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Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (1926-2010)

Related threads:
Susan Reed-appreciation (5)
Susan Reed - Available Recordings (42)


Mary Katherine 30 Apr 10 - 08:02 AM
Deckman 30 Apr 10 - 08:06 AM
Bat Goddess 30 Apr 10 - 08:37 AM
Bat Goddess 30 Apr 10 - 08:41 AM
Mary Katherine 30 Apr 10 - 10:24 AM
Art Thieme 30 Apr 10 - 11:54 AM
Joe Offer 30 Apr 10 - 03:36 PM
open mike 30 Apr 10 - 04:07 PM
WFDU - Ron Olesko 30 Apr 10 - 04:15 PM
open mike 30 Apr 10 - 04:22 PM
Don Firth 30 Apr 10 - 09:08 PM
Deckman 30 Apr 10 - 10:47 PM
GUEST,Wade Reynolds www.wadereynoldsart.com 01 May 10 - 02:36 PM
Little Robyn 01 May 10 - 05:15 PM
Desert Dancer 02 May 10 - 01:47 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 02 May 10 - 10:48 AM
Bonnie Shaljean 02 May 10 - 10:53 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 02 May 10 - 05:32 PM
GUEST,Olaf Van Roggen 14 May 10 - 05:26 PM
GUEST,Olaf van Roggen 14 May 10 - 05:28 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 14 May 10 - 07:36 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 14 May 10 - 07:40 PM
Joe Offer 14 May 10 - 07:49 PM
Charley Noble 14 May 10 - 07:58 PM
Shadowman 14 May 10 - 11:50 PM
GUEST 15 May 10 - 04:38 AM
GUEST,Bill Kennedy 23 May 10 - 07:00 PM
Bonnie Shaljean 23 May 10 - 07:28 PM
GUEST,Bill Kennedy 29 May 10 - 08:24 PM
Joe Offer 29 May 10 - 09:54 PM
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Subject: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Mary Katherine
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 08:02 AM

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100430/ap_en_ce/us_obit_susan_reed

Folk music singer Susan Reed dies at 84

(Associated Press)

LOS ANGELES ? Susan Reed, the cabaret singer whom Life magazine
saluted in a 1955 cover story as the leading lady of the folk music
era, has died. She was 84.

The singer, who regularly performed at Carnegie Hall in New York and
the Wilshire Ebell Theatre in Los Angeles, died Sunday of natural
causes at her nursing home in Greenport, N.Y., publicist Dale Olson
said.

Reed also acted alongside Gene Krupa in "Glamour Girl," and in
numerous TV shows including 1952's "The Firestone Hour."

She starred on Broadway in the Max Liebman production of "Billy the
Kid," and co-starred with her then-husband, James Karen, in regional
productions of "Brigadoon" and "Finian's Rainbow."

She is survived by her son, Reed Karen.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Deckman
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 08:06 AM

Oh dear ... bob(deckman)nelson


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 08:37 AM

Here's a much better obituary --

Obit: Susan Reed

Linn
    The entire text (added by Joe Offer):

      Susan Reed, Folk Singer, Dies at 84

      April 30, 2010, 12:33 AM ET [Wall Street Journal]

      Susan Reed, one of the top folk singers of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 84 years old.

      Born in Columbia, S.C., her father was an entertainer and she encountered a wide range of performers while growing up. Leadbelly was among those who helped introduce her to folk music, and the poet Carl Sandburg was a family friend. She often performed traditional numbers such as “Danny Boy” and “He Moved Through the Fair” and became known for her work on the harp and the zither.

      Reed appeared on the screen as well as the stage and starred in the movie “Glamour Girl” in 1948 with Gene Krupa. “GENE KRUPA’S drummin’ SUSAN REED’S strummin’” read one of the movie’s promotional taglines.

      Like a number of other folk-music performers, Reed was blacklisted in the 1950s, and her career withered.

      “Where do you find all these unusual songs of yours?” she was once asked.

      “Oh, almost anywhere, or wherever people live and work and play, you’ll find songs that they like to sing,” she replied.

      Here’s a clip of Reed on a radio show from the 1940s.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bat Goddess
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 08:41 AM

And here --

http://beinecke.library.yale.edu/cvvpw/gallery/reeds1.html

<< Though Susan Reed enjoyed a great deal of success throughout her career, today her name and her music are not well known, even in folk music circles. Though few remember her, Susan Reed is among the pioneering musicians of the so-called "Hootenanny movement" responsible for exposing American audiences to traditional folk music from many cultures. In the 1950s, Reed made several albums of American and European folk songs; she recorded many folk standards, including "I Know My Love," "Jennie Jenkins," "Go Away From My Window," and "I'm Sad and I'm Lonely." >>

Linn
    The entire text (added by Joe Offer):
      The daughter of Daniel Reed, a successful entertainer, actor, director, and playwright, red-haired folk singer Susan Reed spent much of her childhood surrounded by entertainers. Though she was raised predominantly in South Carolina, she traveled frequently with her father and was exposed at a young age to the entertainment industry in New York, Los Angeles, and Hollywood. Guests in the Reed household often included accomplished singers, dancers, and musicians; it was her father’s friends, the influential folk musicians Carl Sandburg and Huddie Ledbetter, who first introduced Susan Reed to American folk music. She received her earliest lessons in the tradition from some of its finest practitioners.

      Members of the Abbey Theater Company of Dublin, often visited the Reeds when the company toured in the United States. Actors and musicians from this company, including Ralph Cullinan and Farrell Pelly, introduced Reed to Irish folk music. She was so deeply influenced by these performers and their musical tradition that she began playing the Irish harp and learning Irish folk songs. In just a few years, Reed had mastered the instrument; she had also learned to play the zither and the Appalachian autoharp.

      By the time Susan Reed was a teenager, her family had settled in New York City. She began performing in the City’s popular nightclubs to much acclaim. After years of singing in church choirs and performing for wounded soldiers in VA hospitals, Reed had developed a beautiful singing voice that was perfectly matched to the music of her Irish harp. Soon she was traveling to clubs and music festivals all over the United States, playing traditional folk songs from many countries. Reed performed regularly on the radio and she appeared on a number of television programs, including major network specials.

      Though Susan Reed enjoyed a great deal of success throughout her career, today her name and her music are not well known, even in folk music circles. Though few remember her, Susan Reed is among the pioneering musicians of the so-called “Hootenanny movement” responsible for exposing American audiences to traditional folk music from many cultures. In the 1950s, Reed made several albums of American and European folk songs; she recorded many folk standards, including “I Know My Love,” “Jennie Jenkins,” “Go Away From My Window,” and “I’m Sad and I’m Lonely.”


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Mary Katherine
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 10:24 AM

Despite what it says in the first obit I posted, Susan Reed is not on the cover of any 1955 issue of Life Magazine.

There is a story in the 29 Oct 1945 issue, "Susie Reed Is New Folk
Singer," on page 137, but that's a ten-year difference, and Reed is not
mentioned on the cover. (The cover is a picture of a hunter and his
dog in the woods.)

http://www.oldlifemagazines.com/cover.php?d=102945

Not sure where the error comes from.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Art Thieme
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 11:54 AM

My favorite song of Susan Reed's had the refrain of

"And the fairy was laughing too."

That possibly was the actual name of the song--I don't know. --- But I almost learned it once---and it is on a compilation of my favorite songs that I put together a long time ago---and I listen to it quite often. Rest in peace. I remember Susan approaching Folk Legacy for a possible record around the mid 1980s, but times were hard and it couldn't happen then---so it didn't.

Art


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 03:36 PM

The All-Music Guide doesn't have its Susan Beed biography at its Website, but I found it at starpulse.com:

    Susan Reed > Biography

    Born: January 11, 1927 in Columbia, SC
    Years Active: 50 's
    Genre: FOLK

    Susan Reed is one of the lost stars of the post-World War II music world. At one point, in the second half of the 1940s, the barely 20-year-old singer/harpist/zitherist was playing some of the most prominent nightspots in New York to enthusiastic audiences and appearing regularly on radio as well as the newly established television medium, and was courted by the biggest record companies in the world, Columbia Masterworks and RCA Victor. Reed was part of a new breed of entertainer in that genre, along with Burl Ives, Pick Temple, and other folk-based performers who had begun coming to prominence late in the Second World War and immediately after.


    Although she never achieved a level of popularity anything like Ives, she left behind a group of highly prized recordings that range from traditional Irish and American songs to adaptations of classical repertory. The daughter of Daniel Reed, an entertainer, actor, theatrical director, and playwright, she was born in 1927 in Columbia, SC, and, thanks to her father's career, was practically raised to live the life of a performer. Reed traveled extensively with him, and the Reed home was often visited by musicians, singers, and dancers. Among those she came to know were Carl Sandburg, the poet, author, and singer, and Leadbelly, both of whom provided her with an introduction to American folk music. Her introduction to Irish folk music, in turn, came through her father's friendship with members of Dublin's Abbey Theater Company, who were guests in their home during their visits to the United States.


    Reed also attended folk song festivals with her father, and went to services at African-American churches, where the gospel music (some of it strongly folk-based) appealed to her as well. She was drawn to the sounds and traditions of the songs that she learned, and also took up the Irish harp. By her teens, she had mastered the instrument and also learned the autoharp and the zither. By that time, the Reed family had moved to New York City, where, during the Second World War, she performed for wounded soldiers recovering in hospitals. It was through those appearances that, with help from a local music critic, the proprietor of the club Cafe Society chose to seek Reed out. She was immediately booked into the club, and given her considerable appeal, Reed was an immediate hit with audiences. This, in turn, led to appearances on radio and then the brand-new medium of television, as well as her formal concert debut at Town Hall in 1946, when she was all of 19. A national concert tour followed in short order -- the latter also featured Reed's musician brother Jerry, who passed away soon after.


    Her first recordings soon followed, for RCA Victor, on a set of 78-rpm discs. In 1948, at age 21, Reed also made her first and only feature film appearance, a co-starring role in Glamour Girl, a low-budget Sam Katzman production for Columbia Pictures that also starred Gene Krupa & His Orchestra -- in it, she played Jennie Higgins, a backwoods girl who sings folk songs and is brought to the big city to perform. And in 1949, she was engaged by Columbia Masterworks to record a somewhat wider repertory, including an adaptation of Joseph Canteloube's Songs of the Auvergne, which was released as a 10" LP in 1950, and which she also performed at Town Hall. By the start of the 1950s, she had a thriving career, including a second 10" album of traditional American songs on Columbia, and had appeared on-stage with the likes of Lena Horne and Josh White. Claudia Cassidy, writing in The Chicago Tribune, said of Reed, "She creates a pool of enchantment and...is the heroine of every song she sings."


    She became known not only for her singing and harp, but for her work on the zither as well -- along with Ruth Welcome, Reed was a beneficiary of the craze for the latter instrument caused by the movie The Third Man when it opened in America in 1950. Reed later recorded albums for Jac Holzman's Elektra Records, and was working steadily across the early '50s. She was never able to achieve mass appeal, however, and her acceptance among serious folk enthusiasts was also limited. In a sense, she was a victim of her own eclecticism -- she had sung some pop material in her early career, and her approach to her folk material was far more sophisticated than hardcore folk listeners wanted. She was neither fish nor fowl, too pop for the most serious folk audiences and too folky for mainstream audiences. How she would have fared amid the late-'50s folk boom, with its various camps and wings -- juxtaposing pop influences, topicality, and authenticity -- is anyone's guess, but Reed never had a chance to find out.


    Like various other folk artists who had the temerity to go against the grain and actually stand for something, Reed found herself blacklisted in the second half of the 1950s. She thus joined the ranks of Pete Seeger and the other members of the Weavers, and singers like Jo Mapes, who suddenly found themselves persona non grata in most major venues. As a result, her broadcast and recording career came to a halt and her performing eventually followed. Reed's work was mostly forgotten over the ensuing decades, except by dedicated record collectors and people with long memories. In 2006, however, her Elektra recordings were reissued on CD, spurring renewed interest in Reed and her work. One can only hope that her RCA Victor album will someday reappear in some form as well. Although she left professional music long ago, it was reported in 2008 that she still performed occasionally in her community. Bruce Eder, All Music Guide


This Flickr page has some interesting photos of Susan Reed and others.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: open mike
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 04:07 PM

Is this the woman who was mentioned in a thread
a while back, who was a shop keeper ?

what a sweet voice on that radio show clip!

she says she sang this on the Burl Ives show..turtledove

any recordings of that? was it a radio or t.v. show?

what instrument do you think the "everloving" was?

some sort of harp, zither, autoharp? ukelin?

she is also one of the featured players on the c.d.
that accompanies the book "Follow the Music" about
Elektra Records..she was one of the early artists
recorded by Elektra.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: WFDU - Ron Olesko
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 04:15 PM

I'm so sorry to hear of her passing. She was a wonderful person. Susan appeared at a couple of benefit concerts for WFDU back in the 1980's and appeared as a guest on the station a number of times.

For many years she ran an antique shop in Nyack, NY. She was also a painter, and Tom Chapin used several of her paintings on his CD covers. Very folksy style.

I will pay tribute to her and play selections from some of the previously mentioned albums on my May 9th show on WFDU.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: open mike
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 04:22 PM

yes. she is the one mentioned in the "susan reed lp" thread
with a reference to her shop which sold "folk clothing,
jewelry and art" in Nyack, NY ...

also in that thread is mention that she was in a rest home in 2009

....Nyack Antique and Craft show....just across the Hudson from our Westchester County...I spotted a store on the corner that said 'Susan Reed'....I asked the... elderly lady behind the counter if she had an Irish Harp. (Back in the 40's, Susan Reed was known and parodied for climbing on a tall stool and saying with her innocent soprano girlish voice, "This is an Irish Harp.".....she pulled out an LP which I recognized as an antique itself. ..I told her about the Mudcat and her contemporaries who are om it ("Jean Ritchie! She's years older than I am!").....she started as a girl of sixteen (sixty years ago),...She said she still sings, but mostly in the local park, recalls her most recent gigs at some folk festival in or near Philadelphia ("I love the people in Pennsylvania"), she's painted...album covers... for Tom Chapin's CD's.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Don Firth
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 09:08 PM

Sooner or later inevitable, of course, but I am sad to hear this. Susan Reed's was one of the first voices I associated with folk music even before I became actively interested myself. Along with Burl Ives, I heard her on the radio from time to time and I saw her in the movie, "Glamour Girl," a grade B movie, but its saving grace was that it featured a lot of singing by Susan.

I often wondered why, as folk music suddenly took off as a pop music phenomenon, Susan Reed (to me at least) was conspicuously absent. I was not aware that she got caught up in the blacklist with so many others. The idea that her sweet, unaffected singing might be a danger to the country shows just how asinine that whole blacklist thing really was!

I have a few of her records (from which, early on, I learned several songs), but I wish I had more of them. A lovely, sweet voice, nice, tasteful harp and zither accompaniments, and all-in-all, a wonderful singer of folk songs and ballads.

"When comes such another?"

Don Firth


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Deckman
Date: 30 Apr 10 - 10:47 PM

The late Walt Robertson told me of many wonderful visits he had with Susan and her husband when he visted them. Another ICON gone ... too damned many! bob(deckman)Nelson


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Wade Reynolds www.wadereynoldsart.com
Date: 01 May 10 - 02:36 PM

Susan and her husband had a wonderful antique shop in the village where I met and became close friends with them, in the early mid fifties.

Susan was a delight and just slightly quirky. They had a large beautiful red setter that lost all the hair from it's tail. Susan fashioned a slip-cover of fringed red led leather to cover the embarassment.

When James was appearing with Joan Blondell in a production (I believe in Connecticut) he asked me to escort her on a concert tour to which she was already committed.

I would love to hear from their son, because I am sure there was a film in the late forties with her father as a folk singer, which is not mentioned. I think he recorded folk also.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Little Robyn
Date: 01 May 10 - 05:15 PM

We'll be playing a track from her Electra record on our radio show, Folk on Sunday, in a few hours. I think it's Poor Miss Bailey.
Robyn


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 02 May 10 - 01:47 AM

Here is the obituary in the New York Times:

Susan Reed, a Fleeting Star in a Folk Music Revival, Is Dead at 84
By DENNIS HEVESI
Published: May 1, 2010

One night in 1944, a high school girl with streaming red hair skipped onto the floor of a New York nightclub, perched on a high stool and said, "This is a zither."

In her pure, sweet soprano, lilting to the twangy sound of that string instrument, Susan Reed soon enchanted the crowd with a range of folk songs, with lyrics like, "Black, black, black is the color of my true love's hair."

Within a year, Life magazine was proclaiming: "The pet of Manhattan nightclubbers is a chubby, freckle-faced redhead of 18 named Susie Reed. Three times a night, Cafe Society Uptown's choosy customers sit enraptured while Susie sings old Irish, English and Appalachian ballads and accompanies herself on the zither or the Irish harp."

And two years later, Alan Lomax, a renowned authority on American folk music, was hailing her as a leading voice in a rebirth of the genre. "One of the most heartening things about America in 1947 is the spring freshet of enthusiasm for native balladry and folklore that is running through the country from coast to coast," Mr. Lomax wrote in The New York Times. "Big, dulcet-voiced Burl Ives from Indiana, Josh White with his South Carolina blues, Woody Guthrie with his Okie songs, Susan Reed with her Southern lyric songs have become nationally known."

Barely more than five years later, however, Ms. Reed all but stepped off stage.

On April 25, Ms. Reed died at a nursing home on Long Island, her son, Reed Karen, said. She was 84 and lived in Nyack, N.Y., where for years she had owned a handicraft shop.

Susan Catherine Reed was born in Columbia, S.C., on Jan. 11, 1926. Although her parents, Daniel and Isadora Reed, were well acquainted with folk songs and tales, they were not country folk. Her father was a film director, her mother a theater publicist. A close family friend, the poet Carl Sandburg, regularly visited the Reeds in South Carolina as he compiled his folk anthology, "The American Songbag."

Susie picked up tunes, as well as a zither, a harp and a lute. When the family moved to New York, she began entertaining at private parties and fund-raisers for wounded World War II soldiers recovering in Manhattan hospitals. Barney Josephson, the owner of the Cafe Society nightclub, spotted her and gave her her big break.

She went on to sing on radio and television, at Town Hall in New York, and at dozens of concerts a year around the country. She recorded for RCA Victor, Columbia and Elektra. In 1946, she appeared on Broadway in "Shooting Star," a musical about Billy the Kid. And in 1948 she co-starred with Gene Krupa in the movie "Glamour Girl," playing a backwoods girl who sings folk songs and is brought to the big city to perform.

But Ms. Reed's full-time folk career lasted less than six years. She performed intermittently in the 1960s and '70s, always starting by saying, "This is a zither."

Asked why she walked away, she told The Times in 1971: "I was singing at the Palmer House in Chicago when I thought, 'This is a rotten business.' And I just turned off."

Her son, Reed, said, however: "Although that may be true, the Red Scare also forced her to leave the limelight. She was involved with civil rights; her father had been a Communist. She was pretty much relegated to whistle-stop engagements in Podunk towns."

Besides her son, Ms. Reed is survived by two grandchildren. Her marriage to James Karen, an actor, ended in divorce.

Out of the limelight, her voice a bit deeper, she still performed at the occasional fund-raiser. "Everyone with an organization who wants to put over brotherhood and peace," she said, "they just call old Sue."

They have a link to the Life Magazine article (not a cover story, though) in Google Books: clicky.

My parents had an album or two of hers that I remember loving when I was young.

~ Becky in Tucson


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 02 May 10 - 10:48 AM

YouTube of a 40s radio programme of her singing here, with some vintage photos, plus more if you trawl around Youtube via the search box - I found this by putting in "Susan Reed harp"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8GhLrKT9s4


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 02 May 10 - 10:53 AM

And from 1945 (you'll have to vertically-scroll past the Burl Ives number to the "B" side, which is where Susan is):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOSfxRWP9Pk

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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 02 May 10 - 05:32 PM

An early favorite of mine for her 78s and her Columbia LP "Songs of the Auvergne" ? the first 12" LP I ever owned, laid out as follows:

Side 1: classical settings of Canteloube's arty treatments of Auvergne songs (hers are prettier than anyone's?Natania Devrath et al lack her charm?if not very true to the brazen Auvergne traditional vocal style).
Side 2: her performances of traditional songs including Zebra Dun, Next Market Day and the first recorded version of "Pretty Little Turtle Dove," which she learned from (I think) Bascom Lamar Lunsford, and subsequently made into a much-covered folk standard.

I remember seeing her in concert around 1958, at Smith College if I remember correctly, and going backstage afterward to talk. Though she seemed tired (this was the late 50s, and her vogue had already passed, despite her recent Elektra album that reintroduced her and found her a new audience), she was unfailingly nice, unpretentious ... and had one of the sweetest voices I ever heard.

Oh, and Art, that "fairy was laughing too" line comes from "The Leprechaun," which Richard Dyer-Bennett also recorded ... I think Susan may have gotten it from him. It begins "In a shady nook one moonlight night a leprechaun I spied ..."

Wish that Folk-Legacy album had happened. There is all too little remaining of Susan Reed. That radio interview done from her shop is striking and memorable, a radiant visit with an artist who kept her freshness and buoyancy all her life.

Goodnight Susan, you will be greatly missed.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Olaf Van Roggen
Date: 14 May 10 - 05:26 PM

I became a Susan Reed fan when I heard her Elektra albums,through Jac Holzman I got her phone number.
Until she went to her nursing home I called her every month to talk about all sorts of stuff,I sent her photo's and rcordings she didn't own herself and she even painted a birth certificate for our oldest daughter.

I collected some Susan Reed photo's and recordings and you can see it on this link:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/8863156@N08/sets/72157617300627364/

May she rest in peace.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Olaf van Roggen
Date: 14 May 10 - 05:28 PM

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8863156@N08/sets/72157617300627364/


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:36 PM

Wow - what a treasure trove. Thanks so much for sharing this with us, Olaf. Here's a blue clickie (Mudspeak for a hyperlink):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/8863156@N08/sets/72157617300627364/


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:40 PM

Dunno what's going on - Olaf's post above didn't show it as a clickie, just ordinary text (which, when I pasted it into the browser address box, just gave me the 404 Not Found). But now, there it is...   ??? O well, it's worth an instant replay -


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:49 PM

Well, I fixed the link in the second post...


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Charley Noble
Date: 14 May 10 - 07:58 PM

She was someone I evidently missed listening to from the early post World War 2 generation of folk song singers. I find that odd but it's threads like this that fill in some of the voids in my understanding of "contemporary folk music."

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Shadowman
Date: 14 May 10 - 11:50 PM

I echo Charley's sentiments. I take it as a personal failing that there was this fine folk singer in the 1950s and I never heard of her! She has an album on i-Tunes, and I just listened to a couple of samples. Sweet sound.
Charley, it just goes to show you there is still much talent and wonder in the world to be discovered!
Thank you, Mudcat Cafe friends,
Shadowman


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST
Date: 15 May 10 - 04:38 AM

thanks for fixing the link Joe,something went wrong when I tried it.
Susan had still a great memory when we spoke about people,music songs and events.
It's a pity she never wrote that down,'cause she had a treasure of information and knowledge.
Her music and voice still lives on.!


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Bill Kennedy
Date: 23 May 10 - 07:00 PM

I just saw this post for the first time, can't say how sad it makes me, and can't say why. Susan's music was important to me, I have spent many hours playing her songs on the various radio programs I have broadcast, and telling other people about her and hoping to talk to her sometime. I had heard that she entered a nursing home, but couldn't bring myself to accept the inevitable. I will have to do a 2 hour show on her next week.

www.wcsb.org 8 - 10 PM Saturday, May 29.

Bill Kennedy


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Bonnie Shaljean
Date: 23 May 10 - 07:28 PM

Any way of making it a podcast, or re-playable online in some way? I'd sure love to hear it... but I live in Ireland...


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST,Bill Kennedy
Date: 29 May 10 - 08:24 PM

Bonnie I can send you a cd of the show if you like, PM me.


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 29 May 10 - 09:54 PM

Bill, it's nice to see you back. I can hear Bill's program online right now: Click to play....but he's playing his last song right now. Darn.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: open mike
Date: 30 May 10 - 12:05 AM

I played a song of hers on my show today,too: Foggy Dew. I find more and more of the musicians whose music i play are no longer alive :-(


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (April 2010)
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Jan 13 - 09:43 AM

Does anybody know where Susan is buried at a cementary close to where she lived in Nyack?


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Subject: RE: Obit: Folksinger Susan Reed RIP (1926-2010)
From: GUEST
Date: 19 Jul 13 - 06:40 AM

I have been helping a voice student with a high soprano voice look for some songs by SUsan Reed. She has such an easy blend of high voice with straight forward diction and that combination is not easy to find. I loved her as a little girl and sing several of her songs learned from long since worn out 78's. Alas, her musical career ended at its height after she was blacklisted.

What a tragedy!


Like Bob, I particularly like her singing of "Songs from the Auvergne." Absolutely the best!

--Lisa Null


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