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Lyr Add: Very Suspicious (Harry Clifton)

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LANIGAN'S BALL
PADDLE MY OWN CANOE


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Artful Codger 29 May 10 - 10:27 PM
Joe Offer 30 May 10 - 12:43 AM
Artful Codger 30 May 10 - 01:05 AM
Artful Codger 30 May 10 - 01:10 AM
Artful Codger 30 May 10 - 01:18 AM
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Artful Codger 30 May 10 - 01:27 AM
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Subject: Lyr Add: Very Suspicious (Harry Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 29 May 10 - 10:27 PM

"Very Suspicious" is a song/medley Harry Clifton wrote as a duet for himself and Fanny Edwards, a fellow music hall performer for whom he abandoned his wife. In light of this, I find the theme of the song (a wife's suspicions) rather ironic.

All the tunes are taken from earlier songs, by Clifton and others. For me, the songs used are more interesting that this song (which gives doggerel a bad name), but it furnishes an excuse to discuss these other songs a bit, and three elusive tunes have turned up here: for "A Norrible Tale of the Suicidal Family", "Hunkey Dorum" and Clifton's "Awfully Jolly".


VERY SUSPICIOUS
   Comic duet sung by Harry Clifton and Fanny Edwards.
   Written by Harry Clifton. [1868]
   Music by various composers as indicated below.
   Arranged by Martin Hobson.

        1. Tune: Awfully Jolly (verse and chorus)
        HE.
The first years of our matrimonial life,
   I consider'd extremely delicious,
But lately my charming and dutiful wife,
   You appear to be very suspicious;
I cannot walk out by myself half a mile,
   Or dine with a few hearty fellows,
But a frown on your face take the place of a smile,
   You've grown so ecessively jealous.
        SHE.
You were fond of your home, Sir, and proud of your wife,
   And to wander was never ambitious.
        HE.
But lately there's nothing but trouble and strife,
   Since you've grown so very suspicioius.

        2. Tune: Up in a Balloon (verse and chorus)
        SHE.
Suspicious you say, no wonder indeed,
Your conduct's outrageous
        HE.
                        Go on, Ma'am, proceed.
Your manners are charming and lady-like quite.
        SHE.
You may sneer as you please, Sir, but you know I'm right.
It's lucky my temper is even and mild.
        HE.
Remarkably so, quite the style of a child,
A temper like yours, when your tongue is unfurl'd,
Would make a man wish himself out of the world.
   Or up in a balloon, Ma'am up in a balloon.
   That's where I shall wish my self, Believe me very soon.
   Up in a balloon, Ma'am, Up in a balloon,
   I should get a little peace, if I was up in a balloon.

        3. Tune: I'll Meet Thee in the Lane (verse only)
        SHE.
You promis'd to be home, Sir, at six to dine,
Instead of that you come, Sir, at half past nine.
        HE.
Allow me to explain, love, And then you'll not complain, love,
Business me detain'd, love, Till the clock struck nine.
        SHE.
Not business Sir, but pleasure.
The home you once did treasure,
You come come at your leisure,
And wish me to believe.
That business could detain you till half past nine.
If that is your excuse, Sir, I must decline
To hear another word, Sir,
Such quibbles are absurd, Sir.
        HE.
Why cannot I convince this wife of mine!

        4. Tune: Norrible Tale [A Norrible Tale of the Suicidal Family]
        HE.
I've often heard it said and sung
That men and women, old and young,
If e'er convinc'd against their will
Were of the same opinion still:
And as I can't tonight, forsooth,
Convince my wife I speak the truth,
A simple plan I will essay,
To drive some jealous thoughts away.

        5. Tune: Bear It Like a Man (chorus only)
And gaily sing from day to day,
   And do the best I can
To drive such jealous thoughts away,
   Or bear it like a man.

        6. Tune: Tommy Dodd (verse and chorus)
        SHE.
A letter here address'd to him,
   To read I can't resist.
Dear Brown, we meet at half past eight,
   A quiet hand at whist.
And Champagne supper just for five,
   Altho' the number's odd;
There's Fred and Charley (Jones don't play),
   Yours truly, Tommy Dodd.

   I know, Sir, what detains you now,
     It's Tommy Dodd, Tommy Dodd,
   Pretty business you'll allow,
     Tommy Dodd, Tommy Dodd.
   Who he is I'd like to know
        HE.
     He's Tommy Dodd, Tommy Dodd,
   A glorious fellow in a row,
     Hurrah for Tommy Dodd!

        7. Tune: Hunky Dorum
        SHE.
A specimen you of a family man,
   Hunky Dorum diddle um day.
You're going to ruin as fast as you can.
   Hunky Dorum diddle um day.
I'll leave you Mr Willoughby Brown,
   Hunky Dorum diddle um day.
And go to my Mother in Camden Town,
   As sure as my name's Martha Brown,
I'll go to my mother in Camden Town.
        HE.
   As sure as your name's Martha Brown,
You can go to your Mother in Camden Town.

        8. Tune: [Little] Maggie May (first couplet of verse only)
        SHE.
Mayhap you'll sometimes think of me, As with your friends you roam,
And pass away the hours so gay Far from your happy home.

        9. Tune: Come Home, Father
        HE.
Martha, dear Martha, pray list to me now;
   It's high time to finish my fun.
I came home last night tho' you started a row,
   As soon as my day's work was done.
The letter you pick'd up was written by me
   In jest, just to tease you, so, come
And let use be friend and the whole world will see
   How happy we can be at home.
     At home, at home, at home,
   How happy we can be at home.
Your face shall be cover'd with smiles,
   I shall know then where'er I may roam
In spite of the frowns and the cares of the world,
   There's a smile waiting for me at home!


Source: Sheet music published by Hopwood and Crew; serial number 1480.
Sheet music can be seen at University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Steve Gardham's notes:
Cover

"VERY SUSPICIOUS
OR
FAMILY JARS"

COMIC DUETT.
SUNG BY
MISS FANNY EDWARDS, AND MR. HARRY CLIFTON
AT HIS
POPULAR CONCERTS IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND.
London, HOPWOOD & CREW 42 New Bond St. W
Alfred Concanen litho, monotint beige of HC and FE in character. Besuted HC top hat in hand and both hands on hips looking apprehensively at FE who is returning the look reproachfully with raised palm

Inside
"VERY SUSPICIOUS".
COMIC DUET.
Written by Mr. Harry Clifton.               Arranged by M. Hobson.
Serial number H & C 1480

OLIS has the sheet music published by Joseph Williams, serial number 7099
The Era (via Sminky) dates it at 1868 and many of the tunes specified also date from this year or just before. OLIS refs. Harding R682 and R1073.
No known survivals or broadsides.

1. tune: "AWFULLY JOLLY" (Clifton's own song of 1868 sometimes titled 'The Christmas party)

2. tune: "UP IN A BALLOON" (Written by G W Hunt, George Leybourne's big hit of 1868)

3. tune: "I'LL MEET THEE IN THE LANE" (A Christy Minstrels piece of the period)
[incomplete]


This is a brief outline of the songs whose tunes were used:

1. Awfully Jolly: see Steve's note above
Lyrics, ABC and MIDI to follow.

2. Up in a Balloon: words and music by G[eorge].W. Hunt.
Sheet music in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
For transcribed lyrics and a MIDI see Jim Dixon's post here:
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6100#2394003

3. I'll Meet Thee in the Lane (or, My Sweet Mountain Rose): words and music by Charles Blamphin, 1866.
Sheet music in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Sappy song, but for musical completeness, ABC and MIDI to follow.

4. A Norrible Tale of The Suicidal Family: written by E.L. [Edward Litt Laman] Blanchard, 1853? at least by 1864.
Lyrics, ABC and MIDI to follow.

5. Bear It Like a Man: words by Clifton, music originally by Charles Coote, jr.
See this thread: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=129496
MIDI

6. Tommy Dodd: words and music by Ernée Clarke.
Sheet music in the Lester S. Levy Collection.
Transcription and MIDI to follow.

7. Hunkey Dorum: written by George Washington Moore, <= 1866.
Of this song, I've only found partial lyrics quoted by Charles Dickens in an article lambasting the state of popular entertainment in the theaters. This seems to have appeared around Sept. 1866.
         I was out one day for a lark,
            Hunkey Dorum, we am de boys,
         I met a lubly gal in de park,
            Hunkey dorum, doodle dum day.
Based on this sampling, I haven't felt a need to pursue research further. However, I will provide the tune.

8. Little Maggie May: words by G.W. Moore, music by Charles Blamphin.
At pdmusic.org: MIDI (as arr. Charles Harris for guitar), lyrics

9. Come Home, Father: words and music by Henry Clay Work, 1864
DigiTrad: http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=1284
MIDI
Thread: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=127894
Thread on Henry Clay Work: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108905
At pdmusic.org: MIDI, lyrics


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Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Very Suspicious (Harry Clifton)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 30 May 10 - 12:43 AM

MIDI files posted by Artful Codger:


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Subject: Lyr Add: AWFULLY JOLLY (Harry Clifton)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 30 May 10 - 01:05 AM

AWFULLY JOLLY!
Words (and music?) by Harry Clifton

I sat in my chamber one cold Christmas Eve,
   A bachelor wretched and dreary,
A friend of mine bearing the name of Jack Reeve,
   Call'd on me with greeting so cheery;
"Old lellow, it's Christinas, so shake off that frown,
   You certainly look melancholy,
Pack up, I've an invite from friends out of town,
   And I know 'twill be awfully Jolly!"

        Chorus.
  It's a poor heart that never can rejoice they say,
     And fretting is nothing but folly,
  As Christmas it doesn't come ev'ry day,
     We'll try to be ' awfully Jolly !'

Jack call'd a Hansom—-we started direct,
   Full speed to the Paddington station,
And met with a misshap we didn't expect,
   And not to our gratification;
The horse it fell down and over its back
   I was thrown, and Jack roar'd frantically,
As I rose from the gutter, all cover'd with black,
   "Old boy, you look Awfully Jolly."
                It's a poor, &c.

Arriv'd at our friends in the country, we found,
   There were visitors there by the dozen,
The Smiths and the Whites, the Joneses and Browns,
   And many a country cousin.
Such a bevy of girls--with beautiful curls,
   To flirt with beneath the green holly,
And kisses bestow 'neath the bright mistletoe,
   Says Jack, " This is Awfully Jolly."
                It's a poor, &c.

But really and truly the 'cream of the fun,'
   To you I will now be relating,
Was when old Major Johnson who weighs sixteen stone,
   Insisted on going out skating.
The ice being thin the old fellow slipp'd in,
   Which made us at first melancholy,
But the sight that he look'd-—as Jack with a hook,
   Fish'd him out—-it was " Awfully Jolly."
                It's a poor, &c.

The misletoe soon was brought into the room,
   And oh! what a laugh and a giggle,
When jolly old Sprig, who wore a brown wig,
   Insisted on kissing Miss Maggie;
A sour old miss-—so prim and so staid—-
   Who frown'd on such innocent folly,
In the struggle, the old fellow's wig it came off,
   And of course he look'd ' Awfully Jolly."
                It's a poor, &c.

Thus merry and gay, a week soon pass'd away.
   We wish'd it had lasted much longer,
For Jack he declar'd, as to town we repair'd,
   It made him feel seventy years younger;
So may ev'ry one here spend, a happy new year,
   And with fun drive away melancholy,
And dull care defeat—-until we next meet,
   Again to be ' Awfully Jolly."
                It's a poor, &c.

Source: 'Jeremy Jollyboy' Comic Songster (Number 16.), pp. 40-1, by Sol Smith Russell. Published by Robert M. DeWitt, New York, 1876.


ABC transcription of the melody:

X: 1
T: Awfully Jolly
C: Words for both "Awfully Jolly" and "Very Suspicious" by Harry Clifton.
S: Sheet music for "Very Suspicious", Hopwood and Crew, serial number 1480.
Z: by Artful Codger
%%MIDI program 1 74
M: 6/8
Q: 3/8=80 "Moderato"
L: 1/8
K: C
%
%    Piano introduction
g | (geg c'bc' | d'c'b a2) a | (g^fg age | ed2) z2 g |
(geg c'bc' | d'c'b a2) a | gc'e gfd | c2 z H[c2e2g2c'2] ||
%
%    Awfully Jolly
G | G E G c B c | d c B A A> A | G ^F G A G E |
E D2 z2 G | G E G c B c | e d c A2 A/ A/ |
B A B d A B | A G2 z2 G | G ^F G B A G |
c G E G2 G | A ^G A d d c | (c B2) z2 G/ G/ |
c B c d c A | A G E G2 G | c B c d B G |
(G c2) z2 G/ G/ | G E G c B c | d c B A2 A/ A/ |
G ^F G A G E | (E D2) z2 G | c B c d c A |
A G E G2 G | (A B) c d B G | G c2 z3 |

Click to play (Awfully Jolly)


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Subject: Tune Add: I'll Meet Thee in the Lane
From: Artful Codger
Date: 30 May 10 - 01:10 AM

ABC transcription for "I'll Meet Thee in the Lane":

X: 3
T: I'll Meet Thee in the Lane
T: My Sweet Mountain Rose
C: Words and music by Charles Blamphin, 1866.
S: Sheet music published by Oliver Ditson & Co., Boston, 1866
M: C
L: 1/8
Q: 1/4=90
K: D
G | F>E F>G A2 d>e | d2 B2 A2 zG | F>E F G A2 d z/F/ |
w: I'll meet thee at the lane, When the clock strikes nine, In ec-sta-sy a-gain, love, To
A2 G2 E2 zG | F>E F G A d2 d | d c e d c B z E |
w: call thee mine, My heart for thee is bur-ning, My brain is al-most whir-ling, Thro'
E F G ^G A Hd2 F | E z B HA D2 z E | c2 c2 c2 c2 |
w: lo-ving thee so mad-ly My sweet Moun-tain Rose, When ev-'ning stars are
cd B4 E2 | d2 d2 d2 d2 | ^de c4 c2 |
w: peep-_ing Oh then will be our meet-_ing, Old
e2 e2 d2 c2 | Bc d4 d2 | ce3 HB3 c |
w: Time too swift-ly freet-_ing, Our hap-py time a-
A4 z2 G2 | F>E F>G A2 d>e | d2 B2 A2 zG |
w: way. I'll meet thee at the lane, When the clock strikes nine, In
F>E F G A2 d z/F/ | A2 G2 E2 zG | F>E F G A d2 z/d/ |
w: ec-sta-sy a-gain, love, To call thee mine, My heart for thee is bur-ning, My
d c e d c B z E | E F G ^G A Hd2 F | E2 B HA D2 ||
w: brain is al-most whir-ling, Thro' lov-ing thee so mad-ly, My sweet Moun-tain Rose.
%
%    Chorus
G2 | F>E F> G A2 d>e | d2 B2 A2 zG |
w: I'll meet thee at the lane, When the clock strikes nine, In
F>E F G A2 d z/F/ | A2 G2 E2 zG | F>E F G A d2 z/d/ |
w: ec-sta-sy a-gain love, To call thee mine, My heart for thee is bur-ning, My
d c e d c B z E | E F G ^G A Hd2 F | E2 B HA D2-D z |]
w: brain is al-most whir-ling, Thro' lov-ing thee so mad-ly, My sweet Moun-tain Rose.

Click to play (I'll Meet Thee in the Lane)


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Subject: Lyr Add: A NORRIBLE TALE OF THE SUICIDAL FAMILY
From: Artful Codger
Date: 30 May 10 - 01:18 AM

A NORRIBLE TALE OF THE SUICIDAL FAMILY.

Stuart Robson's Great Song, published by his permission, and sung by the Great Comedian, Stuart Robson, for upwards of 500 nights, with rapturous applause, at Mrs. John Drew's Arch Street Theatre.

Johnson & Co., Song Publishers, 18 North Tenth Street, Philada
[Written by E.L. Blanchard]

Oh! a norrible tale I have to tell,
Of sad disasters that befell
A family that once resided
Just in the very same thoroughfare as I did.
The parient was so grim a guffin,
He never liked no man or nuffin,
And he never made the least endeavor
To make a joke, not what-sum-de-ver.

Chorus—
For it is such a nor-ri-ble tale,
'Twill make your fa-ces all turn pale,
Your eyes with grief will be o-vercome,
Twee-dle twad-dle, twiddle-huddle-hum.

They never saw no compa-nee.
Tho' they was a most respectable fa-mi-lee,
And every boy and ev-ry gal
Grew hy-po-con-der-i-a-cal.

They thought they had all sorts of sorrows,
And conjured up all kinds of borrows,
Each had a face as long as a ladder,
And was frightened in-to fits if they see their own shadder.
        Chorus, &c.

They sat with their cur-tains drawn down tight,
On pur-pose to keep out the light,
Father, mother, sister, and bro-ther
Never spoke a word to one ano-ther.
Well at last this dole-ful, dismal lot .
So ve-ry me-lan-cho-ly got,
That an end to themselves they did agree,
When they had settled which end it was to be.
        Chorus, &c.

First the father into the garden did walk,
And cut his throat with a lump of chalk,
Then the mother an end to herself she put,
By drownding of herself in the water-butt.
Then the sister went down on her bended knees,
And smothered herself with toasted cheese,
But the brother, who was a determined-young fellar,
Went and poisoned himself with his umbrella.
        Chorus, &c.

Then the little baby in the cradle
Shot itself dead with the silver ladle,
While the servant girl seeing what they did,
Strangled herself with the saucepan lid.
The miserable cat by the kitchen-fire
Swallowed a portion of the fender and did expire,
And a fly on the ceiling-—this case was the wust-un,
Went and blowed.iteelf up with spontaneous combustion.
        Chorus, &c.

Then in walked the auctioneer,
Who did with the furniture disappear,
And the broker man, this aint no fable,
Made himself away with a three-legged table.
When the walls saw this, their sides they splits,
The windows cracked themselves to bits,
And so universal was the slaughter-rate,
There was nothing left but an unpaid water-rate.
        Chorus, &o.

        MORAL.
So here's a moral if you choose,
Don't never give way to the blues,
Or you may come to the dreadful ends
Of these my melancholy friends.
        Chorus, &c.

Source: The Canteen Songster, pp. 102-3, 1866.


ABC transcription:

X: 4
T: Norrible Tale
T: Original title: A Norrible Tale of The Suicidal Family
C: Tune written by E.L. [Edward Litt Laman] Blanchard, 1853? or at least by 1864
S: Sheet music for Harry Clifton's duet "Very Suspicious"
M: 2/4
L: 1/8
Q: 1/4=100
K: Cm
B | G E B> B | G E B> B | A F c c | A F c> d |
w: I've of-ten heard it said and sung That men and wom-en, old and young If
e e G> G | c c G2 | G G/ G/ G G | (G/F/) (E/D/) C2 | z2z B |
w: e'er con-vinced a-gainst their will Were of the same o-pi-*nion* still: And
G E B> B | G E B> B | A F c> c | A F c> d |
w: as I can't to-night, for-sooth, Con-vince my wife I speak the truth, A
e e G> G | c c G> G | G G G G | (G/F/) (E/D/) C z ||
w: sim-ple plan I will es-say, to drive some jea-lous thoughts* a-*way.

Click to play (Norrible Tale)


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Subject: Lyr Add: TOMMY DODD (Ernée Clarke)
From: Artful Codger
Date: 30 May 10 - 01:22 AM

TOMMY DODD
   Written & composed by Ernée Clarke

1. I lead a somewhat easy life, Like most men about town,
But still I must submit to you, I'm somewhat of renown,
A speculative turn of mind, It may seem rather odd,
I have a weakness, and it is A love for "Tommy Dodd!"

        Chorus.
   I'm always safe when I go in, Tommy Dodd, tommy Dodd!
   Glasses round, cigars as well, Tommy Dodd, Tommy Dodd!
   Now my boys, let's all go in, Tommy Dodd, Tommy Dodd!
   Head or tail I'm safe to win, Hurrah for Tommy Dodd!

2. In town now if you meet a friend, You cannot let him pass,
Of course you must do somewthing You then propose a glass.
Now if I meet a chum or two, I nail them with a nod,
Propose for each a "full grown dose" But submitting "Tommy Dodd!"

3. You've no idea the run of luck Which I have found the rule,
Attends you if you go in "hot," Of course remaining "cool,"
A purse is just in case of need, For you can ride rough shod,
And live like any fighting cock, If you're up in "Tommy Dodd!"

4. A friend of mine three daughters had, He ask'd me home to tea,
I play'd and sung, when by and bye, They all spoon'd on to me,
I couldn't court the lot you know, For that would seem so odd,
So I proposed that they'd decide, By way of "Tommy Dodd!"


Source: Sheet music published by Balmer & Weber, St. Louis. S/N 1895-3

Click to play (Tommy Dodd)


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Subject: Tune Add: Hunkey Dorum
From: Artful Codger
Date: 30 May 10 - 01:27 AM

ABC transcription of the melody:

X: 7
T: Hunkey Dorum
C: George Washington Moore, by 1866
S: Tune as given in Harry Clifton's duet "Very Suspicious"
Z: by Artful Codger
%%MIDI program 1 74
M: 6/8
Q: 3/8=80
L: 1/8
K: Eb
%
B | e e d e2 B/ B/ | e e d e3 | E2 F G2 G | A G F B2 B |
e e d e e B | e e d e3 | E2 F G2 G | A G F E2 B |
e2 d (e2 B) | e e d e3 | E2 F G2 G | A G F B2 B |
e e d e e B | e2 d e2 B, | B, E E (E2 G) |
(AB) F B2 B | c c B B B B | (AG) F E2 B, |
B, E E (E2 G) | (AG) F HB2 B/ B/ | c B B B B B | G2 E E2 z ||

Click to play (Hunkey Dorum)


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