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BS: Signs of Autumn

keberoxu 16 Sep 18 - 07:22 PM
keberoxu 14 Sep 18 - 09:35 PM
Gallus Moll 11 Sep 18 - 01:27 PM
keberoxu 09 Sep 18 - 05:38 PM
keberoxu 31 Oct 17 - 06:27 PM
Donuel 31 Oct 17 - 08:28 AM
Charmion 31 Oct 17 - 08:07 AM
keberoxu 30 Oct 17 - 11:55 AM
keberoxu 27 Oct 17 - 05:57 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Oct 17 - 07:45 PM
Gallus Moll 25 Oct 17 - 05:29 PM
Steve Shaw 25 Oct 17 - 06:54 AM
Gallus Moll 25 Oct 17 - 06:22 AM
mg 24 Oct 17 - 11:42 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Oct 17 - 08:40 PM
Steve Shaw 24 Oct 17 - 08:16 PM
keberoxu 24 Oct 17 - 07:20 PM
Donuel 23 Oct 17 - 03:37 PM
Gallus Moll 23 Oct 17 - 12:25 PM
keberoxu 22 Oct 17 - 07:10 PM
Steve Shaw 22 Oct 17 - 04:10 PM
Donuel 22 Oct 17 - 10:58 AM
Stanron 22 Oct 17 - 10:50 AM
Donuel 22 Oct 17 - 09:05 AM
Gallus Moll 21 Oct 17 - 06:38 PM
keberoxu 21 Oct 17 - 06:13 PM
Joe Offer 13 Oct 17 - 07:20 PM
Steve Shaw 13 Oct 17 - 06:54 PM
keberoxu 13 Oct 17 - 04:38 PM
keberoxu 09 Oct 17 - 01:23 PM
Steve Shaw 08 Oct 17 - 08:51 PM
Gallus Moll 08 Oct 17 - 04:58 PM
keberoxu 08 Oct 17 - 04:42 PM
Steve Shaw 06 Oct 17 - 09:25 AM
Steve Shaw 06 Oct 17 - 08:55 AM
Stilly River Sage 05 Oct 17 - 10:14 PM
Gallus Moll 05 Oct 17 - 06:41 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 17 - 08:35 PM
Gallus Moll 04 Oct 17 - 07:07 PM
Steve Shaw 04 Oct 17 - 02:16 PM
Steve Shaw 02 Oct 17 - 08:07 PM
keberoxu 02 Oct 17 - 07:31 PM
Gallus Moll 02 Oct 17 - 06:27 PM
Steve Shaw 01 Oct 17 - 07:45 PM
Donuel 01 Oct 17 - 06:12 PM
JHW 01 Oct 17 - 05:34 AM
Tattie Bogle 28 Sep 17 - 02:55 PM
keberoxu 28 Sep 17 - 01:33 PM
Mr Red 28 Sep 17 - 04:47 AM
Tattie Bogle 27 Sep 17 - 08:26 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 16 Sep 18 - 07:22 PM

Apples, anybody?

What kinds of apples are ripening for the harvest
where you live?


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 14 Sep 18 - 09:35 PM

The trees are turning, I mean the leaves are.
And early morning has that crispness to the air
which has been sorely lacking
during the muggy soggy humid summer heat wave.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 11 Sep 18 - 01:27 PM

copper beech update- - discovered my lovely neighbour across the way has a copper beech sapling from a self seeded nut of my poor old tree! He has offered it to me when I get around to start reorganising the garden - ie get the wood cutters and chippers round to finish the job of dismantling and clearing the body of my beautiful tree. Parts of it don't know they are dead- sprouts have grown from the supine trunk! And the poor stump does not realise there is no tree above to feed, it still draws water and nutrients from the ground - in vain.
Many of the other plants and bushes that I thought had been destroyed have amazingly forced their way through and around the wreckage of the beech, flourished all summer. Fingers crossed they survive the next onslaught when the final cutting up of the trunk happens!
I feel calmer about the whole experience now - there are benefits, much more light /better views - however the whole world can see in now, no shelter!
Coming up for 11 months -- what a sad year, what a dreadful loss.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 09 Sep 18 - 05:38 PM

Ah, well.
It will be a while before the heat gets turned on
in my apartment building.
And the nights are really cool now.
So, out with the my-God-this-thing-is-heavy quilt.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 31 Oct 17 - 06:27 PM

Come ON, landlord,
turn the heat on in my apartment building
!!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 31 Oct 17 - 08:28 AM

snow tires mounted, insulated windows check, clearing out basement looking for chrismas crap. One or two more mowing mulching of the leaves and then I need to extract the snow blower from the growing weeds where it was parked all summer. Furnace should be replaced , maybe next year. like I promised 15 years ago.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Charmion
Date: 31 Oct 17 - 08:07 AM

Sunrise at 0730 and frequent cold rain. Hunting for gloves. Duvet back on the bed. Cats even more somnolent than usual. Advertisements for snow tires. "Shouldn't you have called the furnace cleaners by now?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 30 Oct 17 - 11:55 AM

First time i've seen THIS in over a year:
the aftermath of the previous day's wind and rain.

Fallen Leaf Mush! The stormwinds blow the leaves off the branches;
the heavy rain makes porridge out of the fallen leaves.

And now the colorful mushy stuff
is all over the streets, sidewalks, driveways, curbs,
parked cars ...

it's kind of a challenge for the leaf blowers
when the leaves are saturated and sopping wet.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 27 Oct 17 - 05:57 PM

Bare trees, for the first time in months and months.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Oct 17 - 07:45 PM

Well I reckon you have a good few years left in you! I always tell Mrs Steve that I can't die this coming winter because I've just planted out my purple sprouting for next spring and I'm damned if I won't be around to eat it! I'm pretreating some stone pine seeds in my fridge at the moment and will sow them in the spring. As I'm 66 I know I'll never be harvesting pine nuts from them, but the joy is in growing them. I'm also trying some Strelitzia seeds, the bird of paradise flower that looked so lovely all over Madeira, knowing full well that I won't see a flower until I'm at least 71! These things have to be done!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 25 Oct 17 - 05:29 PM

you are correct -- anyway I'll not be around to see the mature results!
I guess we plant hardwood trees for future generations.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 25 Oct 17 - 06:54 AM

It's all in the genes. You'll have to grow a few for a year or two and do some selecting. You won't have the heart to ditch the rejects though!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 25 Oct 17 - 06:22 AM

Thank you Steve- - I was wondering why the younger beech trees already growing around my garden (presumably having grown from fallen nuts or ones buried by squirrels?) did not have the deep copper colour of the fallen one- - is there some way of encouraging this to happen or is it just random chance?
Our winters have not been so cold in recent times- - 40 years ago I had to cover the car windscreen with newspaper from November to February (the days before screen defrosting sprays!) but the screen is rarely frozen nowadays.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: mg
Date: 24 Oct 17 - 11:42 PM

Flooding the cranberry bogs


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Oct 17 - 08:40 PM

If you've collected beech nuts from your tree there's a fair chance that some, or most, of them will give you a copper beech, though some may turn out green.

First, give your nuts a squeeze (😉) to check that they are nice and plump. You may find a lot of empty ones. Now for the hard bit. Beech seeds must be stratified, in other words they have to think they've been through a winter before they'll germinate. Sow two or three in three-inch pots in well-drained compost (add a bit of sharp sand or something, leaf mould if you make it) and leave them outside for the winter. You will have to fiercely protect them from birds, mice and squirrels. Maybe put them in a shed or outdoor garden store and keep an eye on them for getting too dry, but those BLOODY mice...In the spring make sure they don't dry out. Your success rate may still be quite low. Another thing you can do is to put some seeds in little plastic bags of dry but not bone-dry compost and put them in your fridge for the winter, then sow them in late Feb or March in pots outdoors. Don't expect fast germination. Just leave them, for months if necessary. I'm trying this with stone pine seeds that I bought in Madeira. They are in the fridge for a few more weeks yet. Good luck!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 24 Oct 17 - 08:16 PM

Beech trees are monoecious, that is, they bear flowers of both sexes on the same plant. Unlike with many flowering plants male and female parts are in separate flowers (which is what "monoecious" means), but on the same tree. The product of the male flowers has you sneezing in the spring and the product of the female flowers feeds the wild boar in the autumn.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 24 Oct 17 - 07:20 PM

When I left Massachusetts for Arizona, the tree foliage was vivid colors.
Most likely the leaves are all on the ground being blown around by leaf blowers now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 23 Oct 17 - 03:37 PM

Yep, if a tree has nuts, its a girl. The paw paw tree has what appear to be twin fruit testicles that hang low. They have a banana like texture and a wintergreen flavor. They grow from Michigan to Carolina

There is a blush of color in the area now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 23 Oct 17 - 12:25 PM

Thank you keberoxu -- - not sure if Beech trees have separate sexes (I know some do eg Hollies, Hazels) - but I reckon if this living being produces nuts/offspring then 'she' is the correct term!

I have found the whole episode traumatic- from all the 'might have beens' if she had fallen onto the road or even on one of the vans/cars driving in and out of the garden at various points (postie etc!) - thanks goodness no person or pet (dog/cat/chickens) was killed / injured- - am hoping very much that the wild birds and red squirrels would have had sufficient time to escape.
It is a shame that various plants, bushes, fruit trees have been wrecked, specially those planted for a special reason (to mark the grave of a pet, or given as a gift, or souvenir of some special occasion) also there's the inconvenience of replacing a hen house and some chicken runs.
But the worst thing of all is seeing the jagged stump and the huge sad carcase of what was a truly magnificent being, perhaps even older that the house she quietly guarded during the years. I feel so helpless, there is nothing I can do.....
I will plant her seeds for future generations, but it is terrible looking at the empty space where this glorious Copper Beech once stood.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 07:10 PM

Thinking of you, Gallus Moll. Thanks for your posts and for calling the tree "she."


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 04:10 PM

Generally speaking, deciduous trees don't rely on temperature signals to drop their leaves. It's all daylength and hormones.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 10:58 AM

Global warming is not a promise we can break.
It is merely a fact.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Stanron
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 10:50 AM

Was I dreaming or did I really see a weather forecast promising a heatwave, here in the UK, on Thursday?


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 22 Oct 17 - 09:05 AM

Unrelenting heat has left the leaves unchanged. While the sun shines chlorophyll continues to make sugar. Only the weary leaves do fall brown and dead. There are only four weeks left for the trees to change and drop all their drop their leaves. The canopy is still full with virtually all their original leaves from late March.

Cool mornings and near 80 degrees in the afternoon. may lure the forests into a false security that will bring them low with snow and fracture many unto a deadly fall.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 21 Oct 17 - 06:38 PM

It happened - the decision was taken for me when Storm Ophelia blew over from Ireland.
It has been a traumatic week - the thought of what might have been if she had fallen on a person, amazement that she managed to lay herself along the very line the tree surgeon would have chosen (but thought impossible) and terrible sorrow that this beautiful tree is fallen, dead, just a memory, leaving an huge empty space and a sad jagged stump. (Hope google street view don't return for a long time)

GRIEVING for a COPPER BEECH
My heart is broken, gentle giant, as I see you lying there; tis a
shocking thing that you have fallen, your life cut short by the storm.

I thought I was your custodian, privileged to have your companionship
and beauty, your shade and shelter, for the years I lived beside you,
just as others have done, over more than a century and a half.
I believed you would still be standing tall, guarding the gateway,
sheltering the land, feeding the squirrels, harbouring birds.

Your fresh green leaves of Springtime turning deep copper in Summer,
through all the shades of brown, gold, bronze, yellow then casting
your nuts like a gentle shower as you prepared for Winter sleep.
The hurricane that took you - did you know, and fear the end?
If you had fallen on the road it might have caused great harm;
but it seems to me you twisted round to lay yourself down just so, in
the garden where you had lived so long, beside the aged Monkey Puzzle.

Perhaps the thoughts of past companions who lived in this place
before, reached out with ethereal hands to support and guide you as
you fell? Those long gone who knew and loved you, people just like me.

I'm heartfelt sorry dear old friend, companion of all those years gone by.
I can't believe you are no more - for such a mighty tree now to be
a sawn-up carcase, firewood logs, brashing and sawdust piles is an awful sight to see.
                                 
In a few short months there will be no sign that you had ever lived
But I saved some of your seeds, and I hope that they will sprout when
Springtime comes again, I'll plant some young on your behalf
and hope so very much that a hundred years from now at least one
more magnificent Copper Beech will tower above this home you had - -
that is my fervent wish.

Adieu old friend and thank you - I grieve that you are no more.
                        __________________________


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 21 Oct 17 - 06:13 PM

I know there will be CHRISTMAS crapola all over the Cracker Barrel store,
but I'm hungry,
so I'm going to the restaurant anyhow
for their chicken and rice with mushroom gravy. (I said I was hungry.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Joe Offer
Date: 13 Oct 17 - 07:20 PM

We're on the eastern edge of the Pacific Flyway in Northern California, so lots of migrating birds fly past us. Many more will spend the winter in the Sacramento River Valley. We've seen flocks of Sandhill cranes, and scads of turkey buzzards, and lots of geese.

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 13 Oct 17 - 06:54 PM

I picked about a hundred pounds of apples today. I have to give most of them away but I'm absolutely loving munching my way through Fiestas (aka Red Pippin), Jupiter, Laxton's Fortune and, believe it or not, Golden Delicious which, when you grow it yourself and pick it ripe, is totally unlike the shop-bought version. I also have hundredweights of Bramleys. They were here before us. I give nearly all of those away. I can't stand sloppy apple sauce! The trouble is that scoffing apples with abandon makes me fart like a trooper. I care not a jot. That's everybody else's problem, not mine! I never buy shop apples. I want apples picked ripe between August and November. I have no interest in them beyond those months.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 13 Oct 17 - 04:38 PM

There are certain retail places --
that includes restaurants not just shops --
that I know to stay out of, about this time of year.
We're just coming up to Samhain / All Hallows / Halloween now;
but in "Retail State Of Mind"
they are already promoting Thanksgiving and Christmas...
so I'll just wait til November maybe...


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 09 Oct 17 - 01:23 PM

. . . tonight the winter quilt has to come off
because it's too warm. Back to the cotton blanket.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 08 Oct 17 - 08:51 PM

I studied the monkey puzzle and its fossil come-froms at university. I'm not really a monkey puzzle fan when I see it in suburban gardens, though I believe that it's magnificent in its native forests in South America. Wherever I go in slightly warmer European climes than here, I see the Norfolk Island Pine, not a pine at all but a very close relative of the monkey puzzle. That's a very nice architectural tree. I love the stone pines of Italy, as I've said before, and my other favourite iconic tree of Europe is the Mediterranean cypress, Cupressus sempervirens.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 08 Oct 17 - 04:58 PM

Acme, there are many amazing Copper Beech trees around here, many of the former 'big houses' have them - also Monkey Puzzle trees, I guess they were fashionable back in Victorian times?
There is a very striking one in the Younger Botanical Gardens in the parkland in front of Benmore house - -very photogenic.
My tree is actually bigger and more beautiful, but in a more cramped setting - a road in front of it, a hill to one side and the slope down the glen to the burn on the other.
I have a magnificent Monkey Puzzle in my garden too -- 40 years ago it was one of those with a long bare stem and a bunch of branches at the top - but about 20 years ago it changed and began sprouting lower branches -- amazing! (tho not when your head brushes against one - -)
then about 15 years a ago it began to produce seed regularly ie every or almost every year!
Not many of them germinate but we have a few babies of different ages growing around the place -- they don't seem to transplant well (or maybe I don't know how to handle them properly)
BUT- - in recent times there has been a disease affecting Monkey Puzzles, airborne I understand - no cure. So my fingers are very tightly crossed that mine stays safe - - I could not bear to lose two beautiful specimens!
Some of my red squirrels have a drey in the Monkey Puzzle, and magpies nest in it too -- they must have evolved techniques for not getting jagged!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 08 Oct 17 - 04:42 PM

A Morris Side of huge spiders. This thread has some diamond posts.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Oct 17 - 09:25 AM

Cheers, Acme. I’ve been racking my brain as to what it was that I meant to add to the shopping list. Pine nuts!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 06 Oct 17 - 08:55 AM

Your beech tree has actually achieved around the average lifespan for the species. Beech trees aren’t as long-lived as many other forest trees.

We’ve had two nice days in a row. We get around 17°C by day and around 8° by night. It’s very pleasant sitting outside in the sun (UV3). I have to shift one ton of coal that’s just been delivered then cut up some logs. My Sungold cherry tomatoes are bravely resisting the blight and cropping very well for now. You never see them in the shops on account of their habit of splitting easily, but I reckon they’re the tastiest of the lot. I have summer sprouting broccoli, some nice kale, lots of salad leaves and plenty of spuds to harvest, as well as a spectacularly huge crop of flat-leaf parsley. Some very poor, windy weather last month saw off my French beans and runner beans prematurely. I’m sowing broad beans later. It can be too windy for them in winter but I’m having a go for the first time ever. The purple sprouting and parsnips are looking very promising. And my spring greens are up. My freezer is full of blanched broad beans.

Last week in Madeira, where it never goes below about 10°C, we discovered the delights of pitanga, aka Surinam cherry or Brazilian cherry. I’ve brought some seeds back from the ones I stole and ate raw from the B&B garden. There isn’t much hope for them here, less still any prospect of fruit, but I’ll try anything. They make the most amazing jam with a lovely grown-up flavour. I have a young loquat plant that I grew from a seed I saved from a breakfast in Florence in May. It’ll be big enough to plant out in spring. I have high hopes for it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Stilly River Sage
Date: 05 Oct 17 - 10:14 PM

Here in the US several of the big box stores sell small potted trees as "living xmas trees" at the holiday season. It happens that Italian stone pine works well for this, and they are about $15 for a 1-2 gallon tree. I have five I've planted around the yard because they grown well in xeriscape settings. It takes about 40 years before you get the cones, and I think they're difficult to get out of the cones once you have them. If the trees are still here in another 30 years and anyone knows what they are, someone may enjoy the pine nuts. (I prefer to plant the smaller trees - it's easier to untangle roots wrapping around in the pot, and the hole one digs is much smaller! They grow fast to catch up with the more expensive and slower to get established bigger trees.)

Gallus, there is a spectacular copper beech in the Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York City that I walked past daily as a ranger. It had a place of honor at the end of a long open field, but hopefully enough forest on one side of it to prevent the wind damage you describe. I can't identify a photo of it online now, but it was so spectacular I feel like it should be famous. Planted by Frederick Law Olmstead when he planned the park.

When autumn arrives my North Texas garden gets it's second wind. There are green tomatoes everywhere and lovely black aubergine. I've dug many pounds of sweet potatoes and left a few more for when my daughter visits next week; she loves to dig them also and sometimes you need an extra incentive to get your adult children to come visit. Whatever it takes!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 05 Oct 17 - 06:41 PM

How in the heck did I write 'funguses'?!    Fungi of course -- must've been too late at night!

My poor tree has succumbed to wind coming down the glen, causing 'spiral fractures' as the wind catches the branches and leaves, twists the trunk.
This has happened over many years and was not something I knew about till the tree surgeon told me and showed me.
But even if we had known way back at the start of the problem I don't think with a huge beast of a hundred and fifty four year old mature Copper Beech that anything could have been done to arrest the problem and stabilise the tree. Perhaps if it had been a spreading oak, or a much smaller /younger tree, there would have been methods (I saw one in St Andrews Square in Edinburgh which had a support and prop..... but it was a relatively little specimen.
My tree - - well, the tree for which I have been custodian for nigh on 40 years --- is very tall, much higher than the Victorian house, and the weight of even one limb must be enormous. It is going to be some operation, involving a large cherry picker, it will have to be taken down in sections. There are also telephone and Hydro Board lines involved, and a road closure -- - and ultimately the trauma of looking at the empty space where The Tree used to be - - -- -


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Oct 17 - 08:35 PM

You may never see it in its full glory, but plant another tree. Make sure that what killed your tree wasn't a soil-borne disease first (I doubt it). Maybe a different species. I love the idea that we plant for generations to come. I know that isn't much consolation.

I bought some stone pine seeds last week. They're stratifying in the fridge at the moment. Stone pines are the trees you see all over Italy, in Rome, Pompei and Sorrento. I'll be at least 95 before I see any pine nuts from them, but I'm having a go anyway. I'm not sure that Mrs Steve can countenance another thirty years...


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 04 Oct 17 - 07:07 PM

I know that when you plant trees they are for future generations, and I accept that sometimes things go wrong and one might be lost too soon due to wind or lightening or some sort of disease-----I also understand that In a forest the cycle of life requires that as new trees grow, some old ones will die, fall, decay, thus providing habitat for different creatures and funguses, and nutrients to the enrich the ground.
But - when a particular tree has a long association with a special place, is part of your life, has the graves of your pet dogs and cats and various other creatures (red squirrels, birds, a rabbit, chickens) that have passed away over the long years.... it is really hard to come to terms with the impending loss.
If the tree had been out the back, well away from the house, we could just have let nature take her course. - I'm the sort of person who saves worms on the pavement when it rains, or spiders trapped in the bath or upside down beetles; I am finding this so very hard - - never to see the dark copper glow in the sunset, or the bright gold in the mid-day sun, nor hear the rustle of breezes in the leaves, and the scattering sounds of beech nuts falling to the ground through the flurry of Autumn leaf-fall.
Thank you for your sympathy and understanding!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 04 Oct 17 - 02:16 PM

I've spent this afternoon making a massive stack of leaves that I've mixed with loads of fresh grass clippings. They'll rot down nicely for use in the spring. There should be a couple more batches to make if I have the energy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 02 Oct 17 - 08:07 PM

I know that feeling too. Our garden is sheltered mostly by elms. They haven't been dying off for many years, but this last couple of years Dutch Elm Disease has started to take them again. This year I've also lost my favourite apple tree, one which I planted thirty years ago when we first moved in, and I haven't worked out what it was that got it. Nothing to be done. I've just planted some stone pine seeds. That's the umbrella pine that you see all over Italy and the one we get our pine nuts from. At 66 I'm being a little optimistic that I'll ever harvest my own pine nuts, but hey!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 02 Oct 17 - 07:31 PM

I'm sorry, Gallus Moll, accept my sympathy.

Where I was raised, a form of chestnut tree,
known locally as a Buckeye tree
because of the nuts' appearance,
was native, and a few old ones still stood.

I often got a close look at an huge thick old Buckeye tree
that was supposed to be several centuries in age.
An enormous trumpet vine grew literally next to the tree roots and
wound itself around the trunk;
the vine was big and thick and covered in its own bark.

If either tree or vine went down, I would feel
the same way that you feel now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Gallus Moll
Date: 02 Oct 17 - 06:27 PM

I am breaking my heart as my copper beech, planted when the house was built in 1863, is losing her leaves and shedding her beech nuts for the final time. This magnificent tree has quietly been suffering from spiral fractures, caused I think by the increased winds / lack of shelter in the years since the mature pine woods behind my house were cut down by the local authority. Even if I had known and realised, the way the tree has grown would not have allowed for any suitable pruning or support.... and now the end is near and I am so sad, so sorry - - with a tree like this I thought I was a custodian, sharing maybe 50 or 60 years with it till the next guardian took over; instead I am the person who has - reluctantly - had to accept the advice of professionals and the evidence of my own eyes that the time has come.....and I can't bear it.
But neither can I risk the tree falling onto the road, harming someone.
So - what I am hoping is that some of the poor tree's wood can be seasoned and then made into a piece of furniture (there are two or three local craftsmen in this area)for the house or garden.
I have gathered nuts to plant and grow -- there are already different ages of offspring of this tree in the garden.   
Trying to think positively - - but crying inside.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 01 Oct 17 - 07:45 PM

Well I came back from our holiday in Madeira last Thursday to find that the grass had grown like mad, as it has done all through this wettish summer. Generally I charge round with the mower's mulcher plate in place, but this time it was too long so I had to collect the clippings. At this time of year that's no disaster as I can scoop up tons of fallen leaves and mix them with the grass clippings in heaps. That way you get leaf mould that rots down so fast that you can use it next spring as the grass clippings add nitrogen that's lacking in the fallen leaves alone. That idea came from the estimable Bob Flowerdew, whom God preserve, who dubbed the resulting product "accelerated leaf mould." So tomorrow I'm out there raking up shitloads of fallen leaves, and I'll be repeating the exercise several times until November.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Donuel
Date: 01 Oct 17 - 06:12 PM

By day cloud like shadows race across the ground as birds practice for migration. By night loud honking geese V their way in near darkness before sleep.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: JHW
Date: 01 Oct 17 - 05:34 AM

Lots of leaves in the gutters and on the paths but they're last year's. Council can't afford to clear them away anymore. (Darlington UK)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 28 Sep 17 - 02:55 PM

It was going in reverse today in Edinburgh, Keberoxu, but at least, no rain!


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: keberoxu
Date: 28 Sep 17 - 01:33 PM

Still no heat in my rental apartment --
it will come, just not tonight.
So since tonight is going to be much cooler than it has been of late,
must again grab the
Oh-My-God-This-Thing-Is-Heavy quilt
and
plan on sleeping under it tonight.

All the humidity is blowing away in the breeze.

There's a glorious phrase in the book "Edinburgh"
by Robert Louis Stevenson
when he describes a day going from humid to dry:

"the sky has drunk up all the clouds."

Goodness, that man could write.


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Mr Red
Date: 28 Sep 17 - 04:47 AM

A swallow made its nest in the bus shelter see pics - some photo are blurred out of deference to the birds.
But if they are the only ones there will be a very small line on the telephone wires, maybe they have already gone!
The GFs farm seems to attract more swallows - all that BS (or should it be cowshit?)


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Subject: RE: BS: Signs of Autumn
From: Tattie Bogle
Date: 27 Sep 17 - 08:26 PM

Suffled through fallen leaves on my way down the road tonight.
Hundreds of lovely apples and plums on my daughter's trees.


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Mudcat time: 25 September 7:38 AM EDT

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