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Lyr Req: Andrew Bardeen

GUEST,Jane 03 May 10 - 06:16 AM
Susan of DT 03 May 10 - 06:49 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 03 May 10 - 06:52 AM
Mick Pearce (MCP) 03 May 10 - 10:32 AM
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Subject: Lyr Req: Andrew Bardeen
From: GUEST,Jane
Date: 03 May 10 - 06:16 AM

Hi All,
I'm looking for the lyrics to a version of Andrew Bardeen (ballad of Andrew Barton? of possibly a verson of Henry Martyn)

The first verse I have is:

There were three brothers in old Scotland
Three loving brothrers was they
They all cast lots to see who should go
a robbin' all o'er the salt sea.

If anyone knows the source of this version or has the rest of the lyrics I'd be glad to get them.

The tune I have is a phrygian one...not in my shortened version of Bronson.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Bardeen
From: Susan of DT
Date: 03 May 10 - 06:49 AM

Here are several versions of Andrew Barton and Henry Martin from the Digital Tradition.


Andrew Barton
Andy Bardan
Andrew Barton 2
Henry Martin


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Andrew Bardeen
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 03 May 10 - 06:52 AM

Looking at my Roud index, the Andrew Bardeen title seems to be on American versions: Randolph's Ozark Folk Songs, Flanders' Country Songs of Vermont and Ancient Ballads Traditionally Sung In New England and Moore's Ballads and Folksongs of the Southwest seem to be the sources for printed versions.

Here's the Randolph version from Bronson. The tune is Phrygian (or as Bronson puts it Phrygian (-VII) if on E, Ionian (-II) if on C). I'll post the tune in a while and you can see if it's your tune.

Mick



ANDREW BARDEEN

There was three brothers in old Scotland,
Three lovin' brothers was they,
They all cast lots to see who should go
A-robbin' all o'er the salt sea.

The lot it fell to Andrew Bardeen,
He being the youngest of three,
Was forced to go robbing all o'er the salt sea
To maintain his two brothers and he.

He had not sailed more than a week in the year,
When a ship he did espy,
Come sailing so far off and so far on
Till at last it come sailing so high.

Who are you? Who are you? cries Andrew Bardeen,
Who are you? And where are you bound?
We're the merry rich merchants from old England,
Won't you please for to let us pass on?

Oh no, oh no, cries Andrew Bardeen,
Oh no, that never can be.
Your ship and your cargo we'll take all away
And your merry men we'll drown in the sea.

Go build me a boat, cries Captain Charles Stuart,
Go build it both safe and strong,
That I may go capture this king of the sea,
Or my life it will not last me long.

He had not sailed more than a week in the year,
When a ship he did espy,
Come sailing so far off and so far on
Till at last it come sailing so high.

Who are you? Who are you? cries Captain Charles Stuart,
Who are you? And where are you bound?
We're the merry Scotch robbers from old Scotland,
Won't you please for to let us pass on?

Oh no, oh no, cries Captain Charles Stuart,
Oh no, that never can be,
Your ship and your cargo we'll take all away
And your merry men we'll drown in the sea.

Come on, come on, cries Andrew Bardeen,
'Tis I that don't fear you a pin,
'Tis you that can show your bright brasses without,
But we'll show you bright steel within.

'Twas at that moment the battle began,
And loudly the cannon did roar,
They had not fought more than a last and a half,
Till Captain Charles Stuart gave o'er.

Go back, go back, cries Andrew Bardeen,
And tell King George Third for me,
that he may be king of the whole wide land,
But I will be king of the sea.


Source: Bronson, originally from Randolph, 1946 from Bruce Evans, Rogersville, Mo, April 19, 1934.


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Subject: Tune Add: ANDREW BARDEEN
From: Mick Pearce (MCP)
Date: 03 May 10 - 10:32 AM

Here's the tune from Bronson. The tune there does not have lyrics under the notes, but the first verse seems to fit as is.

Mick



X:1
T:Andrew Bardeen
S:Bronson from Randolph from Bruce Evans, Rogersville, Mo, April 19, 1934
B:Bronson - Traditional Tunes of The Child Ballads; Randolph - Ozark Folk Songs
L:1/4
M:4/4
K:E Phr
E|c c E/G/B/A/|E E2
w:There was three broth-ers in old Scot-land,
E|c c A/B/ B|G2 z
w:Three lov-in' broth-ers was they,
G|c c E> G|G A/A/ B>
w:They all cast lots to see who should go
B|G E A/ A G/|F E2|]
w:A-rob-bin' all o'er the salt sea.


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