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BS: Language Pet Peeves

Joe_F 24 Aug 20 - 09:42 PM
Lighter 24 Aug 20 - 12:10 PM
leeneia 23 Aug 20 - 03:04 PM
Mrrzy 23 Aug 20 - 09:53 AM
Lighter 23 Aug 20 - 08:04 AM
JennieG 23 Aug 20 - 01:09 AM
leeneia 22 Aug 20 - 11:53 PM
JennieG 22 Aug 20 - 08:34 PM
Lighter 22 Aug 20 - 07:11 PM
Nigel Parsons 22 Aug 20 - 04:27 PM
Lighter 22 Aug 20 - 01:27 PM
leeneia 22 Aug 20 - 12:14 PM
Charmion 20 Aug 20 - 05:37 PM
leeneia 20 Aug 20 - 11:17 AM
Steve Shaw 20 Aug 20 - 09:34 AM
Mrrzy 20 Aug 20 - 09:11 AM
meself 19 Aug 20 - 10:08 PM
Lighter 19 Aug 20 - 09:32 PM
Charmion 19 Aug 20 - 09:20 PM
Steve Shaw 19 Aug 20 - 07:35 PM
Bill D 19 Aug 20 - 07:19 PM
leeneia 19 Aug 20 - 05:37 PM
Mrrzy 19 Aug 20 - 02:02 PM
Lighter 19 Aug 20 - 12:57 PM
Bill D 19 Aug 20 - 09:42 AM
Lighter 19 Aug 20 - 07:32 AM
Doug Chadwick 19 Aug 20 - 05:54 AM
Nigel Parsons 19 Aug 20 - 05:22 AM
Mrrzy 18 Aug 20 - 06:00 PM
meself 18 Aug 20 - 05:32 PM
leeneia 18 Aug 20 - 05:28 PM
Mrrzy 18 Aug 20 - 02:34 PM
meself 18 Aug 20 - 10:41 AM
Charmion 18 Aug 20 - 10:35 AM
Mrrzy 18 Aug 20 - 07:19 AM
Lighter 17 Aug 20 - 03:25 PM
leeneia 17 Aug 20 - 01:22 PM
Rusty Dobro 17 Aug 20 - 03:44 AM
leeneia 16 Aug 20 - 02:57 PM
Mrrzy 16 Aug 20 - 08:06 AM
meself 16 Aug 20 - 01:30 AM
leeneia 15 Aug 20 - 11:40 PM
Mrrzy 15 Aug 20 - 07:35 PM
Mrrzy 15 Aug 20 - 07:33 PM
Lighter 15 Aug 20 - 07:03 PM
Mrrzy 12 Aug 20 - 11:13 AM
Steve Shaw 11 Aug 20 - 04:21 PM
Nigel Parsons 11 Aug 20 - 02:50 PM
Steve Shaw 11 Aug 20 - 02:14 PM
leeneia 11 Aug 20 - 01:43 PM

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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Joe_F
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 09:42 PM

"Ex", not "equis"? What a bastard formation!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 24 Aug 20 - 12:10 PM

If "Hi, guys" bugs you, what do Mudcatters think of "Latinx," a new, gender-neutral word for Hispanic persons.

It's becoming common among American academics, though not yet among the people it designates.

It's pronounced "LatEEn-ex," btw.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 03:04 PM

I've been addressed as sir, although I don't try to look masculine at all. True, my hair is short, but I always tell the beautician, "Maximize the waves; I don't want to look like a boy."

When somebody calls me sir, we all pretend it didn't happen.

If somebody's gender is a mystery, don't use Sir or Ma'am. How about "my friend" instead?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 09:53 AM

Sir and Ma'am are now scary to some people because of the awkward transgender issue, which also, as a nonbinary person, bugs me. That is, if you look like a bloke, I don't think it's fair of you to chastise people who automatically Sir you.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 08:04 AM

When I was a lad, the expressions used were "Go way!" "Get outta here!" and "Are you kiddin'me?" "You're kiddin' me!" or "You gotta be kiddin' (me)!"

Since then, there's been "No way!" "Get out!" "Get outta town!" and "Shut up!"

In certain cirles, "F--- off!" has long been used instead of "Get outta here!" Also the substitution of "s---tin'" for "kiddin.'"


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: JennieG
Date: 23 Aug 20 - 01:09 AM

leeneia, your MIL's "Get out!" sounds very much like the context of "Shut up!" Yes, it was used in the context of incredulity and I can see it would get irritating very quickly.

I remember an Irish TV series from several years ago, 'Father Ted' (I just looked it up, it was in the late 1990s) in which the housekeeper kept repeating "ah, go on, go on, go on, go on......." to the point of irritation.

Speaking of irritation, a colleague in my last job used the expression "the irrits" meaning something which annoyed her - as in "it gives me the irrits". Or even "a strong dose of the irrits", if it was even more so. Far from bugging me I quite like it, and sometimes use it myself. She was from Victoria, Oz, so perhaps it was a Victorian thing; they are quite different to those of us who hail from New South Wales with different patterns of speech. My Posh Melbourne Grandmother's way of speaking was very Melbournian despite having grown up and married in N.S.W.; my grandparents moved to Melbourne, Victoria, upon marriage.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 11:53 PM

Hi, Jennie. I don't think I've heard the kind of "Shut up!" you mean. Is it an expression of incredulity? My mother-in-law went through a phase where everything anybody said was met with incredulity. A favorite response was "Get out!", which sounds like your "Shut up!"

I was grateful that as an in-law, I could just sit nearby and pretend none of this was happening. After a while I was reading a psychology book, and the author said that incredulity was a fad of the time, and it saved the speaker from having to listen and formulate an appropriate response to the other person. In time, people starting ignoring the MIL, and that broke her of the habit.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: JennieG
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 08:34 PM

I don't like being chirpily addressed as "Hi, guys!" either. Anyone approaching us for a charity donation and addressing us in such a way gets short shrift and no money.

While we're at it, what's with "shut up!" in the context of "well, really?" I've seen it on TV a few times and, being an Olde Pharte as what I am, am totally puzzled by it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 07:11 PM

That's not what the servers (i.e., waiters and waitresses) mean.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 04:27 PM

Guys are cords used to provide angular tension to support a tent.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 01:27 PM

"Guys" makes me feel like a teen again.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 22 Aug 20 - 12:14 PM

Exactly!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Charmion
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 05:37 PM

Oh, yes, leeneia!

We are completely unknown senior citizens who might well part with a nice tip — why can’t we be Sir and Ma’am? Must we plunge into the deep waters of familiarity at very first contact?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 11:17 AM

It's the fake familiarity of "Hi guys!" in a video that irritates me. "Guys" as a vaguely non-gender term is okay, coming as it does from these obvious C-students, but I resent the way they sound like I'm their drinking buddy. They may not care about nuances in language, but they do know the difference between a buddy and a stranger.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:34 AM

It was about the "listen UP" just as much as it was about "guys."


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 20 Aug 20 - 09:11 AM

Guys has been genderfree for a while now. Yeah, wonder why too.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 10:08 PM

It is ironic that at just about the point at which the universal "man" (i.e., as in "mankind") was fully purged from the language, the universal "guys" was gaining a firm foothold. For some reason, that one doesn't seem to bother the language police.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:32 PM

> "OK, listen up, guys!" notwithstanding that there were both boys and girls in the group!

About the norm in the U.S. for 30 years or more. So no exclamation point is required in these parts.

The usage of "guy" is surprisingly nuanced.

Grown American women call each other "girls" or "gals," but "guys" may be even more common among females under fifty or so. But it would sound very weird to me to hear a lone female addressed as "guy" by anybody. Men and boys, of course, are often addressed as "guy." (I don't intend to get into the complications of "bud," "buddy," "bro," "brah," "boy," "dude," and earthier terms.)

"You guys" long ago became essentially the Northern equivalent of genderless Southern and African-American "y'all."

P.S. Plural "youse" seems to be on the way out. And I've never heard anybody say "youse guys" who wasn't on a movie screen, though I can easily imagine it being used occasionally for emphasis.

Neither of my middle-class grandparents, born in NYC in the 1880s, ever said "youse." Everybody was "you" (plurals: "both of you," "all of you.")


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Charmion
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:20 PM

We are often addressed as “You guys” by chirpy young folks in service occupations. When I feel extra-curmudgeonly, I will stiffly inform these nice people that I am a woman, and no “guy”, thus earning a full dose of that whipped-puppy expression that I have learned to dread, for it means : “You are unhappy with me already and I don’t know *why*!”

Of course, my curmudgeonlyness just multiplies.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 07:35 PM

At the last school I taught in, we had a PE teacher who would round up his kids on the field of play by shouting "OK, listen up, guys!" notwithstanding that there were both boys and girls in the group! I fell out, temporarily, with the same bloke when, as as a form teacher collating subject reports, I sent one back to him in which he had written, about one of the many kids who understandably lack enthusiasm for enforced sportiness, "This boy is completely disinterested in PE." The dispute went as far as the headteacher (ironically, a graduate in English from Cambridge University), who overruled me! Good times though...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 07:19 PM

....pre-recorded earlier at a previous time before this... ;>)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 05:37 PM

This is pure peevishness on my part. I'm tired of clicking on YouTube videos that begin with an over-chirpy young person exclaiming "Hi guys! What's up?" The person is usually too close to the camera.

What's up is I was hoping for a good video.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 02:02 PM

Right, I finally found out they meant A star made out of diamonds.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 12:57 PM

You mean like "prepare in advance"?

Personally, I think such redundant phrases reflect a natural desire for emphasis and not the speaker's foolishness.

They make easy targets, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Bill D
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 09:42 AM

I worked for a woman once whose pet peeve was "pre-recorded earlier".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 07:32 AM

In any case, it truly is an example of incomprehensible writing.

The writer should have said, "a star consisting of five diamond shapes" or something like that.

The valuable principle of omitting needless words refers only to *needless* words.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Doug Chadwick
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 05:54 AM

each design includes a yellow diamond-shaped star

If we are talking about the proposed Mississippi state flag, the yellow (5 pointed) star is made up of 5 diamond shapes, as against the solid, white or blue 5 pointed stars shown elsewhere in the designs.

DC


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 19 Aug 20 - 05:22 AM

each design includes a yellow diamond-shaped star
I have no problems with that. a quick google will give pictures of such a display (as a 4-pointed star). Perhaps you were expecting the more common 5 pointed star.
A quick look at flags will show you stars with many differing numbers of points:
3: The international brigade (or, on cars, Mercedes Benz)
4: Aruba, Nato
5: USA, Tunisia
6: Israel, Morocco
7: Australia
8: Phillipines
And there are flags with even pointier stars.
But it is just a representation. Most pictures of our nearest start show it as being almost spherical, and not pointy at all.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 06:00 PM

Ok now this:

each design includes a yellow diamond-shaped star

Again... What?!?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 05:32 PM

The more heinous the crime, the more certain the perp will be referred to as "the gentleman".


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 05:28 PM

"Alleged" means that the person is suspected of a crime but has not been convicted. In fact, the person may be innocent. Both police and journalists use the term.

Cops have their jargon, all right. They never seem to drive or walk anywhere, they proceed. And why do they have to say that something "went down" when the rest of us say it happened?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 02:34 PM

I have no idea what they meant, even after reading the article! I just loved the "caused by" x "unrelated" oxymoron.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:41 AM

Did they also state that the "suspect" stabbed the victim?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Charmion
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 10:35 AM

The language of police and lawyers is one of the most fertile sources of language peeves. With cops, some of the worst tangles arise from an effort to avoid implying as a fact something that is not yet officially "true", such as the constant reiteration of the word "alleged", and others come from narrow special meanings, such as the "unrelated" incident in Mrrzy's example. I'll bet that actually means the stabbing and the "unrelated" incident were not committed by the same person, or were committed by the same person but not for the same reason.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 18 Aug 20 - 07:19 AM

According to the Charlottesville Police Department, the stabbing was the result of an unrelated incident that occurred on the UVA Corner, which sent me thinking, what?!?


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 03:25 PM

There are also "firenados." And "sharknados."

There's no limit to a wordnado. (Bigger than a "word cloud.")


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 01:22 PM

You forgot derecho, tornado, heat wave and haboob.

I was on the fringe of a derecho last week - the weather map showed a cone laid on its side, and inside the cone were tiny green dots, each one a thunderstorm. I think there were 524 in all. The cone extended from Nebraska to Indiana at the time I looked, and places had winds of 80 mph.

My sister called me from Wisconsin, upset and on-edge, just needing somebody to talk to, because she had non-stop thunder for an hour.
==========
Spellcheck in out-of-date. It doesn't like derecho or haboob.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Rusty Dobro
Date: 17 Aug 20 - 03:44 AM

The TV weather girl has just announced that we’re having literally every kind of weather thrown at us today!
I’m now preparing for deep snow, hurricanes, pea-soupers and a new ice-age. What an August this is turning out to be!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 02:57 PM

You're welcome. You would do the same for me, I'm sure.

We had lentil soup last night, and for the first time I added some celery seed at the end. It was good.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 08:06 AM

I have long wondered why that food is named Advocate. The ancients probably beaned a miscreant with hard things but if you were on their side, you could demonstrate your support by using a hard thing wrapped in softer stuff?

Thanks for a creative way of repairing my, uh, boner!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: meself
Date: 16 Aug 20 - 01:30 AM

I really wish I'd been aware of the word "funeralize" in my younger days - I'm sure I would have been heard to say, "I'm going to funeralize that sonofabitch!" (I had a habit of announcing what I would - ideally, theoretically, hypothetically - enact.)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 11:40 PM

Well, let's make it relevant to a language thread.

Your avocado reminds me of a joke in the comic opera Fledermaus. The Italian tenor who's been trying to seduce the leading lady is in jail (I forget why) and he demands a lawyer (avvocato.)

A guard reports to the warden that the prisoner wants an avocado.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 07:35 PM

Oops wrong thread!


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 07:33 PM

I started off to stuff half an avocado with crab salad, but it kinda took a sharp left... Now I have a big bowl of chopped lettuces tomato avocado celery dill parsley with crab and lemon on top, with vinaigrette and almonds. Yum.


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Lighter
Date: 15 Aug 20 - 07:03 PM

A current news story refers to wild-boar piglets (or "boarlets") as "cubs."

Scandalous or so-what?

https://www.yahoo.com/news/wild-boar-stole-german-nudists-152429522.html


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Mrrzy
Date: 12 Aug 20 - 11:13 AM

Pope's nose on chicken, game hen, duckduckduckgoose in my family


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 04:21 PM

Very good, Nigel! Just a tiny cavil: it's the pope's nose on a turkey... ;-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Nigel Parsons
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 02:50 PM

I'm with Nigel on this one. And then, of course, there's strangling the turkey....
Ah yes, "Parsons knows" best ;)


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: Steve Shaw
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 02:14 PM

I'm with Nigel on this one. And then, of course, there's strangling the turkey....

Another drastic thing that doesn't necessarily kill you is electrocution...


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Subject: RE: BS: Language Pet Peeves
From: leeneia
Date: 11 Aug 20 - 01:43 PM

Mrrzy, I agree with you. We are so accustomed to media reporting on deaths that when we see 'strangled,' we assume the victim died. 'Choked' or 'started to strangle' would be better journalism.


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