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Lyr Add: La Llorona

DigiTrad:
A LA PUERTA DEL CIELO
AMANECER (Daybreak )
CIELITO LINDO
COPLAS
EL RANCHO GRANDE
GRACIAS A LA VIDA
GUANTANAMERA
HAY UNA MUJER DESAPARECIDA
LA GUITARRA
LA QUINCE BRIGADA
LOS CUATROS GENERALES
N-DE COLORES
RIU RIU
SENOR DON GATO
SI ME QUIERES ESCRIBIR
VENGA JALEO
VIVA LA QUINCE BRIGADA


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emily rain 09 Aug 99 - 02:49 PM
darkriver 09 Aug 99 - 06:55 PM
Dale Rose 09 Aug 99 - 08:18 PM
KickyC 10 Aug 99 - 12:33 AM
emily rain 07 Sep 99 - 11:05 PM
Frank Hamilton 08 Sep 99 - 06:24 PM
Frank Hamilton 08 Sep 99 - 07:00 PM
Conán 08 Sep 99 - 08:15 PM
Escamillo 09 Sep 99 - 12:47 AM
Tom B. 09 Sep 99 - 01:20 AM
Tom B. 09 Sep 99 - 02:05 AM
Peter T. 09 Sep 99 - 01:31 PM
Peter T. 09 Sep 99 - 01:40 PM
Tom B. 09 Sep 99 - 02:56 PM
Allan S. 09 Sep 99 - 08:18 PM
Escamillo 10 Sep 99 - 01:18 AM
Tom B. 10 Sep 99 - 01:39 AM
Escamillo 10 Sep 99 - 02:22 AM
Peter T. 10 Sep 99 - 10:35 AM
Allan S. 10 Sep 99 - 02:26 PM
Rincon Roy 11 Sep 99 - 01:48 AM
Bryant 12 Sep 99 - 02:34 AM
Banjer 12 Sep 99 - 07:04 AM
Peter T. 12 Sep 99 - 12:20 PM
Peter T. 13 Sep 99 - 03:36 PM
Tom B. 13 Sep 99 - 08:53 PM
Peter T. 16 Sep 99 - 02:56 PM
Dale Rose 16 Sep 99 - 04:38 PM
emily rain 17 Sep 99 - 12:17 AM
Peter T. 17 Sep 99 - 08:41 AM
emily rain 18 Sep 99 - 12:06 AM
Allan S. 25 Sep 99 - 07:22 PM
Escamillo 25 Sep 99 - 11:35 PM
Escamillo 04 Dec 99 - 04:29 AM
Stewie 04 Dec 99 - 07:59 AM
Dale Rose 04 Dec 99 - 11:44 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: LA LLORONA (trad. Mexico)
From: emily rain
Date: 09 Aug 99 - 02:49 PM

LA LLORONA
(trad. Mexico)

Si al cielo subir pudiera, llorona
Las estrellas te bajara
Si al cielo subir pudeira, llorona
Las estrellas te bahara
La luna tus pies pusiera, llorona
Con el sol te coronara
La luna tus pies pusiera, llorona
Con el sol te coronara

Ay, de mi, llorona
Llorona de azul celeste...
Aunque la vida me cueste, llorona
^^ No dejare de quererte...

Dicen que no tengo duelo, llorona
Porque no me ven llorar...
Hay muertos que no hacen ruido, llorona
Y es mas grande so pena...

Ay de me, llorona
llorona de ayer y hoy...
Ayer maravilla fui, llorona
Y ahora ni la sombra soy...

Salias del templo un dia, llorona
cuando al pasar yo te vi...
Hermoso huipil llevabas, llorona
Que te virgen te crei...

Ay, de mi, llorona
Llorona llevame al mar...
A ver a los buceadores, llorona
Que perlas van a sacar...

-------------------------
Does anyone speak Spanish out there? My source for this is Jerry Silverman's _Folk_Song_Encyclopedia_, and as I don't believe he's a Spanish speaker, I'm sure it's riddled with textual and grammatical errors. Any assistance from you guys is much appreciated!

And Joan Baez (also not a fluent speaker) starts out with a verse that goes something like this:

Todos me dicen el negro, llorona
Negro pero carin~oso...
Yo soy como el chile verde, llorona
Picante pero se(b/v)roso...

All I can understand is that the singer is comparing herself to a green chile! Hahaha!

love, emily


See La Llorana


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: darkriver
Date: 09 Aug 99 - 06:55 PM

Emily,

Thanks for posting this song. It has such a beautiful melody; I hope somone posts that too.

I know formal, schoolboy Spanish, but no colloquialisms, so if this song has 'em I'm sunk. The last verse you quote, however, could be translated as

They all call me the Dark One, the Weeping Woman
Dark but caring...
I am like a green chili,
biting but stern...

Hope this helps.

Doug


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Dale Rose
Date: 09 Aug 99 - 08:18 PM

Someday I am going to get around to posting my top folk recordings of the 90s. One of them is very definitely Aquella Noche, Tish Hinojosa, Watermelon 1005, 1991. It has the words AND translation for La Llorona (Weeping Woman). It looks like a pretty long and complicated job. I will get to it, possibly tomorrow. (The transcription, not the list!)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: KickyC
Date: 10 Aug 99 - 12:33 AM

Translation for La Llorona

If I could climb to heaven, Llorona (the weeping woman from legend who murdered her children and wanders around looking for them)
I would bring the stars down to you

I would put the moon at your feet
I would crown you with the sun.

Oh, me, Llorona
Llorona of heavenly blue
Even if it cost me my life,
I would never stop loving you.

They say that I don't have any pain, Llorona
Because they don't see me crying.
There are deaths that don't make a sound, Llorona
And greater is their (should be spelled su instead of so) suffering.
Oh, me, Llorona
Llorona of yesterday and today
Yesterday I was marvelous
And now I am not even a shadow.

You left the temple one day, Llorona
When you passed I saw you.
You were wearing such a beautiful huipil (a type of loose-fitting blouse), llorona
That I thought you were a virgin.
(The Spanish here doesn't make sense. I think it should read "que una virgen te crei")

Oh, me, Llorona
Take me to the sea
To look for the divers, Llorona
That are gathering pearls.

I love this song! It is one of my favorites.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: emily rain
Date: 07 Sep 99 - 11:05 PM

thank you so very much, kicky c!


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Frank Hamilton
Date: 08 Sep 99 - 06:24 PM

As I understand this song, it is known throughout Mexico and that the weeping woman is a kind of symbol. It chronicles a legendary love affair that ends in tragedy. I understand that there is a connection with La Llorona as an old woman (crone) who is part of the symbolism. Am I far off here? Anyone with the information can enlighten me?

Frank Hamilton


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Frank Hamilton
Date: 08 Sep 99 - 07:00 PM

Todos me dicen el negro, Llorona

They say I am dark (darkskinned?)

Negro pero carinoso

Dark but caring

Yo soy como el chile verde, Llorona

I am like the green chili,

Piquante pero sabroso

Spicy but sweet

This is the version that I know.

Frank


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Conán
Date: 08 Sep 99 - 08:15 PM

!Viva la letra buena!
This song takes me back to my student days in Madrid. I think - subject to interpretation - that some of the words may have another translation than that offered in the initial note:-
"Que es más grande su pena...."
(There are dead people who make no noise)
"Though their torment be so great"
"Y ahora ni la sombra soy" might be better rendered as:
"Y ahora ni sombra soy"
This suits the melody better and presses home the thought that:
"Today I'm not even a shadow" (Though yesterday I was a wonder."
"Salías del templ' un día, Llorona.......
..................................
Que La Virgen te creí"
The implicatioon being that you were so beautiful leaving the church that "I thought that you were the Virgin."
Much more in keeping with the ethos of basic Catholicism than whether or not you were "intacta."
Conán


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA LLORONA
From: Escamillo
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 12:47 AM

Emily, sorry for having seen this thread a little late. Of course I am Spanish-speaking (if speaking at all) and will be glad to post this version with some corrections. Please tell me if you SEE the accents in vowels and not a lot of hieroglyphics, since my keyboard may be set differently.

Si al cielo subir pudiera, llorona
Las estrellas te bajara
Si al cielo subir pudiera, llorona
Las estrellas te bajara
La luna a tus pies pusiera, llorona
Con el sol te coronara
La luna a tus pies pusiera, llorona
Con el sol te coronara

Ay, de mí, llorona, llorona,
Llorona de azul celeste...
Aunque la vida me cueste, llorona
No dejaré de quererte...

Dicen que no tengo duelo, llorona
Porque no me ven llorar...
Hay muertos que no hacen ruido, llorona
Y es más grande su penar...

Ay de mí, llorona, llorona,
llorona de ayer y hoy...
Ayer maravilla fui, llorona
Y ahora ni sombra soy...

Salías del templo un día, llorona
cuando al pasar yo te vi...
Hermoso huipil llevabas, llorona
Que la virgen te creí...

A mí me llaman El Negro, llorona,
negro pero cariñoso..
Yo soy como el chile verde, llorona,
picante pero sabroso..

Ay, de mí, llorona, llorona,
Llorona llevame al mar...
A ver a los buceadores, llorona
Que perlas van a sacar...

Ay, de mí, llorona, llorona,
Llorona llevame al río...
Tapame con tu rebozo, llorona
porque me muero de frío..

Beautiful song! I'll be happy to help in any matter like this. I'm Argentinean, live in Buenos Aires, and although not an expert, I am very close to sources of South American folk.

Best regards - Andres Magre - escamillo@ciudad.com.ar


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA LLORONA (from Tish Hinojosa)
From: Tom B.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 01:20 AM

Kicky C did a good translation and Conan I think is right about the Virgin being Mary. The Llorona is a Mexican Legend/Folk Song with many different versions. It is in the text book "Conexiones" that I use to teach third semester Spanish in the community college here ((c) 1999 Prentice Hall). One of my students just TONIGHT put the lyrics on the board and sang the song, beautifully, with guitar, so it's a real coincidence to see this thread.

La Llorona is a frightening apparition of a woman who wails but may not be seen, or is seen dressed in white, who scares even the bravest of men who see her, she who may submerge herself in a lake, and who is said in some versions to have drowned her kids in a lake or river because of some mortal sins. That is the legend.

The song version by Tish Hinojosa goes like this:

Sali'as del Templo un di'a, Llorona
You were leaving the Temple one day, Llorona (one who cries a lot)
cuando al pasar yo te vi.
when I saw you as I passed.

Ay de mi', Llorona, Llorona, Llorona
(expression like "woh")
de un campo un lirio
an iris from the countryside
Ay de mi', Llorona, Llorona, Llorona
Lle'vame al r'io
take me to the river

Hermoso huipil llevabas, Llorona,
You wear a beautiful huipil
que la Virgen te crei'.
that I though you were the Virgin Mary herself.
No se' lo que tienen las flores, Llorona,
I don't know what's wrong with the flowers (as in "to have" a disease or a problem)
las flores de un campo santo.
the flowers of a sacred ground.
Que cuando las mueve el viento, Llorona,
That when the wind moves them (the flowers)
parece que esta'n llorando.
it seems like they are crying
Dos besos llevo en la frente, Llorona,
Two kisses I wear on my forehead
que no se apartan de mi'.
that won't leave me.
El u'ltimo de mi madre, Llorona,
The first one from my mother
y el primero que te di.
and the first that I gave you
No se' lo que tienen las flores, Llorona,
I don't know what's wrong with the flowers
las flores de un campo santo.
the flowers of a sacred ground.
Que cuando las mueve el viento, Llorona,
parece que esta'n llorando.
Ta'pame con tu rebozo, Llorona,
Cover me with your shawl
porque me muero de fri'o.
because I'm freezing my butt off (I'm dying of cold)

Hope this is of interest to someone.

Tom B.

I'd appreciate it if someone could tell me how in these threads or in email as well how you put the accents, tildes, underlines, italics, etc. in. Is that a DOS thing? I know how to put the marks in in Word or Wordperfect, but not in email or threads. Thank you.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Tom B.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 02:05 AM

Ignore this post, unless you're interested.

Hmmm. Gee all that work for nothing, sort of. I mean when I tap the ENTER/RETURN key, there are no line breaks. Is that inherent in the system, or someone's brilliant, 1957 DOS idea? I have no idea, since I was born in 1960. I must learn the rules.

I just read in another thread that you put
when you want line breaks, so I will try that as an experiment.
, such an exquisite keyboard dance step. Will this really be necessary? Let's see...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 01:31 PM

Dear Tom, special symbols, all accents, elided letters, circumflexes, brackets, etc., in HTML are handled by using the ampersand sign (&) followed by different instructions, followed at the end by a semicolon. This complicated system was designed to make sure that you didn't shift into symbols while typing other things. You would have to get an HTML manual for all of them. Essentially, in Windows and Macs there are codes with numbers, for example(and I will use "and" instead of the ampersand so as to make them show up):
and#233; is the sign for e with an acute accent as used in MACs and Windows
another version of this is:
andeacute; gives you the same. And so on.
I don't have a site listing all these, but as I said, any good HTML manual will list them all.
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 01:40 PM

Sorry, I wasn't quite clear. There are two systems, both signalled by the ampersand and the final semicolon. One is a numbering system, and the other simply spells out what is required, like "andeacute;".(remember I am replacing the ampersand with an "and"). If you can't remember the number or don't have the list you can often try using the ampersand, the letter you want changed, and the usual name for it, or the first 3,4, or 5 letters of the command if it is a long word, followed by the semicolon. For instance, andatilde, andeuml (for umlauts), andiacute, andograve, anducirc (for circumflexes)......etc.
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Tom B.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 02:56 PM

Thank you Peter.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Allan S.
Date: 09 Sep 99 - 08:18 PM

If I am correct there is reference to this under the web site "URBAN LEGANDS. I first heard this back in Wash DC 1953 from Steve Gambara when I was in the service. I understood that she killed her children to gain the love of Cortez but he spurned her for doing it??????? Has anyone ever heard this story?????


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Escamillo
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 01:18 AM

If you see these accented vowels : á é í ó ú
then the simple secret is to set the keyboard to English International, like mine, and just type a single quote before the vowel, for example M a g r ' e will render Magré. (You won't see the tilde until you type the vowel. If you type any other letter or symbol, then the quote and the new letter will both appear , like 'This is'. If you want single quote followed by blank, just type the single quote and space character)

If you can't see these accents, then I will have to go to study HTML

And please feel free to contact me for anything concerning Spanish language, which is a thing I know almost well :))

Andrés Magré


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Tom B.
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 01:39 AM

Allan, actually the lady who sang the song in my class mentioned that same thing, but I have no details to add other than what you said.

Andres, thanks for the advice, yet I don't know how to set my keyboard to international or i'd test it right now; there's nothing on my current menu that would let me. If it's something i can do off-line, i'll check into it when i go there (of course I know how to do it in the wp programs I

By the way, how was my translation, if you speak that spanish almost well...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Escamillo
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 02:22 AM

Tom B: Just go to Configuration, Control Panel, Keyboard, click on Language, select United States International and "default". If USA International does not appear in the list, click on ADD and probably wou'll be asked for the Windows CD, then select it and click DEFAULT.

As for the translation, it is excellent, with two minor corrections:
////las flores de un campo santo. the flowers of a sacred ground. Que cuando las mueve el viento, Llorona, parece que esta'n llorando. Ta'pame con tu rebozo, Llorona, Cover me with your shawl porque me muero de fri'o. because I'm freezing my butt off (I'm dying of cold) ////

Campo santo is simply a graveyard.
Freezing my butt off would be correct for the expression "porque me cago de frío". Since it says "me muero", the second parenthesized expression is correct.

(Show this to a mexican and he will die of laugh)

Andrés Magré - escamillo@ciudad.com.ar


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 10:35 AM

A note of thanks to Dale -- if I remember correctly you recommended Aquella Noche elsewhere some months ago, and I finally found it about 2 weeks ago. What a great album. Thanks a million.
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Allan S.
Date: 10 Sep 99 - 02:26 PM

OK all you wise guys Take it from here. On Yahoo home page I put in La Llorna and hit search and 850 came up yes thats 850 All sorts of good stuff Is there any college or University in the great South west that specilises in folk lore that I can contact. I will se what I can do . Allan S.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Rincon Roy
Date: 11 Sep 99 - 01:48 AM

Allan, Try The Southwest Folklore Center at the University of Arizona in Tucson: 520-621-6423. Anyone who answers that phone will surely be able to help you. Also, there's a man in Tucson who used to be heavily involved (& may still be) with that Center who would be well worth chatting with: Dr. Jim Griffith: he is one of those amazing "walking treasure troves" of all things folkish, especially of Hispanic Folklore (as well as a fine clawhammer banjo player). The folks at the center will know how to reach him.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Bryant
Date: 12 Sep 99 - 02:34 AM

It's interesting to see all the variations on this Hispanic ghost story. I'm from Albuquerque and there the legend of La Llorona is associated with the many irrigation ditches that run through the valley along the Rio Grande. The most common variant is of a woman who dies of grief after her child falls into a ditch and drowns. She returns as a ghost who weeps and moans by the banks of the ditches, calling out for her dead child.

The Rio Grande as it runs through Albuquerque (and most of New Mexico) has a half mile or so of cottonwood forest (bosque) on both its banks. When you're down there at night with the wind blowing through the trees it's easy to imagine that the quiet moaning sound is more than just the wind.

So, what is it about waterways, drowning, and ghosts in fokelore? Seems like this story has counterparts all over the world. Thoughts?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Banjer
Date: 12 Sep 99 - 07:04 AM

Tom B., If you will go to

http://www.bbsinc.com/symbol.html

all your questions will be answered. (Except the one about where in the universe all those single socks disappear)

Or if you prefer, CLICK HERE


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 12 Sep 99 - 12:20 PM

Does anyone have the guitar TAB/chords to this song from any source? I have been listening to Tish's version of this song for the last four days and am totally hooked. None of the music libraries I source have it, none of the Spanish folk song books I have tracked down, Joan Baez never included it in her books, no sheet music, nada.
yours, Peter T.
P.S. crossing flowing waterways is for Jungians always a symbol of death and rebirth, and fraught with danger. The flowing water and its banksides are pretty obvious symbols, and the ghosts are failed crossers, hovering over the passageway: women lost in childbirth, murdered because pregnant, drowned for lost love, or just because.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 13 Sep 99 - 03:36 PM


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Tom B.
Date: 13 Sep 99 - 08:53 PM

Banjer, got it. I'll practice an email on someone. I hope it is what it looks like it is, otherwise I'll have to go back to school, and I don't wanna do that...


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 16 Sep 99 - 02:56 PM

refresh! HELP!
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Dale Rose
Date: 16 Sep 99 - 04:38 PM

Peter, I looked at the various Tish sites, but with no luck at all. Glad you liked the album, though ~~ my favorite is Estrellita. Do you have any of her other albums? (side track ~~ thinly veiled attempt at keeping the thread where someone can see it)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: emily rain
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 12:17 AM

peter, i don't have tab, but the chords i've been playing are:

Em Em Am Am
Em Em B7 B7
(repeat)

Em Em D D
C C B7 B7
(repeat)

extra two B7's, then
Em Am Em Am
(as a bridge)


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Peter T.
Date: 17 Sep 99 - 08:41 AM

Great, thanks, emily, I'll give it a whirl -- Dale, love the album, loved Estrellita (I agree completely) -- went right out found the sheet music (Manuel Ponce) -- will post it -- now trying to work out the bloody high notes (Porche yo ya.....). What is her best other album? I read an article on her in Sing Out and it sounded as if the rest of her albums had gone into pop, so I was discouraged. I hear that Fronteras is back to the earlier style. Anyway, I will probably give up and get the rest, just for another Estrellita. Hooked like a fish.
yours, Peter T.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: emily rain
Date: 18 Sep 99 - 12:06 AM

and by the way, jerry silverman's folk song encyclopedia (vol. 1) has the sheet music in it. no tab, just standard notation. and no "lead guitar" parts.


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Subject: la llorona final answer
From: Allan S.
Date: 25 Sep 99 - 07:22 PM

Finally received an answer from folklore dept U-Arizona, Tucson. The legend of La Llorona by Ray John de Aragon as follows Legend of a crying wandering woman popular in Spanish America. 16 cent. Almas que andan penando Souls in search of peace. Legends appear in many countries. Africa,France, Early Dutch settlements in USA, American Indian A weeping woman in search of her loved ones. Also Irish Banshee. Astecs story of Ciuacoatl Weeping goddess.would roam the streets of Tenochtitlan at night. Astec versions borrowed from the Mayas Also popular in Spain 1400's

Mexican version La Malinche an indian princess who aided Cortez in his conquest of the Astec empire and had 2 illegitimate children fathered by Cortez. spent the remainder of her life plagued by remorse over her act and denounced by Indians and Spanyards. The story became popular in New Spain [Mexico ] and was carried back to Europe. Now part of folk lore in Texas Mexico California, Spanish speaking communities. Legend now is of a poor girl and a rich man who refuses to marry her She bears 2 children out of wedlock and then kills them. May have killed them with a knife, hatchet axe or dagger or drowning them in a river . After her death her spirit is seen to rise from the grave. and wanders about searching for her children. The legend is used as a disciplinary tool. as she will come and kidnap bad children

Had to condense this from 12 pages of material, but it gives the basic story and how it evolved from the origional. The story of the indian woman and Cortez is historicaly correct.


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Subject: RE: la llorona final answer
From: Escamillo
Date: 25 Sep 99 - 11:35 PM

Thank you Allan, for this very interesting research ! Yours, Andrés Magré


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA LLORONA
From: Escamillo
Date: 04 Dec 99 - 04:29 AM

I've just found this lyrics by chance. This is the most complete I've ever seen
Hope this carries the original line breaks.
The site is http://ingeb.org/songs/lalloron.html
Best regards - Andrés

Tehuatepec, Oaxaca
La pena y lo que no es pena,
Ay llorona,
Todo es pena para mi;
Ayer lloraba por verte,
Ay llorona,
Y hoy lloro porque te vi

Salias del templo un dia,
Ay llorona,
Cuando al pasar yo te vi
Hermoso huipil con blondas
Llevabas
Que la Virgen te crei

Me subi al pino mas alto,
Ay llorona,
A ver si te divisaba.
Como el pino era tierno,
Ay llorona,
Al verme llorar, lloraba

Cada vez que entra la noche,
Ay llorona,
Me pongo a pensar y digo:
De que me sirve la cama,
Ay llorona,
Si tu no durmes conmigo

Ay de mi, llorona,
Llorona,
Llorona de azul turqui,
Ayer lloroba por verte,
Ay llorona,
Y hoy lloro porque te vi

De la mar vino una carta,
Ay llorona,
Que me mando la sirena,
Y en la carta me decia,
Ay llorona,
Quien tiene amor tiene pena

La pena y lo que no es pena,
Ay llorona,
Ay de mi, llorona, llorona,
Llorona de azul celeste,
Aunque la vida me cueste,
Ay llorona,
No dejaré de quererte.


Luis Martz
Salias del templo un dia,
Llorona,
Cuando al pasar yo te vi;
Hermoso huipil llevabas,
Llorona,
Que la Virgen te crei

Ay de mi, llorona,
Llorona,
Llorona de ayer y hoy,
Ayer maravilla fui,
Llorona
Y ahora ni sombra soy

Dicen que no tengo duelo,
Llorona,
Pporque no me ven llorar
Hay muertos que no hacen ruido,
Llorona,
Y es mas grande su pesar

Ay de mi, llorona,
Llorona,
Llorona, llevame al rio.
Tapame con tu rebozo,
Llorona,
Porque me muero de frio

Todos me dicen el negro,
Llorona,
Negro pero carinoso.
Yo soy como el chile verde,
Llorona,
Picante pero sabroso

Ay de mi, llorona,
Llorona,
Llorona de azul celeste,
Y aunque la vida me cueste,
Llorona,
No dejaré de quererte

Si al cielo subir pudiera,
Llorona,
Las estrellas te bajaria,
La luna a tus pies pusiera,
Llorona,
Con el sol te coronaria

Ay de mi, llorona, llorona,
Llorona de negros ojos
Ya con esta se despide,
Llorona
Tu negrito sonador


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Stewie
Date: 04 Dec 99 - 07:59 AM

Pete T, I have about 6 albums of Tish, one of my very favourite singer/writers. For me the standout album is 'Homeland' A&M CD 5263. The border trilogy - 'Joaquin', 'West Side of Town' and 'Donde Voy (Where I Go)'- is superb. I just checked and CDNOW have it on sale for about $10. My advice to you is to grab it with both hands and thank yourself lucky that you have got a gem before it disappears forever - being on CD is no guarantee of longevity of album availabilty. 'Tao Tennessee' and 'Culture Swing' are also well worth the purchase price.

Regards, Stewie.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Dale Rose
Date: 04 Dec 99 - 11:44 AM

I agree, Stewie. A&M has already kept Homeland (1989) in print longer than I ever thought they would. And besides, you get the bonus of some nifty playing by Flaco Jimenez! I was watching some old video of Tish just last night ~~ always enchanting. Though all her albums are worth having, I think I would agree with your assessment as to recommendations, I would rate Culture Swing (Rounder 1992)slightly ahead of Taos to Tennessee (self produced 1987~~ Watermelon reissue 1992).

Oh, and don't forget to visit mundotish.com for lots of good stuff from Tish.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: GUEST
Date: 18 Sep 02 - 02:53 PM

Google offers a translated (horribly) version of the Luis Martz song (same site that Escamillo took the original Spanish from in this thread). Enter Luis Martz in Google, and you will find the ingeb site in the list. Click on translation (this translation is NOT on the ingeb site, it is a googleized translation).
Nothing on Luis Martz except that he is from Tehuantepec, Oaxaca.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: GUEST,Lisette Lopez
Date: 03 Aug 03 - 03:46 PM

La Llorona is really a traditional song from Tehuantepec, Oaxaca. I know this as my family is from Oaxaca. I have no idea if the song actually relates to the llorona myth.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Deckman
Date: 03 Aug 03 - 04:16 PM

Guest Lisette ... My Spanish is pretty rusty, but I was taught this song by a wonderful Mexican family in 1959. At that time, I was told that this is the true story of the legend. And Juantia, the lady who sang it for me, told me that she herself heard La Llorona, crying for her dead children, as she walked the river bank at night. I have related that story several times to several different people. Modern, meaning younger people from the larger cities in Mexico, all seem to poo poo the notion. But, older native people do not. They just get real quiet! Cheers, Bob(deckman)Nelson


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 03 Aug 03 - 06:41 PM

La Llorona is told throughout the southwestern States and Mexico. Its origin is uncertain but it is quite old. There are a number of versions, which is true of all folk tales. It may have originated in Spain or it may be from colonial Mexico of the 16th century, where the story is known from Mexico City of the 1550s.
This website, at the State University of New Mexico, gives something of the story: La Llorona

A more complete history is available from the TCU website: La Llorona


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 03 Aug 03 - 07:11 PM

In Spanish, something of the history of La Llorona in Mexico. She is noted in Sahagún's Historia: La Llorona


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: AllisonA(Animaterra)
Date: 06 Aug 03 - 07:29 AM

I had learned that La Llorona's grief was because she had drowned her children herself.
Did anyone see the movie Frida ? There is a wonderful scene where the entire song (or at least, many many verses!) was sung by an old woman to express Frida Kahlo's rage and grief.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: GUEST,Q
Date: 06 Aug 03 - 09:00 PM

In the classic "Bless Me, Ultima," Rudolfo Anaya's evocation of Spanish-American life in New Mexico, a version of La Llorona is mentioned, one which used to strike fear into the children of that area.

"Along the river the tormented cry of a lonely goddess filled the valley. The winding wail made the blood of men run cold.
It is La Llorona, my brothers cried in fear, the old witch who cries along the river banks and seeks the blood of men and boys to drink!
La Llorona seeks the soul of Antonioooooooo...." [Substitute your name]
Now imagine listening to a grandma or grandpa, telling the story by firelight as you prepare to sleep....


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Subject: La Llorana lyrics?
From: GUEST,Mando man
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 11:40 AM

Anyone have the lyrics for La Llorana..the weeping woman.? Any guitar chords?


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Subject: RE: La Llorana lyrics?
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 01:05 PM

I didn't find lyrics - yet - but this Google search brings up lots that looks interesting.
-Joe Offer-


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Subject: Lyr Add: LA LLORONA / THE WEEPING WOMAN
From: GUEST,GUEST: Kate
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 01:41 PM

La Llorona (Weeping Woman)

Salias del templo un dia Llorona
Cuando al pasar yo te vi

Hermoso huipil llevavas llorona
Que La Virgen te crei

No se lo que tienen las flores Llorona
Las flores de un campo santo

Wue cuando las mueve el viento Llorona
Parece que estan llorando
Ay de mi Llorona, Llorona
De un campo lirio
Ay de mi Llorona, Llorona, Llorona
Llevame al rio

Tapame con tu rebosa Llorona
Porque me muero de frio

Dos besos que llevo en la frente Llorona
Que no se apartan de mi

El ultimo de mi madre Llorona
Y el primero que te di

Ay de mi Llorona, Llorona, Llorona
De un campo lirio
Ay de me Llorona, Llorona, Llorona
Llevame al rio

Y el que no sabe de amores, Llorona
No sabe lo que es martirio

You were leaving the temple one day, Llorona
As I passed I saw you

A beautiful shawl you wore, Llorona
That I believed you to be the Virgin

I know not what the flowers hold
Those flowers from the graveyard

That when the wind moves them, Llorona
It looks as though they weep

Ay, my Llorona
From the lily field
Ay, my Llorona
Take me to the river

Cover me with your shawl, Llorona
Because I'll die from this cold

Two kisses that I carry on my brow, Llorona
They may never leave me

The last one from my mother, Llorona
And the first one that I gave you

Ay, my Llorona
From the lily field
Ay, my Llorona
Take me to the river

And one who does not know of love, Llorona
Does not know of martyred pain


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Subject: RE: La Llorana lyrics?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 01:45 PM

Guest Mando Man- There are many La Llorona stories, not just one, depending on the location where the story was found, from the 16th c. Aztec poem to the folk tales from New Mexico and southern Colorado where the tales multiplied and diversified. Most are stories, not song.
The most sung is the version from Tejuantepec by Luis Martz. Escamilio posted this one in thread 12887: La Llorona
Most are in Spanish only. Haven't found any useful chords.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 02:03 PM

Lyr. Add: LA LLORONA (Tehuantepec)
Posted 04 Dec 99 by Escamilio. Seven verses.

Lyr. Add: LA LLORONA (Luis Martz)
Posted 04 Dec. 99 by Escamilio. Eight verses.

They were obtained from La Llorona


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Subject: RE: La Llorana lyrics?
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 02:05 PM

Error- the Tehuantepec version is not by Martz. The one following is.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: La Llorona
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 17 Dec 04 - 03:10 PM

Lyr. Add: LA LLORONA
(Huapango; Oaxaca, New Mexico)

A. Ay de mi, llorona, llorona,
   llorona, Lléva me al río.
B. Tápa me con tu rebozo, llorona,
   por que me muero de frío.

A. Todos me dicen el negro, llorona,
   negro, pero cariñoso,
B. Yo soy como el chile verde, llorona,
   picante, pero sabroso.

A. Ay de mi, llorona, llorona,
   llorona te estoy amando;
B. Me han de quitar la querencia, llorona,
   pero de olvidarte cuando.

A. De tarde se me hace triste, llorona,
   de noche con mas razón.
B. Y llorando me amanece, llorona,
   llorando se pone el sol.

A. Ay de mi, llorona, llorona,
   llorona de azul celeste.
B. Yo te ha de seguir queriendo, llorona.
   y aunque la vida me cueste.

(la)Ay de mi, llo(re)rona, llorona,
llo(la)rona, Lléva me al (M7)rio
Tapa me con tu re(mi)bozo, llorona,
por (re)que me muero de (M7) frio.

From MS, p. 28, "New Mexican Folk Songs," Charles F. Lummis. Date?, typed 1941.


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