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Lady plays the blues

Shanghaiceltic 29 Jun 10 - 08:56 PM
mousethief 29 Jun 10 - 10:12 PM
Dave MacKenzie 30 Jun 10 - 04:03 AM
GUEST 30 Jun 10 - 08:10 PM
Folknacious 30 Jun 10 - 08:13 PM
mousethief 30 Jun 10 - 11:13 PM
Janie 01 Jul 10 - 02:03 AM
Leadfingers 01 Jul 10 - 11:14 AM
Tug the Cox 01 Jul 10 - 11:53 AM
Tug the Cox 01 Jul 10 - 11:56 AM
pdq 01 Jul 10 - 12:17 PM
Dave MacKenzie 01 Jul 10 - 07:18 PM
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Subject: Lady plays the blues
From: Shanghaiceltic
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 08:56 PM

Lady plays the blues

Might be of interest, 4 days left on the BBC archive:

In this documentary, ex-Catatonia vocalist Cerys Matthews travels to the USA to find out why so few women are known for singing and playing the blues.

When it comes to the blues and those who have mastered it, the list usually runs along the lines of: T-Bone Walker, B.B. King, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Johnson, Eric Clapton, Muddy Waters... the list goes on. But it's striking that in many a top 10, 20 or even 100 of all time blues greats, no women appear.

Cerys tries to find out the story of the women who have mastered the art but have rarely been recognised for their talent. Along the way she reveals the stories of female guitarists of the early blues era such as Rosetta Tharpe, Memphis Minnie, Etta Baker, Algia Mae Hinton, and Precious Bryant. These women all lived extreme lives which led to them playing the blues in a way perhaps no man can dream of. Yet most remain unknown and some have died with no recognition whatsoever.

Cerys will also reveal how guitarists from Bob Dylan and Kenny Wayne Shepard to Muddy Waters were themselves taught by some of these ladies who played the blues.

Cerys also travels to the Blues Awards in Memphis and speaks to contemporary guitarists Bonnie Raitt and Debbie Davies about the influence of pioneering blues artists Memphis Minnie and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.

Producer: Jo Meek
An All Out production for BBC Radio 4.


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: mousethief
Date: 29 Jun 10 - 10:12 PM

Hmm. What about Ma Rainey, Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, Ethel Waters, Ida Cox, Victoria Spivey, Sippie Wallace, Alberta Hunter, Clara Smith, Edith Wilson, Sara Martin, Trixie Smith, Lucille Hegamin or Bertha "Chippie" Hill?


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 04:03 AM

They were all "Classic" Blues Singers. Cerys was looking into the country tradition that later evolved into City Vlues and R'n'B. Though I was surprised to hear that nobody had heard of Memphis Minnie.


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 08:10 PM

Jo Ann Kelly . . .


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Folknacious
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 08:13 PM

Try again with cookie . . .

Jo Ann Kelly


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: mousethief
Date: 30 Jun 10 - 11:13 PM

They were all "Classic" Blues Singers. Cerys was looking into the country tradition that later evolved into City Vlues and R'n'B. Though I was surprised to hear that nobody had heard of Memphis Minnie.

Fairynuff.

I'd say that any self-respecting Led Zeppelin fan should know about Memphis Minnie. If it keep on rainin'....


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Janie
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 02:03 AM

I tend to think that female blues singers in the USA do get their "due", well not entirely, but close among blues enthusiasts in the USA.   There are "bluesmen" which generally are the the blues guitar players/vocalists - most of whom are admittedly men, and then there are "blues singers" of note, among whom are many legendary women.

but your point is still well taken. Women who sang/sing the blues and also play blues guitar are not as well-known or named. Sister Rosetta Tharp is a good example. She could both play and sing the blues.


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Leadfingers
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 11:14 AM

Co incidentally I have just revived "Where the Blues Are Found" - Robb Johnston's song dedicated to Billy Holiday !


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 11:53 AM

Bessie Smith was the Queen of them all, many jazz and blues bands still play her material.


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Tug the Cox
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 11:56 AM

See
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Who6fTHJ34
or
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MzU8xM99Uo&feature=related
or
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcrx2-vvwC4&feature=related


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: pdq
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 12:17 PM

Putting Ethyl Waters in with "classic blues singers" is a bit of a stretch. She was from the northeast US and not raised with the blues tradition, and most of he career was spent in music hall, nightclub and Vaudeville settings. She sang mostly Popular Music.

She was very good, unique, and got very well paid for her work.

Bessie Smith was a great blues singer and also well compensated for her efforts.


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Subject: RE: Lady plays the blues
From: Dave MacKenzie
Date: 01 Jul 10 - 07:18 PM

Ethyl Waters might not have been a "classic blues singer", but she was a "Classic" Blues Singer.


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