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BS: Will wine age after it is bottled

Louie Roy 07 Oct 10 - 12:56 PM
SINSULL 07 Oct 10 - 01:09 PM
Jeri 07 Oct 10 - 01:17 PM
Georgiansilver 07 Oct 10 - 01:53 PM
jeffp 07 Oct 10 - 02:13 PM
GUEST,^&* 07 Oct 10 - 03:14 PM
Ed T 07 Oct 10 - 03:15 PM
Smokey. 07 Oct 10 - 04:04 PM
Ed T 07 Oct 10 - 04:15 PM
olddude 07 Oct 10 - 04:22 PM
Jeri 07 Oct 10 - 04:39 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 07 Oct 10 - 06:16 PM
Slag 07 Oct 10 - 06:25 PM
olddude 07 Oct 10 - 08:17 PM
Slag 08 Oct 10 - 02:42 AM
jonm 08 Oct 10 - 06:55 AM
theleveller 08 Oct 10 - 07:39 AM
Paul Burke 08 Oct 10 - 01:07 PM
MikeL2 08 Oct 10 - 03:20 PM
olddude 08 Oct 10 - 05:11 PM
Slag 08 Oct 10 - 08:28 PM
olddude 08 Oct 10 - 08:38 PM
Micca 08 Oct 10 - 10:01 PM

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Subject: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Louie Roy
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 12:56 PM

I used to collect decorative liquor bottles and in 1968 I bought a pint bottle of chianti wine shaped like a concord grape with the following info on bottle vintage Luigi Raspolline 1968 bottled in Italy. I was going through some boxes that have been stored for years and came across it. Mudcat wine connnoisseur your opinions


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: SINSULL
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 01:09 PM

It will age and it will turn to vinegar. How was it stored?
SINS


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Jeri
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 01:17 PM

I think that when it is put from the cask into the sealed bottle, it's pretty much done aging. Not gonna turn to vinegar without air, and once the yeast turns the sugar to alcohol and die, it won't ferment any more. Also the wood flavor came from the cask it is no longer in.

There are folks who know way more than I do about this.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Georgiansilver
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 01:53 PM

It may be drinkable but a good auction house might sell it for enough money to buy a few good bottles of wine... worth a consultation with them anyway! Best wishes, Mike.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: jeffp
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 02:13 PM

Wine definitely ages after it is bottled. We bottled a bunch of wine last year and it just keeps getting better and better. White wine doesn't keep as long as red, but it improves up to a point too. Liquor doesn't age in the bottle, though.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: GUEST,^&*
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 03:14 PM

If, as you describe it, it was bottled and offered for sale the same year, it's a safe bet it was intended to be drunk young - like most Chianti. I'd be very surprised if it survived forty odd years.

Let us know how it looks before you drink it! My guess is dark brown.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Ed T
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 03:15 PM

Does all wine improve with age?

Generally yes, if stored correctly (cool, dark and airitght and not for too long. All wine will improve with a little ageing, but long ageing will only help a wine that has been specifically designed to be aged, and such a wine will often be pretty unpalatable until it has been aged. Red wines generally need a longer rest than whites, because of higher tannin levels.
source


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Smokey.
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:04 PM

I don't drink the stuff, but I seem to remember wine should be stored on its side to keep the cork wet and make a better seal against the oxygen getting to it.. Or am I stating the obvious?


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Ed T
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:15 PM

I never tried a wine with a cork. Mine normally have screq on tops.
Just kidding:)


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: olddude
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:22 PM

My buddie does estate sales, well when he finds bottles he cannot sell them, then the owner either takes them or throw them out. Well I got a bottle of 1956 Dom one time. So I thought lets give er a try Garry... yup wasn't stored on its side and pieces of cork in it ... strained out the cork ... yeeee gads ... was that awful ... still had the fizz but pretty nasty ... overheated ... not stored right ... yikes mistake


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Jeri
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 04:39 PM

I learn. I don't understand why it ages in the bottle, but I suppose I don't have to. Most wine these days has rubber corks, so keeping them wet probably doesn't matter.

I do know there IS a reason for swirling and sniffing. I had pasta last night, and just poured a glass of wine. Oops--should have dumped that one out a long time ago. (ECHHHH!) I dumped it out and got a glass from the fresher bottle with the vacuum pump stopper thingie. I like red wine and can drink white or pink, but the brown stuff is just a notch below gross.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 06:16 PM

Plastic (not rubber) stoppers are now used in over 20 per cent of wine bottles; another 10 percent is screw-cap. (http://www.normacorc.com, and link to Wall Street Journal article).

Research is showing that cork has little or no advantage over the plastic substitutes. Even old line cork producers such as Jelinek are producing plastic stoppers.

The cork producers are mounting advertizing campaigns against the substitute, but some wine producers are putting some of their best wines in bottles stoppered with plastic (my favorite wine merchant showed me some that were in the $45-50 dollar range.

The plastic stopers are not biodegradable, but recycling may be on the horizon.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Slag
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 06:25 PM

Wines never stop aging. The process may be tremendously slowed depending on how it is handled but as long as there is headspace and oxygen present it will continue to change. Modern commericial winemakers have gone farther down the road to halt the processes that take place naturally but the also interrupt the same processes that tend to impart desired nuances to the wine over time. They eliminate oxygen by bottling in an almost pure nitrogen atmosphere. They use composite corks that do not breath the way a naturral cork breathes. And BTW Cork Oak corks add additional flavor to wine. If you make your own wine as I have done, do not skimp on corkage!

Whites and fruit wines arrive at peak flavor much sooner than reds and start "going south" much sooner. Chenin Blanc and sweeter wines do well to stay at peak for a couple of years. Chardonays will keep longer depending on how they are finished. Some big reds will not come into their own until after fifteen or twenty years and some will keep a peak flavor up to one hundred years or more but eventually all wine will go to vinegar.

Wine vinegar is a much more stable product and there are vinegars that are many hundreds of years old (when kept in the family!). Consumption is the main enemy of preservation!

The organism yeast, of course, is the culprit that converts grape juice (the "must") to wine. It's waste product is alcohol which has the benefit of making the enviroment leathal to most other organisms and the wine maker's job is to enhance that ability. When the alcohol reaches a certain percentage (around 12%) the yeast shuts down production as it can't live too well in it's own waste either. Some times a little extra alcohol is added along with sulfuric acid to make sure no further fermentation takes place. Not all the yeast dies however. The older wines that have not gone through modern processes will begin fermantation again if sugar and certain other things are done to the opened wine.

"Mother" is a bacterium carried by fruit flies and some other creatures and it is this that can brave the alcohol content and begin the process that leads to acetic acid, resluting in vinegar. I'm not really up on what, if anything comes after vinegar but it is most stable and has historically been used as a food perservative for thousands of years.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: olddude
Date: 07 Oct 10 - 08:17 PM

I was watching and episode of "pawn stars" Well this guy brings in this rare unopened bottle of some champagne .. the pawn guy calls in an expert. The expert says, Well sadly it is destroyed .. now had it been stored properly that would be an 8-10K bottle ... now it is worthless unless someone just wants the bottle as a conversation piece .. The pawn guy wouldn't even give him 50 bucks for it ...

ouch


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Slag
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 02:42 AM

It's usually pretty hard to tell if a wine has been destroyed by improper storage without tasting it. Burn marks, mold and flood damage, removed seal are a few signs that yes, it hasn't had the best of care. On the other hand wines, ancient wines, have been recovered from the seafloor and drank with delight and sold for big bucks too!


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: jonm
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 06:55 AM

Cork is used for stopping wine bottles because it has a Poisson's ratio of zero - in other words, if you apply force to the end to push it into the bottle, it does not become correspondingly fatter. All other materials, including the various types of synthetic cork, do become wider when force is applied lengthways. This means that once the stopper is in the bottle and the force is removed, the stopper will become slightly narrower in returning to its original shape. Synthetic corks are not as secure and more prone to air leakage, which is why real corks are still used for wines such as Beaunes which complete their ageing in the bottle.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: theleveller
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 07:39 AM

Depends how quickly you drink it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Paul Burke
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 01:07 PM

Not all wines age well, and you can bet that SPECIAL OFFER means "about to turn to vinegar". Pigbread (Boardough in French), and Cheshire wine, such as Premier Crewe, and other red, heavy and tannin- rich wines apparently age best. I wonder if adding sugar and strong cold tea to ordinary wine will make it age?


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: MikeL2
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 03:20 PM

hi

I know nothing about wine other than I found out a few years back that I started to prefer it to beer.

This happened when I went to live in Spain for a time. I found that the beer was not great and I changed to drinking wine....red wine in Spain IMHO is much much better than white so I drink mainly only red or rosado ( pink|).

Since coming back home I have joined an on-line wine club. Not really to find out about all the ins & outs of wines etc but to be able to buy very good wines at a reasonable price.

I buy mainly Spanish wines and there are many of them these days. I enjoy trying different regions. I do buy wines from other countries and I enjoy those from Argentina and Chile best after Spanish ones.

With regard to whether the wines age in the bottle.....I am pretty sure they do. In fact when I buy the wines from the club they give advice on the date when to start drinking it and the longest date that they recommend you keep it.

This varies from " drink now to drink before end of 2015....on the wines I have at present.

As a guide generally the more expensive wines are recommended to be kept for at least a year before opening and the less expensive ones are to be drunk almost immediately.

I have found that this is not necessarily a guide to which suits my taste the best. Some of the cheaper wines are better than the expensive ones.

The way to judge a good wine.....taste it and if you like it, it is good.

Cheers hic

MikeL2


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: olddude
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 05:11 PM

Would I age if I were bottled .. now that is a question I am pondering
:-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Slag
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 08:28 PM

Would they bottle you if you were pickled?


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: olddude
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 08:38 PM

LOL, I am sure bobert has some shine that would do it :-)


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Subject: RE: BS: Will wine age after it is bottled
From: Micca
Date: 08 Oct 10 - 10:01 PM

Dude (re -Boberts shine) is that get you bottled or pickled? or both?


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