get a cottage industry off the ground and that is what he has done allready...

Gardening???

Well, the poor neglected veggie garden and I are going to get reaquainted today... First order of business is weeding... Actually, I don't mind it... It's tilled soil and we have had rain so most of the weeds all but pull themselves... After that it will be time to finish planting the seedlings and various seeds...

The poor P-Vine got sucked into being a judge for the local garden club's flower show today... What a thankless job... I mean, these women in the club all think their flowers are the best and prettiest... Like I said, thankless... Half of Luray will be mad at her by tonight...

But, on the up side, she has been asked to speak to the Mt. Crawford (accross the mountain) about azaleas at their September meeting... That oughtta be fun for her... When I told her about the invite (which came via email) her initail reaction was, "What do I know about azaleas???"... Duhhhhh, let me guess... Sometimes she thinks that everyone knows what she knows... I had to convince here that she could do a fine job... The girl frets too much...

Okay, sun block and to the weeding...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 10 Jun 10 - 10:15 AM

Kat, they make not only cow pots, but also elephant dung pots!

I have not used them, but manure plant pots have been marketed for a long time.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 10 Jun 10 - 10:18 AM

Bobert, one of the valuable things about my advertising sales job was that I learned a lot about SEO, search engine optimization, to help my ad customers build their presence on the web. That helps me now with my own site.

Went out with a watering can of hot water this morning to heat up the soil over seeds that still need to germinate. I recently planted more seeds, and the night temps here are still pretty cold. Hot water helps the germination time.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jun 10 - 01:17 PM

Looks like the tomatoes I planted from the nursery aren't making as many flowers as last year. I'm pollinating every other day with the stuff for setting fruit, using a q-tip, not spraying on each flower (that's a waste).

I don't think I'm going to get any decent squash or zucchini. The boring worms are too pernicious. I have lovely basil and am getting peppers, and there are fruit finally on the eggplants.

I sprayed orange oil and hydrogen peroxide this morning. The orange oil for the red mites starting in on the tomatoes, and the hydrogen peroxide to try to head off any more fungal activity. Early blight is going full tilt out there. I'm working on making healtier soil also, and have started adding some epsom salts along with corn gluten meal and dry molasses.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 11 Jun 10 - 11:19 AM

It SNOWED!

dang it

It's about 9:15 am here, and I just came in from watering with hot water in the containers of plants in the garden, brushing snow and slush away. Good thing I keep the plastic protection over everything.
Anyone who did not have row covers on their garden plants in town lost a lot of their garden last night.

The north side of roofs still have snow/slush and there are patches of it in the yard and garden here and there, but it has mostly melted.
Only 39 degrees Fahrenheit out there.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 11 Jun 10 - 08:09 PM

Danged, Alice... Me thinks that you get the award for the most persistent/determined gardener... This is rediculous... The snow, I mean... It's the middle of June, for gosh sakes...

A long day of weeding here in the veggie garden... Gotta get some newspapers and straw down soon... gettin' old...

And 300!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 06:28 AM

First tiny flowerbuds on the Zuccini!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 08:20 AM

We are way behind in the veggie garden... Bad us...

Okay, to our credit we have had way too many other things to tend to but...

...no excuse!!!

Going to be real hot here in Pine Grove Holler today so I'm going to post this and get in an hour's worth of weeding...

We cooked down our blackberries last night and this mornin' we're gonna heat them back up and run them thru the "Squeezo Strainer III" to get the seed out and make our jam...

The red berries will be coming in this coming week... Some folks call them raspberries, the P-Vine calls 'um "gooseberries"... No matter... They grow wild everywhere you let 'um and they are good... Not as mnay seed at the blackberried... Think we'll try making a couple jars of jam with them this year just to see how that works...

Well, the sun block has sunk in an' I reckon I need to get out there...

Happy gardenin' to all...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 10:19 AM

Sad story and cautionary tale for those who ascribe to "better gardening through chemicals."

Dad grabbed the wrong bottle when he set out to spray their 5 "Knockout" roses for insect damage and drenched them thoroughly with weed killer. Didn't catch his mistake until all the leaves wilted.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 10:29 AM

Bobert - now you've got me curious...are P-vine's "gooseberries" a local name for wild red raspberries or are they the red variety of gooseberries (Ribes)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Stachelbeere_(Ribes_uva-crispa).jpg


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 11:22 AM

Just watered the containers with hot water again, leaving the plastic over them until it warms up more today (if it does). This is another cold spring like we had last year. Drat! That means if you blink, you miss summer.




Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 08:45 PM

Sorry, MMario, but that page didn't work fir me...

Ahhhhh, after weeding this mroning and watering the P-Vine and I headed down to Fredrisburg, Va. to "Junk Alley" which is is the low rent district to look for some metal seating for the gardenes... That was the one thing that we found from out tours... Not enough seating in the gardens...

Well, luck would have it we found the most unusual glider... It's actually two seperat sigle gliders with a table between them with wooden slats... Never seen one like it which, of course, meant that we had to have it... Bargained the guy down from $100 to $60, stuck it in my trailer which I took just in case, and brought it home... It's perfect...

Yeah, something we never talk much about is what hardscape needs to go with any garden... I mean, we spend so much time aking stuff peaceful and then have no way to appreciate it in a leisurely manner...

Well, this little glider will certainly afford us hours of enjoyment to just sit and enjoy...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 08:59 PM

I have a little bench in my garden I made from a wooden box turned over two firewood stumps.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 09:55 PM

Pictures, Alice and Bobert?

yeh, hardscaping. Helps the garden look like a garden, even in winter. Who was it that talked about the "bones" of a garden? On past garden threads I've shared how much I enjoy being in the garden at night. That is when the "bones" and structural elements can best be noticed and evaluated.

I brought all of my garden sculptures (metal and stone), statuary, pedestals, birdbaths, benches, etc., with me, most of it either antiques or good quality cast stone by Al's Art, Campania, etc. Because I had to scramble and my sister and I could not lift it and move it on our own, I was not able to bring a wonderful wrought-iron Mediterranean patio table that I bought at an auction, nor did I have time to dig out 4 wrought-iron trellises. I miss the trellises, but the table, nice as it was, would not have worked here. I didn't think most of the rest would work, since it had all been selected for my Victorian garden and 1914 bungalow, but I have slowly and steadily been figuring out how to make most of the rest of it work around this modest, 1960's ranch. In fact, since I have so little in terms of gardens in place, it is the benches, pedestals, etc., that create some sense of garden and intentional landscape.

At the old place, we had two chimneys taken down, and I used those wonderful old bricks to make dry-stack walls and borders. They added a lot. Here, I hope to eventually lay some stone paths and build some low dry-stack stone walls to frame a foundation bed along the front and one side of the house, and to create a raised border around the rear property line and the driveway. Think I will put up a fence first though - when my ship comes in.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 12 Jun 10 - 11:01 PM

Janie, this photo was taken back in May when I was setting up the containers. The right side shows the little seat that is a wooden box turned over a couple of firewood stumps. It has a triangular piece of wood nailed to the back of the box to make the seat. I usually don't sit there... I use it more often for a place to set things while I'm working there.

Click Here


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 13 Jun 10 - 05:51 PM

A 15 gallon black plastic pot that has been full of garden soil and sitting for years in a corner of the yard was something I finally got around to dealing with today. I needed the pot and the soil, so I dug half of it out into the wheelbarrow, then tipped the pot upside down on the barrow. When I pulled it off... the biggest ant farm I'd seen in years was in the bottom. I need the soil, so that barrow is full of boiling water, tumeric, and some Arm & Hammer laundry suds now. Thank you, ants, for aerating the soil.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Jun 10 - 09:20 PM

Sorry, Jnaie, but pictures, at least the on line variety, are outta my technical skill levels...

I'll have some film ones at the Getaway...

Finished making our jelly today... The strainer worked great... The only problem is that outta a gallon of black berries we only got 5 pints on jelly??? Lotta seed in those berries...

Veggie garden is shaping up!!! Finally!!! Yeah, we're a little late but we're getting it under control... Lotta weeds and grass growing in it that needed to come out... Trying to find *clean* straw to mulch with... The stuff we got last year was loaded with seed (barley) and we ended up with lotta barley growing in the straw... No good!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 14 Jun 10 - 01:59 AM

OK, I really didn't want to stop digging, but it was getting too dark.

I had a spot back by the alley and trash can where a landscaping neighbor unloaded some extra top soil for me a few years back. This pile really needed to be transferred over by the compost bin and garden, so I started digging it all up and wheel barrowing it over.

This was the first day that didn't rain in ages, and it was wonderful!
Not too hot, not too cold, and nicely sunny. I need to take advantage of any day like this that I can, our season is so SHORT!


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 14 Jun 10 - 11:52 PM

I dug some more on a bed in the front yard. I realized I could expand it more than I'd originally designed, so I'll be tweaking some of my steel edging boundaries before I finish.

Picking tomatoes, peppers, herbs (had a real nice pizza the other day with a bunch of stuff from the garden). I dug the last of the garlic this evening, dropping those little corm things back into the dirt. Local gardening guru says to let these dry some, break them into cloves, and plant them in a few weeks for next year. Will do! Those little corms need two years to make a good clove of garlic, apparently.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 12:06 AM

My greatest accomplishment this year (so far) is to have started a chart that shows the location, color, and bloom time of each day lily that has been heeled in "where ever" over the past two years, the better to planfully transplant them as garden beds get created.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 05:10 PM

The alley spot is finished. I worked on it gradually over several days, moving the pile of topsoil and leveling the area.

I have mother of thyme all over in my yard, spreading from where I first planted it in a flower bed. I encourage it to take over the grass, as I'd love it to replace the turf as much as possible.

I dug plugs from different patches of the thyme and planted them back in the area of the alley where I cleaned up and leveled the earth.
That is a project I've wanted finished for years! It is so good to be home.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 07:13 PM

It hailed!!

There was a thunderstorm threatening all day, then the air temp dropped suddenly. I could tell that hail was coming. Garden got covered, and I took some photos before the hail pounded the poppies and the peonies.

Poppies here:
deep, dark orange poppies before hail


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 07:49 PM

Finished plantin' the veggie garden this evening... Done!!!

Found two extra pepper seedlings and on extra eggplant seedling so we made room for them...

BTW, I dpon't know if any of ya'll use fish under yer seedlings but the P-Vine got some nasty jumbo shrimp (sounds funny, don't it???) so rather than throw tham away we used them under our seedlings... The tomatoes that we put in last week must have found 'um cause you can almost see them plants grow... Anyway, good use for bad shrimp...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 08:12 PM

Good recycling/fertilizing there, Bobert.

About 20 years ago, when I planted a grove of aspen trees between my driveway and the neighbor's house, I used a liquid fish fertilizer that I would spray with the hose. The neighborhood smelled like dead fish until winter.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 09:08 PM

Either 2 wrens had a heck of a fight on top of one of my day lilies or a deer came thru and got one mouthful before being chased away by a dog, tripping over the day lily as it took off. It was fine this morning, and beaten up when I got home before sunset.

The beautiful colleagues I have been blessed to work with for lo these many years took me out to supper tonight to say good bye and presented me with a generous gift certificate to Niche Gardens, which specializes in nursery propagated native plants. Niche is also having a spring 25% off sale, so I know where I am headed one day next week during the short break between jobs!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 10:11 PM

Niche Gardens!!! I been hearing about them for years...

Yeah, Alice, we use Fish Emulsion on our veggies during the growing season... Good stuff... Stinky??? Yeah, but...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jun 10 - 10:36 PM

Janie, what a thoughtful gift! Best gift EVER for a gardener.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Jun 10 - 12:48 AM

Would horse manure work as well in a garden as cow or chicken? We have a neighbor with a horse (It's across the creek, so I never hear it myself, but another neighbor reports that it's still back there and she and her small son stop and feed it grass every so often when they're out on walks). I could ask to go muck out the area a bit and put some in a pile to age, perhaps. Any thoughts? This horse probably eats the native grasses and hay.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 16 Jun 10 - 09:39 AM

well aged horse manure works very well.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Jun 10 - 10:37 AM

You mean it should come from an old horse? ;-D

So few tomatoes this year. It's a struggle to get every fruit going. I fear they'll all be seedless, from the spray and Q-tips. Mother Nature pollinating her garden by hand.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 16 Jun 10 - 12:40 PM

Horse manure is known to be very seedy when it is hot... If it is well composted it's fine but really doesn't have the nitrogen as cow manure, or better yet, chicken manure...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 10:05 AM

Spotted a tiny tomato hornworm yesterday. Must hit the garden with BT. All of these plants, so few 'maters. I'm going to pull a couple of these pretty soon and put something else in.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 10:11 AM

Back when I worked on the truck farm - the owner's father took care of the greenhouse tomatoes. He swore that he got the best fruit set with an electric toothbrush.

He used it without a brush - and would just touch the vibrating shaft to the stem of the flower.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 12:42 PM

Interesting, so he would pollinate that way... how often would he do that?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 12:59 PM

We had one day this week that was perfect, sunny and not too hot or cold, and the rest has been rain, hail, wind, cold temps, down in the 30's at night... I had to put a little coffee cup hotplate under the plastic as a heater for the mini-greenhouse.

In the meantime, wonderful bird watching. I get flocks of Western Tanagers in my yard. I have a watercolor of a male Western Tanager in the images on this page. Look to the right side where the moose painting is, and the tanager is perched on a twig in the painting. Males have a red head the body of tanagers is yellow with black on the wings... stunning. I wish I could afford bird seed for them.

With the rain, I've had time to focus more on designs, so I've added some bird related images to the blog here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 02:45 PM

Got 7/10s of an inch of rain last night... We'll take it...

That's allowing me to do stuff other move osciallors around...

Actually, this is a day off from gardening and I've been orgainizing tools and cleaning out the barn...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 03:00 PM

My old man would only have a dozen or so tomatoe plants and he would just use his fingers to cross-pollinate. I don't have many. I use a makeup brush that I found after whatshername left... I think it's for blush??


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 03:33 PM

@Alice - I think he did it pretty much daily - but he was in there daily suckering and tying etc on the tomatoes. He only needed to touch the stem once per cluster.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 03:50 PM

Frontpage news locally here today is that all the cool rainy weather we are having is protecting the wheat crops from a major grasshopper infestation happening in surrounding states.

Bozeman Daily Chronicle:
"...The federal government has allocated $11 million in emergency funding to help farmers in Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming to fight the grasshopper infestation, which could be the worst in nearly three decades. But wet weather isn't good for the small insects that can gobble up farmers' profits, which has area farmers confident they have one less thing to worry about.

"The best thing to knock hoppers back is a cool, wet spring, and that's exactly what we got," said Bob Broyles, USDA county executive director for the farm service agency."


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 17 Jun 10 - 11:10 PM

I just figure the bugs and wind will see to tomato pollination. I've never tried to help it along.

Sorry you are having a bad tomato year, Maggie. Seems like that just happens sometimes.

I picked and ate one small gold cherry tomato today. It will be awhile before there are more, but all (3) of my tomato plants are growing well so far this year, have plenty of blooms, especially since they get the minimum amount of sun, and the earliest blooms are fruiting now. I notice some volunteer seedlings from the cherry tomato I grew in a pot last year are coming up in a pot I had kale growing in last year but haven't dumped yet. Debating pricking a couple of them out to plant for a late season crop. Would have to be in pots, though, so I don't know if I'll fool with them.

I probably planted too much basil. Better too much than too little.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 12:09 AM

I have a few beautiful tomatoes in the fridge, and a few on the plants, but I'm not seeing new ones on the plants.

For grasshoppers, get finely powdered kaolin clay and mix it in a slurry in a hose end sprayer and spray it over the garden. The power (from the same clay used in pottery and cat litter) will simply coat the leaves and grasshoppers don't like it. There is a commercial application. If you want to find more information, visit http://www.dirtdoctor.com and go to the library area and look up grasshoppers.

I'm slowly hand-digging a new bed across the bottom of the front yard, (the left-hand side from the path from front porch to the street when you're on the porch). I put down another 8' length of steel edging this evening, and have one length left for that project. I'll be planting and mulching heavily out there this weekend. And this means several more square yards of turf GONE! I love getting rid of grass. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 10:18 AM

Tomatoes have problems with setting fruit at temps above 90 and virtually none will set above 95 degrees. (I found this out on google - I thought I had seen something regarding this)

So that may be the problem.

@Janie - can you really have too much basil?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 12:02 PM

Veggie garden successfully corralled with bird netting to keep out marauding chickens... blueberry patch fully enclosed... just went up the hillside to check on my strawberry beds this morning and found--oh, NO!!!--a WOODCHUCK!!! *sigh.* That's the one pest we haven't had to deal with here--haven't seen any on our property for over a decade--but I guess it's time to invest in more critter-b-gone, netting, and shells for the .22 (otherwise known as critter-b-gone, phase II!)

On the bright side, we have tomatoes and peppers and squash blooming, peapods setting, and basil and carrots up between the tomatoes. Kale is being harvested regularly, as is the Swiss Chard. First planting of lettuce has bolted in the hoophouse. Time to yank it, give the stalks to the pigs and chickens, and plant again!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 12:12 PM

No woodchucks for years....heaven on earth; we see multiples daily...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 04:17 PM

I had pretty good results using hot pepper spray to keep the woodchucks off my beans. It comes neatly packaged or you can just dilute hot sauce, I suppose. I only used it on foliage, tho. I certainly wouldn't want to try to get hot sauce off my strawberries!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 04:25 PM

I had to put Wasabi on my lawn deer in the back yard this week, because 5 fighting magpies were tearing the antlers apart. I didn't have any chili powder, but wasabi worked.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 18 Jun 10 - 05:13 PM

The 2 heirloom tomato plants I bought at the market have several tomatoes each, altho they're still small. And the heirloom seedlings that I started inside have survived transplantation. They're still very small, but each has put out new leaves. My black raspberry bushes are loaded this year, and they all look big and fat. Just turning the palest pink now. They usually begin to ripen about the last day of June, my birthday present.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 12:06 AM

I'm about to pull out the heirloom plants. There isn't a single fruit between the two of them. I have other stuff I can put on that space.

Watered with the soaker hose again today. It's just so hot. In the morning I'll go over and get more free mulch and pile more up around my garden plants. And maybe put some newspaper under the mulch. I know that if the roots can stay moist (but not soggy) the rest of the plant will be much better off. We've been up to about 98o every day this week.

I'm eating at least one tomato a day, two if I can manage it. They have so much flavor! I had such a drought over the winter, because no matter how much a store tomato looks like it MIGHT have flavor, it doesn't. I have the big one for the BLT. Now if I can just get my daughter (Moonglow) to come down for the ceremony we do every year. I make a loaf of bread and give it time to cool from baking, but is still Uber fresh. Then we get (or thaw - I always have some handy) bacon, and pull out fresh lettuce and the mayo and we do the Rites Of Summer. We make BLTs.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 12:21 AM

BLT's. Yum.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 07:31 AM

Most of us are a month away from our first real tomatoes, Magz, so we're havin' to enjoy them thru you... Not quite the same, however...

The P-Vine got one decent landscaping job and two orders for plants yestderday so we are off to Richmond (Colesville Nurseries) which is a wholesaler and open until 1... It's 2 hours, 45 minuits down there so...

...gotta go...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 10:01 AM

Two of our local farms make good money growing heirloom tomatoes for the Boston market (Boston is only an hour away from here if you drive in the middle of the night and avoid traffic). They're the last tomatoes to produce, and there are never very many of them. We won't see them till August, even when we're two weeks ahead of ourselves this year. The stands will be selling multicolored cherry tomatoes by early July, however, and they'll have vast quantities. I took the hint and grow a couple cherry tomatoes for myself and buy the heirlooms. My favorite heirloom is yellow Brandywine but most of the 30 or so vairieties are wonderful. The strawberry pick-your-own fields are in full production. Cherries and raspberries are starting. Soon they'll add the yellow and black raspberries and blueberries.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 12:10 PM

Okay, I'll leave those out there for a little while longer. But there is nothing, just flowers, no fruits. I have one bowl of tomatoes in the fridge, and none ripening on the window sill right now. Last summer we had a bumper crop.

I've been eating strawberries every day. We seem to have a new burst of activity, and I get just enough to go in a bowl of cereal or yogurt for breakfast. Mmmmm!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 02:27 PM

Turned over the compost pile - a great way to work out frustration!

Today is the second sunny day in a row, so finally the garden can grow a little faster today. Had to stake up the delphinium, as high winds came up last night. Thunderstorms forecast for this afternoon and tomorrow, but in the meantime, the garden and I are enjoying warmth and blue skies!

A couple of bush beans sprouted. They've been in the ground so long I thought they never would. A couple of the sunflowers sprouted, but the pounding rain and hail sliced and diced them.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 02:59 PM

Geez, Alice, it's a wonder you carry on. Have you read Elliott Coleman? He thinks he has harsh weather on the Maine coast. His site shows his setup - tunnel greenhouses with black plastic mulch and fabric rowcovers in his coldest season. Sometimes he doubles up the tunnels, too, I think. But on the coast of Maine, moderated by ocean temps, he'll never see the extremes you put up with.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 03:10 PM

Thanks for the link - he has a great setup there!

Yup, it can snow any time of the year here. It's a challenge!
I think it will make anything I harvest even more satisfying that it survived to ripen!

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 03:24 PM

I'm so jealous of all of you folks who can eat strawberries. It's been about 5 years since the terrible Memorial-Day-Strawberry-Fiasco. I ate a lot all at once and broke out into a terrible rash, over a holiday week-end, naturally. Ended up with shots & pills to take for a week, and everything.

I asked my doctor a few months ago whether I could try some again, and he advised against it. "Nevermore!" Arrgh!

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Joe Offer
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 04:11 PM

My wife Christina is an amazing gardener, and our yard is ablaze with color just now. Our neighbors' dog ate our rain gauge, so I don't know how much rainfall we got this year. We usually get 40 inches, and we seemed to get a lot more than usual this year. The garden hit peak about the last week of May - usually it's a couple of weeks earlier, but we had a fair amount of chilly weather this spring.
I think we had our last good rainstorm during the last week of May. We might get another, but probably not until November. So, now we depend on irrigation. I suppose we could use well water, but we're afraid of pumping the well dry. So, we pay almost a hundred bucks a month for a "miner's inch" of ditch water from the Boardman Canal. The canal dates back to Gold Rush days, and it's an open ditch for much of its length with a nice hiking trail alongside. We pump water from the ditch up a steep hill, so our water costs a fair amount in electricity, too - and it involves a lot of maintenance work.
This year, we had to muck out the concrete tank where our pump is located, and that was quite a project - eight inches of sticky mud at the bottom of a 4' by 8' tank, and that's a heck of a lot of muck. I was covered with mud by the time I got done. And then the pump made a horrible noise and didn't work. Turns out that we had to prime the pump, because our cleanup job had drained all the water from the pump.
I'm not sure all this is worth it, but our garden IS beautiful. Christina has lots more irrigation work planned for me....

-Joe-


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 06:49 PM

I now have 5 little everbearing strawberry plants in the largest container in the garden. A couple have buds on them... I wonder if I'll have to wait until next year to see strawberries?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 06:53 PM

Joe, post some photos! Sounds lovely! There is a Mudcat Gardener's group, though we haven't posted there much lately.

Mudcat Gardeners on Google Groups.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 07:49 PM

Big dfay at Coleville Nursery... Times are slow so on Saturday they only have a smallish staff working... Maybe 8 people... We got the head of trees & shrubs and he was great... We'd find somethin' we liked and he'd ask, "What would you like to pay for it???"... Never been treated like that.... We bought two "Catawba" Crepe Myrtles whioch should have been $185 wholesale for $65 each... I mean, nice 8 foot plus plants just fixing to bloom and we got to pick form 20!!!

6 foot b&b Dragon Lady Holley costs us $85... It was in the wholesale book for $140...

Anyway, we filled the trailer and the truck... 46 plants in all... And all pre-sold... Even got home and found an extra "Catawba" Crepe Myrtle in a 5 gal. pot that somehow got into the trailer and we weren't billed for... But one of our customers wants it so we'll let him have it and mail the nursery a check fir it...

Right now??? Dogged tired... Long drive and 2 hot hours at the nursery...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 08:12 PM

Boy howdy, Bobert, I want to go wholesale plant buying with you two!

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 08:51 PM

Its amazin', maeve, but most retailers mark their plants up anywhere from 300%-400% of cost... At least yer big ones do... That's a lot of profit... We just double the price but that includes our time to go fetch 'um and the gasoline to run the truck... Ain't gettin' rich but, hey...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM

Wow, that's great, Bobert! I'd love to see some reasonable retail prices. I cannot believe what they want for Blue Spruce and Quaking Aspens around here. It's not as though they are endangered or anything; they are all over the forests here.

Anyway, I just thought the following might be of interest in regards to slugs cutworms in a garden. It's from a naturalist who sends out weekly newsletters from Mexico and elsewhere:

At http://www.backyardnature.net/n/10/100613co.jpg you
can see one way I put an end to that. Our guests leave
behind many plastic bottles that once held purified
water, so from those bottles I've been cutting
"collars" to put around the seedlings. In the picture
the blue thing is the collar. It forms a wall that
keeps out cutworms roaming across the ground looking
for juicy stems to cut.

Another cutworm-fighting technique sounds almost too
simple to be true, but I tried it during my hermiting
days in Mississippi and it really works. Just stick a
toothpick next to a seedling's stem. To do its work, a
cutworm must encircle a stem with its body. Apparently
a toothpick rising flush with the stem's surface
confuses the worm, or messes up its cutting technique.
Whatever happens, toothpicks work.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Jun 10 - 11:12 PM

That, Kat, is bizarre!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 12:02 AM

My sinuses have been cleared by the concoction I made this afternoon in the blender.

I don't have a fence, and I'm tired of stepping in the doggy doo from the dogs that neighbors allow to wander.

So... into the blender went jalapeno peppers, horseradish, garlic, wasabi, and mint extract.

I sprayed the solution all around the perimeter of the lawn and garden.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 12:15 AM

some natural repellent & pesticide recipes


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 08:10 AM

Stilly - did you see my note re: tomatoes and temperatures? You are not going to get much fruit set with temperatures going into the 90's; especially the higher 90's


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 10:02 AM

Hey, Alice... That's my secret coleslaw recipe that you've just announced to the world... Geeze...

B;~)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 12:26 PM

Kat, cutworms and slugs are different critters. I've always just wrapped a piece of paper around tomato stems at ground level for the same effect. That said, I've rarely seen cutworm damage to unprotected seedlings.
Cutworms
Slugs are different and I do have a problem with those critters. The worst, I think is in my houseplant pots that I put out for the summer. They'll be hiding out in the drainage holes, 2 inches long, but the end of the summer.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:05 PM

Leo, I go out and pollinate by hand this time of year. It's the only way to get fruits. Usually if it stays at 80o or higher overnight, they won't pollinate. So I go around with my cotton swab and squirt on some of the blossom setting stuff you can buy, and I get sterile tomatoes. It's this way every year. But before it got this hot, they just didn't set as much fruit as usual.

I found lace bugs on the underside of the sunflowers. They've all but killed a small one. They usually get in the eggplant, but I guess they like the sunflower even better. Now to get them off of the sunflowers without moving over en masse to the eggplant.

Working some more on my keyhole garden today. I've built it up so it actually is beginning to look interesting. But this hasn't been a one-day project, I'm pacing myself and may be able to plant one part of it soon. I'm filling it with stuff I'm digging from the front bed (the new one) so I know it will end up full of Bermuda for a while. The diggings are going in the very bottom layer, but Bermuda is amazing, in how deep it can go.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:10 PM

I was struck this morning by the extremes in our Mudcat Gardening...


too cold to germinate

or

too hot to pollinate


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:27 PM

Scuse my last post... I did not know tomatoes are self-pollinating. My old man, who taught me, said all fruits require it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:33 PM

According to the studies I was reading if it goes over 95 degrees they won't set fruit period, sterile or not.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 01:56 PM

MMario


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 02:17 PM

Alice, another strange fact - cities in the latitudes 41 to 42 degrees North include Cheyenne, WY; Boston, MA; Barcelona, Spain; and Rome, Italy. It's a funny old world.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 02:59 PM

Bobert, do you use Seven Sons shrubs? I planted one from a Mass. Hort. Society sale about 10 years ago, not knowing it would be a 15 foot monster. It's the center of my backyard now, and when it blooms in September it collects Monarch butterflies heading south. But it rarely gets to the bright-red stage before frost cuts the show short. I've often thought it'd be happier further south.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 03:18 PM

The 5 little strawberry plants I got yesterday are called


Fort Laramie - variety info here.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 03:42 PM

Bettynh,

No, we don't have any "Autumn Lilac" but now that you have brought it to my attention I'll make a point of hunting one or two down... BTW, I ckicked on the picture of the bark and really like it... Reminds me of cedar... Thanks...

Well, folks... Hotter than a 3 dollar pistol here but I had to replace a section of deer fence and just came in from that unpleasant job... Fortunately, the deer didn't get into the gardens but from the looks of the fence musta gotten a foot caught in it near the top and freeked out 'cause it was torn purdy bad...

Hope that this story about tomatoes not likin' to set fruit in the hot ain't all that accurate 'cause we're in for 90 plus days as long as we can see... Gonna be a hot summer... Last summer we had 2 days over 90 and we've allready had 13 or 14 and, heck, summer is just barely here!!!

Headin' up to Baker, WV tomorrow for Pine Fines and bagged mulch... We have trouble finding decent bagged "Pine Bark Mulch" around here... Pleanty of hardwood but folks don't sell the pine bark much... We like it on azaleas because it gets more acid to the plants then does the hardwoood... "Pine Fines" is a staple in mixing our planting soils... It is finely ground up pine bark, lots of acid, lots of nitrogen and holds moisture... We plant all our shrubs and trees with it... Great stuff.... Also not available... So it's off to Baker with truck and trailer tomorrow...

Tuesday to Saunders Brothers Nursery between Lynchburg and Chalottesville... They primarially grow boxwoood and we incorporate alot of different boxwoods in our designs... The "Dee Runk" columnal is real nice... Low maintence... Deer resistent... Drought resistent... Well behaved... Saunders Brothers is a real treat... The propagate and sell every concievable boxwood known to mankind and have a couple hundred acres of just boxwoods... But they have lots of other shrubs, too... Not too many trees or perenials but shrubs, shrubs and more shrubs...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: katlaughing
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 04:05 PM

Bettynh, thanks for catching that. I've changed it as I did mean cutworms. My friends in Casper, WY use little lids of beer to take care of slugs in their strawberries. It seems to work very well for them.

Thanks, again,

kat


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 06:17 PM

I picked my first black raspberry this afternoon, and expect a few more to ripen by tomorrow. There's no rain in the forecast tonight, so I'll go out and put some water on them now.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 08:34 PM

You must be way behind us, maire-aine... Ours are startin' to give out... We've had 'um on cereal, we've baked 'um into cobbler and we've put up about 5 pints of (seedless, thanks to our new Squeezo gizmo) jelly... We cooked down about a half a gallon today to run thru the "gizmo" for some more jelly... We'll put them in 1/2 pint jars for give aways...

Real curious about the "Autumn Lilac" that Bettynh put a link to and we'll be looking for a direct source... If not, we'll go ahead and order one and maybe propagate off it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 08:46 PM

Tornado just touched down in Billings. I called and talked to a friend there who rode it out in her basement. Power lines are down, several large buildings destroyed, flooding downtown from the rain, baseball sized hail on the ground. The only damage at her house she can see is a broken skylight. Still too early to get all the news details.

I could feel the air temperature dropping while I was on the phone with her. Covered the garden again in case of hail here.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 08:59 PM

Good luck, Alice. Do you need some row cover?

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 09:33 PM

Reading the website of the TV station in Billings - many business buildings demolished, power lines out, flooding downhill in the city.

The Antiques Road Show was going to be held/filmed in Billings this coming weekend at the Metra. There is more than one building at that convention center/arena. I don't know if they will be able to go ahead with filming the program there.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM

VIDEO Billings tornado, taken from car near Metra Arena


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM

What a range of garden problems we have!

I was looking through that link from Bettyhn to the snail page. Happy to say we're using all of the organic methods, though instead of a "poker" I just pick up snails and toss them to the concrete, and when I get out of the garden I step on them. And I use the beer trick. I've gotten upwards of 100 snails per bowl that way, especially in wet years when we have so many more. I like the idea of moistened wet dog food in the garden to attract them, but I think I'd attract too many other things, many on four feet, that way.

And on the cutworm link, again, I simply skimmed, but there was an "ah-ha!" moment - my eggplants have been doing better this year, fewer lace bugs on the leaves. But then I realized that's because they're attacking the sunflowers instead. That page talks about planting sunflowers around the perimeter to attract cut worms, but it is also a more attractive plant for lace bugs, that is also great. Not lace-winged, just lace bug.

Great stuff! Alice, for all sorts of organic recipes and up-to-date information about plant stuff (I need to try the Bio-Wash, also called Plant-Wash, the next category of insecticidal soaps, and Thrive, which helps with soil health and microrhizal fungi. You know, like the white strands that form in good compost.) http://www.DirtDoctor.com.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jun 10 - 10:47 PM

Alice, I also meant to say, those strawberries sound wonderful! We have some pretty hardy ones here that can fruit in summer still. They're not big and the dry up fast, but they're such a nice surprise mixed in with the leaves! I go through the patch a couple of times a day to find them as they ripen, and try to beat the birds to them.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 12:25 AM

Hey, Bobert, that squeezy thing sounds great for the raspberries. But I don't have enough plants to give me a big crop, so I just eat 'em. If there are extras, I bag 'em and put them in the freezer. I'm in southeast Michigan, by the way, just north of Detroit.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 07:00 AM

Bobert, the bark is that nice in real life. I haven't pruned it much and it's grown into a multistemmed (about 8) shrub that grows quickly to about 15 feet then arches back down (I guess they call that vase-shaped). I prune it up and there's grass to within about a yard of the roots. We've had some pretty heavy ice storms which it weathered by simply drooping lower, but last March we had a heavy windstorm that took out a whole trunk (about 3 inch diameter) to the ground.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 07:21 AM

Yeah, Bettynh, I was reading people comments at the site you provided and read where it will grow to 12 feet in 2 years... That is amazing... We'll definately get one and see how it looks as a possible addition to the plants that we use in our designs... I would imagine that, as fast as it grows, that it can be propagated from cuttings...

Always exciting to find new plants... This year, it has been the buckthorn that I discovered at the Blandy (state ahboritum) Sale this past spring and now this fall bloomer... Love it, love it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 07:54 AM

You're correct, Bobert. Cuttings will do it. We picked up a couple of Seven Sons with our FEDCO order this spring; replacing the lost nursery stock of fruit trees and ornamentals.

Another one we like is ninebark- Diablo is the cultivar's name. We're growing some seedlings from our original specimen and may keep those with unusual color variations for propagation and naming.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:16 AM

gee... no one commented on my message about the tornado that destroyed part of Billings yesterday.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:23 AM

Sorry, Alice. I live in Texas. That's kind of typical news around here. I'm afraid I hardly notice those things now-a-days, now that I've seen quite a few tornadoes myself. I kind of hold my breath and cross my fingers when the weather looks like they're headed this way. Do you know anyone who was in the path?

Okay, gardeners, I made a huge discovery yesterday - handling okra hurts like hell. What's the story with this? Is this a result of just the juice from cutting the okras off the plant (that's when I got the zing), or does it come from touching the foliage, etc? Maybe this is why my hands have been so broken out this year? I usually check my plants all through the garden for pests, so I have been touching it. What do you do about it? My neighbor had trouble growing it last year, so I thought I'd give it a try, but I've only eaten it a couple of times and never been near the plants before. Advice, please!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:30 AM

Yes, it went over a friend's house where I stayed a couple weeks ago. Her skylight was broken, but she is okay. It wiped out a business section, and the Metra Arena, which is the largest venue in Montana, where concerts and other events are held in the state.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:43 AM

yes - okra has a bunch of small hairs/spines and many , even most, people are sensative to them.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:51 AM

Yuk. Okra. I've never met an okra dish that tasted good.
We must not know how to cook it up north.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 01:28 PM

I never ate it, but I've lived in the South for a long time now, and breaded and fried it isn't too bad. I'm mostly interested in the gardening challenge. I think 2 plants won't produce enough to do much with. I'm told it really loves the hot weather. The flowers are lovely.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 01:32 PM

related to hollyhocks and rose of sharon.; Okra does have a pretty flower.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 01:39 PM

anything can taste not too bad if it is breaded and fried ;-)


Another cold, wet night last night, but the garden was covered in case of hail. I planted the sunflower seeds in time stages and different places in the yard. Four have sprouted. I have hope!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 10:22 PM

I'm prone to food prejudices and am very particular about texture - have never got over the sliminess of okra in gumbo (which I do not eat for that reason) so can't bring myself to like fried okra (or Thai summer rolls with that cold, sticky-slimy rice paper.) Took me years get over the feel of cooked mushrooms, no matter how good they tasted.

Stilly, you have had, and continue to have, a blistering spring and summer. I didn't know that tomatoes will not self-pollinate when the temps get and stay real high, even at night. Although diseases usually begin to take significant toll by late July or early August, my tomatoes have tended to continue to bear (though declining) right up until 1st frost. Thinking about it, though, I realize there are usually pauses during those times in late summer when night temps stay really high.

I watered everything really, really deeply Thursday night, and watered again before I left Friday morning, and everything looked good when I got home tonight, in spite of the high temps. You may remember that I got a late start on planting this year. Even accounting for that, my tomatoes, basil, cukes and zukes look remarkably healthy. The only thing I have done other than fertilize regularly is hit the tomatoes with a hard spray early on to knock off flea beetls. I am realizing it is because this is a "virgin" crop. New raised beds with new topsoil hauled in that is not harboring pests or diseases from the crops of prior years.

Regarding cutworms - I routinely cut collars from waxed paper cups (i.e. Dixie cups) for susceptible plants, and either sow within the collar or slip the rootball of the transplant through the collar before planting.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 21 Jun 10 - 11:09 PM

Nice tip, Janie...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Cuilionn- no biscuit?!
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:07 AM

Hello, Folks!

Thought you might enjoy a bit of seasonal reading for the first full day of Summer. Here's the "crop " I've been fussing with lately!

--Cuilionn


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: WalkaboutsVerse
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:37 AM

This morning I, eventually, convinced a spider to leave my bath for a piece of tissue paper, which I then floated down to the garden below my flat's window.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 02:46 PM

Today I am cleaning out a neglected flower bed under a grove of aspens. Somewhere in there are day lilies and Siberian iris. Gradually pulling out grass and weeds, I am adding spruce needles for mulch and uncovering more Columbine volunteers. I have Columbines that reseed themselves every year around the yard, and this year lots of white ones are blooming. A few years ago, they started blooming as doubles and triple flowers, which I'd never seen before. Colors range from white to pink to blue to deep purple.

I found an example of what they look like when they start tripling up their petals.
http://www.wuvie.net/columbine.jpg


This is what Columbines normally looks like:

http://www.westford.com/fingerhut/Flowers/Columbine.jpg


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 02:57 PM

Pretty! our Eastern native columbine is red.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 02:58 PM

Oh! And......


400!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 09:06 PM

Hail again.

I got out to the garden when I heard the thunder.

I covered most things before the worst of it hit.

The garden has been babied along to this point, so having it chopped up by hail would be a big disappointment.

Looking out the window at it, so far it is like rock salt, not the golf ball and baseball size they had east of us.

The problem is, it is pounding down with tremendous force.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 10:11 PM

Alice,

It is time someone had a talk with your weather.....



Again re: cutworm collars, I cut them about 2 1/2-3 inches high and twist them down into the ground at least 3/4 inch.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 10:17 PM

Amazing how quickly the temperature can drop... tender stuff is covered up with the clear plastic, and tomorrow we have a forecast of a high of close to 80 degrees, which will be the warmest day so far this year.

It is about 58 out there now, and will go down into the 30's again tonight.

Soaking some more seeds, as I will have to keep planting to make up for what has not germinated. I am up to this challenge!!


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 10:41 PM

We have a different problem here, Alice, with the hottest June on record... Seems it's 90 by 10:00 in the morning every day... Oh well, I 've always said that you can complain about heat or cold but not both so I can live with the hot... Winters suck...

Went to Saunders Borthers today and picked up the rest of the plantts for one of the landscaping jobs we have going and, of course, while I was loading up the truck and trailer (by myself) with some heavy 10 gallon pots the P-Vione went off to look around... Why does it work that way???

(Because you are the "undergardener", Boberdz...)

Oh...

Well she came back with a brand new (to the ttrade) hydrengea called "Strawbrry Vanilla" and a shartrose (sp) huckeria (sp) and somethin' else that escapes me...

Oh well???

Asked about that "Seven Sons" fall lilac but they aren't propagting and selling it...

Looks like I'll have to get it on the internet???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 10:46 PM

I can send some softwood cuttings if it would help, Bobert.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 22 Jun 10 - 10:52 PM

This is another interesting site with information and photos of Seven Sons Tree http://www.rainyside.com/features/plant_gallery/shrubs/Heptacodium_miconioides.html


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 12:26 AM

We're almost 10 degrees above the typical average here this month. We've had three days (this was one) at or over 100 already. And at night the breeze from the gulf brings in the humidity. It's miserable. I've been watering tonight, moving the sprinkler that goes in a circle, pulsing as it goes. I can't get it to go back and forth, the lever sticks, so I have to put it strategically as close to the center and go from there. One more part of the yard yet to do.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 01:18 PM

I'm feeling the effects on my injured right shoulder from pulling weeds and grass out of the aspen grove. It has been over 3 years since my injury, but my shoulder will never be the same again. I try to use my left arm and hand, but I'm right handed, so that doesn't always work.

Years of weeds have been growing in that flower bed. There is an even larger and more neglected one next to it that sometime I will clear out.

I just took some photos, but the results don't look all that dramatic without a "before" picture. I may post a photo link when the daylilies bloom.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 03:01 PM

I took my eye off of the eggplant and this morning found one in there the size of the large grocery store ones. I think the main difference this year is that the sunflowers nearby are attracting the pests that usually bother the eggplants. I think I'll use this one in a big lasagna. :)

This yard work in the heat has taken a toll. I felt like I was coming down with a bladder infection this morning. I think I haven't been drinking enough water, so today I'm letting it wash through the system. I have a couple of friends who have ended up with kidney stones from getting too dehydrated while out mowing (as a regular summer job). Gotta pay attention to the body's early warning signs.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 05:31 PM

I feel like I should not complain about the cold, SRS, as at least I can put on a sweater. Once it gets too hot... it is just TOO HOT!

My pumpkin started wilting from our hottest day today, all the way up to 78 degrees! Had to turn the sprinkler on, which was the first time this year.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 06:29 PM

Wilting leaves do not big pumpkins make.

I dug out an old deck umbrella from the garage and anchored it on a stake in the garden. It is almost big enough to be shade cover for all of the container garden. It cranks closed when not needed. Amazing what one can find in either garage or basement.



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 08:01 PM

95 here today... I've got a 3 day landscaping job that the people want done by the weekend... Oh well, it pays well...

Thanks, maeve, for the offer of the cuttings... Lemme see if I can find a plant first but if I can't I'll sho nuff take you up on the offer...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 23 Jun 10 - 10:01 PM

Last summer I had overgrown junipers removed from the north side of my house. I left one well-shaped juniper at the corner and next to it created another rock garden. I brought in some flagstones and river rock to create a "dry stream" like I did next to my small pond.

The plants are starting to really grow now, and here is one that has been blooming a brilliant, deep colored pink.

CLICK here


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 01:07 AM

Fertilized all the veggies today. The cherry tomatoes are setting fruit with np problem or hesitation. The heirloom "mortage lifter", may be another story. Time will tell.

Huge but brief wind/rain storm here this afternoon.   I have a humonguous peace lily (I've had it for 18 years and it was relatively big when it was given to me.) It had been perched on top of a file cabinet in my large office, recently vacated, and I had put it on top of the table on my carport, hopefully for the summer, while I contemplated building an addition (joke) to house it and a ficus I bought when it was small and also had in my large office. The storm blew the dang thing right off the table and turned it upside down. I am amazed (and somewhat disappointed) that more damage was not done.

I really do not know what I am going to do with either the ficus or the peace lily, but especially the peace lily. The diameter of the foliage is more than 4 feet. It ain't gonna fit in my new, smaller office, nor in the waiting room.

The ficus has also grown uncomfortably large, but not as large as the peace lily. I could probably accomodate it in my house, but it is so messy I'm not sure I want to. After living with a slob/packrat for 25 years, then moving into a house 45% smaller, I have become a bit of a fussbudget about clean, clear, easy-maintenance space. My emotional attachment to these two plants is in conflict with easy, clear, clean.

What's a girl to do?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 01:21 AM

Wonderful creeping phlox, Alice.

Good illustration of the difference in climate zones. I think your photo is of phlox subulata. both it and p. stolonifera can begin blooming here as early as late February, depending on sun exposure and temperatures, and are completely finished by the end of April.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 01:46 AM

So far, ( as Bobert noted, it is still early in the year for tomatoes here,) trellising the cherry tomatoes ornamentally is working well. I do note that a few of the the lowest leaves on both the Sweet 100's and the orange cherry (I have already lost track of the variety for that one) are showing the first signs of yellowing. The lower one or two leaves of the zucchini are also showing some signs of disease, even before fruit has set. I notice ants are all over both the zucchini and the cukes, but see no signs of aphids.

We shall simply have to wait and see.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Maryrrf
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 09:36 AM

Alice, can you send us some cooler weather? And some rain too, if you can spare it? It's been very, very hot the past couple of weeks, and today it's supposed to top 100 degrees, and possibly set a record. They keep saying "chance of thunderstorms" but they never seem to materialize, and we really need the rain. Preferably a few misty, drizzly wet days to thoroughly soak the soil. I've been watering the garden, but the sun in the daytime is just brutal. Things were looking very droopy yesterday afternoon. I watered the whole plot well, and everything looks better this morning. I harvested some pattypan squash, cucumbers, and carrots. Some of the tomatoes are starting to turn. I can't wait till I can make tomato sandwiches dripping with juice.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 11:37 AM

Wow. I wish I could share some cool breezes with you.
It gets cold at night up here in the mountains, so even if it is hot during the afternoon, mornings are cool. My son put the screens on the doors yesterday. It was finally warm enough to take off the winter storm door windows.

Regarding the peace lily, Janie, you could divide it, give some of the roots away, and repot what remains. It will recover.



Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 05:18 PM

Wow... Unbarable hot here... I went to my landscaping job early this mornin' (fir me, that is) and got done what I planned to get done which took 4 hours... I thought I was gonna die right there... Got home and dfiscovered it was 99 friggin' degrees... Laid down for my usual 15-20 minute nap and didn't get up for the next hour and a half!!! Seems like someone has taken all the oxegen outta the air and that breathin' is all but a waste of time...

Hard to think gardenin' when ya' feel more like complainin' about the heat... And I rarely complain about heat but this stuff is beyond heat... It's air that ain't doin' much of anything fie ya'...

But...

...the landscaping job is looking real good... So far I've finshed 2 of the 3 roundish beds where old beat up boxwoods were taken out and put in well behaved "Dee Runk" boxwoods (columnal) in the center ringed with alternating "Green Pillow" boxwoods and hychonacloa (sp) which is a wonderful grass... Only grows to about 18 inches... Shartrose, somewhat verigated and very light and wispy so that in late summer when everything gets very still this grass continues to move givin' one the allusion that there is a breeze...

BTW, seein' as the people I am doing this job for are re-doing the landscaping around the house I'm bringin' home some stuff that they no longed need... I don't know daylillies names to well but brought home a clump of them today... Real pretty... I'll have to stuff them into my back-of-the-farm Bobert garden (Fibbers McGees garden) (lol) but, hey...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 05:27 PM

Welcome to the long hot summer, Bobert! I mowed the front this morning "early" (not the crack of dawn, but mid-morning) and it had to be over 90 by the time I finished. We've been up around 100 for the last couple of weeks.

Keep drinking the water. I've had some tea, but I'll skip the carbonated drinks for a while. I think those make the heat feel worse, in a physiological sort of way.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 09:20 PM

Today was another sunny day good for growing.

I planted some seeds I'd soaked for a quick start... sunflowers, radishes and lettuce. I used cinnamon to keep them from damping off.

Now there is a thunderstorm moving in, cloudy, rumbling, just about to open up. The forecast is for rain overnight, but not as cold as it has been. Should stay in the 40's overnight.

The pumpkin is growing so fast, you can almost see it expanding while you watch. I used some diluted milk today to ward off mildew.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 24 Jun 10 - 09:25 PM

I have no idea how I lost my mudcat cookie.

Anyway... regarding milk, I'm using it as prevention because of how very wet it has been.

Here is the info:
Got mildew? Get milk.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 12:10 AM

I use full-strength 3% hydrogen peroxide on powdery mildew. Works better than baking soda or potassium soda. There is a product called Veggie Wash or Bio Wash that is also very good on mildew. And if it isn't hot out, Neem is very good on mildew.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 07:58 AM

Good morning, everybody. I finally uploaded my pictures. You can see tham at garden pics at FB

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 09:27 AM

yesterday the only thing I got done was move the siberian iris from the base of the retaining wall where it has only bloomed once in six years to other locations. What was a single stem of the variety "tiger" (a yellow and brown spotted combo - why "tiger and not jaguar" I don't know) has multiplied so I divided and planted it out in 8 locations yesterday - and have six more sets to plant...

This weekend I am digging, seperating and moving a bunch of daffies....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:20 AM

I have a pot of daffodil bulbs that are probably dried out. I'll go check, I forgot about them.

Maryanne, your yard is lovely! Those berries look delicious!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 11:57 AM

yeah - I've got two pots of hyacinths and two of lilies I need to get plugged in somewhere as well. The lilies I may just sink the pots so I can use them a potted plants gain next year. The one I did last year that way worked nicely.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 12:52 PM

Finished my landcaping contract and gonna move a few plants around this afternoon... Mostly into Bobert's Fibber McGee's back-of-the-farm garden... It's so hodgepodgy... Nuthin' that get shown to touring groups... Mine and I love it... It's kinda like lettin' my freek flag fly...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 01:06 PM

Maryanne, it is great to see so many colorful flowers blooming at once! Thanks for posting the photos.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 08:48 PM

We had a tiny amount of rain here at the house, compared to the large amount of rain they got today at my doctor's office, about 3 or 4 miles west of here. I'll still go ahead and water tomorrow like I had planned to.

Getting dehydrated in this heat is I think what egged on if not caused the bladder infection that finally woke me in a sweat last night at 3am, wondering if I needed to go to the hospital and have my bladder removed and if I'd end up wearing a dribble bag for the rest of my life. Oy. This afternoon I lucked out and got an appointment with my doctor's nurse practitioner and some cipro to hit it with. And I dug into my stash of old narcotic painkillers and didn't hesitate to go to the top of the heap: hydrocodone. I had quite a nap this evening.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 09:04 PM

SRS, I hope you recover quickly.


I started to turn the compost heap and as the top few inches had dried out, an ant colony had moved in. I just set a bait trap of borax, sugar, molasses, water and peanut butter. Don't know if they like sugar or protein, so I included both. I would just leave the ants there, but the compost is right next to the garden, and I don't want to deal with aphid farming, too.

Today was another day of sun/clouds/rain and so far no hail - Woo Hoo!


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 09:25 PM

You don't have fire ants up there, do you?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 09:47 PM

As far as I know, we don't have fire ants (lucky).


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 25 Jun 10 - 10:54 PM

This heat sucks! I'm having to run my window ac day and night to keep a room or two habitable, even with all the shade. Gonna hate to see my next power bill.

Not that the heat has anything to do with it, but I have been home all week (between jobs.) Had hoped to get some landscaping done, or at least the yard mowed, but instead have been buried in taking care of paperwork and personal business that I never have time to get to. (and still won't get it all done!)

Oh well, at least the little veggie garden is getting watered daily and tended to.    The cherry tomatoes appear to be setting fruit despite the heat. The mortgage lifter is not. Doing like your's Maggie. Blloms, but the blooms, but no fruit. On the other hand, the two tomatoes that did form before the heat wave are growing great guns, and with no competition, ought to grow to be prize winners.

Thanks for sharing your garden photos, Maryanne. Looks great!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 01:06 PM

Well, I read through the instructions on the Cipro Rx and it seems I have to avoid a lot of direct sun for now and for a few weeks after the doses finish. I'll try to work in the yard in the morning or evening. This kind of antibiotic makes one more prone to sunburn. (I think pasty white skin also does that, so this is a double-whammy!)

We had a tantalizing sprinkle last night, but not enough to make a difference in the yard. I'm running the soaker hoses today.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 01:48 PM

Another downpour last night, so everything is soaked today.

It doesn't look like the ants are liking the bait tray... they are running around it but not going to it. I guess I'll just wait and see if I get results.

Mosquitoes love me, so I am working outside with an OFF fan device clipped to my belt loop. It seems to work better than anything else I've tried. We have had such a wet spring, I know we are in for lots of mosquitoes.

So far the garden containers are all looking great. Zucchini finally came up, squash has blossoms, native perennial sweet peas came back strong, potatoes have been hilled up numerous times, and the pumpkin is growing like a godzilla.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 07:42 PM

Well, I'm with Janie... The heat sucks... This is going to be one of those summers for the books...

Add drought to the equation and we'tre in quite a pickle... Moving ocsillators all day long...

Worst part is that I'm trying to get about an acre of grass to grown between our house and the pond where trees and stumps were removed and that's alot of grass to keep watered... Wearin' me out...

But, could be worse... Like rain and evenings in the 40s like Alice... Not!!! That sounds delightful!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: TJO
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 07:53 PM

I'm just catching on to this thread -- guess I been too busy gardening. Nice reading and some interesting adventures.
We've given up on veggies, 1/2 mile outside the D.C. Beltway in Kensington, MD, and the deer raccoons, rabbits, possum don't give us a chance, not to mention the squirrels. Our resident fox can't keep up and control all those critters. And our yard is too big and too uneven and wooded to fence without a big bucks effort.
But it was a strange spring. We have a bunch of azaleas and rhodies and they finished a month early -- we've usually got some blooming from early March to July fourth, and then some of the native deciduous ones in August -- but not this year.
Now we're mostly trying to keep the deer from eating all our daylilies. A tip for Liquid Fence users -- add a bit of sticker spreader solution to the mix and it lasts longer.
And BTW, the lavender strap petal azalea is called Koromo Shikibu, with a short "bu" at the end, rather than the long "boo".

T.J.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 09:13 PM

Welcome to the thread, TJ.


Bobert, I wish I could send some cool mountain air over there.
The temps have been perfect today.
The sun will be going down soon and I'll have to put on a sweater.



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 09:41 PM

Hey, TJO...

Sounds like yer an azalea person... You oughtta join the Azalea Society... My wife is presdient of the NoVa chapter and we'd love to have you... I love Koromo Shikibus and have about half a dozen... We're growing out about 200 hybrids right now from various hybrdizers on the east coast... Yeah, we know them all... Don Voss, Don Hyatt, Bob Stewart, Joe Limivich, etc.... I ain't into that pistols and stemens stuff... I just design gardens and do landscapin' fir $$$ on the side...

BTW, we're 9 miles south of Luray in the mountains...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 10:47 PM

I grew up in Washington State were rhododendrons and azaleas grew wherever you happened to want to poke them. There are only a few types that can tolerate this climate in Texas. I am so envious of the colors and varieties you get to play with, Bobert.

I'm going to pull the heirloom tomatoes tomorrow. They're not doing a thing out there but taking up space. The rest of the crop (Super Fantastic) is doing okay, more or less. I'm getting a few tomatoes a day, enough to eat and give one away occasionally. There is no overage yet.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 26 Jun 10 - 10:54 PM

The only thing I can harvest so far is wintergreen and basil.

Oh, well, the garden will eventually come in with all the TLC I'm giving everything.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 01:29 AM

Welcome TJO!

The lace bugs are beginning to get the upper hand on the Koromo Shikibu, only on its second year in the ground from the rooted cutting Bobert gave me.    I'm concerned that using either neem oil or insecticidal soap in this heat would do more damage than the bugs. I think I'm gonna start blasting it hard with a spray of water a couple of times a day in hopes of at least slowing them down a little until the temps drop. I have also started irrigating it more heavily to reduce stress and decrease its vulnerability until I can start spraying again.

The last time I sprayed neem oil was two weeks ago. I wasn't careful enough and got some neem oil on the leaves of a potted hydrangea arborescens given to me late last winter by a friend who is devoted to native plants. The plant will survive it, but where the neem hit the leaves they have turned dark brown and brittle.    I had moved an unknown cultivar of h. arborescens with me. It is probably, but not certainly "Annabelle." The leaves on the potted speciman are somewhat narrower, but the bloom is quite showy.   Still haven't absloutely decided if the potted hydrangea is is the species or a selection in cultivation.

Again, time will tell.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 07:28 AM

Jane, is your lace bug like this or this (my photo posted for a weblog)?

I found this year that by leaving a few volunteer sunflowers (the big kind, because the bird feeder dropped them in the garden) I have almost no lace bug problem in my eggplant. They all went for the sunflowers instead (companion planting). The eggplant is what they usually hit hard. Previously to get them off the eggplant I'd go in with a band of masking tape (pull a strip maybe 8 - 10" off the roll and stick it to itself in a loop with the sticky outside and put your fingers through the loop of tape and use it to roll the bugs, eggs, and babies right off the backs of your leaves). This is a little tackier than one of the Dollar Store garment rollers, but not so strong that it rips the leaves, and I use the 2" wide light brown tape. I find the mechanical removal was more efficient than trying sprays or hitting plants with water hard.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 07:55 AM

Actually, Magz... I think some of the native azaleas will do well in yer area... BTW, there is a Texas chapter of the Azalea Society that has been reorganized of late... I'll find out where they are... The natives, BTW, are great plants and grow in full sun...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Guy Wolff
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 08:15 AM

Some amazing plantsmen this year at the "North Hill Symposium" on Friday . Dave Burdick and Rob as usual , Walker Farm and Broken Arrow from Ct .Glenwood Gardens as well Fergus Garrett from Great Dixter and Keith Wiley from Devon were both speakers plus Tom Cooper . Of course Joe Ech and Wayne Winterrowd (our hosts ) both spoke .

The really interesting change was the gathering was at Scott Farm next to Rudyard Kipling's house in Dummerston just outside Bradlebourgh Vt . What wonderful land for gardeners to gather on ..

I am thinking of making up a collection of historically inspired flowerpots to give to the museum at the White House . Hopefully other horticultural potters will add to it as time goes on   .

Erica's gardens are doing great . We are also in the town's public vegetable plot . Great fences in a beautiful field with a ton of light !! Wonderful thread as every year ! yours Guy


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 10:27 AM

Look very similar to your photographs but are somewhat lighter - though the differences may simply be about lighting in the photos. They are azalea lace bugs.

I was just reading more about them. Apparently azaleas and rhodies that are sited where they get more sun are more bothered by them.   That may be why my Koromo Shikibu is consistently more susceptible. It is positioned so that it gets more sun than the other azaleas.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: pdq
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 10:48 AM

Here is a site with tons of info on native Texas plants including some azaleas...

                                                                         aggie-horticulture


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 12:11 PM

I don't have a digital camera, so these shots are not very good quality... just taken with the laptop.

Sweet Rocket comes up everywhere here as a weed, but I let it bloom... it is so fragrant and I love the purple color.
Here it is with the last of the falling peony petals in the background.
Sweet Rocket

The hens & chickens that I planted years ago when I made a pond and rock garden are beautifully well established.
Pond & hens & chickens


Snow In Summer in front of pond

old rock garden, Hens & Chickens, violets


old rock garden, Close Up

Daisies are a weed here, just like sweet rocket, coming up
in the lawns, the ditches, the alleys, everywhere.
I mow them down except for a few choice places like the
flower garden where they came up with sweet rocket.
Daisies and Sweet Rocket


Lupines, flowers about ten
inches tall.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 12:15 PM

It looks like spattered paint on those rocks,
but it is actually
Lichen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 07:28 PM

I have a link on my clipboard so I'll post it and then go back to Alice's photos. Taken with your laptop? Now someone with a digital camera should walk around behind you and document that! ;-D

pdq, the Aggies are a good source of information, and for even more local to my area, I love this little nursery (placed on the side of an old estate of some sort in the southeast section of Fort Worth) Weston Gardens in Bloom.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 08:16 PM

I love Dame's Rocket! It also grows wild here, but not profusely. Ox-daisies are my favorite of all the daisies. I transplanted them to my garden. Also transplanted bidens and Golden Ragwort to my garden in Hillsborough. The bidens had to be weeded aggressively to keep it from taking over, but was worth it.

Your pond is lovely, Alice.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 27 Jun 10 - 08:30 PM

Yeah, Janie... Yer evergreen azalaeas will do best with mornin' sun and not have to bake in the afternoon sun... The diciduous azaleas are the opposite as most are primitaives that have been hybridized from seed collected from their natural habitat which is on top of mountains... Okay, many do well on the sides of mountains as well but those too will tolerate sun...

Just returned from driving the P-Vine to an Executive Committte meeting of thr azalea bunch and it was held at a member house who is also into conifers and she knows that I like them, too, so she had three wonderfiul books waitin' for me to look thru... Found some really nice ones to research...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Jun 10 - 12:26 AM

Bobert, have you ever read the old little naturalist book Reading the Landscape of America?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 28 Jun 10 - 12:47 AM

So far, the cherry tomatoes look quite attractive on the trellises and will look even better as the tomatoes color up. Have misplaced the usb cable to download photos from my camera. When I can find it, and if I can remember my flickr log-in, I'll post pictures.

My zukes and cukes are finally starting to produce fertile blossoms so I should have a couple of each to harvest before too long. Next year I won't plant anything else in the raised box with the zuccini. Its big leaves are starting to shade out the basil and the cuke I planted in the same box. I may buy a couple of shorter garden trellises for the cukes. They are trying to climb a basil plant now, as well as the trellises the tomatoes are on. That would also raise the one cuke above the shading zuke foliage.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 28 Jun 10 - 08:24 AM

No, Magz, I haven't.... I'll have to see if the library has a copy...

Yea!!! Only 92 here today... Geeze, I never thought I appreciate "only 92"???

Zukes and cukes on the way here, also... Maybe two more day for each... Okra finally takin' off... Planted fennel about ten days ago and nuthin'??? Did everything the seed pack said but... Maybe they are just slow to go???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 28 Jun 10 - 11:54 AM

Janie, do you ever prune your zucchini?

You can cut off the large leaves that are shading other plants and also shading the zucchini too much itself.

It can help your zucchini and surrounding plants by opening it up to light and air.

Here are some tips on zucchini pruning:
CLicK


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 28 Jun 10 - 05:45 PM

Janie, if your camera has a memory card and you have a card reader, you can get images without the cable.

Bobert, the author is May Theilgaard Watts. I think you'll see why I asked if you had read that book if you pick it up.

Alice, I don't prune my zucchini - I'm lucky if any are alive out there now, the worms and beetles have been so bad this year. I'm just leaving the existing one alone and watching it.

It's raining - after weeks of nothing, we've have a nice little thunderstorm roll over us this afternoon. Maybe a half inch? We needed it, and more!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 01:10 AM

Interesting idea, Alice.

I would be a little hesitant to try it, though. I can see where it might be a good idea for your short, cooler season. Here in the south, though, I think the shading of roots and fruit provided by the leaves may be more benefit than harm.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 08:45 AM

"Raining"??? What's that???

Went out this morning with the P-Vine and we picked close to a gallon of red berries (don't know what they are called???) to make jam this afternoon...

Going to dig red potatoes next and then put the oscillator on the rest of that area of the garden... First zuke gets picked tomorrow morning...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 02:54 PM

This year has been the perfect combination of rain and temperature, and I'm harvesting more black raspberries than ever in the last 20 years. I've eaten them by the bowl-ful, frozen some and given lots to my neighbors, and they're still coming.... Plus, they're a week earlier than usual.

Tomato plants are doing well; should have some nice ones if the critters don't get them first.

My favorite garden center had flats of annuals on sale, so I bought some zinnias & snapdragons. I put them in the strip between the sidewalk and the street, just for a little color.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 03:18 PM

My raspberries are bee-ing pollinated now.

The winter snow drifts really crushed my raspberry patch, but the canes that survived are very healthy, so I hope to have enough to freeze.



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 06:03 PM

I may have missed my mustang grapes with being stuck in the house and feeling like shit. I'll go look this evening.

It has rained, heavily off and on, for two days here! Whooo! (I'm going to have to go back to mowing for a couple of weeks, I can see.)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 11:40 PM

Need to get this weather to pace itself. Another downpour and all of my larger tomatoes will split.

I checked out the wild grapes across the road. They're solidly green now. I'll look again next week. When they go, they go fast.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 06:36 PM

My hand was smashed by golf ball sized hail - trying to run to the garden to cover it, I held a plastic chair over my head, and made it only to the spruce tree where I stood under a branch and was pelted... bleeding and bruised hand.
The garden is mostly decimated. Some of it may recover, but the squash and pumpkin that were thriving were cut back to the ground by the hail.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 06:40 PM

Oh Alice- That's a heart breaker. Take care of your hand.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 06:56 PM

I brought in two of the hail stones and took photos. They are a little larger than golf balls. One is like an ice pinecone with a pointed end.
Branches and tree leaves and things broken by the wind are everywhere on the street and around town.

Hail stone on left has a sharp point on one end.


Hail accumulated against west door.


AAaaarrgh... was it really worth all that work to make a garden?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 09:39 PM

Alice, we've got the wet end of that kind of storm down here. It took down my 12' sunflower last night. I went out this morning when it was sunny and bright and propped it up with all sorts of garden hardware stuff (metal posts) but it rained again this afternoon and now this evening. I just now went out and cut the top three feet (more or less) off of the plant, hoping that the top won't be waving in the wind and bring the whole thing, now a plant plus adjacent hardware, down like a guillotine onto the plants around it.

The garden is going to try to rot after all of this rain. I did design these raised beds to drain, so I think some of it will be okay, but just simply getting this much precipitation.

I took a nice sized eggplant over to my neighbors this morning: produce is coming out of the garden, but eggplant are a summer loving plant, so I'll have to watch it now to see if it dries out enough to keep setting fruit.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 10:19 PM

My hand is bruised and swollen but the bleeding stopped.
A bicyclist caught in the hail had his hand broken from hail hitting it. There was a funnel cloud in the valley, but the baseball to tennis ball to golf ball sized hail and the strength of the wind in town broke windows at the university, all the skylights at WalMart, cars totaled, home and business windows, roofs torn up, trees blown down on buildings and cars, power lines down...
and Mexico and Texas is getting the hurricane.

Back when I was just battling frost and snow, I said the best way to have a garden here is to grow it in a greenhouse. I feel really defeated trying to fool Mother Nature into letting veggies grow outside.

Delphiniums and Foxgloves were just starting to bloom (trashed now).

I think I'll have a Guinness and wait until tomorrow to look at what is left of the garden.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 12:52 AM

Oh Alice, so sorry!

But was it worth it anyway? Only you can answer. Did it feel good to be out there working and nurturing, and digging while you were doing it? Will some plants survive and recover, despite the beating they took? Can some seeds be resown? Will there be another year, or other years when the hail stones don't hit and the garden is glorious, helped along by the loving attention you continuously provided to the earth on the ground or in the pots? Can you fill a decimated bed with flowering annuals that will cheer with their beauty in a few weeks or a month?

We all might have different responses to these questions. There are certainly no right or wrong answers. For me, the reality of life is "shit happens", whether it be life in and of the garden or in other aspects of life. Let the crap compost, and much that is good and positive is nurtured. Lessons in the value and strengths to be found in developing resilience is how I choose to see it. (after I've cried or despaired, sometimes.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 12:55 AM

Local news reported today that my region has experienced the hottest June on record.

Temps have moderated starting yesterday, and look pretty decent for the next few days. Have had a few, brief showers but have also had to water or irrigate.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 07:06 AM

First of all, Alice... MOVE!!! Jus' funnin' wid ya'... I know that people like where they are 'er they would move so...

...sorry about yer hand... That really sucks... And yer garden... Maybe you'll get a few surprises and find that some stuff will survive nicely... Hailed on Mr. Clifford's veggie garden two years ago and it turned out okay...

Me??? Wish I could find time to work in my own garden but the P-Vine keeps getting these landscape jobs and they tie me up... Meanwhile, she gets to pay gardener... Grrrrr....

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 12:06 PM

We haven't been hit by hail, but we have a good chance of more rain today. It really poured last night. After beheading my big sunflower it still seems to be alive out there. It attracts pests away from othe things in the garden, so I want it out there. If it's no longer a big charasmatic plant, I'm sorry, but it's still doing a good job.

I'm afraid stuff will rot with the massive amount of rain. I built these beds to drain, so this is the real test.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 01:42 PM

We have only 3 or 4 months of real growing season here, so this setback may have pretty much eliminated chances for enough time to regrow and harvest anything. I can't afford to buy replacement plants.

I was SO optimistic about the start I got with tender things like peppers, squash and melons. Not too excited about getting just a some radishes and potatoes out of this.

I just came in from gathering up leaves and vines and broken plants from some of the garden.

We have 3 more days of severe storm forecasts, even though it is calm blue sky right now. I covered the garden containers with rakes, chairs, lattice and wheelbarrow, whatever I could gather up that won't blow away. Weatherman says we have more bad stuff coming.

The county is going to have to get emergency disaster help for all the hail damage yesterday.

Blink and the warm months are over here.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 07:09 PM

HAIL HOLE - Two and 1/8 inch dia. hole punched through a hard plastic chair.

I had some lettuce and radishes sprouting in pots on a table on the deck, and had turned a couple of plastic deck chairs over the pots to shade them for a few days.

I didn't discover that the hail had punched a hole through one of the chairs until this morning. No wonder it HURT when it hit!

Well, I'm going to battle this weather.... not giving up. I have a couple of old steel fenceposts that I'm going to put in by the garden and construct some lath and/or hail screening over the garden.

Today I covered the garden with lath, rakes, anything that will protect it from the predicted severe storms for the next few days. I even found a few badminton rackets to layer over some pots.

... of course you know, this means war.




Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 07:45 PM

Hey, the badminton ricket is as good a weapon as any.... I take 'um and put metal screen over the head of it... Makes short order of any buzzin' thing buzzin' you... Most bees don't bother me at all but some are agressive... Plus carpenter bees are destructive... On shot with the badminton ricket and they are done...

Had our fist zuke last night... Sauteed it with some onion (also from the garden) and some turkey kilbasa... It was good... Poured the fish emulsion to the cukes, peppers and tomatoes so they oughtta get happy and fast...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 05:47 PM

Another thunderstorm is starting now. We've had days of rain, and my drainage system is draining, and there are lots of flowers on the tomatoes and it's cooler, but still - it's so darned soggy out there! I did some weeding on one side. It's lovely to pull weeds when they come out when the soil is like soft butter. :)

I picked up another load of topsoil and humate to finish the keyhole garden, or come close to finished. I'll plant it for fall. I haven't had a chance to plant the new bed out front, and I'll have to weed it before I do it, with all of this rain. I can see sprouts of Bermuda.

I picked up an organic crabgrass killer that is supposed to be pretty good from the reports on my Sunday organic radio program. It's mostly ground cinnamon, so depending on how it looks and smells, I may hit the bulk spice aisle next time I want to kill crabgrass and a few other weeds that don't like it. (It's supposed to be put down when the grass is wet, but not when it's raining, so I can't test it yet).

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 05:58 PM

The first hail storm on June 30 was a record storm that caused so much damage that the total it is still being computed.

The forecast was for more days of afternoon hail. We had the hail again yesterday, not as big or forceful as the storm on the 30th, and now another one is moving in this afternoon.

Everything is covered as well as I could for the next storm.
I'm still pondering plans for better garden coverage. Anything else I plant this year will go in containers on the deck so they can be better protected.

SRS, it sounds like you prepped your garden beds well. You will get used to that mud... and everything will take off growing like crazy from all that rain. It's quite a sense of satisfaction when you can pull a weed root out by hand.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 06:30 PM

Alice, it took me weeks to build those beds, because I designed them as I worked, looking at the results and building from there. Lots of trips to Home Depot for dirt, piecemeal, and then I planted fairly late, but not so late and everything caught up. Though the proportions aren't quite so long or narrow, if you place your hand on the table top with your four fingers separated (with about a finger's width in between each finger) and think about building a backboard and building a raised bed radiating out along that plank (several 2 x 12s) and positioning several bed separations so you can step between them, then you have this garden. My yard is wedge-shaped and along the sloped driveway. I can walk around the back side of this and pick from the other side of the planks (I also put chicken wire up to keep dogs, etc., from running into the bed) and step into any of the trough areas (though now many of them have volunteer tomatoes that I didn't have the heart to pull and wasn't fast enough to transplant). I filled the lower areas with an inch or two of coarse free mulch so it wouldn't be too slippery after watering, but this rain is really testing this system.

Last year my eggplants were on the level ground and we had similar rain and they simply drowned in the mud. Now they're about 12 inches above the orignal level of the bed, as are all of the tomatoes, peppers, everything else. I didn't build frames, I simply beveled the soil and kind of tamped down the edges. Since it isn't framed, I can move the raised beds fairly easily in the off season, or pile it all up and move it around and rebuild them (though I don't plan to unless I have to).

I have this idea for taking Bobert's leftover deer fencing and putting it stretched out horizontally over the top of Alice's garden to protect it. That hail would never know what hit it, eh?

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 06:47 PM

Yup, I need some kind of netting, small enough to prevent the hail from going through, but not so fine that it catches the wind and sails off. I was going to use an old bed sheet with vents slashed in it when I do get the posts in to hold some kind of the covering. I've been looking at hail nets on the web. There are quite a few products, like this one
Anti-HAIL structure


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 07:45 PM

Turn those suckers on their side and you have deer fencing!

My hands smell like basil and rosemary. The ex came over to get some stuff for our son who's at his house for a few days, and took back the herbs for a well-seasoned chicken for dinner. I'm going to bring in more to put on a pizza (cheese, basil, peppers, chicken, mozzarella, and topped with a sprinkle of Parmesan and garlic powder, all on a home made crust out of the freezer), and open a cold bottle of Riesling. The Cipro is finished! Just in time to kick back for the weekend.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 10:19 PM

Cherry tomatoes are beginning to come in well enough for salads, but not abundant enough yet for whatever that lovely italian salad of basil, cherry tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and olive oil is called. (So much basil I am buying cherry tomatoes - but not for long!

More fruit setting on the Mortgage lifter tomato. I'm a long way off from having ripe slicing tomatoes, though.

Ooooooh. Should have cukes to pick tomorrow or Sunday. Something weird going on with the zuccini. Plants look healthy, but the first fertile flowers turned brown and the tiny zukes are yellowing.

Dadgum, Alice! That was a windshield shattering hailstorm! We get hail occasionally here, and every now and then will get a really bad one that does lots of damage to crops and property, but not real often, and certainly not every season. How common are badly damaging hail storms there?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 02 Jul 10 - 11:35 PM

That was the worst hail storm this town has ever had - historic damage from the size of the hail, some of it baseball sized, the duration, and the strong winds with it.

Over 1,000 windows broken at the university campus, cars totaled that were in the open, including new cars at dealers lots.

PHOTO



I went through my garage looking for things to use in my hail shield that I'm planning. Found a backdrop of a stage we used to use for performing. It's masonite, three sided, can stand on its own. If set up on the west edge of the garden, would be some shelter, although not all that attractive.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 03 Jul 10 - 08:23 AM

The only nettin' I know of that is small enough to stop hail is sun screening and then you loose the light... BTW it can be purchased at Gemplers (online)... The deer fence would have stopped those hail balls but yer average hail ain't that big and the deer fencing is 2 inch squares...

We're still in a purdy severe dry (drought) here and running oscillators from the time we get up unti the time we go to bed...

Zukes, yellow crooknecks and cukes coming in with regularity now...

Fisnished yet another landscaping job yesterday (3 creape myrtles, 5 inkberry hollies, 5 criptomeria "radican"s and on plum yew) so today I get to weed and mulch a couple newer azalea beds....

Back to Alice's garden:

Is it possible to creat some kinda roller that is mounted on two posts that can be used (like a spool) to pull out shade cloth when they are calling for bad weather??? Of course, you'd need to have one side stapled to another long rod and two post opposite the post with the roller to attach the shadecloth to so that you'd have a roof over the veggie garden... Sounds doable and not all that expensive... The shade cloth comes in sections up to 16 feet wide...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 03 Jul 10 - 11:52 AM

Yes, Bobert, I'm planning something I can roll out over the garden patch. I can't buy anything for it... unemployment still has my application pending, and I haven't had an income since early this year. I'm using savings to live on, so I can't spend on anything that isn't a necessity. I do have some old screen but not enough to cover the whole garden.

I will figure something out. Like I said, it's amazing what you can find in your garage and basement. Also, we have freecycle email group here, so I may post an 'In Search Of' old screens request and see if anyone has some to give away.

The forecast yesterday was for colder weather, and they were not kidding.

A cold rain came in last night, still raining, and temps in the 40's.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 03 Jul 10 - 12:47 PM

I suppose if you're simply looking for emergency cover and you want to cover the garden with something that will dissipate the impact of the hail stones, then simply getting a plastic painter's drop cloth (cheap at Home Depot, cheaper yet at Big Lots or Harbor Freight) and anchoring it down over the garden with a few things like tomato cages to stand up under it to keep the plastic off of everything, and you might be able to dodge more trouble.

My yard is soggy and the lawn is now overgrown. It's too wet to mow. I'll have to time this right, to mow but when it isn't bright sunlight. I'm off the drugs now, but I'm supposed to stay out of the sun for a while yet. Hard to do in Texas in July!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 03 Jul 10 - 04:20 PM

I still have my three large clear plastic bags that I've used since planting the garden to keep them warm at night. Those are slipped over 3 tall trellises now, so they can be quickly put over part of the garden.

I am in the midst of creating a structure today that will support screening or the trellis panels if I need them. It consists mainly of 3 steel fence posts, wire, cable, and 6 bamboo garden stakes that are each seven feet long. I keep looking over my shoulder at dark clouds coming from the west.... so far so good today.

I finally uncovered everything and inspected the damage. Some raspberry canes torn out. One cantaloupe completely cut off at the ground, the other only has 4 small leaves left. One pepper plant cut off at the ground. All the plants lost leaves and stems. I was most concerned about losing the strawberry plants, but they came through okay. The squash and pumpkin, well, each lost about 3/4 their size. One potato plant cut off at the ground, but it may put up new shoots. It could have been worse from what I first saw right after the storm.


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 10:23 AM

Had an arborist out yesterday and the big dying oak tree comes down next week. It is one of the biggest trees in the yard and is going to open quite a hole in the canopy. Will change things a bit, I expect.

Anybody need firewood?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 11:46 AM

Janie, pile it up somewhere (remember, critters like to live in it, so don't put it next to the house) and next year make the offer and you'll probably have some happy takers. Or you could sell or trade it.

It's sad to see trees go, but at the same time, it opens so many possibilities as far as that space. Enjoy the transition! And if they are going to leave an attractive stump, have a nice bench or something put around or next to it.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 12:13 PM

Another day of waterin'... Guess the silver lining is that I'm playin' a 4th of July Festival today and so I'll get off watering detail at 3:00... The worst of it is the pond field where I took down so mnay trees and then had a massive bonfire... It's got new grass coming up and so I'm having to water it in addition to the beds...

...and 500...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 12:14 PM

....ahhhhh, so much fir these glasses???

B;~)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 12:40 PM

You've got dibs on it, Bobert.

It hasn't rained here today, but it's early yet. My raised beds are holding their own and keeping the eggplants happy. The tomatoes are delirious (all over the place, I should thin them, but who thins tomatoes?)

Foliar feeding this morning, I picked up some of Howard Garrett's "Garrett Juice" (a mix of compost tea, liquid molasses, apple cider vinegar, and a couple of other good things) and mixed that with some fish and seaweed fertilizer, some Hastagrow fertilizer (not quite organic, but pretty close) and a measure of BT. I have a plant out front with a happy little tobacco horn worm eating away (it's a datura, no big deal, so I'm leaving him alone) but I don't want these guys in the veggie garden.

I pulled up a dead coriander and harvested a handful of seeds from it. Another handful of seeds was on the ground under it already, over where it gets a little light but is mostly shaded by the basil. Hopefully I'll get some coriander this season.

I transplanted some oregano to the bed out by the curb. I'd love it as a groundcover out there. The cicada killer wasps have been buzzing me because I disturbed some of the holes they dug under the oregano when I dug this up. They kind of big dopey bugs, one was going to buzz me but bumped into a basil plant and was buzzing angrily underneath a leaf for enough time that I moved out of it's way. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 04 Jul 10 - 11:56 PM

Photos from today:

garden facing NE

garden facing NW

old tricycle with flowers in front of pond

old radio flyer planted with red, white & blue petunias


Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 10:45 AM

The drought here is terrible... The grass crinkles when you walk on it... We did tweek the water pressure up at the pressure tanks so that we can run two oscillators at a time and...

...no end in sight with 100 degrees every day for the forseeable future and no rain... Haven't seen it this bad in, oh, maybe forever... So for all of you who have had rain I'd say you need to give thanks for it...

Like yer hardscape, Alice...

B~

p.s. Not 500... lol...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM

I just watched the weather report on the heat wave back East where you folks are sweating. Sorry that it's a cooker there for you.

This morning is another beautiful, big blue sky, sunny, moderate temp day.
Yesterday was gorgeous. I turned the top layer of the compost and steam came up. Woo hoo!



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Janie
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:32 PM

Arrgh! Squash borers.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: pdq
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 03:48 PM

Squash borers...

try putting out a few salad bowls full of yellow-dyed water with a few drops of liquid soap in them. This may catch a few adults before they lay eggs.

Once the larvae are established in a stem there isn't much you can do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 08:12 PM

I may just pull the zucchini up. I should have just planted it in the small raised bed I have it in, although it may have been ok if I had planted it on the west side of the bed instead of the east, as most of the sun is morning sun. It is shading out a basil and a cucumber, and it isn't producing, probably because of the borers.

Red about injecting the stems with BT, but I don't think I like zucchini well enough to go to that trouble. Maybe I'll try your suggestion next year, pdq, along with regular surface treatment with BT.

Cherry tomatoes coming in well now, and I have my first cucumber!

We had a few really lovely days with highs in the mid to upper 80's and night time lows down to 60 or the upper 50's. Today in the mid nineties and headed for the next several days into the high nineties. Humidity is not as high as is usual for this time of year, so it could be worse in terms of how it feels. Irrigating something or other every night.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:10 PM

First of all that BT is what gave me phenomia and secondly...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:11 PM

...got it right this time...

500!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:43 PM

Phenomia?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 09:53 PM

Pneumonia, I think, Janie.

Congratulations on your successful "500", Bobert.

I just locate and kill the borers, then cover that part of the stem with compost. They can root and continue growing.

I am a one-woman bucket brigade watering the vegetables, flowers, and potted fruit trees. We need rain; I'm grateful we were able to mulch the veggies before the heat spell began. Roses and many different poppy selections are lovely right now.

maeve


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 10:06 PM

Yeah, the P-Vine goes after 'um too then uses duct tape??? I know, sounds like it won't work but it does... The ol' gal uses duct tape on all kinds of plants for various and sundry issues and it seems to work???

Me??? I'm the official "undergardner" meaning I get all the "hard" work... I leave that creepy stuff to her...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 10:30 PM

For myself, I opted for more cukes and basil and pulled the zukes. Working close to 70 hours a week right now between the day job and the private practice. If it can't get by with watering, fertilizing every 2-4 weeks, and an occasional application of either neem oil or insecticidal soap, then it will have to die or be pulled up if the pests might jeapardize future crops if allowed to propagate on the host plant.

Between the time I left for work this morning and when I got home tonight a large (6"x4" patch of a bright yellow fungus/mold has appeared on the soil immediately adjacent to my slicing tomato plant, which got a quick ground shower this morning to tide it over until I could get home tonight to water well. Think I'll go see what Google turns up. (lots of interesting fungus, molds and mushrooms on this lot.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 10:33 PM

No pics or descriptions quite match it at this stage. May be a slime mold that hasn't turned slimy yet.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 11:37 PM

I'm buying my squash and zucchini now, none growing in the yard. Tomatoes are a mess now, but lots of blooms from last week may produce fruit. Still get a few strawberries. Lots of herbs.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 05 Jul 10 - 11:43 PM

Forecast low tonight of

34 degrees F.

Forecast low tomorrow night of

30 degrees F.


Wish I could send some coolness to all of you who have too much heat.

I just came in from covering everything feasible to cover.
Flowers beds and such will just have to freeze. I moved the wagon under a juniper and put a chair in front of it. I covered the tricycle with rakes and the wheelbarrow. Veggies and the garden have more plastic and better coverings, but the flower beds... just can't protect everything. Que sera, sera.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 07:35 PM

This is our 8th (maybe 9th) day without rain, and the 4th day in the mid-90sF (34C-ish) in southeast Michigan. The black raspberries are all over, but I had to water them today because the new growth was looking very wilted. I've also been watering the tomatoes. Used the soaker hose on the flower bed, but only every 2nd or 3rd day. At least the grass isn't growing very much.

Keep cool y'all,
Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 07:58 PM

Getting ready to go out and cover the garden for the 30 degree low tonight.

I am using the little coffee cup hot plate as a heater, now in the tent shaped garden A-frame that I constructed. It worked well last night. It's like babying the garden through the cold back when I was first planting in May. I have old aluminum newspaper press plates, which make good heat reflectors at night, light weight and easy to position to keep the heat reflected into the garden tent.

Good luck with all the high temps, folks. I have the other extreme, but at least I can put on a sweater to deal with my weather.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 09:14 PM

Geeze...

Forcast here: 1,000 degrees tomorrow... Heck, it's almost dark right now and it's in the 90's...

But, I worked in it purdy much all day.... Got some day lillies transplanted... Did some weedeating... Did lots of oscillator moving and managed to weed and mulch about 30 feet of one of our many beds...

Just kinda have to pace yerself and do the hardest stuff early...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 06 Jul 10 - 09:43 PM

Keep your fingers crossed. It looks like at least some rain is possible late in the week.

The lower humidity really does make this more bearable than it otherwise would be.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Jul 10 - 08:45 AM

Well, one thing I have been able to do with the heat is weed and mulch our beds which are right up next to the woods... The sun is off that area by 1:00 leavin' it shady for the remainder of the day... However...

...I have run out of the "chopped" pine mulch which I use underneath a decorative shredded pine mulch so...

...we've off to Baker, WV again for another 40 3 cu.ft. bags... The P-Vine is going with me just to get away for half a day...

Come on, rain!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 07 Jul 10 - 12:35 PM

The garden was covered up, tucked in and heated for the night, so everything came through okay. Peppers really don't like night temps lower than 50, though, so who knows... but they do have buds.

I put up the aluminum press plates on the west end of the A-frame to reflect more heat and light into the garden today.

Hail and birds took out almost all of the sunflowers that sprouted, but I have about 4 left that are about inch to two inches high in little pots I made from paper and sawed off sections of a mailing tube.

ONWARD into the garden!!


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 07 Jul 10 - 12:41 PM

I've found the bales of pine needles online, Bobert. Wish I could get them locally, both for mulch and the Longneedle pine variety for basketry. They are the best mulch for tomatoes, potatoes, and strawberries!

I could also use some pine needle mulch when I move my wildflower nursery to a new nursery bed in case we build a new little house. I'll have to move them either way, for if I wait until we are ready to build I'll never find all of the ephemerals.

I'm struggling to keep the potted fruit trees and the vegetables and flowers watered. TL filled every available container for me Sunday night (using a generator and the tilted, old leaky water tank hooked to a hose)and I've already carried and poured out half of it. I don't dare run the camper's ac until TL needs it to cool off after work; it uses too much electricity. It's hard to breathe.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 07 Jul 10 - 03:26 PM

Fortunately for us there is a massive pine grove here in Pine Grove holler and we're friends with the folks who own the land and they let us come get whatever we want... We can fill 5 contractors bags in about a half an hour...

The bales are real expensive around here... Like $4.50 a bale and these bales are just half the size of a straw or hay bale... That's too much...

We have our entire veggie garden mulched with straw... 'Bout 6 inches deep... Works real well and unlike the pine needles, low in acid so it can be plowed under in the fall and not mess with the Ph...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 07 Jul 10 - 03:41 PM

Around here we have lots of hay (with accompanying weed seeds) but straw is expensive and hard to find. TL and I have acres of pine and balsam fir, but no time for bagging and hauling the needles. I use whatever I have for free or close to it: newspaper or cardboard covered with hay, sawdust from firewood cutting, woodchips, compost, stones (under the apple trees), dried lawn clippings, and shavings from the chickenhouse or a nearby boatbuilding shop. When I can get seaweed I add it to compost and also mulch with it.

I just built a new asparagus bed by piling a big mess of sun-cooked weeds (pulled up back in the springtime) in a long, low mound on top of growing weeds, a thick layer of mulch hay (damp and decomposting fast enough the hay was hot), topped with 5 layers of newspaper, compost, and appropriate amendments. I'm keeping it watered in the heat, but in another week or two I'll top it off with another layer of compost, water it with diluted fish emulsion, and mulched with shavings and chicken manure from the old chicken house.

I just wish we could water with hoses instead of my back and buckets.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 08 Jul 10 - 06:51 PM

Turned the compost again today and it is steaming nicely in the center. Today was a gardening day of cleaning up weedy edges, screening soil and enjoying the recovery of the garden after the storm. Summer is so short here, I have to appreciate every warm day.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 08 Jul 10 - 10:05 PM

Finally got a little rain this afternoon-- hope to get more overnight. Dead-headed most of the perennials, so the flower beds look nicer. The black raspberries are over, so I cut back the old branches. There are still a few left, but the birds & "woodland creatures" can have the rest. I'll shred the branches after they've dried up. The tomato plants are holding up well in spite of the heat.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 08 Jul 10 - 10:34 PM

Hoses???

We have just this year got enough hoses, posts with hose holders, splitters, etc. so that we can get to all 5-6 acreas we have behind deer fence and are taming/gardening...

The 5 gallon buckets will work ya'... Especially here where everything is *uphill*... lol... Yeah, lotta downhill, too...

We planted some "patio" cukes and they are coming in big time... 10 a day... They are really pickeling cukes... About 3-4 inches long when ripe... Not bad in vinegar & oil with some of Uncle Vern's onions... Not bad, at all...

Happy gardenin'...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 08 Jul 10 - 10:45 PM

Seeking recipes for garden-fresh cucumber and mint salads and dressings.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 12:20 AM

Made chicken and eggplant Parmesan this evening. Fresh from the garden.

It rained three times today. Hurricane slopover, I guess. Getting a little tired of it, but the raised beds are helping all survive.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 07:59 AM

Our chicken plants are doing much yet... Awwww' jus' funnin' with ya, Magz...

We got about 1minute's worth of rain overnight... Not even enough to measure... Greater chances this afternoon and tomorrow...

We have yet another mini-tour tomorrow for one of the uppity-ups in the Georgia chapter of the azalea society who is makin' the rounds collectin' cuttings... He's in Philly today collectin'...

Oh well, another day of movin' oscillators...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 10:22 AM

I can't remember rain. Thunderstorms have tracked just north or just south for more than a month. June rainfall total was 0.17 inch and nothing in July. Pansies in the front bed are fried, and I had to water the basil. The cabbages are looking great, however, and the parsley and rosemary are thriving. The tomatoes are standing still, hopefully digging deep while waiting for cooler weather to set fruit. A crunchy lawn doesn't need to be mowed, at least. But there was no second hay crop for the farmers. All the hayfields look as if they were mowed yesterday and it's been a month. There are reports of brush fires, most of obscure origin. If this continues, we're at risk for real forest fires, something we haven't seen here in a long time. This town (Nashua, NH) is built on a sand barrens, which normally burn periodically, so it could happen.

I live in my grandfather's house, and it's full of the detritus of 4 generations (if you count my kids' stuff, left behind when they moved out.) These hot days are good for sorting in front of a fan. I really do understand why a woman might need 2 sets of dishes, one for daily use and another for holidays. So far, I've found at least 8 sets, including a fancy depression glass set. My mother sewed, as did my grandmother. I've boxes of cloth, zippers, buttons, stuff. When the weather cools a bit, there'll be a big yardsale and I've put some good china and glass in a consignment shop. There was a penny from 1797 in the button tin. I don't want to see good stuff go to the landfill, but it's overwhelming sometimes. I'll keep the penny, though, I think.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 10:23 AM

Black raspberries just starting; need to check my cherries.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Janie
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 11:16 AM

Judging from my birdbath, we had a hard shower or two last night, but they must have been fast and furious. Good chance of showers for the next few days.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 11:28 AM

Lucky you, Janie...

I've just taken a break... Been weedin' right in the middle of a large bed that has lots of flowers and shrubs and the bees are having a ball... Except the one that stung me on my left hand... Must have done something wrong... usually I'm in there with them and we co-exist nicely... Oh well, put some onion on it and it seems to be doing a little better...

They are calling for a 40% cahnce of rain here this evening and a 50% tomorrow... I donno??? I do know that the Big Guy ain't answerin' the phone when he sees it's me: "Hi, this is God... Leave a message..." is all I'm gettin'... We need rain and soon...

Sounds like a nice ol' house, Bettynh... Being a reformed "collector" hearin' about places like this always remind me of my "praticin'" days as a collector... That was before Betty Ford... lol...

Back at it...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 12:30 PM

Bettynh, you need to work your way over to our de-clutter threads. I have a lot of that same stuff here in my house, from a great aunt's house. Lots of depression glass, lots of sets of things, lots of sewing stuff.

It is overcast again, certainly below 80 at night, so I hope some fruit is finally setting on its own in the tomatoes.

I have huge rosemary plants around the yard, it's a great evergreen shrub, and the dogs smell so good when they've been chasing around running through the one in the back yard. The basil is seasonal, of course, but the oregano is pretty tough and I have some of it year round. I'm waiting for the burrowing wasps to stop their thing before I dig up any more oregano. They don't like it when I disturb their nests.

I mowed once this week and it needs it again already.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 01:12 PM

I wish things were actually ripening and edible from the garden (other than wintergreen and basil, nothing to eat yet).

Today the waterfall (pumped) into the pond was at a trickle, so I pulled out the pump to see what was plugging the flow.
I have some screen wrapped around the pump to keep twigs and leaves from clogging it. There was a mass of earthworms filling the pump and screen. They must have gone through the screen as babies and grew too big to get out.

It is a good thing I planted many series of the packet of sunflower seeds, as the first few plantings were either eaten by birds, didn't germinate, or smashed by weather. I have about 10 surviving sunflower starts in various places. It is so late now for them to grow before fall snow... we'll see how they progress.

Another beautiful, big blue sky day.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 02:40 PM

The rosemary is just for the summer here. It's in the ground and very happy with our heat and drought. I've promised myself that I'll be ruthless and cut it to the ground just before it freezes.

We have that beautiful blue sky here, too, Alice, but it's not as big - hemmed in by trees and hills. The predicted thunderclouds aren't here.

I live on the line between where worms are native and where they're an introduction. It's very hard to think about. The glaciers killed them off and they were slowly migrating back when Europeans arrived. I read a really strange colonial report of a "plague of worms" in the springs they were using for drinking water. They were saved by the work of "cherry birds" - the American robin. I read all this in various gardening and nature magazines. I think I'd like to talk with a scientist who can read history like that in our soil, but I don't know who they are.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 05:17 PM

I can't believe this. It's just about to start raining again. It's gotten really dark and the outflow boundary is stirring up the tree outside my window.

Enough already! My crops won't start looking like they have more fruit till all of this rain finishes. I never get as much out of the garden with these rainy spells, but afterward, the plants go to town with production.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 09:34 PM

Different story here, Magz...

It has been raining for about 2 hours here... Nice gentle, soft rain... Thank you, Lord... First rain since June 14th when we got 4/10s of an inch in about ten minutes... Most of that ran off... This is the first real rain we've had since around the 2nd of June when we got 7/10s over about 2 hours...

Think this means that we'll be hearing lawn mowers again... Haven't heard one in 3 weeks... I donno... Maybe this won't even bring back the grass... It almost white...

The P-Vine is going to make dill pickles tomorrow... We got 40 of these little pickling cuke outta the veggie garden and so she's gonna make 14 pint jars... Well see how our dill holds out... We have one monster plant but not too much else???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 09 Jul 10 - 11:46 PM

Nice weather today, but hot enough to make a jug of sun tea this afternoon.

This evening we had a typical summer Technicolor sunset for Bozeman, like this one:
CLICK


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 12:46 AM

Lovely sunset, Alice!

I stopped making sun tea when it was pointed out (last year) that letting dried organic material (tea) soak in water at temperatures not hot enough to kill anything, only to let bacteria grow, is an invitation to a nasty bug growing in the jar. I don't make sun tea any more. I make a quart or two at a time, but I use green tea bags and boiling water.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 07:44 AM

Red skies at night
Sailors delight...

Very pretty...

Speakin' of very pretty??? There's 1.3 inches showin' in the rain guage!!! And it's till raining softly... Thak you, Lord... This is a major relief...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 02:20 PM

I wish I could send you more. I feel positively mildewed we've had so much rain lately.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM

Have to water the aspen trees today for the first time.
Hoses are out soaking the grove and flower bed. Sun is so bright this morning that it triggered a migraine aura.



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 02:24 PM

Wish you could, too, Magz... But we're happy with what we got... Maybe more on Tuesday???

No waterin' today... Hooray...

The P-Vine is goin' to make 14 pint jars of dill pickles from an award winnin' recipe she has from way back that come outta Tennessee...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 05:09 PM

I blanched and froze about 3 pints of tomatoes that were getting too ripe to use for slicing. Not enough to can, so into the freezer they go. I'm down to only 3 ready to eat tomatoes right now. What a summer. By now I should have them lining the windowsill and covering the kitchen counter top.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 05:25 PM

When I bought this house in 1987, the realtor gave me a gift of three large bleeding heart plants. They went into a shady corner, but eventually neighbor cats that liked to dig there and overgrowing junipers eliminated most of the growth. I found a few leaves still growing under the juniper today and dug what is left of the bleeding heart out of that location. Hopefully what little was left of the root will survive in its new location.

Mild in comparison to the rest of the country, but I'm not yet used to this much heat.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 06:04 PM

my pickling cuke is bearing like crazy. The other (straight 8) has yet to yield a cuke.

The first two Mortgagelifters are coloring up! Tomatoes really starting to come in.

Some rain showers overnight. Had hoped for more today, but the sky is completely clear now, after threatening to shower earlier today. Temps have modulated but the humidity has shot up. This 87F with the humidity is much more uncomfortable than was the 97-101F with low humidity several days ago.

Ah well. Just keeping up the time honored tradition of complaining about the weather:>)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 07:04 PM

Last night I made a salad of a cubed store-bought cuke, a couple of cubed home-grown tomatoes, a sprinkling of feta, with a little Italian dressing over the top. I barely have enough fresh tomatoes now to make another batch of it. What a strange summer.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 07:14 PM

Alice, we had bleeding hearts all around the yard where I grew up in Seattle, and I think we took some with us when we moved to the next town north. I know my mother moved her peonies when she moved back to Seattle some years later. Good luck with the transplant!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 08:34 PM

We have both white and pink bleeding hearts but they have come and gone...

Like you, Janie, we have picklin' cukes by the bucket full but the Sweet Slice is a tad lazy...

Gotta a wierd tomato, however... It has set a couple tomatoes but they are shaped like cukes??? Never seen anything like it... I know we got some odd-ball seeds but I don't remember ordering any seeds that made cuke shaped tomatoes...

Got in a little weeding this evenin' until two of our cats decided to have a rumble right there where we were weedin'... Kinda took the mellowness outta it...

Tomorrow is the anual azalea cuttin' exchange... I don't want any!!!... We're growing over 200 from last year and it's time consuming... Plus, just don't need any more azaleas...

I will try to get a cutting going of the "Seigi" for you, Janie, but if that's all I do that will be fine... There is a limit to how many danged azaleas one needs... The Lowers, both in the 80's, have some 15,000 azaleas... I really feel for Phil every time there is an auction of cutting exchange 'cause his wife, Frances, just can't get enough azlaeas... He teases me that I'm gonna end up like him... That, my frineds, ain't gonna happen... I'll go tomorrow but not for the cuttings but the pot luck lunch and the company...

No more azaleas!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 10 Jul 10 - 10:02 PM

I love bleeding hearts. They are early bloomers here in the mid-south. I had to hunt for enough shade for them at the old place. When time and money permits me to develop the beds under the trees, I expect to have large drifts of them in spring.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 10:44 AM

I've posted a few photos on the Mudcat Gardeners' page.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 12:09 PM

They're beautiful, thanks. Any readers who want to join this group, it's a Google Group where we can send messages and post photos on pages. Google Wave is the next stage, but I don't know anyone who uses that. In case anyone is interested in testing it out.

http://groups.google.com/group/mudcat-gardeners.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 12:28 PM

I just looked at the google group page.
Beautiful photos, Maeve!



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 12:32 PM

Thanks, Alice and Maggie. I've trepidations about posting them in public. On the other hand, it's fun to show what we've been working on.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 01:34 PM

Bobert... a cumato (kumato) looks wierd.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Darowyn
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 03:20 PM

This week we have had our first (almost) completely home-grown dinners.
The meat was from the supermarket, but the potatoes, peas, salad leaves and herbs were from the garden- and so were the raspberries for after!.
Considering we started here from nothing, apart from a lot of nettles and thistles, less than a year ago, I'm really proud of what we have achieved.
And just in case you think we are being completely utilitarian, the Geraniums, Marigolds, Dahlias etc. etc. are brightening up the place beautifully too.
It's looking like a good year so far- except for the parsnips, none of which have germinated at all. We shall have three types of beans, fennel, tomatoes, more lettuces, beetroot, broccoli and carrots in another couple of weeks.
And if you've never tried them, can I recommend Melon Turnips- they are pure white and sweet enough to eat raw, but make great soup too.
Cheers
Dave


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 05:18 PM

Dave, if you told us where you're located, I can't find it. Where is this garden of yours? Sounds wonderful!

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 08:56 PM

Just got home from the cutting exhange and, amazingly enough, we only brough home 4 baggies of cuttings (4-6 per bag) which means that other than the Sergai that I'm gonna try to propagate, looks like we'll only be growing about 20 new azaleas...

The setting for the event, however, was breath-taking... These folks who haven't been members of the Azalea Society but for the last 6 or so months invited us to their place.... Their place??? 10 acreas of wonderful gardens right on the Virginia side of the Potomac River near Fredricksburg... Big money area... They bough 40 years ago for $10,000... Today??? 10 acres in that area on the river is a million dollars... No matter... We had a great time... Food (pot luck) was super...

And only 4 baggies of cuttings!!!

That Betty Ford stuff does work if ya' give it half a chance...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 09:16 PM

The little red wagon of petunias was partly overwatered, so it is going into the garage tonight... thunderstorms forecast.

I finished up raking green pinecones and branch tips that were broken by the big hail storm underneath the spruce tree. It is like a hidden room in there... I like being under those huge boughs.

A robin followed me around eating up the bugs that were disturbed by all my raking.

One last big cleanup job that has been neglected for years is the front east side of the house where junipers were removed last year. Now it is a jungle of aspens sprouting, weeds, columbines, iris put in about 20 years ago, poppies, and other volunteer shrubs planted by the birds. It is such a big job, I've put it off until last.

The hoe and shovel are sharpened. Tomorrow will be the day.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 11 Jul 10 - 10:15 PM

Sounds like ya' need a buddy with a back-hoe, Alice... Roots are tough...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 10:21 AM

The Mudcat Gardeners Google group has gained a couple of new members. I'm looking forward to seeing photos of your gardens!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 10:25 AM

well - once again the "folks at home" neglected to water the hanging plants over the weekend. (they suck up a qt or two of water a day) probably because they had a downpour friday eveening...but the hanging baskets never seem to get wet enough in a rainstorm to make no nevermind. The problem being - it takes me two weeks of coddling to get them to recover from two days neglect!!!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 10:32 AM

Thanks for the reminder, MMario... We're 'sposed to be watchin' our neigbors stuff and I'm sure their hangin' basket would like a drink...

Dug a row of potatoes this mornin'... Yukon Golds... Got about half a bushel outta that row (35 feet long)... One more row still comin' on that were planted two weeks later than these...

Photographs... This is still a sore subject fir me... I wish there was a class closer to home than Harrisonburg (45 minute drive) so I could learn how to use my digital camera... The instruction book is usless with my lexdexia... I can't even get thru one danged page without the wheels fallin' off...

We might have more rain comin' so I'm out doing some more weedijn' in the veggie garden...

BTW... The lower leaves on some of the tomatoes are curlin' up... They have water and have have been fed fish emulsion... Any ideas???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 01:46 PM

Overwatering?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 02:01 PM

I've noticed it with staked and pruned tomato plants, especially when there's been a whole lot of watering going on. No harm that I have seen.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 07:24 PM

Overwatering isn't good for tomatoes. Do you water deeply every so often, instead of watering daily? Deeper less often is better.

Tomatoes don't like their leaves getting wet, according to some gardeners, so I usually use a soaker hose around them.

If they have mites, that is a sign that the plant is already in some distress and the mites are coming in for easy pickings. If they have a mildew problem, you could make a tea from soaking cornmeal or corn gluten meal and spraying them, but better yet would probably be to spread some corn gluten meal around because it also acts like a good fertilizer. For various fungal diseases straight grocery store hydrogen peroxide (put it in a sprayer, not a hose end thing, you want the 3% peroxide full strength. The stronger stuff can be dangerous to you - it has weed control and pest control applications in organic gardening, but it is more dangerous.

Bobert, tell me what make and model of digital camera, I'll look up the information, then give you just the basics, or can even call and talk you through it. How's that? Do you still have the stuff that came with it? Cables, memory cards, etc?

I have to take BT out and spray my tomatoes and eggplant. I couldn't find the culprit but I found a trail of caterpillar poop in the chewed up eggplant leaves today. And there are bound to be a few hornworms in the tomatoes after all of that rain and no chance to treat for worms.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 12 Jul 10 - 11:59 PM

By this time of the season, bobert, I always have some yellowing of lower leaves - less so this year than in years past, but I have also been able to keep the few tomatoes I have, planted in 1' high raised beds, very evenly moist while also well drained.

Speaking of them 'maters, I went ahead and picked the two mortgagelifters that are showing good color. They are not entirely ripe yet, but I was afeared a mocking bird or sumpin' would come peckin' at 'em iff'n I left them on the vine any longer.

Now that I have pulled the zucchini, the "Straight 8" cuke is finally starting to grow some cukes. It was also developing some powdery mildew that I haven't had time to do anything about, but the improved air circulation seems to have helped a good bit.

That bright yellow fungus is weird. It mostly arises in a spreading fashion on the soil surface, then turns a buff color. Where it grew up under one of the basil plants, it puffed up a bit around the stems, but doesn't seem to have harmed the plants any. It changes really quickly.

The mycelium have been visible on the soil surface for several weeks, sometimes more visible than others, and there is definitely a relationship between rain and/or watering and fruiting. I don't think it is anything to worry about. Just interesting.

As I have said before, under all these trees I have noticed all kinds of interesting fungi and mushrooms over the nearly 2 years since I actually moved in. (Unfortunately, while most are benign, some are dangerous to the trees, and some can be damaging to the trees is the trees get stressed (like- by the 3 year severe drought of the recent past.) He says the borers that killed the big white oak are opportunistic, and probably would not have caused much harm to the tree unless the fungus had already done significant damage. He noted 2 different fungi of concern (which I will have him write down when he shows up, hopefully this week, to take down the dead tree) on assorted trees.

One of the two is generally not so serious, and not so hard to treat and control, but if trees are stressed or old and it really takes hold, can make them vulnerable to borer damage and death. Sorry I can not remember the name, but it causes the tree to ooze sap where it gets in between the bark and the cambium layer. Has a sweetish, fermented odor. That is the fungus that drew the hordes of hornets year before last to a small patch on an otherwise healthy tree.    He says it is common, and not of concern to healthy, reasonably unstressed trees.   I have one other large oak that straddles the rear property line with some more extensive damage from that fungus, but he suggested some controls, including treating with a hydrogen peroxide solution and cutting back the plethora of privet and forsythia sprouts that crowd it's base, sapping nutrients, water, and causing poor air circulation. 99% of the brush is on my neighbor's property, but I expect she will give the ok for me to cut it back. He thinks the tree can be saved if vulnerability is reduced now, in spite of some evidence of borers.    This tree is older and bigger.

The other fungus is more serious. The few places he saw evidence of it are currently inactive, but he told me to keep a very close eye on them, and to treat them immediately if it became active. (he recommends organic treatments as first choice.)

He also led me to some new research. He suggested chipping the smaller wood from the tree he will be taking down, and using it to mulch around the trees. Says it is ecologically good practice to allow the debris to remain when it was produced. The last time I researched using chipped wood as mulch it was a strong no-no, but that was a long time ago.    More recent and (what looks to me) good research, makes a strong argument in favor of going ahead and using the woodchips for mulch around the trees.

Dang, learn something new every day!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 01:00 AM

Headed to bed, I'll read Janie's post closely in the morning. But it occurs to me to post this:

You want Mycorrhizal fungi - the white strands in the soil and in the compost. There is a product now that encourages it. Thrive.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 06:42 AM

Showers overnight and a good chance of showers each day for the next several.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 09:09 AM

No yellowing like a couple years ago so I don't think it's fungus... As fir watering, we're having to use the oscillator so the leaves do get wet but we only water when things get good and dried out from the last watering and then we do water deeply and leave them alone... Other than the lower leaves curling the plants are doing very well... They are setting fruit inspite of the hot...

The camera is an Olympus D-490 Zoom from the mid 90s, Magz... Meave has allready provided me with a link to check out... It's really not the camera that I have the problems with it's the computer end of the deal... I can plug in my card reader and that's about the extent of my knowledge... Files??? Links??? Cut 'n pastes??? Outta reach...

Got another 4/10s of rain yesterday... Expecting more later today... Bring it on... Grass is still grayish brown... Not that I look forward to havin' to mow again but, geeze...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 11:08 AM

Bobert,

A camera that old is not going to be helpful now. If you can pick up an inexpensive little camera today (they're across the board - I like the Nikon Coolpix varieties, but there are tons of them) then you'll find it comes with software to install and a cable for connecting. Typically one adds a SD or other memory card to save the photos, and then the card reader is useful. I seem to have a card my reader can't recognize, but it's higher end than I normally would have bought.

I'll look at what's on sale these days and see if I can recommend one that will work easily for you.

The neighbors on both sides of me have now mowed this week. I'll have to get out there this evening and take care of the tall grass.

Lots of little tomatoes set during the rain, so though I was going to thin the thatch out there, it now is clear I need to leave them alone. It's going to be a struggle to pick some of this, but after so little early in the summer, hopefully I'll have enough to juice this fall.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 02:28 PM

Bobert... "Other than the lower leaves curling"

Is this a bad sign? How is it corrected?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 03:06 PM

That's what I'm tryin' to find out, gn-zer... I don't wnat any problems with my 'maters...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 03:33 PM

Mine are curling but I thought it might just be the way the plant deals with too much heat from the sun.

maeve diagnosed my yellow leaf problem, although I did use the spray I posted earlier but just once. She also told me about mulch to stop rain splash and mentioned pine needles would work and would do sommat or other for the soil too. Just so happens I got a whack a pine needles.

Some tastey!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maeve
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 05:07 PM

"Leaf roll, or leaf curl, is a physiologic distortion that may develop with periods of cool, rainy weather. It causes the lower leaves to roll upward and become thick and leathery. Leaf roll does not affect plant growth or fruit production and requires no treatment." From here:

"15. Q. What causes tomato leaves to curl?

A. The exact cause of tomato leaf roll is not fully known. Tomato leaf roll appears about the time of fruit setting. The leaflets of the older leaves on the lower half of the tomato plant roll upward. This gives the leaflets a cupped appearance with sometimes even the margins touching or overlapping. The overall growth of the plant does not seem to be greatly affected and yields are normal. This condition appears to be most common on staked and pruned plants. It occurs when excessive rainfall or overwatering keeps the soil too wet for too long. It is also related to intensive sunlight which causes carbohydrates to accumulate in the leaves. Some varieties of tomatoes are characteristically curled."
here

If there isn't any yellowing, browning, or other symptoms, Bobert, I'd go with the two links I glued on in this post.

The camera I was using before the fire was an Olympus Camedia nearly as old as yours, Bobert. It worked fine. There are a few advantages in getting yourself a shiny new camera (they know how to talk purty to the 'puter), but I'll be glad to work with you if you want to use your Olympus.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 06:18 PM

My Olympus is also a "Camedia", maeve... Not too sure what I want to do since I have fires all around me... Might just get a few of them put out before doin' anything... Meanwhile, my other Olympus (film) camera is hiding... I'm down to my 40 year old Honetwell Pentax... Might have to shoot some pics with it and just amil folks some copies???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 07:49 PM

Well, most of the limbs came off the old oak today. They'll be back off and on all week to take the rest of the tree down. They will chip the smaller wood and leave it for me to mulch around the trees with, then cut and stack the rest of it near the road. My neighbor has already told me he knows some one who will probably take all of it.

Have a cucumber and sour cream salad chilling for supper!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 08:39 PM

Cucumber, onion in vinegar here... This is the first time I've grown these picklin' cukes... Very prolific plant... 15 a day... All 4-5 inches long, small seeds and delicious...

Also never grew acorn squash... It's a real space hog but puttin' out lotta squash... We've harvest a couple and used 'um in stir fry... They are tender... Lot like butternut... We'll let most go the distance and get dark green... I love 'um cut down the middle and baked with butter and a little brown sugar... Yummy...

Little more rain this evenin'... Thank you, Lord... More maybe on the way...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 08:56 PM

I have almost a clean slate now to work on, with the weeds and small aspen suckers and volunteer baby shrubs taken out of the east side big flower bed.

I have a nice old birdbath that has become concealed under some trees, so I may move that to this flower bed. The bed is large enough to mulch an area to create a bench area or something like that.

I dug out the Iris, left in the Poppy, left a few aspen suckers to grow up along the edge of the bed and lawn... now just need to figure out what to landscape in this 22 ft. x 8 ft. space without spending any money!

Janie, it sounds like you have a clean slate now to imagine something new where the oak tree was.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 13 Jul 10 - 11:21 PM

We've had gully washer after gully washer come through tonight, some just hard rain and others periods of one thunderstorm after another parking right over top of us. Right thrillin'!

Sum Yung Sun is listening to "the Young Dubliners" behind me and singing along to celtic rock versions of trad. tunes.

Yes, Alice, I will be intrigued to observe the changes as, at first there is much more sun on that side of the yard, and then, slowly, the younger, but still decades old oaks that had been overshadowed slowly add width to their canopies.

Bobert, I've grown more pickling cukes than not for a number of years.   As you say, they are prolific, tasty, with small seeds, and in my experience, the plants last longer in the garden. Still like a good slicing cuke, though, for the short period of time I can usually grow them unless I fuss over them more than I have the time to do.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 14 Jul 10 - 10:14 AM

We also have "sweet slice" cukes which are prolific enough... 3-4 a day...

The rain also made it up here and we got another 1.4 inches since yesterday afternoon... Everything is soppin' wet 'round here... Good... No carryin' water...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jul 10 - 09:55 PM

There is plastic down on the big flower bed where I chopped and dug out the weeds and overgrowth. I'm looking for a garden bench on freecycle and seeing all the things around the yard I can divide and move to that space... iris, daylilies, seeds from lupines, snow in summer, columbine seeds, daisies, mother of thyme and sage. There should be plenty to dig, divide and move.

Yesterday evening I pruned out the suckers of the lilac.

Slowly, years of neglect are being taken care of.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 15 Jul 10 - 10:05 PM

I should have explained that the plastic is down to solarize the seeds and grass left there. Then I'll use cardboard, paper, compost and pine needles to "lasagna" the area and plant it anew.

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 15 Jul 10 - 10:14 PM

A little slow to respond Darowyn, but that sounds so good! Nothing quite as satisfying. I knew that when I had the space and the sunshine. I appreciate it even more now. Just making a caprese salad with my own basil and tomatoes, or eating cukes and onions maranaded in a vinegar solution is good.

It was so satisfying to come home from a long day at work and hit the garden to harvest supper. Re-energizes one, doesn't it!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 01:19 AM

Just checking in - had kid stuff today. Trip to ER, but he's fine. It's a chronic thing, few times a year, we're going to visit a specialist and see if we can't sort it out. Killed the day for anything else, though. (He's feeling much better, went to the movies with his friends tonight!)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 03:19 PM

Ran a soaker hose today, first time in weeks. It's drying out after all of that rain. Now that a couple of weeks have passed from the Cipro I'll get out during the daytime more to work in the yard. I need to weed really bad, but didn't do it right after the rain because of the sun and delicate tendon possibility from Cipro. Such a bummer.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 03:47 PM

"left a few aspen suckers to grow up along the edge of the bed and lawn"

Populus tremuloides, in all forms are simply one of the biggest weeds on the planet. I LOATHE them. The only value of a poplar is beaver food. And, of course, porcupine food because if you get stuck in the woods without food or weapon, you can always rip down a small poplar and kill a porcupique with it for food. Even use the poplar as a roasting stick.

I killed about 50 of the damn things today on Mum's lawn, 10 to 50' away from her neighbour's poplars.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 04:40 PM

Started a new project today to make a fountain/basin pond under the bay window. It is a sad spot since the hail storm.

I decided to take a few photos of the work in progress.

BEFORE picture, Poppies blooming before the June 30 hail storm

Beginning work on new fountain and rock garden

I found enough pots and rocks to put together something in that space. I have an old fountain pump. Stones were under the deck. It's sad the poppies and other flowers were so slashed by the hail. This spot is along the driveway, so it is part of the entry way to the house from the garage. I just want to see something attractive there again after the storm destruction.

A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 07:22 PM

The tree is down, and the fellows are still working at sawing it into sections and rolling them to the edge of the lot. BIG pile of woodchips to use to mulch around the many remaining trees.

The tree had clearly just died. The wood is solid all the way down. Beautiful white oak. The fungus got between the cambium layer and the bark, killing the cambium layer. Says the best thing I can do to protest the remaining trees is to protect them from stress as much as is possible. I can treat the fungus, but will not be able to eliminate it's presence. The severe 3 year drought is what he thinks was the main stressor. However, with so many trees, it would be extravagantly expensive to keep them sufficiently irrigated during a drought. He says grass is much more competitive than I realize, and recommends I mulch as much of the yard as I can.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 16 Jul 10 - 08:58 PM

Yeah, large oaks need 25 gallons of water 2-3 times a week... That is a lot and is part of the reason that when times get tough they will send roots outward in search of water... No tap root for oaks so they gotta do what they gotta do...

Glad it's down, Janie, tho I am sorry you lost it...

We just got back from a couple days away so will check things out tomorrow... Should be okay other than harvesting a few veggies...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 17 Jul 10 - 03:08 AM

Janie, here is the latest version of Howard Garrett's Sick Tree Treatment. It's good for healthy trees, but it is very effective for sick trees.

Did your tree guys talk about how the roots of the trees will meet underground and transmit disease? Oak Wilt is found around here and sounds like what you're describing. The Sick Tree treatment is good for it, also.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 18 Jul 10 - 10:49 AM

We've had 3 events of water from the sky in the past couple weeks. All passing thunderstorms. Boston got more than three inches, and whined about street flooding. A couple nights ago, there was thunder and the local airport (with official weather station) got a downpour for a half-hour. That one missed me completely. The other day last week that brought rain did produce puddles, but when I tried to weed, the soil a half-inch down was dust. The temperature has hit 90 just about every day but one this month. I know wishing for rain and cool is begging for the law of averages to come crashing down in me - the next thunderstorm could dump a foot of water in an hour, there's been snow in September more than once here. But I'm ready. Bring it on. Predictions are, however, for temperatures flirting with 90 and "isolated showers" for the next week.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 18 Jul 10 - 12:16 PM

We had a pretty severe storm come thru on Thursday night, but the power came back on Friday afternoon. Lots of tree branches down, though. A branch of one of my tomato plants bent over, but that was the only damage to the garden. I've got 2 "Boxcar Willy" heirloom tomatoes that are beginning to ripen, so I'm excited, and the plant is loaded with more green ones.

Went to the farmers market yesterday & got peaches, so I'm making peach crisp this afternoon.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 18 Jul 10 - 12:31 PM

It was in the high 80's yesterday and forecast today. In spite of the record wet June that we had, we have not had rain for awhile.

I'm still cleaning up damage from that June hail storm, trimming out slashed leaves in the day lilies.

I need to gather some creek rocks to finish my water feature project.

Still nothing big enough in the garden to harvest! Many plants just getting a chance to bloom now, some still have not grown enough to have buds.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 18 Jul 10 - 12:49 PM

Well, looks as if I'm finally within shooting distance of havin' the entire veggie garden weeded and mulched... I've used up 16 bales of straw up to now...

Canning and freezing this afternoon... We took a couple days off this week and went over to the bay and it's warmer there and stuff that ain't in here is there so we got a bushle of pretty corn and about 10 pounds of vine ripe tomatoes... The corn we'll take off the cob and freeze in vacuum bags...

Got 1/10 inch of rain last night... Need more... Chances are good every day this week with high temps and humidity..

Happy gardenin' to all,

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 19 Jul 10 - 12:23 AM

Judging by the low number of threads "below the line" this evening, everyone has been busy today. It's very hot here, though we had a short noisy thunderstorm this evening and now it feels like a sauna outside. I'd begun to water with the soaker hoses again, and saving dish water to take by the bucket out for strategic watering.

My heirloom tomatoes this year are a wash. If the darned cicada killer wasps weren't so pushy this year, I'd wade in and pull them out. They keep buzzing me and telling me to "move along!"

Tomorrow I'll pick some eggplants. I think there are a couple of good sized ones hidden in the foliage, and there are a lot of tomatoes growing into the eggplant.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 19 Jul 10 - 10:20 PM

Over the past week we have had a bunch of localized heavy storms happen to pass right over us. The clay soil is very moist to a good depth, but not soggy.

Enough tomatoes, basil and cukes to declare that, at the moment, life is good!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 19 Jul 10 - 10:43 PM

No ripe tomatoes here... Usually the 1st of August with the bulk of them in Septmeber...

Getting 4-5 pounds of roma pole bean a day and 15-20 pounds of squash, zukes & cukes... The P-Vine called her sister to come down and take some home and I know we put 40 pounds of stuff on the poor girl...

Only problem we have now is a fox... I've seen him 3 times in the last day... This morning I saw him burrow under the deer fence and went to get my rifle... Didn't see him again... Can't have a fox livin' here... I don't want any dead or injured cats... There's only one cat, outta 4, that I'm not concerned about 'cause this cat would put a serious whup on a fox... But the others ain't scapers... I got a trap set fir him tonight and sho be nice to get him...

Not excactly gardening but...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 01:51 AM

Just so the deer don't watch the fox and get ideas. . . I can see it now. Aside from how terribly funny it would look to see deer digging under the fence, it would be hard on the garden. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 07:51 AM

Well, one thing that deer don't do is burrow... I mean, you could installl the fence a foot off the ground and they wouldn't go under it...

No Mr. Fox in the trap but I think he's still around because of the cat's body language... They are on alert... Kinda jumpy...

We've had it with the pickling (patio) cucumbers and have decided to pull up one of the two bushes because between the two we're getting 15-20 a day and we have plenty of relish we made last year so we just don't need that many cukes...

Gonna only put in about 3 hours this morning and then reward ourselves for bein' so good by goin' off to Harrisonburg for lunch and run a few errands over there...

Oh yeah, forgot... We have a habiscis in bloom and the blooms are 6-7 inches and dark blood red... Very pretty... Crepe myrtles also also in bloom (we inhereted 13) and quite stunning...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 11:06 AM

Is there a food bank or shelter or church or charity you can donate those cucumbers to? So many people need fresh food and can't afford it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 02:32 PM

I set up the fountain pump on Sunday, and have added more to the rock garden around the fountain. The previous owners of my house were rock hounds. They left lots of quartz, cut stones and tumbled rocks under the deck. Clay pot shards and rocks are part of the fountain, which is basically two wok-style plastic pots that are terracotta color, but are water and shatter proof.

The water is so clear, you can't tell the catch bowl is full of water to the rim. This is still a work in progress. I have to add more plants and rocks to finish it.


Close up from side

Another close up

Alice


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 20 Jul 10 - 02:48 PM

Here is a link to the album so far, from before the hail storm to the beginning of the fountain.


CLICK


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 01:49 AM

Got home from work after 9 tonite to find much of the small wood is gone, and a note in the door from some stranger asking for permission for the rest. Called him. Heats with wood, has a wood splitter to handle the big sections, and wants all that remains.

He says he will have at it tommorrow. Here's hoping....

Have never had much problem around here with foxes messing with cats. I guess there is easier prey around.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 02:15 PM

I got started watching the animal videos on YouTube last night. I wonder what some of those homes smell like, with all of the various wild animals they have tamed and have live indoors.

The mystery volunteer tomatoes are revealed. Large cherry tomatoes. I'll get a smattering of them. I was hoping they'd grow to be large Super Fantastic, but at this point, I'll take anything I can get.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 02:30 PM

Jus' takin' a break from the weedeater and saw that big "599" and figured I'd better go ahead and round it up to...

...600!!!

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 03:23 PM

More flowers have opened in the north side rock garden.
Sorry for the poor resolution... just taken by aiming the laptop at the ground.

CLICK HERE


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: maire-aine
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 09:29 PM

The photos look real good, Alice. What are the little red flowers?

I just ate the first ripe tomato tonight. And the tomato plants I started from seed have blossoms.

Maryanne


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 10:13 PM

This is the first year I've seen it bloom. It is a ground cover that opened up both white and dark red flowers (must have planted more than one plant that was in the starter pot). I posted a photo of the bright pink one that opened in June, which is planted right next to this one just opening now - Creeping Phlox. There is yet another bunch of Creeping Phlox that is in slightly more shade that probably won't bloom until next month. I wonder what color that will be?



A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 10:19 PM

Nice pics...

Anyone ever used horticultural vinegar on weeds??? If so, how'd it do???

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 21 Jul 10 - 11:02 PM

Ten percent is optimum strength vinegar. Get the regular vinegar, not the acetic acid petroleum product vinegar. Grocery store vinegar is 5%, feed stores sell 20% but that is overkill, if you get that, dilute it to 10%.

If it is really warm and sunny without much wind, that is perfect. Put it in your sprayer and spray over the weeds you want to kill, and avoid any foliage that you want to keep. It doesn't kill the roots, just the green tops, but usually if you go over an area of grass a few days later, that's enough to kill the weeds.

It works pretty fast, but you need heat and sunshine. Careful getting it on your skin, it can smart. Here's the "V" section at the Dirt Doctor library. You'll find lots of vinegar entries. Here's the main text you need, though:

Weeds can be controlled with non-toxic products.   Forget using black plastic, toxic chemical herbicides, salt and bleach. Remember one of our primary rules – do nothing to harm the life in the soil. Bleach and toxic chemical herbicides are poor choices, but there are some good ones.

To keep the weeds out of a decorative or utility gravel area, the best approach is to design them out from the beginning or use organic products later to kill the weeds. Salt, toxic herbicides and bleach should never be used because they contaminate the soil long term. They also leach into the water stream. To head off the problem, install the gravel in a thick layer – 6-8" after scraping away all grasses and weeds.

For additional control, add a layer of white caliche rock before putting the gravel on top. Any weeds that grow through the gravel can be sprayed and killed with a mix of 10% pickling vinegar mixed with 2 ounces orange oil and 1 teaspoon liquid soap or you can use commercial organic herbicides. There are also commercial products now available. Vinegar sprays can also be used to kill weeds in the cracks in sidewalks and driveways.

The strongest vinegar available in retail stores is 30% but it is far too strong and I do not recommend it. For general use 20 percent or 200 grain is available but it is stronger than needed and I no longer recommend. At this strength it is corrosive enough to eat metal and must be handled carefully in plastic containers. It is also dangerous to breathe. It will obviously kill weeds, but so will RoundUp, 2,4-D and MSMA which we also don't recommend. It works best when sprayed full strength during the heat of the day and in full sunlight. While 200-grain (20 percent) material is still on the market, it can be reduced to the recommended 100 grain (10 percent) by doubling the amount of water in the 20% vinegar. Diluting cuts the cost in half and makes it a safer product to use. The mix I recommend for weed non-selective weed control is 1-2 oz. of orange oil and 1 teaspoon of liquid soap per gallon of 10% (pickling) vinegar made from grain alcohol. Vinegar that is made from the petroleum derivative, 99% acetic acid, is not acceptable in an organic program.

If your water is alkaline, add 1 tablespoon of 50-grain (5 percent) natural apple cider vinegar to each gallon of water to improve the quality of the water for potted plants and bedding. This doesn't have to be done with every watering, though it wouldn't hurt. This technique is especially helpful when trying to grow acid-loving plants such as gardenias, azaleas, and dogwoods. A tablespoon of vinegar per gallon added to the sprayer when foliar feeding lawns, shrubs, flowers, and trees is also highly beneficial, especially where soil or water is alkaline. The other horticultural use for vinegar is the watering can.

Vinegar

Vinegar and orange oil have become staple products in the organic program and easier to find in garden centers, hardware stores and feed stores. We keep a pretty good reference list on our web site. Click Here to find Sources where all the stores we know about are listed in alphabetical order. By typing in your city, a list of stores near you that sell at least some of the organic products will come up. The stores that are highlighted tend to specialize in organic products and understand how to answer questions.

Vinegar is a wonderful organic tool that was discovered by accident ten thousand years ago when wine was accidentally allowed to ferment too long and turned sour. It can be made from many products, including beer, apples, berries, beets, corn, fruits, grains, honey, malt, maple syrup, melons, molasses, potatoes, rice, sorghum, and other foods containing sugar. Natural sugars from these food products are fermented into alcohol, which is them fermented into vinegar.

Treat Weeds in Paved Areas with Vinegar

Weeds can be controlled with non-toxic products.   Forget using black plastic, toxic chemical herbicides, salt and bleach. Remember one of our primary rules – do nothing to harm the life in the soil. Bleach and toxic chemical herbicides are poor choices, but there are some good ones.

To keep the weeds out of a decorative or utility gravel area, the best approach is to design them out from the beginning or use organic products later to kill the weeds. Salt, toxic herbicides and bleach should never be used because they contaminate the soil long term. They also leach into the water stream. To head off the problem, install the gravel in a thick layer – 6-8" after scraping away all grasses and weeds.

For additional control, add a layer of white caliche rock before putting the gravel on top. Any weeds that grow through the gravel can be sprayed and killed with a mix of 10% pickling vinegar mixed with 2 ounces orange oil and 1 teaspoon liquid soap or you can use commercial organic herbicides. There are also commercial products now available. Vinegar sprays can also be used to kill weeds in the cracks in sidewalks and driveways.

The strongest vinegar available in retail stores is 30% but it is far too strong and I do not recommend it. For general use 20 percent or 200 grain is available but it is stronger than needed and I no longer recommend. At this strength it is corrosive enough to eat metal and must be handled carefully in plastic containers. It is also dangerous to breathe. It will obviously kill weeds, but so will RoundUp, 2,4-D and MSMA which we also don't recommend. It works best when sprayed full strength during the heat of the day and in full sunlight. While 200-grain (20 percent) material is still on the market, it can be reduced to the recommended 100 grain (10 percent) by doubling the amount of water in the 20% vinegar. Diluting cuts the cost in half and makes it a safer product to use. The mix I recommend for weed non-selective weed control is 1-2 oz. of orange oil and 1 teaspoon of liquid soap per gallon of 10% (pickling) vinegar made from grain alcohol. Vinegar that is made from the petroleum derivative, 99% acetic acid, is not acceptable in an organic program.

If your water is alkaline, add 1 tablespoon of 50-grain (5 percent) natural apple cider vinegar to each gallon of water to improve the quality of the water for potted plants and bedding. This doesn't have to be done with every watering, though it wouldn't hurt. This technique is especially helpful when trying to grow acid-loving plants such as gardenias, azaleas, and dogwoods. A tablespoon of vinegar per gallon added to the sprayer when foliar feeding lawns, shrubs, flowers, and trees is also highly beneficial, especially where soil or water is alkaline. The other horticultural use for vinegar is the watering can.

Fruit vinegar is made from the fermentation of a variety of fruits. Apples are most commonly used, but grapes, peaches, berries and other fruits also work. The product label will identify the starting ingredients, such as "apple cider vinegar" or "wine vinegar". Malt vinegar is made from the fermentation of barley malt or other cereal grains. Sugar vinegar is made from sugar, syrup, or molasses. White, spirit, or distilled vinegar is made by fermenting distilled alcohol. Distilled white vinegar is made from 190 proof alcohol that is fermented by adding sugar and living bacterial. Natural vinegar contains at least fifty trace minerals. Vinegar that is made from the petroleum derivative, 99% acetic acid, is not acceptable in an organic program.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bettynh
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 09:34 AM

In about 1990 my kids were 8 and we had an Apple IIGS computer. Virgil was patient and persistent as a kid (played Battle Chess through all the moves he needed to see all the battles and all the deaths). I'd heard that LOGO was educational and fun, so I bought it and set Virgil loose on it. He discovered that by typing in a long string of random numbers and pushing a single key he could make the cursor draw lines that bounced all over the screen, leaving trails. There was probably a fantasy about light lasers - he's that kind of kid. It seemed a random and useless activity to me, but experimenting was part of the point of the program, and he did no harm. It'd take about 10 minutes for him to type in the numbers, then he'd call me (and sometimes his twin brother) over to watch the show. But one time when the straight lines started pinging around the screen, a perfect circle appeared, clear of lines, in one part of the screen. As the screen continuued to fill, the circle only became more defined. It was spooky, and as far as we could tell, totally random.

I feel like I'm living in that circle now. Severe thunderstorms all around, tornado warnings, funnel clouds sighted, hail, 4 people hit by lightning in the past week, street flooding, and this little spot has had about 2 minutes of rain last night in total. A couple days ago the front yard got damp (dry under bushes and trees) and the back yard stayed completely dry.
AAARRRRGH!!!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 10:35 AM

I've used vinegar on weeds. Just buy the cheapest stuff at the store, regular vinegar you use for cooking.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 11:01 AM

Alice... "I've used vinegar on weeds. Just buy the cheapest stuff at the store, regular vinegar you use for cooking."

Mix anything with it?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 11:44 AM

Just pour the vinegar on the weed but realize that you don't want to do this in soil that you're growing stuff you want to keep alive. It makes the soil acidic.

I use it on the weeds that grow in the cracks between the concrete curb and the sidewalk. It's cheaper and safer than Roundup.

I have, though, used vinegar on soil that I needed to make more acidic for a plant that likes acid soil. It was coming up with yellow leaves, and after adding some dilute vinegar, turned deep green.


A.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 22 Jul 10 - 12:47 PM

Grocery store vinegar isn't strong enough. And it won't make the soil acidic. If you're going to buy vinegar at the store, find the pickling vinegar, that's the right strength. Use it full strength, don't add anything else, and put it in a spray bottle, you need to get the spray on the leaves, not pour it on roots.

Your best bet is to go to the feed store for the proper strength, and again, read the label to avoid the petroleum product acetic acid. If it is vinegar you can't consume, it is vinegar you shouldn't use in the yard.

Vinegar also acts like a fertilizer, and used in small quantities in a mix (like foliar feeding) is beneficial.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 24 Jul 10 - 02:19 PM

Yesterday afternoon we had almost 2 inches of rainfall. And this morning it looks like the weeds are experiencing explosive growth.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 25 Jul 10 - 02:00 PM

I was up very late last night canning peaches. And then I had to shut down that operation (at a logical point, and preserve my syrup for today) and de-skunk the dogs. This time they caught a glancing blow, they didn't try to kill it.

These peaches are from a local stand, and are marvelous. I've never canned peaches before. I can see why in large families it was an assembly line process. I remember helping when my mother canned. All by myself it is quite a dance around the kitchen.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 26 Jul 10 - 11:55 AM

I'll buy more peaches this week, I hope, and can some more. I have only 14 pints right now, a good start on my maiden voyage for canning peaches. They average just under $1 per pint, counting fruit and sugar. Labor isn't factored in or they're way-expensive. But we all know the pleasure our future selves will experience during the winter months when we open something we put away carefully for ourselves during the hot months. :)

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Bobert
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 12:54 PM

Thanks all for the good info on vinegar... The P-Vine is going to come and read it later and she'll probably have some further comments...

Dug the last of the potatoes today... Maybe 35-40 pounds outta that disappointing row...

Harvested the acorn squash... I think the plant is done but I'll keep an eye on it... We got 6 or 7 real pretty dark green ones... I'm purdy sure they will keep in the tater frig (45 degrees) for a long time...

Cuke plants continuin' their insanity... We're givin' away alot of cukes...

Pole (roma) beans about done... And we're about done pickin' and freezin' 'um...

No ripe tomatoes yet... Real late... Grrrrrrrr....

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 01:38 PM

Most everything I planted this spring seems to be "taking" - putting out new growth, not loseing older leaves, etc. Three azaleas even had a flush of second blossoms! At least one of the iris I tranplanted has put out new growth...there was two weeks of scorching weather after I transpanted them so I thought I may have lost them all, but iris tubers are pretty tough.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: GUEST,Janie
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 03:23 PM

Hurray, Mmario!

powdery mildew is about to finish off the slicing cuke - that plant did not do well from the start. the pickling cuke is slowing down. Having trouble using enough basil to keep it cut back and free of blooms. I still have pesto in the freezer from last year so am not inclined to freeze much of it. We love fresh pesto, but just don't get too excited in the winter about pesto from the freezer. The tomatoes are doing well. I need to fertilize again this weekend. As is par for the course by this time, the bottom leaves are starting to yellow, but the plants are still growing and bearing.

Soon it will be time to pull up the cukes, and probably some of the basil to make room for kale and fall onions. I love those small, white baby turnips, but my son won't eat them, so I don't think I'll bother. I may try some mesclun mix, but it is hard to get a fall crop of lettuce or greens here. Winter is too cold and fall is often too hot.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: MMario
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 04:18 PM

How do you freeze your pesto? because an ice cube of frozen pesto dropped into minestrone or bean soup can sure add some yummy;


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 04:33 PM

Janie, as soon as you start to see the conditions for powdery mildew, or start to see a little turn up on the plants, pour a fifty-cent bottle of hydrogen peroxide (undiluted) into a spray bottle and spray the entire plant. Peroxide is a great way to deal with fungus on plants.

I've just picked up some concentrated stuff called "Veggie Wash." My organic gardening guru has been talking about this for two or three years now, and I finally decided to give it a shot. I'll read the bottle and see what I can do with it this weekend.

I've been reclaiming part of my paved space outside the back door. Years ago I put some lovely pots of mint and lemon balm on the bricks I'd set after digging up turf beside the back patio. The mint vanished but the lemon balm took off. Seeded into the cracks of the brick and took off. I like lemon balm, I put it in tea all of the time. But now it is coming up everywhere, and I'm pushing at least this patch to the very back of the yard.

Earlier today I went through the back gate to look at the area above the creek and found some cacti that I tossed there a couple of months ago. These are native plants I rescued before they ploughed under the prairie to build houses across the road from us. I was tired of looking at it in disintegrating pots and knew I wouldn't plant them anywhere, so I tossed them in the back to see what would happen. They're growing happily under the trees. I think that back area needs some good root structure to keep from washing out, so I'll keep tossing all of these plants and seeds on the back of the lot and let them do their thing. I've got to spray a little poison ivy back there - I've killed most of it. That was the ground cover back there when I moved in, but I'd prefer more benign plants. Poison Ivy is so hard on me. . .

I have an eggplant with at least a half dozen fruits ready to pick today. I took a bag of okra to the next door neighbor (I've been tossing them in the freezer) and got a squeal of thanks for it. Those same two plants are coming up with a lot more every day now so I think the next bag will come in a few days. Still no overflowing of tomatoes, just a few cherry tomatoes every so often. Janie, for the way too much basil and such, my co-workers know that when I come into the office with a couple of buckets that it's time for the fresh produce! I took a lot of basil over yesterday. Also gave away at least a half-dozen eggplants and a bunch of peppers.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 06:46 PM

I haven't tried hydrogen peroxide, but was planning on using it on another of the big trees that was attacked by that dread fungus, but which the arborist says can probably be treated and saved.

As small as my little raised bed garden is, I really don't have time to do much in terms of disease/pest control. That's why I pulled the zucchini, and I really should have pulled the one cuke before now.   I'll jerk it out this weekend.

Between my son, working 60+hours on the weeks I don't have him, the 45 minute commute with the new job, visiting a former client who is at the inpatient hospice, and all my weekend trips up to WV to spend time with my Dad and Mom, what can't take care of itself other than watering and fertilizing has to go. I've been very lucky with thunderstorms most of the summer, or would not have been able to keep up with the watering either.

Not a whine - just the way things are. I'm just happy to grow what I can for as long as it will grow.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 30 Jul 10 - 07:04 PM

Used regular white vinegar (5%) with a squirt of liquid dishwashing soap in a handheld spray bottle. Killed em dead in one spray. Now, the dandelions took two sprays.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 31 Jul 10 - 01:12 PM

I should have put in my fall stuff already, but I didn't. So I'll probably do it this weekend and run a soaker hose through the bedding plants and have a neighbor water this bed for me when I'm away for a few days in August. I hate trying to get a garden set up just to have to leave it to the minitrations of someone who didn't do all of the work. Though if I make sure gardener neighbors water, then it should be okay.

This week we're supposed to be in the triple digits for several days. Everything is green right now because of all of the rain. I suspect brown will soon be the color, for those of us who don't water turf much.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 31 Jul 10 - 02:14 PM

Welcome to gnu's Garden Game!

My back is messed up bad. So no gardening at all this year. Just annuals in flower pots. But I had a bunch of seeds left over from when I used to grow stuff up at my camp in the backwoods. No, Bobert.

So, I was cleaning cupboards a few weeks back and found the seeds. I went to a 20 square foot plot behind my garage, hoed and raked it, scattered the seeds willy-nilly, raked em in and watered em.

If you can identify what is growing, weeds included (No Bobert... weedS), you could win a fabulous, all paid, one day vacation* within walking distance of your abode. Just send me the receipts and I will have one of my accountants issue a cheque.

I might, from time to time, remember to take and post pics as my garden grows. But, you might have to PM me to remind me to do so.

Here is gnu's back twenty.






*One day vacation excludes night. For complete contest rules, guess.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:07 AM

Well 'geez, gnuzer. All look an edible shade of green to me. Eat some of them in a salad. If you live to tell about it, I win!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:50 AM

We must have a skunk den in the area. My dogs (the catahoula this time) killed another skunk. One last Saturday night, another this Saturday night. This isn't how I like to experience my yard in summer.

These are young ones, not so heavy as the adults, but they still make a mighty stink. The pit bull stayed out of harms way, but the catahoula got a direct shot to the face, on the side under her ear. It is just such a foul smell. I'm spritzing her with the enzyme stuff about every 20 minutes. She's the one with a heavy coat. And she keeps shaking off before I'm out of the way.

The back yard smells awful, so no matter how nice it looks after mowing, and how much I'd like to resume using my clothes lines, I'm going to have to wait some more. And see if there are any gaps in the fence I can fill. Thing is, these skunks are all hair - when I look at the actual size, they might be able to go through the chain links of the fence. Maybe there is some mesh I can install on the bottom of the fence.

SRS


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 06:35 AM

SRS.

That really stinks.

What a terrible thing to have to contend with. Too bad the dogs can't learn to "avoid" the skunks... if possible.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 11:25 AM

One dog has learned. But that still leaves one really stinky dog. :-/


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: gnu
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:15 PM

My old man told me of his cousin's dog... it was just about to bite a skunk which made a den under the barn when the skunk sprayed directly into his mouth. The dog went through a hay field with his head sideways to the ground and his mouth open. he made it to the river where he began drinking and vomiting. Eat grass, drink water, vomit.

He came home three days later. Every time he smelled a skunk after that, he would go apeshit and bark incessantly until Dad's cousin killed the skunk.

Thank goodness he learned a lesson because there was a porcupine in the outhouse not long after and he wouldn't go near it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:32 PM

I didn't think about that. It hit awfully close to her mouth. I wonder if that's part of the problem, on that skin as well as her coat? Ugg.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Janie
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 02:46 PM

Good luck, Stilly.


Waughhh!!!!! 3 big mortgagelifters very nearly ripe. Big rain. Split tomatoes.

*sob*


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: BS: Gardening 2010
From: Alice
Date: 01 Aug 10 - 10:10 PM

aaarrrgh!

Another devastating (for the garden) hail storm.

Things look like they were shot with buckshot or hacked with machetes.

Next year I may only grow potatoes.



Alice


Post - Top - Home -