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Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat

Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jan 10 - 06:05 PM
Charley Noble 24 Jan 10 - 07:22 PM
RTim 24 Jan 10 - 07:23 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jan 10 - 08:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jan 10 - 09:12 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 24 Jan 10 - 09:41 PM
Artful Codger 24 Jan 10 - 11:07 PM
Artful Codger 24 Jan 10 - 11:13 PM
Artful Codger 24 Jan 10 - 11:31 PM
Artful Codger 24 Jan 10 - 11:46 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 25 Jan 10 - 05:21 PM
Artful Codger 25 Jan 10 - 08:13 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 10 - 10:49 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 10 - 10:58 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 10 - 11:06 AM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM
Jim Dixon 27 Jan 10 - 03:42 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 27 Jan 10 - 04:58 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: SUSAN ON MY KNEE
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 06:05 PM

Fiddler's Green by Captain Marryat was posted in thread 47889:
Fiddler's Green

Here are some from The Dog Fiend or Snarleyyow

Lyr Add: SUSAN ON MY KNEE

1
'Twas on the twenty-fourth of June I sail'd away to sea,
I turn'd my pockets in the lap of Susan on my knee;
Says I, my dear, 'tis all I have, I wish that it were more,
It can't be help'd, says Susan then, you know that we've spent galore.

"You know we've spent galore, my Bill,
And merry have been we,
Again you must your pockets fill,
For Susan on your knee."

Chorus-
For Susan on my knee, my boys,
With Susan on my knee.

2
The gale came on in thunder, lads, in lightning, and in foam,
Before that we had sail'd away three hundred miles from home;
And on the Sunday morning, lads, the coast was on our lee,
Oh, then I thought of Portsmouth, and of Susan on my knee.

For howling winds and waves to boot,
With black rocks on the lee,
Did not so well my fancy suit,
As Susan on my knee.

Chorus

3
Next morning we were cast away upon the Frenchman's shore,
We saved our lives, but not our all, for we could save no more;
They march'd us to a prison, so we lost our liberty,
I peep'd between the bars, and sigh'd for Susan on my knee.

For bread so black, and wine so sour,
And a sous a-day to me,
Make me long ten times an hour
For Susan on my knee.

Chorus

4
One night we smash'd our jailer's skull, and off our boat did steer,
And in the offing were pick'd up by a jolly privateer;
We sail'd in her the cruise, my boys, and prizes did take we,
I'll be at Portsmouth soon, thinks I, with Susan on my knee.

We shared three hundred pounds a man,
I made all sail with glee,
Again I danced and toss'd my can,
With Susan on my knee.

Chorus-
With Susan on my knee, my boys.
With Susan on my knee.

Extended chorus by all hands-

Very good song, and very well sung,
Jolly companions every one;
We are all here for mirth and glee,
We are all here for jollity.
Very good song, very well sung,
Jolly companions every one;
Put your hats on to keep your heads warm,
A little more grog will do us no harm.

Chap. IX, sung by Jemmy with fiddle accompaniment. Untitled, but for most of the songs, a title is easily taken from the chorus.

Captain Frederick Marryat, 1792-1848. He entered the Royal Navy in 1806 aboard a ship commanded by Lord Cochrane. After several engagements, Marryat contracted malaria in 1809 and returned to England aboard HMS Victorious. Returning to service, he was promoted to Commander in 1815.
He sketched Napoleon on his death bed in St. Helena. After service to Burma, and raised to Captain, he resigned his commission in 1830, when his first novel, The Naval Officer, was published.
Snarleyyow, or The Dog Fiend, 1837, was for young people. (More at Wikipedia).

-------------
More songs to follow.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Charley Noble
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 07:22 PM

Q-

Keep 'em coming!

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: RTim
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 07:23 PM

Is this the same Marryat who wrote - Children of the New Forest?

Tim Radford (who was once one!)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 08:42 PM

He wrote Children of the New Forest in 1847.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 09:12 PM

The famous book, Eighteen Views Taken at and Near Rangoon by Lieutenant Joseph Moore and Captain Frederick Marryat, 1825, aquatint engraved plates, is difficult to find in complete condition.

A single plate from the work, "Inside View of the Gold Temple on the Terrace of the Great Dagon Pagoda at Rangoon" (Pl. 8) may be had for $1250.00 from Abebooks (others in the same price range).
Captain Marryat also was an illustrator, but only considered an "acceptable" artist.

Marryat wrote and contributed to history and travel books, inc. A Diary in America with Remarks on its Institutions.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 09:41 PM

Lyr. Add: Crying's All My Eye
Captain Marryat

1
Oh, what's the use of piping, boys, I never yet could larn,
The good of water from the eyes I never could disarn;
Salt water we have sure enough without our pumping more;
So let us leave all crying to the girls we leave onshore.
They may pump,
As in we jump
To the boat. and say, "Good-bye;"
But as for men,
Why, I say again,
That crying's all my eye.
2
I went to school when quite a boy, and never larnt to read,
The master tried both head and tail- at last it was agreed
No larning he could force in me, so they sent me off to sea;
My mother wept and wrung her hands, and cried most bitterly.
So she did pump,
As I did jump
In the boat, and said, "Good-bye;"
But as for me,
Who was sent to sea,
To cry ws all my eye.
3
I courted Poll, a buxom lass; when I return'd A B,
I bought her ear-rings, hat and shawl, a sixpence did break we;
At last 'twas time to be on board, so, Poll, says I, farewell;
She roar'd and said, that leaving her was like a funeral knell.
So she did pump,
As I did jump
In the boat, and said, "Good-bye;"
But as for me,
With the rate A B,
To cry was all my eye.
4
I soon went back, I shoved on shore, and Polly I did meet,
For she was watching on the shore, her sweetheart for to greet;
She threw her arms around me then, and much to my surprise,
She vow'd she was so happy that she pump'd with both her eyes.
So she did pump,
As I did jump
To kiss her lovingly;
But, I say again,
That as for men,
Crying is all my eye.
5
Then push the can around, my boys, and let us merry be;
We'll rig the pumps if a leak we spring, and work most merrily;
Salt water we have sure enough, we'll add not to its store,
But drink, and laugh, and sing, and chat, and call again for more.
The girls may pump,
As in we jump
To the boat, and say, "Good-bye;"
But as for we,
Who sailors be,
Crying is all my eye.

Sung by 'Obadiah Coble', Snarleyyow, or the Dog Fiend, 1837, Chap. IX. "A long chapter, in which there is lamentation, singing, bibbling, and dancing."


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Artful Codger
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 11:07 PM

Very Good Song

Chorus.—Very good song, and very well sung,
Jolly companions every one;
We are all here for mirth and glee,
We are all here for jollity.
Very good song, and very well sung,
Jolly companions every one;
Put your hats on to keep your beads warm,
A little more grog will do us no harm.

From Snarley-yow, or The Dog Fiend, by Frederick Marryat, 1837.


Per A Dictionary of Music and Musicians (George Grove), the first couplet is sung to first strain of "Lilliburlero" (quick step part), composed by Henry Purcell and published in The Delightful Companion (2nd ed. 1686):

X:1
T:March [Lilliburlero, first part, quick step]
C:Henry Purcell
M:C/
L:1/8
K:C
cdcB c2G2 | c2d2 (ef) (fe/f/) | g2fe a2g2 |
fedc d2B2 | cBcd c2G2 | c2d2 (ef) (Tfe/f/) |
g2fe a2A2 |d2B2 c4 || dcBA G2d2 | g2df Te2(dc) |
f2(Tgf/g/) a2_b2 | Tg4 Tf3e | d2(cB) g2(fe) | c2TBA f2(ed) |
TB2(AG) c3d | Td4 c4 H||


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Artful Codger
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 11:13 PM

Also from Snarly-yow:


The Captain Stood on the Carronade

The captain stood on the carronade—first lieutenant, says he,
Send all my merry men aft here, for they must list to me:
I haven't the gift of the gab, my sons—because I'm bred to the sea;
That ship there is a Frenchman, who means to fight with we.
Odds blood, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea,
I've fought 'gainst every odds—but I've gain'd the victory.

That ship there is a Frenchman, and if we don't take she,
'Tis a thousand bullets to one, that she will capture we;
I havn't the gift of the gab, my boys; so each man to his gun;
If she's not mine in half an hour, I'll flog each mother's son.
Odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea,
I've fought 'gainst every odds—and I've gain'd the victory.

We fought for twenty minutes, when the Frenchman had enough;
I little thought, said he, that your men were of such stuff;
The captain took the Frenchman's sword, a low bow made to he;
I havn't the gift of the gab, monsieur, but polite I wish to be.
Odds bobs, hammer and tongs, long as I've been to sea,
I've fought 'gainst every odds—and I've gain'd the victory.

Our captain sent for all of us; my merry men, said he,
I haven't the gift of the gab, my lads, but yet I thankful be:
You've done your duty handsomely, each man stood to his gun;
If you hadn't, you villains, as sure as day, I'd have flogg'd each mother's son.
Odds bobs, hammer and tongs, as long as I'm at sea,
I'll fight 'gainst every odds—and I'll gain the victory.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Artful Codger
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 11:31 PM

And another, from the same source. I've omitted most of the narrative text between the verses, except for a paragraph relevant to performance. The verse beginning "Yack alive" was sung by a Scandinavian crewman.


Jack's Alive, and a Merry Dog

Jack's alive, and a merry dog,
When he gets on shore
He calls for his glass of grog,
He drinks, and he calls for more.
So drink, and call for what you please,
Until you've had your whack, boys;
We think no more of raging seas,
Now that we've come back, boys.

Chorus: With a whip, snip, high cum diddledy,
The cog-wheels of life have need of much oiling;
Smack, crack,—this is our jubilee:
Huzza, my lads! we'll keep the pot boiling.

All the seamen joined in the chorus, which they accompanied both with their hands and feet, snapping their fingers at whip and snip, and smacking their hands at smack and crack, while they danced round in the most grotesque manner...

Jack's alive and merry, my boys,
When he's on blue water,
In the battle's rage and noise,
And the main-deck slaughter.
So drink and call for what you please,
Until you've had your whack, boys;
We'll think no more of angry seas,
Until that we go back, boys.

Yack alive and merry my boys,
Ven he get him frau
And he vid her ringlet toys,
As he take her paw.
So drink, and call for vat you please,
Until you hab your vack, boys;
Ve'll think no more of angry seas,
Till ve standen back, boys.

Jack's alive and merry, boys,
When he's got the shiners;
Heh! for rattle, fun, and noise,
Hang all grumbling whiners.
Then drink, and call for what you please
Until you've had your whack, boys;
We think no more of raging seas,
Now that we've come back, boys.

Jack's alive and full of fun,
When his hulk is crazy,
As he basks in Greenwich sun
Jolly still, though lazy.
So drink, and call for what you please,
Until you've had your whack, boys;
We'll think no more of raging seas,
Now that we've come back, boys.

From Snarley-yow, or The Dog Fiend, by Frederick Marryat, 1837.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Artful Codger
Date: 24 Jan 10 - 11:46 PM

In my scan-through of Snarley-yow, some time ago, I made note of some other poems I found interesting, though this list is hardly complete, and for most I did not extract the texts. They were:

Port Admiral
Short stay speak was the anchor (1 verse)
Oh, what's the use of piping, boys, I never yet could larn
I suppose that you think 'cause my trousers are tarry
Bless my eyes, how young Bill threw his shiners away (Don't forget there's tomorrow)
Lost, stolen, or stray'd, / The heart of a young maid
When will you give up this life of wild roving?
Fond Mary sat on Henry's knee
I've often heard the chaplain say, when Davey Jones is nigh
Fill, lads, fill

And these may be found in another novel by Marryat, Poor Jack:

Farewell and adieu to you, Spanish ladies
Nigger Gin'ral Gabriel ("Listen, my boys, and I will tell you")
It was one November--the second day
Now your fader is asleep, maid, listen unto me
Sam Swipes, he was a seaman true

I scanned through a few other novels of his (Peter Simple, The Phantom Ship and The Pirate) but without finding additional poems that interested me.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 25 Jan 10 - 05:21 PM

Not much merit to some of the Marryat 'songs', except to the narrative.
This one is not too bad.

Better Luck Still

1
Fill, lads, fill;
Fill, lads, fill.
Here we have a cure
For every ill.
If fortune's unkind
As the north-east wind,
Still we must endure,
Trusting to our cure,
In better luck still.
2
Drink, boys, drink;
Drink, boys, drink.
The bowl let us drain,
With right good will.
If women deceive
Why should we grieve?
Forgeting our pain,
Love make again,
With better luck still.
3
Sing, lads, sing;
Sing, lads, sing.
Our voices we'll raise;
Be merry still;
If dead to-morrow,
We brave all sorrow,
Life's a weary maze-
When we end our days,
'Tis better luck still.

Also from "Snarleyyow,....," Chap. 51.


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Subject: Lyr Add: Port Admiral (Frederick Marryat)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 25 Jan 10 - 08:13 PM

Port Admiral

'Twas at the landing-place that's just below Mount Wyse,
Poll lean'd against the sentry's box, a tear in both her eyes;
Her apron twisted round her arms, all for to keep them warm,
Being a windy Christmas-day, and also a snow-storm.

And Bet and Sue
Both stood there too,
A shivering by her side,
They both were dumb,
And both look'd glum,
As they watch'd the ebbing tide.
Poll put her arms a-kimbo,
At the admiral's house look'd she,
To thoughts before in limbo,
She now a vent gave free.
You have sent the ship in a gale to work,
On a lee shore to be jamm'd,
I'll give you a piece of my mind, old Turk,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

Chorus.—We'll give you a piece of our mind, old Turk,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

Who ever heard in the sarvice of a frigate made to sail
On Christmas-day, it blowing hard, with sleet, and snow, and hail?
I wish I had the fishing of your back that is so bent,
I'd use the galley poker hot unto your heart's content.

Here Bet and Sue
Are with me too,
A shivering by my side,
They both are dumb,
And both look glum,
And watch the ebbing tide.
Poll put her arms a-kimbo,
At the admiral's house look'd she,
To thoughts that were in limbo,
She now a vent gave free.
You've got a roaring fire I'll bet,
In it your toes are jamm'd:
Let's give him a piece of our mind, my Bet,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

Chorus.—Let's give him a piece of our mind, my Bet,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

I had the flour and plums all pick'd, and suet all chopp'd fine,
To mix into a pudding rich for all the mess to dine;
I pawn'd my ear-rings for the beef, it weigh'd at least a stone,
Now my fancy man is sent to sea, and I am left alone.
Here's Bet and Sue
Who stand here too,
A shivering by my side;
They both are dumb,
They both look glum,
And watch the ebbing tide.
Poll put her arms a-kimbo,
At the admiral's house look'd she,
To thoughts that were in limbo,
She now a vent gave free.
You've got a turkey, I'll be bound,
With which you will be cramm'd;
I'll give you a bit of my mind, old hound,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

Chorus.—I'll give you a bit of my mind, old hound,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

I'm sure that in this weather they cannot cook their meat,
To eat it raw on Christmas-day will be a pleasant treat;
But let us all go home, girls; it's no use waiting here,
We'll hope that Christmas-day to come they will have better cheer.
So, Bet and Sue,
Don't stand here too,
A shivering by my side;
Don't keep so dumb,
Don't look so glum,
Nor watch the ebbing tide.
Poll put her arms a-kimbo,
At the admiral's house look'd she,
To thoughts that were in limbo,
She now a vent gave free.
So while they cut their raw salt junks,
With dainties you'll be cramm'd;
Here's once for all my mind, old hunks,
Port Admiral, you be damned.

Chorus.—So once for all our mind, old hunks,
Port Admiral, you be damned.


From Snarley-yow, or The Dog Fiend, Frederick Marryat, 1837. Sung "to a slow air".


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Subject: Lyr Add: LOST STOLEN OR STRAYED (Frederick Marryat
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 10:49 AM

Not a sea song, but from the same book:

From Snarleyyow: or, The Dog Fiend. An Historical Novel, Volume 2 by Frederick Marryat (Philadelphia: E. L. Carey and A. Hart, 1837), page 11:

1. Lost, stolen, or stray'd,
The heart of a young maid;
Whoever the same shall find,
And prove so very kind,
To yield it on desire,
They shall rewarded be,
And that most handsomely,
With kisses one, two, three.
    Cupid is the crier.
    Ring-a-ding, a-ding,
    Cupid is the crier.

2. O yes! O yes! O yes!
Here is a pretty mess,
A maiden's heart is gone,
And she is left forlorn,
And panting with desire;
Whoever shall bring it me,
They shall rewarded be
With kisses one, two, three.
    Cupid is the crier.
    Ring-a-ding, a-ding,
    Cupid is the crier.

3. 'Twas lost on Sunday eve,
Or taken without leave,
A virgin's heart so pure,
She can't the loss endure,
And surely will expire;
Pity her misery.
Rewarded you shall be,
With kisses one, two, three.
    Cupid is the crier,
    Ring-a-ding, a-ding,
    Cupid is the crier.

4. The maiden sought around,
It was not to be found,
She search'd each nook and dell,
Haunts she loved so well,
All anxious with desire;
The wind blew ope his vest,
When, lo! the toy in quest,
She found within the breast
    Of Cupid, the false crier.
    Ring-a-ding, a-ding-a-ding,
    Cupid the false crier.


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Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN WILL YOU GIVE UP THIS LIFE OF...
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 10:58 AM

Ibid, page 12:


"When will you give up this life of wild roving?
When shall we be quiet and happy on shore?
When will you to church lead your Susan, so loving,
And sail on the treacherous billows no more?"

"My ship is my wife, Sue, no other I covet,
Till I draw the firm splice that's betwixt her and me:
I'll roam on the ocean, for much do I love it—
To wed with another were rank bigamy."

"O William, what nonsense you talk, you are raving!
Pray how can a ship and a man become one?
You say so because you no longer are craving,
As once you were truly—and I am undone."

"You wrong me, my dearest, as sure I stand here,
As sure as I'll sail again on the wide sea;
Some day I will settle, and marry with you, dear,
But now 'twould be nothing but rank bigamy.'

"Then tell me the time, dear William, whenever
Your Sue may expect this divorce to be made;
When you'll surely be mine, when no object shall sever,
But lock'd in your arms I'm no longer afraid."

"The time it will be when my pockets are lined,
I'll then draw the splice 'tween my vessel and me,
And lead you to church, if you're still so inclined—
But before, my dear Sue, 'twere rank bigamy."


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Subject: Lyr Add: FOND MARY SAT ON HENRY'S KNEE (F Marryat)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 11:06 AM

Ibid, page 14:


1. Fond Mary sat on Henry's knee,
"I must be home exact," said he,
And see, the hour is come."
"No, Henry, you shall never go
Until me how to count you show,
That task must first be done."

2. Then Harry said, "As time is short,
Addition you must first be taught;—
Sum up these kisses sweet;
Now prove your sum by kissing me:—
Yes, that is right, 'twas three times three;—
Arithmetic's a treat.

3. "And now there is another term,
Subtraction you have yet to learn:
Take four away from these.
Yes, that is right, you've made it out."
Says Mary, with a pretty pout,
"Subtraction don't me please."

4. Division's next upon the list;
Young Henry taught while Mary kiss'd,
And much admired the rule;
"Now, Henry, don't you think me quick?"
"Why, yes, indeed, you've learn'd the trick;
At kissing you're no fool."

5. To multiply was next the game,
Which Henry, by the method same,
To Mary fain would show;
But here her patience was worn out,
She multiplied too fast, I doubt;
He could no farther go.

6. "And now we must leave off, my dear,
The other rules are not as clear,
We'll try at them to-night."
"I'll come at eve, my Henry sweet,
Behind the hawthorn hedge we'll meet,
For learning's my delight."


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Subject: Lyr Add: YELLOW JACK (Frederick Marryat)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 03:13 PM

From Rattlin, the Reefer by Frederick Marryat (London: George Routledge and Sons, 1873), page 210:

[The accompanying narrative explains that at the end of each repeated chorus, a bumper of the previously-named beverage is drunk, and one of the forthcoming beverage is poured.]

CHORUS 1: "Yellow Jack! Yellow Jack! hie thee back! hie thee back!
To thy damp, drear abode in the jungle;
I'll be sober and staid,
And drink LEMONADE,
Try and catch me—you'll make a sad bungle,
Yellow Jack!

VERSE 1: "But he came, the queer thief, and he seized my right-hand,
And I writh'd and I struggled, yet could not withstand
His hot, griping grasp, though I drank lemonade,—
He grinn'd and he clutch'd me, though sober and staid.

REPEAT CHORUS 1.

CHORUS 2: "Yellow Jack! Yellow Jack! hie thee back! hie thee back!
To thy pestilent swamp quickly hie thee;
For I'll drink SANGAREE,
Whilst my heart's full of glee,
In thy death-doing might I'll defy thee,
Yellow Jack!

VERSE 2: "But the fiend persever'd and got hold of my side,
How I burn'd, and I froze, and all vainly I tried
To get rid of his grasp—though I drank sangaree,
No longer my bosom exulted with glee.

REPEAT CHORUS 2.

CHORUS 3: "Yellow Jack! Yellow Jack! hie thee back! hie thee back!
Begone to thy father, old Sootie,
Pure WINE now I'll drink,
So Jack, I should think,
Of me thou wilt never make booty,
Yellow Jack!

VERSE 3: "But a third time he came, and seized hold of my head;
'Twas in vain that the doctor both blister'd and bled;
My hand, and my side, and my heart too, I think,
Would soon have been lost, though pure wine I might drink.'

REPEAT CHORUS 3.

CHORUS 4: "Yellow Jack! Yellow Jack! hie thee back! hie thee back
To the helldam, Corruption, thy mother;
For with BRANDY I'll save
My heart, and thus brave
Thee, and fell Death, thine own brother.
Yellow Jack!"

VERSE 4: "To brandy I took, then Jack took his leave,
Brandy-punch and neat brandy drink morn, noon, and eve,
At night drink, then sleep, and be sure, my brave boys,
Naught will quell Yellow Jack but neat brandy and noise.

REPEAT CHORUS 4.


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Subject: Lyr Add: SAYS THE PARSON, ONE DAY (F Marryat)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 03:42 PM

From The Dog Fiend: or, Snarleyyow by Frederick Marryat (London: George Routledge and Sons, 1873), page 42:

1. Says the parson, one day, as I cursed a Jew,
"Do you know, my lad, that we call it a sin?
I fear of you sailors there are but few,
St. Peter, to heaven, will ever let in."
Says I, "Mr. Parson, to tell you my mind,
No sailors to knock were ever yet seen.
Those who travel by land may steer 'gainst wind,
But we shape a course for Fiddler's Green.

CHORUS: "For Fiddler's Green, where seamen true,
When here they've done their duty,
The bowl of grog shall still renew,
And pledge to love and beauty."

2. Says the parson, "I hear you've married three wives.
Now do you not know that that is a sin?
You sailors, you lead such very bad lives,
St. Peter, to heaven, will ne'er let you in."
"Parson," says I, "in each port I've but one,
And never had more, wherever I've been.
Below I'm obliged to be chaste as a nun,
But I'm promised a dozen at Fiddler's Green. CHORUS

3. Says the parson, says he, "You're drunk, my man,
And do you not know that that is a sin?
If you sailors will ever be swigging your can,
To heaven you surely will never get in."
"(Hiccup.) Parson, you may as well be mum.
'Tis only on shore I'm this way seen;
But oceans of punch, and rivers of rum,
Await the sailor at Fiddler's Green. CHORUS


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Sea Songs by Captain Marryat
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 27 Jan 10 - 04:58 PM

Good to have the words to "Fiddler's Green repeated here. I linked the lyrics at the top of this thread, but it is handy to have them all together.

As noted in that older thread, this 1837 poem by Marryat was the first to use the term "Fiddler's Green" in the sense common to seamen.


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