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Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues

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*#1 PEASANT* 03 Mar 10 - 08:29 AM
manitas_at_work 03 Mar 10 - 09:04 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 03 Mar 10 - 09:26 AM
Dave MacKenzie 03 Mar 10 - 09:35 AM
PoppaGator 03 Mar 10 - 05:28 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 13 Mar 10 - 09:32 PM
Dave MacKenzie 14 Mar 10 - 05:14 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 14 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM
Dave MacKenzie 14 Mar 10 - 08:42 PM
The Fooles Troupe 15 Mar 10 - 01:42 AM
Folkiedave 15 Mar 10 - 09:41 AM
Folkiedave 15 Mar 10 - 09:41 AM
*#1 PEASANT* 15 Mar 10 - 09:49 AM
Jim Dixon 15 Mar 10 - 02:38 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 15 Mar 10 - 04:44 PM
mayomick 16 Mar 10 - 08:46 AM
George Ellias 16 Mar 10 - 10:56 PM
*#1 PEASANT* 16 Mar 10 - 11:22 PM
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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 03 Mar 10 - 08:29 AM

Another problem with pitchers is that there are two sizes. One is much larger than the other so one must be careful.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: manitas_at_work
Date: 03 Mar 10 - 09:04 AM

Which sizes? In the UK you usually only see a 4 pint pitcher.

I've only ever come across one tasty alcohol-free bitter. This was Smethwicks (it wasn't entirely alcohol free) from Guinness. I suspect they dropped it as it was in competition with Kalibre ( it was entirely flavour free) which was being positioned as a premium lager and therefore more expensive.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 03 Mar 10 - 09:26 AM

Having gone totally on the waggon for a good year or so I went on the alcohol free beer. Some good ones out there. Guinness made a great one and there are at least two widely marketed german ones. Trouble is the have great flavor but loads of calories. I am also dealing with need for weight loss.....

CB


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 03 Mar 10 - 09:35 AM

Some of the German alcohol free beers almost taste like beer.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: PoppaGator
Date: 03 Mar 10 - 05:28 PM

Apropos of drinking in colonial America: "hard" apple cider was the daily beverage of choice for most people. The varieties of apples under cultivation were generally much too tart to eat, and used only to make cider. The famous "Johnny Appleseed" planted cider apple trees all over the countryside and well into the frontier territories of the time.

Water was still generally suspect as unhealthy, and milk was uesd primarily for butter and cheesemaking.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 13 Mar 10 - 09:32 PM

Being made from poor water and without flavoring your basic english ale tasted terrible as hops were a later development hence, popularity of spicing the ale- infact wassail was not really special.

Beer came to the Uk in 17th century and was considered by the wine drinking elite (Ben Jonson and Canary) to be "luther's Beer" a german plague.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 05:14 PM

Beer came to the UK in the 17th century? Beer was being brewed in Britain long before the introduction of hopped beer by the Flemings in the 15th century!


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 06:59 PM

must check my source back later- maybe it was rise of popularity. But I do have a quote.....


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 14 Mar 10 - 08:42 PM

Here's another quote:

"Fraoch - Heather Ale 4.1% abv
Brewed in Scotland since 2000 B.C. heather ale is probably the oldest style of ale still produced in the world. From an ancient Gaelic recipe for "leann fraoch" (heather ale) it has been revived and reintroduced to the Scottish culture."


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk ven
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 01:42 AM

"Being made from poor water and without flavoring"

I don't know of any period recipe for brewing anything that didn't involve boiling the water - hence the reason why any brewed beverage was less toxic and more healthy than unsterile water...


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: Folkiedave
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 09:41 AM

A doctor did ask me how much I drank and pointing out that I knew he would double what I said I calculated more or less exactly how much beer I had drink in the previous week. I got the "slow down", "don't drink as much", "that's disgusting", "way over government guidelines", etc....

As he went out the door I whispered "Do you want to know about the ine as well?"


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: Folkiedave
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 09:41 AM

"wine" of course. Sorry.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 09:49 AM

On my last vacation in the hospital....

Doctor had the staff send me a tray- it contained a glass filled with a white liquid they had something to do with cows. Amazing and the cows don't mind you drinking their stuff?

Another glass had a clear liquid in it. You know it was the same stuff my wife uses to wash the dishes and the clothing. The thought of drinking that stuff really turned me off.

I had answered the initial questionarre honestly.

Each vital signs check night and day nurse would ask me if I was nervous
I was not never had been and wasnt a problem. After about the tenth time I finally asked them why they asked. They said they had a pill for that. I said why. They said that the quack thought I might be undergoing withdrawall.

I responded I beg your pardon, I am a trained athlete.

Conrad


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk ven
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 02:38 PM

Pitchers? I though in the UK they called them bowlers.

Oh, well, I never did understand cricket.

I have never seen a pitcher of beer in the UK. (I have seen some nice pictures of beer, though. I used to have a nice framed picture of the Harvey's brewery, but I accidentally left it behind when I cleared out an office I once used, and it disappeared.)

Are pitchers a new development? I think the last time I was there was about 5 years ago.

In the US, pitchers are commonly seen where draft beer is sold, but, as PoppaGator said, several people normally share one. With groups of 5 or more people, a pitcher normally corresponds to a "round" as in, "I'll buy the next round." (Do you use that term in the UK?) If everyone at the table buys a round (i.e. a pitcher), then, by the end of an evening, you will have consumed the equivalent of a pitcher of beer, yet I have never seen anyone buy a pitcher just for himself. If you did, people would look askance at you. They would wonder, "What's the matter with him? Doesn't he have any friends to share that with? He must be an alcoholic, to enjoy drinking alone like that."

Once or twice, I have shared a pitcher with my wife, but that's more than I usually care to drink. What's the point of getting tipsy with your wife? If you're not meeting friends, what's the point of staying in a bar longer than it takes to finish a meal?

Maybe we should compare sizes. (If you show me yours….)

I know that in the UK, beer is sold by the pint or half-pint; that a British pint is 20 ounces; and that a British ounce is the same as an American ounce. Furthermore a British beer-glass is marked with a tiny crown to show that it has been certified to hold exactly a pint (or half-pint).

In the US, a "glass" of beer is whatever size the proprietor wants to sell you. If you ask, the bartender will show you a glass before he fills it, or maybe tell you how many ounces it holds. I don't think there is a standard, but I'd guess the average "glass" holds 8 or 10 ounces. In addition, the bar will usually offer at least one larger size called a "mug" (if it has a handle) or a "schooner" (if it has a stem) or a "pint" (if it has neither). I don't think a "pint" is necessarily exactly a pint by measure. I would guess these larger sizes vary from 12 to 20 ounces.

Pitchers vary in size, too. I would guess a pitcher holds four or five mugs (or whatever the bar uses as its larger size glass).


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 15 Mar 10 - 04:44 PM

I like to shut the heat and electric off and go down to the pub and get my work done. I generally have a few books and a file or two of paperwork. I order pitchers of beer so the wait staff can have a break and it can warm up slightly and so that I dont run out so often thus having to call for a wait staffer or get up. Mainly convenience but occasionally the volume purchase will save money. I used to meet folk in the back terraces of Newcastle upon tyne who never went home enjoying the warm coal fire in the lounge bar sipping tea doing needlework singing the occasional song. One folk musician complained that I drank cheap beer- easier for him to say as the house gave him bottles of import and I had to pay for mine but never a comment or bad look.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: mayomick
Date: 16 Mar 10 - 08:46 AM

I like your style Peasant . You really do seem to have living the cheap life down to a fine art , you'd probably save on toilet paper that way as well. It's nice of you to be so considerate to the waiting staff , giving them breaks by ordering your beer by the pitcher.


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: George Ellias
Date: 16 Mar 10 - 10:56 PM

Yes. Drink and be merry!

-George


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Subject: RE: Should drink pitchers be required for folk venues
From: *#1 PEASANT*
Date: 16 Mar 10 - 11:22 PM

thank you mayomick terrible especially when eating Mexican to have to wait 20 minutes for the next bottle. I find also that ordering four bottles or so from the start perplexes the wait staff no end


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