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Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)

DigiTrad:
WESTERING HOME


Related threads:
Chord Req: Trasna Na Dtonnta (5)
Hey TROLL! Can I borrow this: Westering Home (14)
Lyr Req: Westering Home (15)


peterwright@worldnet.att.net 07 Apr 97 - 09:46 PM
Teru 08 Apr 97 - 05:10 AM
Ralph Butts 08 Apr 97 - 07:06 AM
Bobby O'Brien 08 Apr 97 - 08:41 AM
Teru 08 Apr 97 - 07:45 PM
Bobby O'Brien 09 Apr 97 - 07:41 AM
Anne Cormack 19 Apr 97 - 09:21 AM
Murray@saltspring.com 20 Apr 97 - 01:44 AM
dick greenhaus 20 Apr 97 - 12:06 PM
Teru 21 Apr 97 - 01:40 AM
Teru 21 Apr 97 - 08:17 PM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 16 Feb 00 - 11:31 PM
GUEST, Bob Bolton('s other computer) 17 Feb 00 - 06:35 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 17 Feb 00 - 10:51 AM
Troll 17 Feb 00 - 11:07 AM
Bert 17 Feb 00 - 11:23 AM
GUEST,hugh 21 Mar 02 - 06:16 PM
Kenny B 21 Mar 02 - 06:36 PM
Kenny B 21 Mar 02 - 06:44 PM
greg stephens 21 Mar 02 - 07:15 PM
Mrrzy 22 Mar 02 - 09:18 AM
MMario 22 Mar 02 - 09:32 AM
Scabby Douglas 22 Mar 02 - 10:23 AM
Willa 24 Mar 02 - 03:23 PM
GUEST,Scabby Doug (without a cookie) 24 Mar 02 - 03:46 PM
Dave the Gnome 24 Mar 02 - 05:06 PM
Teru 17 May 02 - 07:42 AM
GUEST,mike at mgm@btconnect.com 12 Mar 03 - 10:37 AM
Declan 12 Mar 03 - 11:26 AM
alinact 12 Mar 03 - 11:34 AM
Sandy Mc Lean 12 Mar 03 - 09:53 PM
Boab 13 Mar 03 - 01:54 AM
Strupag 13 Mar 03 - 03:13 AM
Jim McLean 13 Mar 03 - 06:43 AM
IanC 13 Mar 03 - 07:07 AM
Declan 13 Mar 03 - 07:16 AM
Strupag 13 Mar 03 - 01:22 PM
Felipa 13 Mar 03 - 01:24 PM
GUEST 28 Dec 03 - 01:58 PM
GUEST,Philippa 03 Jun 04 - 06:51 AM
George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca 26 Jun 04 - 04:57 PM
GUEST,mike sullivan from boston usa 30 Dec 04 - 10:08 AM
GUEST,shemac96@yahoo.com 20 Mar 05 - 01:48 AM
jacqui.c 20 Mar 05 - 06:44 AM
GUEST,Barrie Roberts 20 Mar 05 - 02:01 PM
Boab 20 Mar 05 - 11:52 PM
GUEST,Neville D'Herville 25 Dec 06 - 02:15 AM
Peace 25 Dec 06 - 02:58 AM
Peace 26 Dec 06 - 12:10 AM
Tattie Bogle 26 Dec 06 - 08:34 AM
Teribus 27 Feb 08 - 01:53 AM
GUEST,Gr8scot 08 Mar 09 - 07:17 PM
GUEST,Andrew Roberton 24 Jun 09 - 03:59 AM
Rumncoke 24 Jun 09 - 07:43 AM
goatfell 24 Jun 09 - 12:12 PM
bubblyrat 25 Jun 09 - 04:44 AM
Tattie Bogle 25 Jun 09 - 08:20 PM
goatfell 26 Jun 09 - 06:04 AM
GUEST,BEARGER 12 Aug 09 - 11:46 AM
Jim McLean 12 Aug 09 - 03:48 PM
GUEST,Here's the Corrie's singing Westering Home 16 Aug 09 - 09:18 PM
GUEST,IslayLuv 18 Apr 11 - 03:19 AM
doc.tom 18 Apr 11 - 06:14 AM
GUEST 16 Sep 11 - 10:18 AM
GUEST,SRD 16 Sep 11 - 04:04 PM
GUEST,Jo 16 Jun 12 - 05:36 AM
GUEST,Jo 16 Jun 12 - 05:44 AM
GUEST,Jo 16 Jun 12 - 05:48 AM
GUEST,Jo 16 Jun 12 - 05:49 AM
ollaimh 27 Feb 13 - 08:55 PM
Edthefolkie 22 Aug 13 - 06:50 AM
Edthefolkie 22 Aug 13 - 06:58 AM
MartinRyan 27 May 14 - 08:03 AM
Tattie Bogle 31 May 14 - 08:18 PM
GUEST,keberoxu 07 Aug 16 - 05:41 PM
Felipa 07 Aug 16 - 07:08 PM
Gallus Moll 07 Aug 16 - 08:50 PM
GUEST 07 Aug 16 - 09:18 PM
GUEST 03 Nov 16 - 07:54 AM
GUEST 03 Nov 16 - 07:31 PM
GUEST,Learaí na Láibe 04 Nov 16 - 03:55 PM
Felipa 05 Nov 16 - 05:59 AM
Felipa 05 Nov 16 - 06:07 AM
Felipa 05 Nov 16 - 06:15 AM
Felipa 05 Nov 16 - 06:43 AM
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Subject: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: peterwright@worldnet.att.net
Date: 07 Apr 97 - 09:46 PM

Could someone please give me the lyrics to : Westering home and a song in the air, Light in the eye and its goodbye to care, Laughter o' love and a welcoming there, Isle of my heart, my ain one.

Oh where are the folks like thte folks of the west Kindly and ..... and always the best, there I willhae me and there I will rest back hame with me ain folks in Islay

I've forgotten the nest verses if someone could please help me?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Teru
Date: 08 Apr 97 - 05:10 AM

You can find the lyrics somewhere on the INTERNET.

If you cannot, I'll write them here.

With regards

Teru


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Subject: Lyr Add: WESTERING HOME ( Hugh S. Roberton)
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 08 Apr 97 - 07:06 AM

WESTERING HOME

    CHORUS And it’s Westering home, and a song in the air,
    Light in the eye, and it’s goodbye to care.
    Laughter o’ love, and a welcoming there,
    Isle of my heart, my own one.

Tell me o’ lands o’ the Orient gay,
Speak o’ the riches and joys o’ Cathay;
Eh, but it’s grand to be wakin’ ilk day
To find yourself nearer to Isla.

    CHORUS

Where are the folk like the folk o’ the west?
Canty, and couthy, and kindly, the best.
There I would hie me and there I would rest
At hame wi’ my ain folk in Isla.

    CHORUS

^^^


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Bobby O'Brien
Date: 08 Apr 97 - 08:41 AM

Recorded in the early 1990's by Declan Nerney in Ireland, on the CD/tape "Declan Nerney's Favourites". Also record- ed in gaelic in 1977 by John Kerr (also Ireland) on the lp/cassette "My 14 Irish Requests".


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Teru
Date: 08 Apr 97 - 07:45 PM

Bobby,

Is the song Irish? I think it's Scottish.

Sincerely,

Teru


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Bobby O'Brien
Date: 09 Apr 97 - 07:41 AM

Gee, good question! haha

It has appeared on Irish albums that didnot include other Scottish songs.

But then, the Irish stole "Loch Lomond" and changed it to "Red is the Rose", and we completely robbed the Scots of "Dark Island" (...In the years long ago when I first left my home...)

We're thieves who claim everything we sing as our own :-)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Anne Cormack
Date: 19 Apr 97 - 09:21 AM

Westering Home is most definitely a Scottish song, the island that is mentioned is Islay,which is in the Hebrides off the north-west coast of Scotland - incidentally they make a very fine whisky too!!! The words were written by Hugh S. Robertson (1874 - 1952). The tune is partly "Bonny Strathyre", while the chorus was taken from the singing of Donald McIsaac. Robertson was knighted for his services to music in 1931.

Regards

Anne


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Murray@saltspring.com
Date: 20 Apr 97 - 01:44 AM

A wee correction-- it's Hugh S. Roberton (no S, oddly enough). I must say it bothers me no end when I see his songs published or recorded without any acknowledgement of the author. This goes for a good few songs, somehow:a lot of groups seem to think that if they hear a song that sounds traditional, it's "folk", ergo in public domain, and so fair game. Actually I'm bothered even when the song (or tune) is umpteen years old, like the great compositions of Scott Skinner. This topic, though, really belongs on another thread, I suppose. -- Murray.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 20 Apr 97 - 12:06 PM

Interestin'. I'va always considered the tune as essentially the same as the Muckin' O' Geordie's Byre---also known (in American Revolutiaonary times as The Scotch Watch.

And thanx, Murray, for the attribution.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Teru
Date: 21 Apr 97 - 01:40 AM

Well, I like this kind of discussion. Without my initial question on 8th April, this discussion could not have been brought up.

I was rewarded!

Thanks everybody

Teru


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Teru
Date: 21 Apr 97 - 08:17 PM

Anne,

I understand Weatering Home is absolutely a Scottish song. I have a wee question.

As far as I know, in medieval Scotland, Islay, together with Outer and Inner Hebrides, had belonged to Kingdom of the Isles until 1265. However, nowadays, Islay, as well as Jura, Mull, Tiree and Coll, is included in Strathclyde, while Skye, Rhum and Eigg are in Highland. The Outer Hebrides are now called Weatern Isles.

Is Islay in the Hebrides as you wrote? What islands are included in the Inner Hebrides?

I suppose Skye, Rhum and Eigg must be, and Coll, Tiree and Mull may be. Jura and Ilay are a bit far from these islands.

Is there any definition of the Hebrides?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 16 Feb 00 - 11:31 PM

I was just noticing that this thread listed Hugh Roberton as the author of this song. Any confirmations? It doesn't seem to have been added to the information in the lyrics in this file. Was it because it was unconfirmed?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST, Bob Bolton('s other computer)
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 06:35 AM

G'day all and any,

I must have missed this first time around ... One surprise on reading through was Dick Greenhaus's observation of the relationship of this tune to The Muckin' O' Geordie's Byre.

In ~37 years of playing The Muckin' O' Geordie's Byre, I had never played it slow enough to hear what it sounded like as a waltz instead of as a double jig: Dick Greenhaus must get to sessions not driven by manic Irish Fiddlers!

Regard(les)s,

Bob Bolton


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 10:51 AM

Bob, you might be right. I've seen it marked as Westering Home (Tune Mucking o' Geordie's Byre) for many years, so it wasn't a surprise. What was to me is the information on Hugh Roberton's involvement.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Troll
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 11:07 AM

When I first heard Westering Home, I thought that it was too short so I wrote a third verse which I sing whenever I perform the song.

Rolling along through the grey Irish Sea,
Ireland to windward and Man on our lee,
Up on the foredeck it's there that I'll be,
Awaitin' my first glimpse of Islay.

ch.

troll


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Bert
Date: 17 Feb 00 - 11:23 AM

Nice verse troll.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST,hugh
Date: 21 Mar 02 - 06:16 PM

westering home has arrangements for 4 part choirs. I'm told teh author was very keen people breathed in the right place so the sheet music also has these marked. Anyone got chords?


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Subject: Lyr/Chords Add: WESTERING HOME
From: Kenny B
Date: 21 Mar 02 - 06:36 PM

This is the chords that work for me
WESTERING HOME

Chorus
[G ]Westering home with a song in [D] the [G] air,
With a [C] light in the [G] eye, And its [Am] goodbye to [D] care,
[G]Laughter of love, And a [Em]welcoming [G] there,
Isle of my heart [D] my own [G] one,

[G}Tell me of lands of the [Am] Orient [G] gay,
Sing of the riches, And [Am] joys of Cath-[D]-ay,
[G]Aye but its grand, To be [Am] wa'kin' this [D] day,
[G] And find myself nearer [D] to Is-[G]-la,
Chorus

Where are the folk like the folk o' the west
Canty and couthie, And kindly the best,
There I will hie me, And there I will rest,
At hame wi' my ain folk in Isla,

Chorus


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Kenny B
Date: 21 Mar 02 - 06:44 PM

Correction Last line of 1st verse ...[G]Isla


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: greg stephens
Date: 21 Mar 02 - 07:15 PM

Troll, it'll be a few hours won't it?Go below and have a kip


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Mrrzy
Date: 22 Mar 02 - 09:18 AM

I know what kindly is, but what are canty and coothie?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: MMario
Date: 22 Mar 02 - 09:32 AM

Merriem Webster says they are respectively cheerful and pleasant.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Scabby Douglas
Date: 22 Mar 02 - 10:23 AM

Couthie/y is pretty much the opposite of Un-couth-y

Cheers

Steven


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Willa
Date: 24 Mar 02 - 03:23 PM

Subject: Glossary of Scottish Words From: John in Brisbane cantie / canty cheerful+ happy couthie /couthy agreeable+ comfortable, affable


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST,Scabby Doug (without a cookie)
Date: 24 Mar 02 - 03:46 PM

I find the Mudcat a focus of much synchronicity. Last night, (Saturday) I was listening to the McCalmans singing this.... Nice to see them again, and Stephen Quigg is settling in nicely....

CHeers

Steven


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Dave the Gnome
Date: 24 Mar 02 - 05:06 PM

My good friend Adam Stewart, rest his soul, always used to sing a Gaelic version after he had knocked back a goodly amount of the water of life. And then swear the next day that he knew not one word of Gaelic! He then used to announce it as the 'Wet String song'.

Knock. Knock.
Who's there?
Wet string.
Wet string who?
Wet string home wi' a song in the air.

Sorry...

Dave the Gnome


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Teru
Date: 17 May 02 - 07:42 AM

SCOTTISH OR IRISH ?

Westering Home is definitely a Scottish song. However, I have a CD "THE IRISH TENORS-ELLIS ISLAND" (Music Matters, 2001) in which Anthony Kearns, Ronan Tynan and Finbar Wright sing Trasna Na Dtonna (Over the Waves) in Irish language. Its tune is similar to, or almost same as that of "Westering Home". The song is included in "Iish Medley". Yes, the Irish changed the song to their own one.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST,mike at mgm@btconnect.com
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 10:37 AM


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Subject: Lyr Add: Trasna na dTonnta
From: Declan
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 11:26 AM

A lot of Irish Gaelic songs were written to the tunes of Scottish songs. Trasna na nDonnta is one such song, written to the air of Westering Home. The Gaelic version is attributed to Tomás Tóibín in Amhránleabhar Ógra Éireann. The lyrics, which express the same sentiments as Westering Home, but are not a direct translation, are as follows :

                Chorus :
Trasna na dtonnta, dul siar, dul siar
Slán leis an uaigneas is slán leis an gcian,
Geal é mo chroí, agus geal í an ghrian,
Geal bheith ag filleadh go hÉireann.

Chonac mo dhóthain de thíortha i gcéin,
Ór agus airgead, saibhreas an tsaoil,
Éiríonn an croí 'nam le breacadh gach lae
'S me ag druidim le dúthaigh mo mhuintir

                Chorus

Muintear an Iarthair 'siad cáirde mo chroí,
Fáilte is féile beidh romham ar gach taobh.
Ag fágaint an tsaoil seo, 'sé guidhim ar an Rí,
Gur leosan a sínfear i gcill mé

                Chorus.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: alinact
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 11:34 AM

Vera Lynn does a song called "Travelling Home" which uses the same tune as Westering Home. I think the best version I've heard Of WH is The Corries.

Allan


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Sandy Mc Lean
Date: 12 Mar 03 - 09:53 PM

This song in scottish Gaelic is "Eilean Mo Chridhe".
The isle being sung about in Gaelic is Skye.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Boab
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 01:54 AM

I wasn't aware that Sir Hugh Roberton was credited with "Westering Home". Not surprised, though, he was a clever songwriter and spent many years leading the Glasgow Orpheus Choir.Another of his compositions, I believe, was "All in an April Evening"--and isn't 'the Mingulay Boat song" from his pen?


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Strupag
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 03:13 AM

Boab, if the original Mingulay Boat song was written by Hugh Roberton, then he must have been a few hundred years old when he did it.
Na it's one of these songs which has been taken from the tradition and sort of sanitised for choral use, probably in this case by Marjory Kennedy Fraser.
MJF maintained that she was saving songs which would otherwise be lost but it is interesting to note that none of the original songs that she changed have been lost to the tradition in their original form.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Jim McLean
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 06:43 AM

I seem to remember there was a court action against Vera Lynn as Travelling Home was deemed to be Westering Home and belonged to Hugh S Roberton's estate.
Jim McLean


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: IanC
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 07:07 AM

Strupag

You're quite wrong, thought the tune is older. The DT attribution has got it right for once. Look at some of the threads about the Mingulay song for more details.

:-)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Declan
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 07:16 AM

We robbed that one as well! An Irish version was known as the Dingle Bay boat song.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: Strupag
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 01:22 PM

Yer right Ian C, and sorry Boab.
I must have been half asleep because the song that I was thinking was "Eriskay Love Lilt"
Mind you if ever a song illustrated the point I was making it is this one.
If you listen to the MJF version and then listen to Capercaille or Ishbel MacAskill do the original version you wonder why anyone would try to improve on perfection.


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Subject: RE: Eilean mo Chridhe
From: Felipa
Date: 13 Mar 03 - 01:24 PM

Eilean mo Chridh' (mentioned by Sandy)


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST
Date: 28 Dec 03 - 01:58 PM

sorry to say this but you need to have the words to DARK ISLAND and in scottish and in english version


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Westering home and a song in the air
From: GUEST,Philippa
Date: 03 Jun 04 - 06:51 AM

for the Irish language translation, Trasna na dTonnta, you can listen to Na Casaidigh album "Singing from Memory". I came across the album lyrics at http://www.geocities.com/celticlyricscorner/cassidys/singing.htm


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Subject: Lyr Add: TRASNA NA DTONNA
From: George Seto - af221@chebucto.ns.ca
Date: 26 Jun 04 - 04:57 PM

I found more verses for Trasna na Dtonna athttp://users.bigpond.net.au/kirwilli/songs/Trasna%20.htm

TRASNA NA DTONNA

Trasna na dtonnta dul siar dul siar,
Slán leis an uaigneas is slán leis an gcian,
Geal é mo chro´ agus geal í an ghrian,
Geal 'bheith ag filleadh go hÉirinn.

Chonaic mo dhóthain de thiortha i gcéin,
Ór agus airgead, saibhreas an tsaoil,
Éirionn an croí 'nam le breacadh gach lae,
'S mé ag druidim le dúthaigh mo mhuintir.

Agus trasna na dtonnta dul siar dul siar,
Slán leis an uaigneas is slán leis an gcian,
Geal é mo chroí agus geal í an ghrian,
Geal 'bheith ag filleadh go hÉirinn.

Muintir ar larthair 's iad cairde mo chroí,
Fáilte is féile beidh romham ar gach taobh,
Ar fhágaint an tsaoil seo 's é a ghuím ar an Rí,
Gur leosan a shínfear i gcill mé.

Agus trasna na dtonnta dul siar dul siar,
Slán leis an uaigneas is slán leis an gcian,
Geal é mo chroí agus geal í an ghrian,
Geal 'bheith ag filleadh go hÉirinn.


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Subject: looking for irish music demos on cds
From: GUEST,mike sullivan from boston usa
Date: 30 Dec 04 - 10:08 AM

part time disc jockey in boston usa. i do from private parties to once in awhile a pub. looking for irish music on demos on cds from any irish band, that would like to post me cds?

Mike Sullivan
email irishmike_02143@yahoo.com


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,shemac96@yahoo.com
Date: 20 Mar 05 - 01:48 AM

I know and love this song but am not sure of the meaning of it. Has the singer been in the orient and returning to Islay, perhaps with a Westerly breeze to help them along or has he been on the mainland and returning westward to Islay?
Sheila


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: jacqui.c
Date: 20 Mar 05 - 06:44 AM

I always thought that this one was about returning from the Orient to the isles. That's what the song says to me anyway.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,Barrie Roberts
Date: 20 Mar 05 - 02:01 PM

Vera Lynn recorded 'Travelling Home' round about 1957. The Estate of Sir Hugh Roberton sued for breach of his copyright in 'Westering Hame' and, as I recall, LOST, because the defendant record company was able to produce the old bloke who taught Sir Hugh the tune!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Boab
Date: 20 Mar 05 - 11:52 PM

Surely the songster was westering home to Islay from the Scottish mainland?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,Neville D'Herville
Date: 25 Dec 06 - 02:15 AM

Please can you find me a cd with vera lynn version of westering home callled travelling home

Regards Neville D'Herville
67 Golf Road Nelson New Zealand


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Peace
Date: 25 Dec 06 - 02:58 AM

The correct title is "Travellin' Home" and it is on 'Vera Lynn: The Decca Years 1936-60 and it's a box set.

Here.


You should be able to order it through any record/CD store. Best of luck with it.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Peace
Date: 26 Dec 06 - 12:10 AM

Refresh


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 26 Dec 06 - 08:34 AM

Notes at the back of one of my Scottish song books: "Westering Home"; words by Hugh S Roberton (1874-1952), who, together with Marjory Kennedy- Fraser and Granville Bantock collected and arranged may Hebridean tunes and songs..............The tune seems to be partly "Bonnie Strathyre", while the chorus was taken from the singing of Donald McIsaac. (Oops, I see Anne C put much the same!)
As for "Bonnie Strathyre", notes in "Songs of the North Vol 1" say the tune was adapted from an old air called "Taymouth", and arranged by Malcolm Lawson, words by Harold Boulton. .........but someone will probably tell me (Ian C has said this already)there's an older version still!!
Picking up on 2 previous postings:
"Islay makes A fine whisky"........well, they actually make dozens of fine whiskies, all with their own character! Maybe more distilleries per square inch than anywhere else in Scotland, except maybe Speyside!
HEBRIDES: Islay is not really in the NORTH-West of Scotland: it's on almost the same latitude as Glasgow and Edinburgh! Calmac (the ferry service to the "Western Isles") divides the islands as follows:
Clyde islands: Arran, Rothesay, Bute.
Southern Hebrides: Islay, Jura and Colonsay/Oronsay
Inner Hebrides: Mull, Iona, Coll, Tiree, Staffa (? also Ardnamurchan peninsula)
Skye, Raasay and the Small Isles(Rum, Eigg, Muck and Canna) - I would include these in the Inner Hebrides.
Outer Hebrides(all those west of the Minch): Barra, Eriskay, The Uists, Benbecula, Taransay, Berneray,Mingulay, Pabbay, Harris, Lewis.
Oh, and a long way further out still........the St Kilda (Hirta) group.
And finally, The McCalman's version: very nice but why change "there I would hie me" to "there I would lie me"??
Happy Boxing Day!
TB


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Teribus
Date: 27 Feb 08 - 01:53 AM

"Surely the songster was westering home to Islay from the Scottish mainland?" - Boab

Chorus
Westering home, and a song in the air,
Light in the eye, and it's goodbye to care.
Laughter o' love, and a welcoming there,
Isle of my heart, my own one.

First Verse
Tell me o' lands o' the Orient gay,
Speak o' the riches and joys o' Cathay;
Eh, but it's grand to be wakin' ilk day
To find yourself nearer to Isla.

All of which suggests to me is that this is a sailor born on Islay sailing home from the Far East, most likely on a "Clipper" on the China run.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,Gr8scot
Date: 08 Mar 09 - 07:17 PM

"Surely the songster was westering home to Islay from the Scottish mainland?" - Boab
I believe Boab is right. This was my mother's party piece in Scotland and she sang it at her 80th Birthday party. A year later she passed away. I grew up understanding that it was an Islay native, who had moved to the big city, Glasgow, as many of the Islanders were forced to do in seek of work. He was comparing stories of China and the Orient, brought back from the sailors on the merchant ships, to his beloved island of Islay and yearned to be back there.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,Andrew Roberton
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 03:59 AM

Dear friends,

Hugh S. Roberton was my grandfather, definitely a Scotsman from Glasgow, and the creator and conductor of the Glagow Orpheus Choir. He was also a prolific composer of choral music, much of it based around traditional Scottish songs and hymn tunes. I was a young teenager at the time of the Vera Lynn case and remember it well. The arguments contained in it illuminate some of the issues raised by your correspondents. There was never a disagreement that the verse of the song was basically 'The Muckin' of Geordies Byre' but Hugh S. Roberton definitely wrote the chorus and all of the words. My father, who was his emanuensis at the time testified to this in court. However the Vera Lynn camp and her recording company produced the royal piper and a couple of other old geezers from the piping field who swore blind that it was all a traditional air. My father always claimed they were given a bung to commit perjury to spare the'Forces Sweetheart' the humiliation of losing the case. The whole thing divided public opinion right down the middle. Miss Lynn was, of course, a wartime heroine whilst my grandfather was a founder member of the Scottish Independent Labpur party, a well known pacifist, socialist and was given the moniker 'The Red Kinight of Clydeside'. Curwen, his publisher were virtually bankrupted by the case and wobbled on for another fifteen years until they were conumed in an asset stripping takeover by the US conglomerate Crowell, Collier Macmillan. My father was made reunundant and set up Roberton Publications to make his father's work available. It grew and by the time of his death in 2003 (he was still running the business at the age of 89) it was probly the most respected choral publishing house in the UK.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Rumncoke
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 07:43 AM

I sing a slightly different version, and these days always get (metaphysically) trampled on in the last line of the chorus.

I have been singing this for about 40 years, but have no idea where I learned it. It wasn't important to note the origin back then. Looking at it written down I have the uneasy feeling that the problem is that I use the wrong last line for the chorus, having shifted it from the verse. How the memory can play tricks.

We're westering home with a song in the air
Light of my eyes and its goodbye to care
Laughter and love and a welcoming there
Home with my own folk in Islay

Where are there folk like the folks of the west?
Happy and homely and kindly, the best
There I will hie me and there I will rest
At home with my own folk in Islay

Tell me a tale of the Orient gay
Tell me of ritches that come from Cathay
Ah but its grand to be waking at day
And find we are nearer to Islay.

Anne Croucher


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: goatfell
Date: 24 Jun 09 - 12:12 PM

ISLAY IS AN ISLAND IN SCOTLAND WHICH THIS SONG IS ALL ABOUT
Islay
Location

OS grid reference: NR370598
Names
Gaelic name: Ìle (help·info)
Norse name: Yula-Oy/Il
Meaning of name: Old Norse for 'Yula's isle'
Area and Summit
Area: 61,956 hectares (239 sq mi)
Area rank: 5
Highest elevation: Beinn Bheigier 491 m
Population
Population (2001): 3,457
Population rank: 7 out of 97
Main settlement: Port Ellen
Groupings
Island Group: Islay
Local Authority: Argyll and Bute

References: [1][2][3][4]
If shown, area and population ranks are for all Scottish islands and all inhabited Scottish islands respectively.
Islay (pronounced /ˈaɪlə/; Scottish Gaelic: Ìle, pronounced [ˈiːlə]), a Scottish island, known as "The Queen of the Hebrides" (Banrìgh nan Eilean),[5] is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides. It lies in Argyll just to the west of Jura and around 25 miles (40 km) north of the Irish coast, which can be seen on a clear day. In Gaelic a native of Islay is called an Ìleach, pronounced [ˈiːləx], and the plural is Ìlich: Scottish Gaelic is spoken by about a third of the population.[6] The island's capital is Bowmore, famous for its distillery and distinctive round Kilarrow Parish Church. Port Ellen is the largest settlement.

Islay is the fifth largest Scottish island[1] and the sixth largest island surrounding Britain.

Islay has just over three thousand inhabitants. It has a total area of just over 600 square kilometres (239 square miles). Its main industries are malt whisky distilling, and tourism largely based on whisky and birdwatching.

The island is home to many bird species and is a popular destination throughout the year with bird watchers, notably in February to see a large colony of barnacle geese. Resident birds include chough, hen harrier, sea eagle, oystercatcher, cormorant and many wading birds.

The climate on Islay is often more clement than the Scottish mainland owing to the Gulf Stream.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Geography
2.1 Climate
3 Economy
3.1 Distilleries
3.2 Wave energy
3.3 Fishing
3.4 Tourism
3.5 Transport
4 Media
5 Churches
6 Famous natives of Islay
7 See also
8 References
9 Footnotes
10 Further reading
11 Gallery
12 External links



[edit] History

View from the American Monument, The OaThe earliest settlers on Islay were nomadic hunter-gatherers who arrived during the Mesolithic period after the retreat of the Pleistocene ice caps. In 1993 a flint arrowhead was found in a field near Bridgend dating from 10,800 BC, the earliest evidence of a human presence found so far in Scotland.[7] Other finds have been dated to 7,000 BC using radiocarbon dating of shells and debris from kitchen middens.[8][9] By the Neolithic, settlements had become more permanent,[10] allowing for the construction of several communal monuments.[11]

Recorded history begins with a document relating to St Columba[12] who probably passed through Islay on his way to establish the monastery on Iona in the 6th century. At this time, Islay lay within the kingdom of Dál Riata and was ruled by the Cenél nÓengusa.

From the 14th to the 16th centuries much of the west coast of Scotland was governed by the Lordship of the Isles from Finlaggan on Islay. A record of lands granted to an Islay resident, Brian Vicar MacKay, by the Domhnall of Islay, Lord of the Isles in 1408 known as the Islay Charter is one of the earliest records of Gaelic in public use and is a significant historical document.[13] The origins of the Lordship date back to the defeat of the Danes off the coast of Islay in 1156 by Somerled.

On Islay there was a stone of inauguration by Loch Finlaggan. It was seven feet square and had footprints cut into it. When a chief of the Clan Donald was installed as the "King of the Isles" he stood barefoot on the imprints on the stone and, with his father's stone in his hand, was anointed King by the Bishop of Argyll and seven priests. During the ceremony an orator recited a list of his ancestors and he was proclaimed "Macdonald, high prince of the seed of Conn". The block was deliberately destroyed in the early 17th century.[14]

In 1726, the island was purchased by Daniel Campbell (d. 1753) of Shawfield for £12,000. It remained in his family's ownership until 1853 when it was sold to James Morrison, the grandfather of the first Baron Margadale.

Starting in the 1830s, the population of the island began dropping from its peak of 15,000 as a result of the Highland Clearances. Today's population is about 3,000. Most emigrants from Islay made new homes in Ontario, Canada, the Carolinas in the United States and Australia.

During World War II, the RAF built an airfield at Glenegedale which later became the civil airport for Islay. There was also an RAF Coastal Command flying boat base at Bowmore from 13 March, 1941 using Loch Indaal, flying Short G Boat, Short C Boat (the precursor of the Sunderland) and Catalina I.[15] On 1 September 1942 a reformed 246 Squadron with Sunderland Mark III aircraft took over.[16] In May, 1943, RCAF 422 Squadron moved to Lochindall at Bowmore with Sunderland Aircraft.[17] The 1942 film "Coastal Command" was partly filmed in Bowmore.[18]

There was a RAF Chain Home radar station at Saligo Bay and RAF Chain Home Low radar station at Kilchiaran which became a RAF ROTOR radar station in the 1950s.

In the early 21st century, a campus of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig was set up on Islay, Ionad Chaluim Chille Ìle.


[edit] Geography

Topographic mapThe island's population is mainly centred around the villages of Bowmore, Port Ellen and Port Charlotte. Other smaller villages include Portnahaven, Bridgend, Ballygrant and Port Askaig. The rest of the island is sparsely populated and mainly agricultural.

The south-western end of the main body is a largely rocky region called The Oa. The north western arm of the island is called the Rhinns of Islay. There are several lochs on the island including Loch Finlaggan, Loch Gruinart, Loch Gorm, Loch Indaal, Loch Ballygrant and Loch Allan.

Lochindaal, a sea loch which separates the Rhinns of Islay from the rest of the island, is formed along a branch of the great Glen Fault called the Loch Gruinart Fault, the main line of which passes just to the north of Colonsay. This separates the limestone, igneous intrusions and Bowmore sandstones from the Colonsay group rocks of the Rhinns.[19] The result is occasional, minor earth tremors.[20]

There are no Munros on Islay or Jura, the highest peak being Beinn Bheigier a Marilyn at 1,612 feet (491 m).


[edit] Climate
The influence of the Gulf Stream keeps the climate mild compared to mainland Scotland. Snow is rarely seen and frosts are light and short-lived. One might expect therefore a gardener's paradise and indeed, it is not unusual to see exotic plants growing in gardens. However, the winter gales which sweep in off the Atlantic can make travelling and living on the island during the winter difficult, while ferry and air links to the mainland are frequently delayed. The weather tends to become more pleasant around Easter and the summer season then extends until well into September.




[hide] Weather averages for Islay
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 7.6
(46) 7.4
(45) 8.5
(47) 10.1
(50) 12.8
(55) 14.5
(58) 16.1
(61) 16.3
(61) 14.7
(58) 12.4
(54) 9.8
(50) 8.3
(47) 11.6
(53)
Average low °C (°F) 3.1
(38) 3.0
(37) 3.6
(38) 4.7
(40) 6.8
(44) 9.1
(48) 11.1
(52) 11.2
(52) 9.7
(49) 7.9
(46) 5.2
(41) 4.0
(39) 6.6
(44)
Precipitation mm (inches) 142.5
(5.61) 98.2
(3.87) 104.5
(4.11) 67.1
(2.64) 54.1
(2.13) 61.5
(2.42) 77.5
(3.05) 98.7
(3.89) 118.6
(4.67) 142.7
(5.62) 136.6
(5.38) 134.5
(5.3) 1,236.4
(48.68)
Source: Islay Info[21] February 2008


[edit] Economy

[edit] Distilleries

View from the Caol Ila Distillery to the Paps of JuraIslay malt whisky is produced by eight distilleries on the island.

The distilleries on the south of the island produce whiskies with a very strong peaty flavour. From east to west they are Ardbeg, Lagavulin, and Laphroaig (which are considered to be among the most intensely flavoured of all whiskies). On the north of the island Bowmore, Bruichladdich, Bunnahabhain, and Caol Ila are produced.These whiskies are substantially lighter in taste.[22] There were more distilleries in the past: Port Ellen closed in 1983 while the Lochindaal in Port Charlotte closed as long ago as 1929. Little blending is done on the island, though since the takeover of Bruichladdich distillery by several private individuals whisky is now blended and bottled there by Master Distiller James McEwan. Bruichladdich is also noteworthy as the only distillery which bottles its malts on Islay.

In 2005, a new microdistillery opened at Rockside Farm. Named Kilchoman Distillery, it officially opened in June, and distilled its first spirit in November. The malting floor burned down in February 2006, but has since been repaired and is back to full production.

In March 2007 Bruichladdich announced that it would reopen Port Charlotte Distillery, using equipment from the Inverleven distillery. The distillery will use the existing warehouses of the former Lochindaal Distillery while a visitors centre will be built on the current site of Clyne's Garage.

Apart from the whisky there is now an original real ale from the Isle of Islay. The Islay Ales Brewery opened its doors on 22 March 2004 and brews seven different real ales,[23] some of which are seasonal, or for special occasions such as the yearly Festival of Malt and Music. The brewery is located on Islay House Square just outside Bridgend.


[edit] Wave energy

Landsat image of Islay, with Jura visible to the eastThe location of Islay, exposed to the full force of the North Atlantic, has led to it being the site of a pioneering, and Scotland's first, wave power station near Portnahaven. The Islay LIMPET (Land Installed Marine Powered Energy Transformer) wave power generator was designed and built by Wavegen and researchers from the Queen's University of Belfast, and was financially backed by the European Union. Known as Limpet 500, it feeds half a megawatt of electricity into the island's grid. In 2000 it became the world's first commercial wave power station.[24]


[edit] Fishing

Looking over to Jura from Port AskaigIslay has some of the finest brown trout fishing in Europe. Imported rainbow trout have not been released on the island and the "brownies" still dominate the freshwater ecosystems. In 2003 the European Fishing Competition was held on five of the lochs. Most of the estates organise fishing on the rivers and lochs and maintain the banks for fishing. Sea angling is also popular especially over the many shipwrecks around the coast.


[edit] Tourism
The Finlaggan Trust has a visitor centre which is open on some days of the week.


[edit] Transport

Road mapMany of the roads on the island are single-track with passing places. The two main roads are the A846 from Ardbeg to Port Askaig via Port Ellen and Bowmore, and the A847 which runs down the east coast of the Rhinns. The island has its own bus service provided by Ben Mundell trading as Islay Coaches.

The island has its own airport, Glenegedale Airport with services to and from Glasgow.

There are regular ferry services to Port Ellen and Port Askaig from Kennacraig, taking about two hours. Services to Port Askaig also run on to Scalasaig on Colonsay and on to Oban on Wednesdays during the summer only. These services are run by Caledonian MacBrayne. There is also a ferry that runs from Port Askaig to Feolin on Jura. A new ferry is expected to enter service in 2011.[25]


[edit] Media
Islay was featured in some of the scenes of the 1954 film, The Maggie.

Part of the action in Julian May's book Diamond Mask takes place on Islay, where some characters engage in birdwatching.

In the 1990s the BBC adaptation of Para Handy was partly filmed in Port Charlotte and featured a race between the Vital Spark (Para Handy's puffer) and a rival puffer along the length of Loch Indaal. The local primary school children were released from classes along the length of the loch to watch the race.

Since 1973 the Ileach has been delivering news to the people of Islay every two weeks. This twenty-eight-page, A4-sized publication now has a circulation locally and worldwide of 3,000 copies. The Ileach was named Community Newspaper of the year in 2007.[26]

In 2007, parts of the BBC Springwatch programme were recorded on Islay with Simon King being based on Islay.[27]

The British Channel 4 Time Team television series excavated at Finlaggan on the 24 June–26 June, 1994. The episode was first broadcast on 8 January, 1995.


[edit] Churches

Kildalton CrossKilarrow Parish Church (aka the "Round Church") is round, legend has it, to leave no corner for the devil to hide in. The Church of Scotland "living" is currently vacant.

The kirk on the Rhinns of Islay is just outside the village of Port Charlotte. Known as St Keiran's, the ministry is shared with the Kilmeny congregation. St John's Church of Scotland, Port Ellen is exploring a possible linkage with Kilarrow and is currently being served by a locum. Each of the vacant Church of Scotland congregations has an Interim Moderator who is responsible for the oversight of the congregation.

There are several other congregations on Islay. Baptists meet in the mornings in Port Ellen and in the evenings in Bowmore. The Scottish Episcopal Church of St. Columba is located in Bridgend and the Islay Roman Catholic congregation also uses St. Columba's for its services.

Many old church buildings on Islay are in an unroofed and ruined state; some have considerable historical interest dating from mediæval times. The ruined church of Kildalton has one of the finest carved crosses in the world; dating to the 8th century, it is carved out of the local bluestone. A carved cross of similar age, but much more heavily weathered can be found at Kilnave.[28] Associated with many churches are mysterious cupstones which date to prehistory; these can be seen at Kilchoman Church where the carved cross there is erected on one, at Kilchiaran Church on the Rhinns and at other sites. Several more recently abandoned churches have been adapted as dwellings.


[edit] Famous natives of Islay
Islay's most famous son of recent times is George Robertson, formerly secretary-general of NATO and British Defence Secretary. In 1999 he was made Lord Robertson of Port Ellen.

General Alexander McDougall, a figure in the American Revolution and the first president of the Bank of New York, was born in Islay in 1731.
The Islay-born Reverend Donald Caskie (1902–1983) became known as the "Tartan Pimpernel" for his exploits in France during World War II.
Glenn Campbell, Scottish political reporter for the BBC, was brought up on Islay and attended Islay High School[29] where his performance in the annual pantomime is still remembered.
Billy Stewart (born 1935) steered a course from Port Ellen Primary school to being the government's Chief Scientific advisor in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Sir William Stewart as he is now known, is currently chairman of the Health Protection Agency.
John Crawfurd was born on Islay in 1783 and during a career around the world became governor of Singapore. He also wrote a number of books.

[edit] See also
Petrosomatoglyph
Earl of Islay

[edit] References
Jupp, Clifford (1994). The History of Islay: From earliest times to 1848. Port Charlotte: Museum of Islay Life. ASIN B0000COS6B.
Storrie, Margaret (1997). Islay: Biography of an Island (New Ed edition ed.). Colonsay: House of Lochar. ISBN 0907651038.

[edit] Footnotes
^ a b Haswell-Smith, Hamish (2004). The Scottish Islands. Edinburgh: Canongate. ISBN 1841954543.
^ Ordnance Survey. Get-a-map [map].
^ 2001 UK Census per List of islands of Scotland.
^ Anderson, Joseph (Ed.) (1893) Orkneyinga Saga. Translated by Jón A. Hjaltalin & Gilbert Goudie. Edinburgh. James Thin and Mercat Press (1990 reprint). ISBN 0-901824-25-9
^ Islay, Queen of the Hebrides. [video]. Scotland on TV.
^ "Boost for Islay Gaelic centre" (11 September 2001) Scottish Executive. Retrieved 3 August 2008.
^ Moffat, Alistair (2005) Before Scotland: The Story of Scotland Before History. London. Thames & Hudson. Page 42.
^ Storrie (1997) p. 28
^ Jupp (1994) p. 10
^ Storrie (1997) p. 29
^ Jupp (1994) p. 11
^ "Finlaggan Trust". http://www.finlaggan.com/. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ David Ross (10 May 2007). "Gaelic documents may return north". The Herald. http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/news/display.var.1387482.0.0.php. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ Bord (1976)
^ "No 119 Squadron RAF". http://www.rafcommands.com/Coastal/119C.html. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "No.246 Squadron RAF". http://www.rafcommands.currantbun.com/Coastal/246C.html. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "The Battle of the Atlantic". http://www.rcafmuseum.on.ca/422ww2.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Filming locations for "Coastal Command"". IMDb. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034603/locations. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "map" (PDF). http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/225/01/Thomas%5B1%5D.pdf. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Jura Earthquake 3 May 1998". British Geological Survey. http://www.earthquakes.bgs.ac.uk/macroseismics/jura_macro.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "The 30 year average for Islay". Islay Info. http://www.islayinfo.com/weather.html. Retrieved on 2008-02-14.
^ "Islay Whisky" information-britain.co.uk. Retrieved 4 January 2009.
^ "Ales from the Isle of Malts". Islay Ales. http://www.islayales.com/. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Islay". Columbia Encyclopedia. http://www.bartleby.com/65/is/Islay.html. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Fleet History". Ships of Calmac.co.uk. http://www.shipsofcalmac.co.uk/ships_timeline.asp. Retrieved on 2007-08-29.
^ "Shetland Times Retains Newspaper Of The Year Award". 18 January 2007. http://www.highland.gov.uk/yourcouncil/news/newsreleases/2007/January/2007-01-18-00.htm. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Springwatch". BBC. http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/springwatch/programmes/. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Archaeology Notes on Kilnave". Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. http://www.rcahms.gov.uk/pls/portal/newcanmore.details_gis?inumlink=37474. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.
^ "Meet presenter Glenn Campbell". http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/politics_show/2813111.stm. Retrieved on 2008-01-23.

[edit] Further reading
Newton, Norman Islay, Devon: David & Charles PLC; 2Rev Ed edition, 1995. ISBN 090711590X

[edit] Gallery
Sunset over the Rhinns of Islay from a Bowmore garden
Bridgend woods in January 2006
Loch Indaal from Port Charlotte
The lighthouse at Carraig Fhada, Port Ellen


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: bubblyrat
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 04:44 AM

Fascinating !! A splendid piece of work---I feel I MUST go there now ! This sort of thing is,surely,Mudcat at its best ?? Thankyou,Goatfell,from a life-long Para Handy and "puffer" enthusiast.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 25 Jun 09 - 08:20 PM

Hmm! Was that not just a massive "cut and paste"?
Where are the "gallery pictures" for example?
I have been to Islay a couple of times, and it is a very interesting (if fairly flat)place, tho' not my most favourite Hebridean island: however, winning a bottle of 15-year old Lagavulin at said distillery's ceilidh was a definite bonus.

I was more interested to read Andrew Roberton's post, having sung a number of his grandfather's excellent arrangements and compositions.

As for Parahandy and the puffers, we saw the "Vital Spark" berthed at the Crinan canal basin just a couple of weeks ago: a wee bit removed from Islay. ("Oh the Crinan Canal for me"!)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: goatfell
Date: 26 Jun 09 - 06:04 AM

go the website then


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,BEARGER
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 11:46 AM

I have been told by family members the "Westering Home" was written by Duncan Johnston, can any one confirm this? Does anyone have any history of D.J. life??


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: Jim McLean
Date: 12 Aug 09 - 03:48 PM

Andrew Roberton is correct. His grandfather wrote words to a traditional tune but that makes the resultant song his. For example, Danny boy played as a melody called the Londonderry Air is trad but when sung as Danny Boy belongs to Fred Weatherley.
Westering Home should have been credited to Hugh Roberton and the Vera lynn case was a travesty of justice based, as Andrew Roberton said, on zeitgeist bias.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Here's the Corrie's singing Westering Home
Date: 16 Aug 09 - 09:18 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eg0w3XJmq2Q


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,IslayLuv
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 03:19 AM

Westering Home - by Norma Munro of Islay

http://www.whiskyclassified.com/WesteringHome.mp3
http://www.whiskyclassified.com/westeringhome.html


Westering home and a song in the air
Light in the eye and it's goodbye to care
Laughter o' love and a welcoming there
Isle of my heart my own one.

Tell me o' lands of the Orient gay
Speak o' the riches and joys of Cathay
Ay but it's grand to be wakin' at day
To find yourself nearer to Islay.

Where are the folk like the folk o' the west
Canty and couthie and kindly the best
There I would hie me and there I would rest
At hame wi' my ain folk on Islay.

Westering home and a song in the air
Light in the eye and it's goodbye to care
Laughter o' love and a welcoming there
Isle of my heart my own one.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: doc.tom
Date: 18 Apr 11 - 06:14 AM

Definitely Scottish. Definitely Hugh Roberton - as were many texts set to traditional Scottish airs. My father, to whom Hugh Roberton gave a gold medal for his singing of Braes of Balquidder at the old Edinburgh Festival, back in the 1920s, used to say that Hugh translated many gaelic texts as well - any confirmation?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST
Date: 16 Sep 11 - 10:18 AM

I've played this song many times at gigs, in each of my bands. I first heard it on an old record that my mum would play when I was only 7 years old. When Judith the music teacher sang and played the piano I was telling all my friends about the song and none of them had heard it at all. In 1997 i bought a Robert Wilson CD, and this song and Bonny Strathyre were on it, and when i hear them they have the same start of they do not end quite the same. Westering home has been played in lots of medleys of that we've done since 2001 when we were the Bravehearts to now when I play solo.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,SRD
Date: 16 Sep 11 - 04:04 PM

I'm pretty certain Westering Home was one of the songs I learnt at school during Singing Together or somesuch. I hope Aunty paid her dues.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Jo
Date: 16 Jun 12 - 05:36 AM

I'm really very sorry to burst all of your bubbles on this point but Trasna na dTonnta is older than Westering Home. The clue is in the fact that we know the author, year it was written and first recorded for Westering Home. The Traditional Donegal Song is so old we don't know who wrote it. There are very old recordings of this song that predate Westering Home. Hope this helps, Jo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Jo
Date: 16 Jun 12 - 05:44 AM

I'm really very sorry to burst all of your bubbles on this point but Trasna na dTonnta is older than Westering Home. The clue is in the fact that we know the author, year it was written and first recorded for Westering Home. The Traditional Donegal Song is so old we don't know who wrote it. There are very old recordings of this song that predate Westering Home. But then there is so much musical history shared by Donegal, Rathlin, The North Coast of Ireland and the Scottish Ilses I'm sure there must be a shared history of the melody due to their once very close trade relationship. A bit like the song Fear a'Bhata. Hope this helps, Jo


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Jo
Date: 16 Jun 12 - 05:48 AM

For the full further details Click here


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Jo
Date: 16 Jun 12 - 05:49 AM

Irish version

    Trasna na dtonnta, dul siar, dul siar,
    Slán leis an uaigneas 'is slán leis an gcian;
    Geal é mo chroí, agus geal í an ghrian,
    Geal bheith ag filleadh go hÉirinn!

    Chonaic mo dhóthain de Thíortha i gcéin,
    Ór agus airgead, saibhreas an tsaoil,
    Éiríonn an croí 'nam le breacadh gach lae
    'S mé druidim le dúthaigh mo mhuintir!

    Ar mo thriall siar ó éirigh mo chroí
    An aimsir go hálainn is tonnta deas réidh
    Stiúradh go díreach go dúthaigh mo chliabh
    'S bheidh mé in Éirinn amárach!

    Muintir an Iarthair 'siad cairde mo chroí,
    Fáilte 'is féile bheidh romham ar gach taobh.
    Ar fhágaint an tsaoil seo, sé ghuidhim ar an Rí
    Gur leosan a shinfear i gcill mé.

Translation of the Irish

    Over the waves, going west, going west!
    Good-bye to loneliness and to the distant remoteness;
    Bright is my heart and bright is the sun,
    Happy to be returning to Ireland!

    I saw my fill of countries abroad,
    Gold and silver, the wealth of the world,
    My heart rises in me with the break of each day,
    As I draw closer to the land of my people!

    On my journey - oh! my heart rises!
    The weather is beautiful and the waves are settled
    Steering directly to land of my bosom
    And I'll be in Ireland tomorrow!

    People of the West, they're the friends of my heart,
    Welcome and celebration awaits me on every side.
    Leaving this life I pray to the Lord
    That it's with them I'll be stretched in the graveyard!

The 20th century Scottish song Westering Home may be derived from it


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: ollaimh
Date: 27 Feb 13 - 08:55 PM

i lost my scotts gaidhlig version, does any one have the full scotts gaidhlig version?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Edthefolkie
Date: 22 Aug 13 - 06:50 AM

Crivvens, that song title takes me back.

My piano teacher, Mr Edwards, also ran a choir or two, and my Mum was in one of them. This would be when I was about 11. When he arranged a concert, we all had to go of course, although my Dad was a bit fed up about it.

Mr. Edwards had selected Roberton et al's "Westering Home" as one of the songs. He also decided to sing one of the verses, backed by the ladies "Ah"-ing.

Just before his verse ("Where are the folk like the folk o' the west" etc), he spotted that some kind person had put a glass of red wine in front of him - so he took a wee draught. He choked, spluttered, went bright purple, coughed for about a minute, but eventually managed to get through the verse. Later, we discovered that the "wine" was raspberry vinegar, donated by a well-meaning member of the choir!

Needless to say he never lived it down - my Dad of course had to remind him at every one of my piano lessons.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Edthefolkie
Date: 22 Aug 13 - 06:58 AM

Strange that this thread has been reinvigorated by South Korean injection mouldings!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 27 May 14 - 08:03 AM

The Irish Language Song "Trasna na dTonnta" mentioned earlier is a modern one. It is given in a song book"Amhránleabhar Ógra Éireann" produced by the Irish Christian Brothers in 1950 with the following ascriptions:
Fonn (air): Westring Home
Tomás Tóibín, d'aistrigh (Translation by Thomas Tobin).

It's followed, incidentally, by "Ag Triall ar Inis Thiar" (Heading for Inishere) which is set to the air of "The Road to the Isles". There were several waves of such adaptations during the attempted revival of Irish.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 31 May 14 - 08:18 PM

I also remember learning this song at primary school - in Suffolk (England)- along with Welsh, Irish, English and other Scottish songs. I don't remember "Singing together" but I think we had the "Community Songbook for Schools" book, from which we learned all these songs.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST,keberoxu
Date: 07 Aug 16 - 05:41 PM

Clearances of the Hebrides

Grim stuff, this.


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Subject: Lyr add: Eilean Mo Chrídhe
From: Felipa
Date: 07 Aug 16 - 07:08 PM

EILEAN MO CHRIDH' By John Maclean, Glendale, Skye (Eilean a' Cheo, an t-Eilean Sgitheanach) (similar air to Westering Home and Trasna na dTonnta, composed at time of WW1)

'S truagh nach robh mis' ann an Eilean Mo Chrìdh'
Eilean mo ghràidh far an dh'àraicheadh mi,
'S truagh nach robh mis' ann an Eilean mo Chridh',
Eilean nam fuar-bheann àrda.

Ruithinn-se cas-ruisg-t air monadh is fraoch
Nam faighinn-se thairis air aiseag a chaoil,
Rachainn le cabhag gu clachan mo ghaoil,
Do'n dachaidh 's an dh'fhuair mi m' àrach.

'S truagh nach robh mis' ann an Eilean mo Chridh' ...

'S mis' a bhiodh sona nan robh mi an dràsd
Ri taobh na cruaich-mhòna, air cnocan a tàmh;
An ceò-geal bu bhoidhche a lùbadh 'sa snàmh
'S a tuiteam mo ghualain Blath-Bheinn.

'S truagh nach robh mis' ann an Eilean mo Chridh' ...

Dhùrachdainn fuireach le cuideachd mo ghràidh
'S a bhothan aig Uilleam aig tuinne na traigh;
Gu'n éisd bhi òirnn tuile gach oidhche na là,
Ach muir agus monadh a laimh rinn.

'S truagh nach robh mis' ann an Eilean mo Chridh' ...

Chì mi am Meall, agus chì mi an Sgòrr;
Slinnean Churaing agus Binnean an Stòrr,
Healabhal Bheag agus Healabhal Mhòr -
Beul nan Tri-Allt is Geàrraidh.

ISLE OF MY HEART translation

O, would that I were in the Isle of my Heart,
My dear island where I grew up;
O, would that I were in the Isle of my Heart,
Isle of the high cold mountains.

Barefoot I'd run over moorland and heather
If I could cross over the ferry to Kyle,
I would go in a hurry to the village I love
To the home where I was raised.

O, would that I were ...

Content I would be if I were just now
Beside the peat-stack on a hillock at rest
The most beautiful mist, wreathing and swimming
And falling o'er the shoulders of Blath-Bheinn

O, would that I were ...

My wish is to stay with the kin of my heart
In William's wee bothy by the waves on the beach,
Where forever we'd listen each night and each day
With but moorland and sea beside us.

O, would that I were ...

I see the Meall and I see the Sgorr
The side of Quirang and the hills of the Storr
Little Helaval and Big Helaval
The Three Streams delta [mouth of the three streams] and Gearraidh

source: http://www3.sympatico.ca/donaldmacdonald/songs.htm#eilean
----
Lomax collection recording http://research.culturalequity.org/rc-b2/get-audio-detailed-recording.do?recordingId=3148

the only other recordings I found on line were choral.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yep1vrhdTM4


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 07 Aug 16 - 08:50 PM

some islands served by ferries missed off T B's earlier list- -
Iona, burial isle of Scottish kings, lies to the West of Mull (Inner Hebrides / Argyll islands)
Gigha, the garden isle, West of the Kintyre peninsula (Southern Hebrides)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Westering Home
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Aug 16 - 09:18 PM

They love dancing well, that dance barefoot upon thorns.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Nov 16 - 07:54 AM

So are we all agreed that the tune used in Westering Home is traditional or at least in the public domain?


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST
Date: 03 Nov 16 - 07:31 PM

The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem did a mighty version on the 1966 LP "Isn't It Grand Boys?"


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: GUEST,Learaí na Láibe
Date: 04 Nov 16 - 03:55 PM

Shouldn't somebody (with better qualifications than me) query the Wikipedia entry on "Trasna na dTonnta" referred to above.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trasna_na_dTonnta

It looks to me more like somebody's erroneous personal opinion than a fact based article.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Nov 16 - 05:59 AM

thanks for pointing that out, Learaí - I think that's a very erroneous entry in Wikipedia. As mentioned earlier in this thread, a songbook " Amhránleabhar Ógra Éireann" attributes translation to Tomás Tóibín; I've always thought Trasna na dTonnta is a translation of a Scottish song rather than the other way about. I think there is a attribution to translator in "Abair Amhrán" as well.

Have you registered with Wikipedia, Learaí, can you edit? This Tune Search entry seems more authoritative but it also says the air is attributed to Tomás Toibín. I dont have access to the Amhránleabhar but Martin Ryan says TRANSLATION (of words) is attributed. (though Jo, writing in 2012 claimed Trasna na dTonnta was published before Westering Home)

"WESTERING HOME AKA and see: "Trasna na dTonnta," "Eilean Mo Chridhe" (Isle of My Heart). Scottish (originally), Irish; Air, Slow March (6/8 time) and Waltz (3/4 time). G Major. Standard tuning (fiddle). One part (Martin): AB (Tubridy). A Scottish chestnut, also popular in Ireland where it appears in a County Donegal Irish Gaelic air (also in a slide version in 12/8 time) as "Trasna na dTonnta," attributed to Tomás Tóibín in Amhránleabhar Ógra Éireann. Many believe the melody of "Westering Home" is a derivative of "Trasna na dTonnta".

However, the chorus of the melody is also said to be based on Harold Boulton's (1859-1935) 1895 Scottish song "Bonnie Strathyre," set to a traditional air he called "Taymouth." Speeded up and in jig time it also resembles "Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre." The song "Westering Home" is by Hugh S. Roberton [1] (1874-1952) who wrote it around 1921..." http://www.taramusic.com/sleevenotes/cd4015.htm

anyone who is a member of tunesearch might correct that reference to Amhránleabhar:

What Martin Ryan wrote earlier in this thread "The Irish Language Song Trasna na dTonnta mentioned earlier is a modern one. It is given in a song book Amhránleabhar Ógra Éireann produced by the Irish Christian Brothers in 1950 with the following ascriptions:
Fonn (air): Westring Home
Tomás Tóibín, d'aistrigh (Translation by Thomas Tobin)."

I think the first publication of Amhránleabhar was 1951.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Westering Home (Hugh Roberton)
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Nov 16 - 06:07 AM

Wikipedia article cited by Learaí na Láibe uses many of the same sentences as http://songsinirish.com/p/trasna-na-dtonnta-lyrics.html

(obviously one is the source for the other or they have a common source(


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Subject: RE: Trasna na dTonnta
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Nov 16 - 06:15 AM

for anyone wishing to learn the Irish language version, this looks interesting, though I have got speakers or headphones connected to check it out - website includes link for spoken lyrics
http://www.irishpage.com/songs/trasna.htm with link to
sound file http://www.irishpage.com/audio/trasna.mp3 (wasnt available when I tried to access the link though)


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Subject: RE: Tomas Toibin
From: Felipa
Date: 05 Nov 16 - 06:43 AM

http://www.ainm.ie/Bio.aspx?ID=1611 Tomás Tóibín. 1920-2002 = poet, translator and polyglot (employed as a clerk and then as a timire - travelling rep. for Irish language organisation, later as a teacher, a translator for Irish parliament and for the publishers an Gum) He was raised speaking Irish at home, but in a larger English speaking community in Cork. Learned some other languages as an adult. Studied Russian language with the one text he could find, an Orthodox bible. The page doesnt mention Trasna na dTonnta, but does mention that Tomás translated The Limerick Rake into Irish Gaelic.

for readers of Irish language, another article about Tomás Tóibín: http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/2.663/troscan-na-ndanta-1.1049424

I do think he is correctly attributed with the translation of Westering Home as Trasna na dTonnta.


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