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Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)

Wolfgang 12 Aug 99 - 10:11 AM
Wolfgang 14 Oct 99 - 06:13 AM
GUEST,Dirk >dirk.sears@verizon.net< 02 Mar 03 - 06:25 PM
MartinRyan 03 Mar 03 - 04:23 AM
Brían 03 Mar 03 - 06:31 AM
Brían 03 Mar 03 - 06:37 AM
GUEST,tadhg maher 11 Jan 06 - 09:23 AM
GUEST,Grandma Jean 14 Mar 09 - 11:47 PM
MartinRyan 15 Mar 09 - 06:23 AM
MartinRyan 15 Mar 09 - 06:39 AM
GUEST,Will 17 Sep 09 - 12:00 PM
GUEST 13 Aug 12 - 03:40 AM
MartinRyan 13 Aug 12 - 05:04 AM
GUEST,leeneia 13 Aug 12 - 01:27 PM
GUEST,Dermot McCaughey (this is close to my favor 18 Oct 12 - 06:44 PM
Jim Dixon 03 Jun 13 - 04:37 PM
MartinRyan 03 Jun 13 - 07:30 PM
GUEST,Who is the author of this song 'Horses and P 24 Feb 15 - 12:34 PM
MartinRyan 26 Feb 15 - 12:53 PM
GUEST 31 Dec 15 - 10:43 PM
GUEST,Liberty Boy (sans cookie) 04 Jan 16 - 10:13 AM
GUEST,Lou Judson 04 Jan 16 - 07:34 PM
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Subject: Lyr Add: HORSES AND PLOUGH
From: Wolfgang
Date: 12 Aug 99 - 10:11 AM

Another song transcription from the South Roscommon Singers' CD . This time, my transcription has serious gaps. If you know the song (the CD) or just have a guess at what is sung at parts where my transcription is unclear, please post them.

Wolfgang

HORSES AND PLOUGH

Oh, (?bonnie; pron.: bon me) the breezes that blow in the spring
and as sweet is the music the song thrushes bring,
but I sigh for a scene that I seldom see now,
a man in the fields with his horses and plough.

Farewell to the days of my youth long ago,
when I harnessed my team near the (?bend; pron.: bed an') below.
Then away to the highland beside (?Carrigoe ; pron.: Kerry gow)
to turn the hard green sod with horses and plough.

Invoking a blessing I started the day,
I (?earned/hadn't) another that's what I would say,
asking for guidance to keep my know how
and strike a straight furrow with horses and plough.

Then up at the headland every once in a while
I rested my body all aching with toil,
the sleeve of my shirt swept the sweat from my brow
as I gazed at the work of my horses and plough.

Whistling and lilting the words of a song
lightened my labour all the day long,
with the seagulls around me and the rooks on the bough
all searching for the bounty of horses and plough.

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,
has crippled the (?cobble; meaning?) and sad was his fall,
while far away (??; pron.: oh pay) we richly endow
that counting (?count in?) the value of horses and plough.
(the meaning of this verse eludes me)

Very soon I'll be called from this valley of woe,
to the fair fields of heaven I hope I will go.
One request from St. Peter I hope he'll allow:
Eternal employment with horses and plough.



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Subject: Lyr Add: HORSES AND PLOUGH (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: Wolfgang
Date: 14 Oct 99 - 06:13 AM

I've found most verses in the Irish Traditional Music Archive, so I can respond to most of my questions. Only the before last verse is still unclear to me. Here's now a much better version:

Wolfgang

HORSES AND PLOUGH
(Micheál Ó h Ógáin)

Oh, balmy the breezes that blow in the spring
and as sweet is the music the song thrushes bring,
but I sigh for a scene that I seldom see now,
a man in the fields with his horses and plough.

Farewell to the days of my youth long ago,
when I harnessed my team near the barn below.
Then away to the highland beside Curragow
to turn the hard green sod with horses and plough.

Invoking a blessing I started the day,
Bail O Dhia or an obair that's what I would say,
asking for guidance to keep my know how
and strike a straight furrow with horses and plough.

Then up at the headland every once in a while
I rested my body all aching with toil,
the sleeve of my shirt swept the sweat from my brow
as I gazed at the work of my horses and plough.

Whistling and lilting the words of a song
lightened my labour all the day long,
with the seagulls around me and the rooks on the bough
all searching for the bounty of horses and plough.

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,
has crippled the (?cobble; meaning?) and sad was his fall,
while far away (??; pron.: oh pay) we richly endow
that counting (?count in?) the value of horses and plough.
(the meaning of this verse eludes me)

Very soon I'll be called from this valley of woe,
to the fair fields of heaven I hope I will go.
One request from St. Peter I hope he'll allow:
Eternal employment with horses and plough.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HORSES AND PLOUGH
From: GUEST,Dirk >dirk.sears@verizon.net<
Date: 02 Mar 03 - 06:25 PM

I've added/corrected lyrics as I hear them. Cheers!

Oh, balmy the breezes that blow in the spring
sweet is the music the song thrushes bring,
but I sigh for a scene that I seldom see now,
a man in the fields with his horses and plough.

Farewell to the days of my youth long ago,
when I harnessed my team near the barn below.
Then I'd hide to the highland beside Curragow
and cleave the hard green swarth with horses and plough.

Invoking a blessing I started the day,
Bail O Dhia or an obair that's what I would say,
asking for guidance to keep my know how
and strike a straight furrow with horses and plough.

Then up at the headland once in a while
I rested my shurshock, (sp?)steaming with toil,
the sleeve of my shirt swept the sweat from my brow
as I gazed at the work of my horses and plough.

Whistling and lilting on the bars of a song
lightened my labour all the day long,
with the seagulls around me and the rooks on the bough
all sensing the bounty of horses and plough.

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,
has crippled the couple and sad was that fall,
while far away Opec we richly endow, forgeting the value
of horses and plough.


Now soon I'll be called from this valley of woe,
And I hope to the fair fields of heaven I'll go.
One request from St. Peter I hope he'll allow:
Eternal employment with horses and plough.


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 04:23 AM

Careful! "Capall" is the Irish word for HORSE! OPEC is,of course, the Organiation of Petroleum Exporting countries!

I'll need to listen to the track to check how "shursock" arises - but suspect it is "tuirseach", an Irish word for "tired".

Regards


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: Brían
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 06:31 AM

Yeah, whatever Martin says

Brian


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: Brían
Date: 03 Mar 03 - 06:37 AM

I didn't mean that to come out that way. I came to the same conclusion Martin did. He just beat me to it.

Brian


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: GUEST,tadhg maher
Date: 11 Jan 06 - 09:23 AM

can anyone tell me where is Curragow, what county is it in?


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: GUEST,Grandma Jean
Date: 14 Mar 09 - 11:47 PM

I've listened to P J Murrihy's cd over and over and I think the second to last verse goes like this:

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all
Has crippled the cotter and sad was his fall.

Note:
Cotter would make sense since a cotter is a person occupying a plot of land and cottage, paid for in services.The tractors would make him almost obsolete.

The next verse has me puzzled.

While far away _______ we richly endow
Not counting the value of horses and plough.

Note:
I suppose it could be OPEC. I'll listen a few dozen more times and see if my hearing gets better.


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 15 Mar 09 - 06:23 AM

Hi GUESTGrandmajean

It's definitely "capall" and "OPEC". I'll need to check the placename. I should have the CD somewhere - I sang a track on the damn thing!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 15 Mar 09 - 06:39 AM

I've listened to the version on the South Roscommon CD and note that he sings:

- "capall" as noted earlier
- carrig - ow as the placename
- something that sounds like "opayk" for OPEC. OPEC is correct
- "not counting the value of horses..." which makes more sense.

"Bail o dhia ar an obair" as in Wolfgang's second version means "God bless the work"

Regards


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Subject: RE: Horses and Plough (ADD & questions)
From: GUEST,Will
Date: 17 Sep 09 - 12:00 PM

Wolfgang, these are the lines of the sixth verse;

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,

has crippled the copail and sad was his fall,

while in far away OPEC we richly endow,

not counting the value of horses and plough.

An explanation; 'copaill' is Irish Gaelic for 'horse'.
The reference to OPEC concerns the new reliance on oil rather than the old use of horses.
The song is a lament to the old ways.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Aug 12 - 03:40 AM

Then up at the headland once in a while
I rested my 'Seisreach' = a team of horses.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 13 Aug 12 - 05:04 AM

Thanks, GUEST - I seem to have missed out on checking that one!

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST,leeneia
Date: 13 Aug 12 - 01:27 PM

A couple months ago we visited the railway museum in Lancaster, PA. We stayed in cabooses surrounded by the fields of the Amish. It was romantic to see the powerful draft horses at work, but it was far less romantic to smell manure every hour of every day.

I do hope the smell doesn't get right inside their homes.

Imagine having to shovel up, load, and spread that stuff all the time, every day.

Manure can spread disease, as well. No, if I were a farmer, I'd go for the tractor, thanks very much.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST,Dermot McCaughey (this is close to my favor
Date: 18 Oct 12 - 06:44 PM

Penultimate verse......have crippled the capall (capall = Irish for horse), meaning = the tractor replaces the ccapall/horse.
Faraway OPEC (Oil producing and exporting countries)....serious social commentary here by the writer...OPOEC control world oil prices, hence we richly endow' them or line their pockets.
Colm O'Donnell on 'Farewell to Evening Dances' which is a mighty CD gives a master class on how to sing this song, a legend.


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Subject: Lyr Add: HORSES AND PLOUGH (from Colm O'Donnell)
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 03 Jun 13 - 04:37 PM

I agree: Colm O'Donnell's vocal technique is impressive. Here's my transcription. I have boldfaced the words that are different from those posted above. I have verified that "Bail ó Dhia ar an obair" (God bless the work.) is an authentic and correctly-spelled Irish expression, also "capall", but I can't identify any place called "Kerriegow" although I have tried several spellings. And I don't know what to make of "barb" in verse 6. It's definitely not "bars."


HORSES AND PLOUGH
As sung by Colm O'Donnell on "Farewell to Evening Dances" (1999)*

1. Oh, balmy the breezes that blow in the spring,
And sweet is the music the song thrushes bring,
But I sigh for a sight I seldom see now:
A man in the field with horses and plough.

2. Adieu to the days of my youth long ago,
When I harnessed the team near the barn below,
And I'd hie for the highlands beside Kerriegow(?)
To cleave the hard greensward with horses and plough.

3. Invoking a blessing I started my day,
"Bail ó Dhia ar an obair" is what I did say,
Hoping for guidance to keep my know-how,
And strike a straight furrow with horses and plough.

4. And up at the headland every once in a while,
I rested my horses all steaming with toil,
With the sleeve of my shirt swept the sweat off my brow,
As I gazed on the work of my horses and plough.

5. And in the evening as the sun it sank low,
With my hurley and ball to the sports field I'd go.
To win the All Ireland we'd all made a vow,
And seek recreation from horses and plough.


6. With whistling and lilting the barb(?) of a song,
It lightened my labours all the day long,
With seagulls around me and crows on the bough,
All seeking the bounty of horses and plough.

7. But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,
Have crippled the capall and sad is that fall,
While far away OPEC we richly endow,
Forgetting the value of horses and plough.

8. Now soon I'll be going from this valley of woe,
To the fair fields of heaven sure I'm hoping I will go.
One request from St. Peter I hope he'll allow:
Eternal employment for horses and plough.


[* Laura Smith sings nearly identical lyrics on "Everything Is Moving" (2013)]


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 03 Jun 13 - 07:30 PM

Jim

The expression "a bar of a song" is very common in Hiberno-English. The most common phrase is "Give us a bar of a song!". It's not meant literally - it's an example of what-ye-may-call-it - substituting the part for the whole! I suspect that's what Colm sings.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST,Who is the author of this song 'Horses and P
Date: 24 Feb 15 - 12:34 PM

Who is the author of this song: Horses and Plough?


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: MartinRyan
Date: 26 Feb 15 - 12:53 PM

As mentioned in the thread title, "Mícheál Ó hÓgáin" (Michael Hogan, in English) - of whom I know nothing, offhand.

Regards


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST
Date: 31 Dec 15 - 10:43 PM

An alternate version:

Oh, many's the breezes that blow in the spring
And sweet is the music the song thrushes bring,
But I sigh for a sight that I seldom see now,
a man in the fields with his horses and plough.

Farewell to the days of my youth long ago,
when I harnessed my team in the tie stall below.
Then away to the highland, we'd harrow the ground
to prep the dark field's sod after horses and plough.

Invoking a blessing I started the day,
"I'll yearn for another", that's what I would say,
asking for guidance to keep my know how
and strike a straight furrow with horses and plough.

Then up at the headland every once in awhile
I rested my horses, weary from toil
the sleeve of my shirt swept the sweat from my brow
as I gazed at the work of my horses and plough.

Whistling and lilting the words of a song
lightened my labour all the day long,
with the seagulls around me and the rooks on the bough
all searching the bounty of horses and plough.

But the clatter of tractors, pollution and all,
has crippled the capall and sad was his fall,
while far away OPEC we richly endow
not counting the value of horses and plough.

Very soon I'll be called from this valley of woe,
to the fair fields of heaven I hope I will go.
One request from St. Peter I hope he'll allow:
Eternal employment with horses and plough.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST,Liberty Boy (sans cookie)
Date: 04 Jan 16 - 10:13 AM

The author, as far as I'm aware was from Loughrea Co. Galway and was the father of Rosemary Hogan, one of the dancers who still regularly attend Brooks Academy set dancing sessions in Na Píobairí Uilleann in 15 Henrietta St. in Dublin.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Horses and Plough (Micheál Ó h Ógáin)
From: GUEST,Lou Judson
Date: 04 Jan 16 - 07:34 PM

Pardon me for being completely of topic, but yesterday I heard a radio program about the planet losing all electricity after some disaster. Then this thread showed up, and I couldn't help myself - I saw "Plough" and thought of it as "Ploo" because it is spelled like cough.

The point of the radio program is we might be back to using horses...

Sorry, a slow day here in the rain.


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