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BS: Kitchenless Cooking

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wysiwyg 07 Jan 10 - 01:06 PM
VirginiaTam 07 Jan 10 - 02:24 PM
CarolC 07 Jan 10 - 02:26 PM
GUEST,leeneia 07 Jan 10 - 02:29 PM
VirginiaTam 07 Jan 10 - 02:32 PM
AllisonA(Animaterra) 07 Jan 10 - 02:45 PM
wysiwyg 07 Jan 10 - 02:47 PM
LilyFestre 07 Jan 10 - 06:30 PM
maire-aine 07 Jan 10 - 11:54 PM
GUEST,999 08 Jan 10 - 12:07 AM
wysiwyg 08 Jan 10 - 12:12 AM
GUEST,999 08 Jan 10 - 12:20 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 08 Jan 10 - 07:42 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 08 Jan 10 - 07:48 AM
wysiwyg 08 Jan 10 - 09:45 AM
GUEST,999 08 Jan 10 - 11:46 PM
Gurney 09 Jan 10 - 11:15 PM
Janie 10 Jan 10 - 12:58 AM
wysiwyg 10 Jan 10 - 07:14 AM
VirginiaTam 10 Jan 10 - 08:50 AM
Maryrrf 10 Jan 10 - 09:12 AM
wysiwyg 10 Jan 10 - 11:41 AM
Dave the Gnome 10 Jan 10 - 02:05 PM
wysiwyg 11 Jan 10 - 09:42 AM
Maryrrf 11 Jan 10 - 11:13 AM
wysiwyg 11 Jan 10 - 11:15 AM
Penny S. 11 Jan 10 - 02:58 PM
wysiwyg 11 Jan 10 - 04:07 PM
bubblyrat 12 Jan 10 - 02:30 PM
Maryrrf 12 Jan 10 - 02:44 PM
katlaughing 12 Jan 10 - 06:51 PM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Jan 10 - 07:05 PM
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The Fooles Troupe 12 Jan 10 - 07:16 PM
McGrath of Harlow 12 Jan 10 - 07:18 PM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Jan 10 - 07:33 PM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM
The Fooles Troupe 12 Jan 10 - 08:19 PM
The Fooles Troupe 14 Jan 10 - 06:53 AM
Penny S. 14 Jan 10 - 07:28 AM
GUEST,999 14 Jan 10 - 05:21 PM
GUEST,WYS-out 14 Jan 10 - 06:22 PM
Bert 14 Jan 10 - 06:26 PM
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maire-aine 08 Aug 10 - 09:22 PM
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Deckman 08 Aug 10 - 10:32 PM
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Subject: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 01:06 PM

By "Kitchenless Cooking" I mean cooking food that tastes acceptable, can be prepared lacking a decent sink, and requires minimal refrigeration (cooler, etc).

Not quite camping cuisine, where one might have all things needed in rustic form, but more like dorm cooking, motel-room cooking, office-desk or rented-room cooking, cooking when renovations (or like our 2000 fire) have knocked out all or most of the kitchen.

Spaw posted once about creative use of ramen. I was thinking of him just now when I made office lunch:

1 2-cup mug
1 pkg beef ramen & flavor packet
1 shake of oregano
1/2 box of NON-REFRIGERATED tofu (Yes! Really!)
1 squeeze of lemon juice
2 T dry milk powder

Nuked and let sit till soft and creamy.

Actually yummy!

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:24 PM

My Mom and her twin sister attended different colleges. But both of them used to make (and sell) toasted cheese sandwiches with irons. What is gross though, is they used same irons to straighten their hair.

When I had to cook on the woodstove (ice storm knocked out electric) I made scrambled eggs, hotdogs, instant mash potatoes, grill cheese sandwiches.

If you have a microwave you can get an omelet dish and cook cheesy omelet with baocs or just eggs and Kroger Zesty Blend.

I put Zesty Blend in everything, because I can't take too much salt. Wonderful stuff.

If you can get the microwaveable pouches of plain rice or noodles, dress up with Zesty blend and Benecol (or other cholesterol busting butter sub). Tastes good and quite healthy. Sometimes I add chopped sun dried tomatoes to pouch of rice or noodles and a little extra water. Sprinkle finished dish with pine nuts or shredded mozzarella or parmesan for protein.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: CarolC
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:26 PM

Grocery stores and health food stores have a lot of really great entrees that only need to be nuked. We've gotten some very good Indian, Thai, and Chinese food from some of them, and there's always soups and beans and things like that. Of course, a plastic or ceramic bowl will be needed for some of them, but a lot of them come with their own bowl or other kind of container that you can eat out of. I'm remembering right now an Italian pasta with a cheese, tomato and wine sauce that was very good. None of the items I've mentioned needed any refrigeration before they were opened.

You can also get packets of things like cooked brown rice at the health food stores and Trader Joes, which you can top with a can of Thai sauce or something like that. These also do not require refrigeration before opening.

We spent a lot of time traveling around the South last summer and living out of hotel rooms. Eating well in hotel rooms became very important to us.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:29 PM

My mother-in-law had a vacation home a few years ago, and decreed that the only cooking implement in it would be an electric skillet. They accomplished a lot with it.

However, when you speak of not having a decent sink, I worry about sanitation. Dishes, tools, surfaces, hands - all need to be cleaned frequently to prepare healthful food.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:32 PM

Can you get a toaster? There are pouches that let you do gooey toasted sandwiches in your toaster though I worry about what chemicals leech out of the pouch into the food.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:45 PM


However, when you speak of not having a decent sink, I worry about sanitation.


This past summer I lived in a cabin with no running water; had to haul water from the other side of the building site, and the cabin had a huge extension cord running from the tree that held the temporary power service. I did my dishwashing with 3 dishpans and nearly-boiling water from the electric tea kettle my DH had insisted we couldn't live without- and he was right!

Cooked on a propane stove, which is almost as good as the real thing, so not much advice there!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 02:47 PM

I remember a tiny natural-gas-fueled "radiator" in one house I rented. It was in Arkansas, and the landlord had decided (rightly) that even in winter the house needed no other heat for the 4 rooms, except hot water for washing. That little rad was about the size of a newspaper, folded, and we'd use it just on really cold, rainy afternoons. It was:
<> Hot enough to warm soup
<> NOT hot enough to fry onion rings or green-pepper rings.

OTOH, I have had air conditioners cold enough to set Jello and keep it fresh.

I've had window ledges cold enough to "keep" cooked pizza fresh for days, as well as other items when times were really tough.

I've had tiny boiling-pots (1/2 qt tops) that could warm an opened can of stew set on top of a ring to make the boiler act as a double-boiler. I lived out of that one for a week when I took a little unfunded trip, and dined in style. I'd boil the ramen water, then heat the canned item to go with it in the double-boiler mode. A pretty basketful of tangerines served as the "fresh" food to fill out the meals. I now include one of these pots in my always-onboard kit, and find it handy more often than I'd expected.

We did an entire 3-week trip once with only motel mini-kitchen facilities, a box of spices, and a charcoal grill to set in a neighboring parking lot. (With the cooler, we ate very well.)

At one workplace I kept a complete condimentarium at my desk. The employer provided a daily onsite cafeteria lunch, and it was purposely bland. But we were welcome to repair to our desks to yum it up and dine handsomely "in cubicle," which we sometimes did in groups, sharing "yummed up" items across the aisles.

We now have a larger wall-mounted gas burner that heats our laundry room, and supplies nearby in case an ice storm knocks out the electric power. I haven't tried frying on it, yet, though. :~)

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: LilyFestre
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 06:30 PM

One Easter while I was still in college, my roommate and I, along with 4 other people were celebrating the holiday in the dorm. With just a small dorm sized fridge and a microwave, we had all the holiday fixings....ham, potatoes, veggies, salad, desert....and we enjoyed it all while sitting on the floor eating from a long coffee table.

Everything was hot and good and it's one of the best Easter meal memories I have!!!

Michelle


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: maire-aine
Date: 07 Jan 10 - 11:54 PM

When I first moved into my house, I didn't have a stove. I sold the gas stove, and I was waiting for the new one to be delivered. I got by with an electric frying pan (and a Mr Coffee) for a few weeks.

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,999
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 12:07 AM

"Nuked and let sit till soft and creamy."

You likely don't want to know how I read that.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 12:12 AM

LOL, no.

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,999
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 12:20 AM

Susan, are the Ramen things you mentioned in the first post those noodles that come in a package and are all kinda very dry and squiggly looking? If so, I love 'em. I like to add some Tuong Ot Toi Vietnam sauce--it's hot but it adds to the flavour. The two packs I enjoy are chicken and beef. They're neet also to toss left-overs into when they're almost done cooking, and they cook fast.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 07:42 AM

The book Cooking In A Bedsitter by Katharine Whitehorn was an absolute lifesaver when I first lived in London, with only a single gas ring, one washbasin in the bathroom, and no fridge except the outside windowsill.

That was more years ago than I care to admit to, but the book is still in print, and probably still saving thousands of students from malnutrition. You can get it on the BRITISH Amazon site - amazon.co.uk - for about a fiver (pounds), whereas on the US Amazon.com one it seems to only be available secondhand at a variety of baroque prices. Foreign currency notwithstanding, you're better off to order it from England. (If you do, make sure you access it through the Mudcat links so they get a cut: Click the blue banjo & catfish logo, then scroll down to the AmazonUK link.)

Well worth it, in my unhumble but still-culinarily-challenged opinion.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 07:48 AM

My apologies to all the Canadian catters - you can get it for quite a reasonable price on Amazon CA. Sorry for the oversight!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 09:45 AM

Bonnie, that sounds like a great book.

999, yes, those are the thingies we have. I love them because they seem to have been precooked, so they soften up nicely without a long boil. I just nuke the water they're sitting in like I'd make a cup of hot chocolate or soup, and the mug I use has a cover with steam-vent holes so I can either leave the water in or drain it out thru the holes.

And yes, I've used all sorts of things on them including Porn Sauce. :~)

We all need a little Porn* in our lives.

~S~

* A brand of Asian sweet-chili sauce as for spring rolls


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,999
Date: 08 Jan 10 - 11:46 PM

Thanks, Susan.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Gurney
Date: 09 Jan 10 - 11:15 PM

There are little Kovea camping stoves that are cheap, self-contained, effective, and the gas cartridges for them are cheap, too. They come in a case so that it looks like a battery drill, so the landlord would never know unless you leave the saucepans about.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Janie
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 12:58 AM

Hmmm. I've lived in a tents for months at a time, sometimes by a (relatively, at least) clean stream, and sometimes hauling water in weekly and storing it in 1 to 3 ten gallon construction coolers. Have also lived in in a gutted travel trailer with only a bed, but with a garden hose and an extension cord running from the well pumphouse, and in a cheap motel room.

I don't know whether to assume you are looking for quick recipes for lunch at an office or how to eat half-way well in one or more minimalist circumstances. If the latter, does minimal mean in-doors with electricity and running water, but with perhaps minimal space, a small handwashing sink and no refrigeration?


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 07:14 AM

I'm not looking for help; I'm offering a place to swap experiences.

I lived for a time with no electrics, in a beat-down apartment with a friendly maintenance man's connived extension cord to run the fridge. That was a BAD place. My mom and I moved me and my essentials outta that one through the window that adjoined the parking lot and into her little hatchback... as I was later to tell a stepkid, "Sometimes you have to GIT, and sometimes you lose your stuff."

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 08:50 AM

I have lived in one of those hell holes before.... sympathy. Didn't lose my stuff (well we were robbed by the landlord) or have to GIT though. But it was a very bad place with a very nasty landlord, indeed.

Tiger tails - hotdogs with little nicks cut at angle, fried in bit of butter and Worcestershire sauce. The nicks soak up sauce and make them look like tiger tails. Can be done in frying pan on woodstove or on plate in microwave 9but without the butter). Just roll them in sauce and put inverted plate over top to stop the splatter. Nice to eat with baked beans and instant mash on the side. Kids loved them.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Maryrrf
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 09:12 AM

I lived in a tiny room in Paris with a very small fridge, a small sink and a hot plate. Somehow I managed to do a lot of cooking on that hot plate - I remember once I prepared a dinner for ten (spaghetti and meat sauce, salad and dessert). The hot plate had no temperature controls - I managed the temperature settings by plugging and unplugging. I got pretty good at that. The shared bathroom and shower was down the hall - but the room was two blocks from the Eiffel Tower. Those were good times!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 11:41 AM

VT I misread your post (sleepy eyes), the first time, so when I make them they'll be not only tiny nicks but tiny dogs, so I'll have to call them puppydog tails and snails (shrimp).

Mary, that does bring back memories! Boston, lots of lovely walking, lots of nearby lovelies, and the hotplate. No fridge. Tiny bathroom-type sink. Hotplate atop metal cabinet. I was so poor (and young) that what I mostly made was oatmeal, and every sandwich I took to work was PB&J.

Oatmeal in a thousand varieties. Any other cash I had went to savings, except for twice a week luxuries-- two favorite restaurants (cheap) at the ends of two favorite walks. One a dinner joint with a HUGE salad bar (real salad, not the now-popular buffet crap) for much-needed VEGGIES. They had an early-opening lunch special once a week where I got my vitamin B's (incl beef). The other a wonderful breakfast joint called The Buttery. A little hole in the wall with soft-scrambled eggs perfectly done and endless coffee served by waitresses happy to let me sit for an hour or more playing caffeinated solitaire. Oh my, that was heaven! Happily alone, hundreds of miles from stressful HOME.

Happy for the hotplate, and yes! It did have to be plug-juggled to moderate heat! Wonder it never burned the old building down, and I'm sure they were in every room, too. It was a big-ole building full of what I guess are called in the UK "bedsitters." Here they were called SROs-- single room occupancies, shower down the hall, etc.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 10 Jan 10 - 02:05 PM

It's dead easy! Chinese takeaway. Indian takeaway. Pizza delivery. Kebab shop. Fish and Chips. Pub. The possibilities are endless. What's all the fuss about?

:D (eG)


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Subject: Healthy, Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 09:42 AM

Cute, LOL.

But the BEST items I have now, kitchenless, have been coming FROM takeaway. Not as-served-- but as the secret ingredient in an omelet, panini, or otherwise healthied-up brekky.

Oh yeah. Eating healthy is not about deprivation or suffering, even in tough times or weight-loss times. It';s about cutting enough of the unhealthy items out as possible without diminishing taste and enjoyment, so you can occasionally indulge in a really rich dish.

For us, this has meant an item left from (or made specially by) a chef's supper extraordinaire. 1/3 may be eaten at dinner, and the rest divided between bedtime snack and fillings for a healthy brekky.

Like the rich, spinach/feta omelette, eaten as served, at supper-- and then a small bite at bedtime with whole-grain crackers, then used again as the filling in the AM for a yolkless omelette. The feta goes a long way, but the AM serving gets loads of lite-butter toast on wholegrain bread for plenty of start-the-day calories-- with substantially less fat and salt.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Maryrrf
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 11:13 AM

One thing I can't do are yolkless eggs. There just isn't much to an egg white, even if you flavor it. I like the rich, golden yolk that has all the taste... yum!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 11:15 AM

Yes, I do too, but there is enough yolk in the leftover-omelette filling I described to let them taste fine-- honest to Pete.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Penny S.
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 02:58 PM

In what was called the winter of discontent when we had regular powercuts, I cooked a spanish omelette in a foil dish on a terracotta flowerpot inverted over a candle - just to show I could. Mostly I ate outside the cut period. Or used a thermos.

Don't forget ventilation if using a portable gas stove.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: wysiwyg
Date: 11 Jan 10 - 04:07 PM

Penny-- BRILL!

(I guess it's a variation on Sterno-- does that need venting too? I've often wished I could brew my own fresh hot chocolate in a hockey seat!)


We have a neat mini-fridge-- dunno if these are still made, but it was built and marketed to hold a sixpack of canned beverage. Like Coke or beer? That is literally all the room it has, but it looks like an old-fashioned white fridge with rounded top, exterior handle, etc. It's a heat pump thingie. I've taken it in case motels don't have refrigeratiuon. It holds more than I might have thought-- not a styro leftovers box but then we carry baggies, so....

Coleman makes a very nice regular-cooler-sized electric cooler, that can be used upright (lets all the cold out whenever you open it), or (as we use it) as a chest to hold the cold. Runs all day fine, no issues except it does pump out a little warm air, out the heatpump flow-fan. And they do make a smaller one, not as small as my mini-fridge but smaller and cheaper than the bigger Coleman or a heavy ole bar fridge. When the mini in my office craps out, that's what I'll get. They also come with an adaptor to run off your car's lighter, or other 12-volt outlet, and I have seen many more 12-volt thingiges at truck stops that they use in those 18-wheeler palaces the drivers sleep in nowadays-- another place for Kitchenless Cooking.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: bubblyrat
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 02:30 PM

We were encouraged,in the Navy,to improvise.Whilst working,as a watchkeeper,in the Aircraft Battery Room of the carrier "Eagle" in the 1960s, I often used to get hungry during the Middle Watch,say around 3 am. Being denied the relief of any form of cooker,I would put a minimal amount of water into our electric kettle,say just covering the element,and then place an OPENED (this is very important !!)tin of Heinz baked beans with pork sausages,or Heinz spaghetti Bolognese,in the shallow,boiling water for a few minutes.This proved to be most satisfactory.
             One could use an upturned iron,but it would be tedious holding the thing steady for long enough.Of course, I had the enormous advantage of "messing" with the Safety Equipment Naval Airmen,who had regular access to cans of "self-heating"(by built-in chemical reaction tubes) cans of soup.Again,vital to open can before firing up !
    I have also eaten eggs cooked over a candle ,and fish & meat cooked in tinfoil wired to the exhaust manifold of a hot engine ---a very good method ! I guess volcanic hot springs might be an option in New Zealand or Iceland,too !


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Maryrrf
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 02:44 PM

A friend of mine had a hotplate and he didn't like to clean his pots and pans, so he would often heat canned food by just placing the unopened can in boiling water. I don't recommend this because it's easy to burn yourself opening the hot can. One day I came over to visit and he'd left a can of ravioli on too long and it had exploded. It wasn't a pretty sight. I helped him clean the ravioli off the ceiling.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: katlaughing
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 06:51 PM

When each sister left to go to college, cooking was not allowed in dorm rooms, so each one got a popcorn popper; the old-fashioned kind with the bottom part having a heat element which plugged in, the top was a handled metal bowl, kind of, which held whatever you might want to cook plus popcorn. They fixed soups, rice, noodles, scrambled eggs, etc.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:05 PM

Ooooo, could write heaps...

Minimal 'desperation' stove...

First, the local Girl Guides showed this one. Get one of those huge 4 Litre (1 gallon) Fruit Juice (for making fruit punch at parties) cans. Remove one end lid (INSIDE the join (strength/safety), not removing the whole end - there are 2 different types of can openers nowadays!). Now you need to make a few airholes near the base (when the closed end is uppermost, making your cooking plate!), or keep the base off the ground with a few sticks, etc. If you make any airholes near the top, be careful, as the more hot iar exhausted, the less heat retained. You WILL get a build up of soot inside.

You place a lighted candle inside.

This will cook pancakes! Seriously! Not too fast, but will cook them properly. Clean the lid, and use a sparing amount of oil - spray can if you want. If you use a spray can while the candle is lit, take care, you don't want a bomb!


Now there are other creative ways to use various cheap electrical appliances... later.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:13 PM

Oh, and if you want to boil a small quantity of water, the candle tin will work too.

Dick Smith Electronics 12V DC Portable Stove

There's no easily found link which goes direct to the (Australian) DS site, but Google that phrase and you will find lots of people trying to sell them... suspect that they are horribly inefficient and draw a massive 12V current... you will also find links on how to build your own too...

The cheap Chinese import canned butane gas stove are useful in a pinch (you need ventilation inside, or you will kill yourself!), but I exhausted a complete can trying to boil a few litres of water for tea...


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:16 PM

Hah - Murphy's Law... The 12 Volt stuff...

http://www.dse.com.au/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/catalog/CTG1000941

Btw, a while ago I found a 12V microwave around - not yet in Oz though...


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:18 PM

Here's a guide to one possibility - Manifold Destiny: The One! The Only! Guide to Cooking on Your Car Engine!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:33 PM

Small 240V electrical appliances used for unintended cooking purposes...

My favourite bottom is the flat plate


Hahah - that typo is too good to lose!

Try again...
My favourite is the flat bottom plate sandwich toaster. They will cook and warm almost ANYTHING that is not liquid. If the items gives off any liquid, they have a small lip that will catch some... You need to 'plug/juggle' if you find the preset temp is too high though. For meat, they usually are small power units, so the meat will usually cook slowly and be tender!

Place a sheet of 'baking paper' on the bottom plate - and top if you are using the contact heating method. Some utensils have a 'height lock' to keep the top plate above the food, needed if you do pizza or other stuff which will need the top plate to be kept off the food top surface or you get a gooey mess. Some stuff (party pies) will crush from the weight of the top plate, you can use a small metal spacer, if there is no height lock. I have even used a knife to keep the plates separated when I had nothing else.

Pizza - even from frozen
Lasagne slices
Fish fingers
Chips (spread in a single layer - and from frozen will take some time to get browned and crisp)
Pies - full size and party, pasties, sausage rolls
Yum Cha style snack thingies and many such normally deep fried snacky things - you use no oil, so most come up better!
Chops, sausages, ribs, many different bits of meat, etc
Pappadums, prawn crackers - you need no oil mostly!
Corn cobs, many other vegies!

You are limited only by your creativity/imagination - almost ANYTHING you would do on a frypan on a hotplate, plus you get top heating like a small 'mini-oven'.

AND you can still do the toasted sandwiches... ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 07:52 PM

Another useful gadget is the 'jaffle iron' - usually dual small pockets which are intended to seal two bread slices around a small quantity of filling. You can also cook an egg/scrambled egg in them, but it can stick. Older 'Scouts' may remember such gadgets designed for use over an open fire - these can be used on a gas stove too.

There two types, I prefer the one WITHOUT the diagonal cutter so that I get one large square pocket, instead of two triangular ones.

The 'pie makers' where you take two slices of pastry and use a filling can be used for many similar snacks - and you CAN use pastry in the jaffle iron, but if you have limited resources and little refrigeration, it's probably difficult to keep frozen pastry slices and making up good pastry to order in very small quantities can be difficult.

You can get various small cans/jars of may things that need no refrigeration, such as creamed corn, mushrooms, deviled ham, specialised 'jaffle fillings' cans, etc. Cheese, tomato slices, spam slices, etc also are useful.

I notice that you can now get 'omelette makers' - small pockets designed to cook scrambled eggs. Also small doughnut makers, and similar gadgets. Personally I think the jaffle iron and plate sandwich toasters are more versatile.

I also still have a toaster oven - a brilliant Delonghi full small over with top and bottom elements with fan, that I use less now that I discovered the sandwich toaster plates....

:-0


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 12 Jan 10 - 08:19 PM

Now for open fires.... been camping a bit - and for a while in a 'medieval recreation' group...

There is the famous 'one pot method' - everything cooks in one pot.... :-)

Any clean steel/iron plate will do to cook bacon, eggs, sausages, etc. If you heat it till a little water dropped on it explodes, then it will be well above 100 deg C and anything nasty for human consumption will have been neutralised!

Thus the old (allegedly dating back to the Roman Army) shovel cooking method...

Then there is the "AJ Can Cooking" method...

AJ - Aussie affectionate term for the 'Army Jerk' :-) intelligence not needed supposedly...

Take can, whack on big tree branch twice on opposite sides so that there are 2 noticeable big dents.

Throw in fire - it is useful now to ensure that there is some rapid safe method of extraction and opening...

There now are 3 subsequent events to be watching for. First the can will pop the two dents, and then explode!

So... once the can has popped the first dent, the can has started to steam and will be quite hot inside. You should now prepare to remove the can and open it. If the can has popped twice and you are not already in the process of removing/opening it, then RUN! :-)


As I said 'AJ' does not imply a LOT of intelligence... but nowadays the Aussie Army has insisted that lace up boots (slip ons on longer allowed!) are used as an intelligence test.... :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 06:53 AM

Looks like I killed the thread then .... :-(


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Penny S.
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 07:28 AM

I've got one of those small mini-fridges which I bought to keep milk in my bedroom for morning tea - but it was too noisy for that. It uses a heat pump and I believe has a warm setting. Also two powered cool boxes for camping - but not to be used off car battery when engine not on. I had to get the AA out.

I have successfully used an insulated food container for haybox type cooking - start a casserole off, keep in container, reheat for serving. Haven't got round to making a haybox yet, but have intended to for years.

The container is also useful for yoghurt. Pour in a tin of evaporated milk. Fill up with boiling water. Add a spoon of previous yoghurt. Put the lid on. Leave till set.

I did have one of those non-electric waffle iron/sandwich makers for a while, and an electric grill, but didn't use them often enough to make the space worth it.

Penny


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,999
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 05:21 PM

Some pretty fancy folks 'round here, what with heating up the canned food and all. Sheesh. Open and serve.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,WYS-out
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 06:22 PM

I've done that, too. Canned chicken a la king has all the stuff for a complete meal, minus the carbs and fruit. Makes a nice cold dip for crackers, and them polish off an apple to get the salt taste out.

In this crazy ministry life Hardi and I never know where we we may be called to run off to, or how long we may be held in an emergency, so both vehicles carry emergency rations in case we are miles from a food stop and need to carry on.

~Susan


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Bert
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 06:26 PM

Try your local thrift stores.

One item we bought when we were Motelling it for a while was a toaster that had a gizmo in the side for boiling eggs. It worked a treat, we lived on hard boiled eggs and toast for days.

Another item was a five dollar pizza cooker, kinda like a 14 inch galletiere. We still use it for just about everything, steaks, sausages, hamburgers and even warming up leftovers.

When we moved into this apartment we inherited an Oster steamer which gets used regularly for cooking rice, although it is supposed to cook vegetables as well.

And don't worry about a working sink. That's why they make paper plates.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,WYS-out
Date: 14 Jan 10 - 10:08 PM

What is a galletiere?

~S~


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: GUEST,WYS-out
Date: 19 Jan 10 - 11:48 PM

From Walkabouts Verse in another thread:



Poem 93 of 230: ONE-POT COOKING

While living as a bachelor,
    I've cooked in just one pot -
Cast iron with a wooden handle,
    It can hold quite a lot:

Slices of potato and carrot
    Are boiled a while,
Before a thinly-chopped onion
    Is mixed with the pile;

Then I drain off most of the water,
    Add canned lentils and beans,
Stir with spice and tomato sauce -
    To an end, it's a means.

From http://blogs.myspace.com/walkaboutsverse (e-book)
Or http://walkaboutsverse.sitegoz.com (e-scroll)
(C) David Franks 2003


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 20 Jan 10 - 05:38 AM

Gasp!....


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 20 Jan 10 - 05:42 AM

Sorry about that - brain explosion !... Well, must hit the target occasionally, even if just at random....

"a five dollar pizza cooker, kinda like a 14 inch galletiere."

I have seen cheap electrical pizza cookers recently, with a circular plate that revolves above a circular shaped element, with another similar above. It would probably be suitable for much of what I described I do with the Flat Plate sandwich toasters. I have thought about it, but most of my needs are met...


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: open mike
Date: 20 Jan 10 - 04:04 PM

i remember hearing from someone who had a ford econoline van (with the engine easily accessible from the cab)..the cowling was lifted up and a sandwich, burrito or other food could be placed on the radiator and
it would be ready to eat after a bit of driving. Aluminun foil wrapped, to protect from engine fumes.

also, not so practical now in winter, as it is cloudy and rainy and snowy but i am surprised no one has mentioned solar cooking (unless i missed it)

http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/The_Solar_Cooking_Archive_Wiki


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Bert
Date: 20 Jan 10 - 04:30 PM

A galletiere is a large round flat cooking surface. Used in Brittany for making crepes.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: bubblyrat
Date: 21 Jan 10 - 05:50 AM

Libertiere----Fraternetiere----Et Galletiere !!


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: VirginiaTam
Date: 23 Jan 10 - 09:36 AM

maybe not right for this thread, but thought I'd share this


5 MINUTE CHOCOLATE MUG CAKE


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 23 Jan 10 - 12:06 PM

If I was kitchenless I could survive just fine if there was somewhere to plug in my microwave.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 07:50 PM

Recently there has been a surge of very cheap mains electric appliances for making Poffertjes - Dutch Pancakes. The plate has a series of dimples, into which a teaspoon of batter is placed.

You can get the recipes easily on the net, but you can also use almost any batter mix - we had a packet of muffin mix - I just diluted it a little as it was a bit too thick.

You'd be surprised as how great some mixes intended for cakes, etc taste - personally I find the 'original' recipie far too sweet.

It is also possible to buy the dimpled plate suitable to cook on gas or other appliances.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Rapparee
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 08:45 PM

Geez, you guys.

1. Make a fire OVER a bed of rocks.
2. While the fire is burning down to coals, dig a hole and line it with aluminum foil (preferably). The hole should be about a half-gallon (2 liters) in size -- and if you MUST use more than one sheet of aluminum foil be sure to crimp the join with tight seams.
3. Fill the hole with as much clear water as it will hold (or as much as can be found).
4. Using green sticks, transfer hot rocks to the water. Replace them as they cool, eventually you will have boiling water -- safe to drink.

or

1. Dig a hole about 2 or 3 feet across and about 18 inches deep (do your own metric conversions).
2. Place a clean can or pot in the middle of the hold (a quart size would be good).
3. Line the hole around the can or pot with green leaved plant clippings (you can even pee on the greenery if you'd like).
4. Put a sheet of (preferably) clear polyethylene over the hole and hold it in place with rocks all around.
5. Put a small rock or pebble in the middle, so that you form a cone over the can.
6. Let the moisture from the stuff around the can evaporate into pure water vapor and condense on the poly.
7. Voila! Distilled water!

or

1. Put a can or pot in the middle of a bigger can or pot. Put something clean in it to make sure it doesn't float.
2. Put snow or "bad water" (preferably clear) around the center can.
3. Put the pot over a heat source.
4. Put the lid on the big pot, but UPSIDE-DOWN. Fill it with ice or snow or anything to cool it.
5. The bad water will boil, the steam will condense on the inside of the inverted lid, and condense back into the can.
6. Voile! Distilled water!

Now, I'm not saying that these last two could be used to distill other things, like, say, cheap wine...but it's handy to know how to distill water in case you need it....


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Rapparee
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 08:49 PM

Everyone here DOES know how to start a fire without matches, right? If you don't, just find someone who has a fire and borrow some of it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: maire-aine
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 09:22 PM

I did start a fire without matches as a kid (Campfire Girl), so that's why I still carry a lighter, even though I quit smoking.

Maryanne


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Janie
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 10:25 PM

Well said, Maryanne:>)


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Deckman
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 10:32 PM

A hundred years ago, when I was younger, I contracted to build a house four hours drive from home. The night before I left, I took a large beef chuck roast (cheap), sprinkled dry onion soup mix on it, wrapped it in three layers of tinfoil, and wired it to the manifold of my 62 chevy flat head, six cyliner, P.U.

When I got to the jobsite, I just shut off the engine and went to work. Come supper time, it was still warm and delicious. bob(deckman)Nelson


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 08 Aug 10 - 11:37 PM

"line it with aluminum foil"

Well actually, when the shit hits the fan, we won't be able to get foil, so you can substitute the stomach - opened out - or freshly stripped hide of an animal or annoying close minded bigoted Mudcatter passing by. The first batch will be a little contaminated what with the blood and all, so perhaps you can just use that batch for soup - it should be fine after a light rinse out for making tea....


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: open mike
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 04:04 AM

i have been enjoying making hummus (hummous)
you do it in a blender. no cooking required
(unless you start with raw garbanzos then
you would have to cook them first..)

1 can garbanzo or chick peas
1 clove garlic
juice of a lemon or 1/2 cup
1/4 olive oil
1/3 cup tahini (sesame seed paste)
some fresh parsley
pinch salt
dash paprika

whiz it all together until smoothe
and use as spread, dip, sandwich fillng or dressing


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: Rapparee
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 06:15 PM

Fooles, I didn't want to bring that up.

Anyway, once you have drinkable water you can make all sorts of things. Soup. Boiled meats and veggies and use the stock for soup.

Or kill an animal and slice the meat into pieces about .25 inches thick, then hang in the sun to dry (works best in desert-like areas). Or start a smudge fire under the drying racks.

If you're somewhere that cattails proliferate you can dig up the roots and cook them like you would potatoes. The seeds can be used as a flour substitute if ground between rocks, or to extend flour you might have. In the spring the shoots can be eaten like asparagus. (They taste like chicken -- everything in the wild tastes like chicken, including rattlesnake, whale, beaver, bison, squirrel, cedar stumps, death camas, catfish, and monksbane.


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Subject: RE: BS: Kitchenless Cooking
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 09 Aug 10 - 06:46 PM

"If you're somewhere that cattails proliferate"

... and of course there are many uses for the many other part of "The 'Cat" .... :-P


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