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new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'

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Desert Dancer 15 May 10 - 12:46 PM
Janie 15 May 10 - 06:05 PM
Desert Dancer 15 May 10 - 11:43 PM
katlaughing 15 May 10 - 11:53 PM
GUEST,Russ 16 May 10 - 05:26 PM
Janie 16 May 10 - 07:29 PM
Dave MacKenzie 16 May 10 - 07:43 PM
Janie 16 May 10 - 08:23 PM
GUEST,Russ 16 May 10 - 08:55 PM
Dave MacKenzie 17 May 10 - 04:02 AM
Will Fly 17 May 10 - 05:42 AM
Bobert 17 May 10 - 10:16 AM
katlaughing 17 May 10 - 10:47 AM
Bobert 17 May 10 - 11:49 AM
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Subject: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 15 May 10 - 12:46 PM

NPR story & interviw (remember, there's usually a bit more in the audio than the text transcript)

Classic Appalachian Blues from Smithsonian Folkways
Various Artists SFW40198

The "mountain cousin" of the Delta blues, Appalachian blues bears the stamp of a distinctive regional blend of European and African styles and sounds born at the cultural crossroads of railroad camps, mines, and rural settlements. Drawn from deep within the Folkways collection and from historic live recordings at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, the music of bedrock blues performers such as Pink Anderson, Lesley Riddle, Etta Baker, John Jackson, and Doc Watson shines bright, claiming Appalachia as a key cradle of American acoustic blues. 21 tracks, 66 minutes, 40-page booklet.

Compiled by Jeff Place
Liner Notes by Barry Lee Pearson & Jeff Place

My Baby's Gone         Sticks McGhee         3:45         
Louise Blues         Big Chief Ellis with Cephas and Wiggins         5:14         
Sitting on Top of the World         Doc Watson         2:58         
Railroad Bill         John Jackson         3:34         
Don't Let Your Deal Go Down         Bill Williams         2:15         
You Don't Know My Mind         Pink Anderson         2:36         
Blues Around My Bed         J. C. Burris         2:54         
Hesitation Blues         Reverend Gary Davis         3:15         
Pawn Shop Blues         Brownie McGhee         3:01         
The Road is Rough and Rocky         Archie Edwards         3:23         
Hoodoo Blues         Carl Martin, Ted Bogan and Tommy Armstrong         5:13         
Red River Blues         Lesley Riddle         2:04         
Walking Cane         Peg Leg Sam Jackson         2:31         
One Dime Blues         Etta Baker         3:43         
Mississippi Heavy Water Blues         Roscoe Holcomb         2:13         
Outskirts of Town         Josh White         3:03         
See What You Done Done         Baby Tate         2:32         
I Got a Woman         Marvin and Turner Foddrell         2:50         
Girl Dressed in Green         John Tinsley         1:56         
Blues in the Morning         E.C. Ball         3:37         
Wine Blues (Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee)         Sticks McGhee         3:43

~ Becky in Long Beach


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Janie
Date: 15 May 10 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for posting this, Becky. I'll take a listen to the NPR interview tonight.

I listened to all the samples posted on the Smithsonian site, and it is a nice collection.

I'm pretty ignorant about blues history and blues styles. However, I'm not sure I am interested in seeing someone reclassify what we categorize as Piedmont Blues as Appalachian Blues, and a goodly number (the certainly not all) of the songs and artists on the cd are well known for their Piedmont Blues styles.

Maybe I will understand better once I listen to the interview, but from the brief notes I read on the NPR and Smithsonian websites, he appears to attribute the music as arising primarily from the coal fields. There are definitely Piedmont style blues folks who were from the southern Appalachians (Doc Watson, Etta Baker, the McGees, for example.) However, except for the McGees, (Knoxville) they hale from places south of the coal fields. Most of the Piedmont blues style artists on this album appear to actually hale from the Piedmont areas of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia.

Seems to me this collection would have been better called a collection of upper and mid-south blues.

I'll shut up and see if some folks who actually know something chime in. In the meantime, I'm just sayin'.....:>)


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 15 May 10 - 11:43 PM

I agree, it does look like they meant blues of the "upper and mid-south"... not just the mountains.

But, I also don't know from much about blues, myself.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: katlaughing
Date: 15 May 10 - 11:53 PM

I heard the program, too, and was wondering what some of you who know more about it would have to say about his claims. I really enjoyed the cuts they player, regardless.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: GUEST,Russ
Date: 16 May 10 - 05:26 PM

I agree.

Whatever definition of "Appalachian" they are using, it is much too broad.

I know one NC musician who was quite upset at being referred to as an "Appalachian" musician on a concert flier.

It is interesting, however, that "appalachian" is apparently no longer a pejorative term.

Russ (Permanent GUEST)


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Janie
Date: 16 May 10 - 07:29 PM

At least, not with respect to music.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 16 May 10 - 07:43 PM

Did you mean, "appaalachian" is no longer a pejorative appellation?


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Janie
Date: 16 May 10 - 08:23 PM

I might be missing a joke here, Dave, but if you are questioning Russ's spelling, he spelled it correctly.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: GUEST,Russ
Date: 16 May 10 - 08:55 PM

Dave,

It is a long story, but...

It seems to me, that for quite a while, "Appalachian" was used to conjure up images of Appalachian people that were most unflattering.

Over the decades the images varied but the tone remained fairly constant.

I don't know when the shift started.

My limited experience with current television indicates that the stereotypes are alive and flourishing whatever the status of the word "Appalachian."

Russ (Permanent GUEST and Appalachian person)


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 17 May 10 - 04:02 AM

It was my spelling that was iffy, and it was a joke.

On this side of the pond Appalachian has never been pejorative, but more a badge of authenticity.

I'm looking forward to getting my copy of the album. I ordered a copy as soon as I saw the track listing.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Will Fly
Date: 17 May 10 - 05:42 AM

My thoughts exactly. When Appalachian was used over here, it was to describe music that was the real deal.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Bobert
Date: 17 May 10 - 10:16 AM

Well, being an odd-ball Mississippi player living in an area that plays what NPR calls "Applicain Blues" I do know something about alot of the music and musicans that are listed above and consider almost all of this to be more what is called "Piedmond Blues"... Piedmont Blues tends to be a tad more structured in its 12 bar 1-4-5 chording... The finger picking is more exacting and less slashing of the thumb down over several strings as opposed to the alternating thumb-finger style of the Piedmont where the thumb hits usually just one string at a time...

John Jackson, who BTW I knew purdy well and had to pleasure of playing with before die 4 or 5 years ago, lived squarely in the Piedmont of Virginia (Rappahanock County)... John Cephas, who I also knew and jammed with on a couple occasions, also lived in the Peidmont... His harp player, Phil Wiggins, lives outsdie of Washington, D.C.... Archie Edwards, also listed, was a barber in Washington, D.C. and held Saturday afternoon blues jams in his barbershop... Seems I spent about every Saturday afternoon for 7 or 8 years in that barbershop jamming with Piedmont style blues players...

Now, I am fully aware that there were a number of blues players from central to eastern Tennessee (Nashwille to Knoxville) and they seemed to be a mixed bag in terms of style... Not quite Mississippi Delta (or North Mississippi Hill Country which lots of folks consider Delta-which it ain't) and not quite Piedmont either... Gary Davis and Sticks McGee seem to fall into that category in style... To some extent, John Cephas, also fell in between...

As for "Appalichian Blues", yeah, Doc Watson, even Ralph Stanley play a bastardized style of mountain music that falls somewhere between Old Time Music and Piedmont Blues... I mean, alot of that stuff is 1-4-5 and some even 12 bar... Just faster...

Well, those are just a few thoughts on this fir now... Gotta go...

Maybe more later...

Pappagator knows lots about this stuff, too... Maybe he'll stick his head in here???

B~


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: katlaughing
Date: 17 May 10 - 10:47 AM

Bobert, I think you should send your analysis/explanation to NPR's program, If poppagator adds his knowledge, too, that would be great.

I think the movie "Deliverance" probably did the worst in stereotyping even through their use of the banjo duel.


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Subject: RE: new cd: 'Classic Appalachian Blues'
From: Bobert
Date: 17 May 10 - 11:49 AM

Just might do that, kat...

There are several websites that deal exclusively with the blues that NPR might find interesting... PBS did a nice 5 part blues program about 7 or 8 years ago which I recorded... Very interesting stuff...

Actually, the Archie Edwards blues folks still do workshops and Saturday afternoon jams... They have a cool website acousticblues.com which has their schedule should nayone be in the DC area and want a treat...

BTW, that's where I first met Gutbucketeer...

B~


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