Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


Upright (bass)--yike!

Melissa 04 Nov 10 - 11:58 AM
Jack Campin 04 Nov 10 - 12:17 PM
Mitch the Bass 04 Nov 10 - 12:28 PM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 04 Nov 10 - 12:34 PM
Melissa 04 Nov 10 - 04:08 PM
Crowhugger 04 Nov 10 - 04:18 PM
Midchuck 04 Nov 10 - 04:59 PM
Melissa 04 Nov 10 - 05:10 PM
Melissa 04 Nov 10 - 05:12 PM
Wolfhound person 04 Nov 10 - 05:25 PM
Melissa 04 Nov 10 - 05:30 PM
McGrath of Harlow 04 Nov 10 - 05:38 PM
Leadfingers 04 Nov 10 - 08:07 PM
Barbara Shaw 04 Nov 10 - 08:47 PM
Bobert 04 Nov 10 - 09:46 PM
Melissa 05 Nov 10 - 01:50 AM
Gibb Sahib 05 Nov 10 - 02:31 AM
Melissa 05 Nov 10 - 02:49 AM
jonm 05 Nov 10 - 03:53 AM
Mitch the Bass 05 Nov 10 - 04:09 AM
Melissa 05 Nov 10 - 04:21 AM
Melissa 05 Nov 10 - 04:34 AM
Will Fly 05 Nov 10 - 05:01 AM
Wolfhound person 05 Nov 10 - 05:49 AM
Leadfingers 05 Nov 10 - 06:42 AM
s&r 05 Nov 10 - 08:48 AM
GUEST,Jonny Sunshine 05 Nov 10 - 12:46 PM
Barbara Shaw 05 Nov 10 - 01:03 PM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 05 Nov 10 - 02:33 PM
Gibb Sahib 05 Nov 10 - 02:59 PM
Crowhugger 05 Nov 10 - 03:14 PM
Melissa 05 Nov 10 - 07:38 PM
Crowhugger 05 Nov 10 - 09:05 PM
Allan C. 06 Nov 10 - 06:12 AM
GUEST,Hotenanny 06 Nov 10 - 08:57 AM
Barbara Shaw 06 Nov 10 - 09:20 AM
GUEST 06 Nov 10 - 05:49 PM
Melissa 06 Nov 10 - 06:11 PM
Barbara Shaw 07 Nov 10 - 08:14 AM
GUEST,Ray 11 Nov 10 - 03:02 PM
Barbara Shaw 12 Nov 10 - 01:59 PM
Jack Campin 12 Nov 10 - 03:57 PM
open mike 13 Nov 10 - 05:09 AM
Melissa 13 Nov 10 - 01:51 PM
Melissa 13 Nov 10 - 04:43 PM
GUEST,punkfolrocker 13 Nov 10 - 05:11 PM
Barbara Shaw 13 Nov 10 - 05:24 PM
Melissa 13 Nov 10 - 05:38 PM
Allan C. 14 Nov 10 - 05:57 AM
s&r 14 Nov 10 - 06:01 AM
Melissa 14 Nov 10 - 03:03 PM
Barbara Shaw 14 Nov 10 - 04:17 PM
Melissa 14 Nov 10 - 07:27 PM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:









Subject: Upright--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 11:58 AM

I'm apparently about to get an upright bass within the next few days..and will need to be able to play it within the next couple weeks.

I don't need fancy stuff or elaborate instruction (yet) but sure would appreciate links, suggestions, hints, etc. to make my crash course easier with less wrong-turns.

I'll be playing OldTime, Old Country, mild bluegrass type.


Thanks,
M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Jack Campin
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 12:17 PM

This seems to be the state of the art:

Francois Rabbath


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Mitch the Bass
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 12:28 PM

I started to learn double bass in 1964 and I'm still learning.
I prefer the older Simandl method to Rabbath.

You'll need a strong left hand, especially the little finger and leather-like fingers on the right.

Do you have any specifics you're looking for? Ideas for easy bass lines, getting the finger positions right...

Mitch
http://www.hgmitchell.co.uk


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 12:34 PM

thin strips of easily removable masking tape
stuck to the side of the neck
marked off in ink indicating where the important 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th
'frets' would be..

[arrived at by harmonics, a tuner, and a long enough ruler...]


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 04:08 PM

I'll look and see what I can find on Simandl and Rabbath..both are names I would never have come up with on my own. Thanks!

I think I'll probably try starting out with pencil markings on the side of the fretboard. They'll be visible enough and I'm a little bit leery of adding anything with edges that might aggravate my hand by rubbing..I think I will probably have enough hand trauma with just the fretting.
If that doesn't work for me, would the colored masking tape for painting hold on well enough to use? I would really like to avoid anything that might leave a gummy mess when I get rid of it.

I've got an adequate ear which ought to help me bungle through until I get my feet under me. I have a regular e/a bass and have messed with it a little so the thing won't be completely foreign to me. I've never played with an upright at all.
My weak spots are that my left arm is a little bit wimpy (recent ulnar nerve surgery) and I'm not sure how to hold that arm/hand/shoulder to give it the least stress..and I would like to see clear picture/video of how my right fingers should work their part.

I'd truly prefer not picking up any bad habits-in my immediate rush- that will be hard to unlearn. I don't mind starting out playing very basic/simple stuff..we have a forgiving audience.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Crowhugger
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 04:18 PM

My cello teacher used regular masking tape cut into narrow strips, directly on the fingerboard where wire frets would be, but certainly try painter's type. She puts it on all beginners' instruments up to 5th fret. If you already play a fretted instrument, it may be enough for you to mark 5th & 7th frets, and visualize the ones in between with just a little practice. Or make dots from post-it notes to put on the side, they should stick for a while if you wipe the neck well first.

Have a great time, sounds like a load of fun!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Midchuck
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 04:59 PM

If you can persuade everyone to play three-chord songs in D, you don't need to use the left hand at all.

Peter


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 05:10 PM

I do play other instruments..mostly guitar, but I have some experience with banjo, mandolin, fiddle and bass. I think once I get the thing in my hands and my hands learn what they're supposed to be doing, I'll be ok.

I do want to try to start out with my hands doing what they ought to so I can build on what I start with instead of undoing/relearning.

It will either be a load of fun or a handful of torn up fingers, huh?
I'm excited and raring to go..looking forward to bringing the beast home and putting it to work.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 05:12 PM

ha..it probably won't be much of a chore to find three-chord/D songs around here. That seems to be the favorite.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Wolfhound person
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 05:25 PM

Be prepared for blisters. Take plasters to first gig, and wrap right hand fingers well.
(I'm assuming you're not going to be using a bow)

Try to play along with other instruments right from the start to get your ear in.
Make sure you have good strings and if you haven't, change them. Try not to look at the bill for this too much.
Consider having the bridge set as low as possible.

Paws


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 05:30 PM

Right..not using a bow (for now)

I have two kinds of fake skin stuff..one that sprays on and one that paints on. It provides a thin layer of protection without stiffness.
Would that be any use to me?

What type of bandage tape stuff do I want to have handy?



You folks are giving me good information!
Thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: McGrath of Harlow
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 05:38 PM

Would rubber gloves work?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Leadfingers
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 08:07 PM

Playing in D and G is relatively uncomplicated - The masking tape to indicate fret positions is a good idea , and pray that you DONT have to restring too soon !! Main thing is to enjoy it ! And DONT try to take it t a Gig on a Bicycle !!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 08:47 PM

A tiny dot of white enamel paint (like that used to touch up appliances) on the side of the neck can mark the frets, and wears off all by itself eventually, after which you won't need the marks.

Teflon tape-wound strings by Innovation are very easy on the fingers and sound great. Strings cost a lot but last a looooong time.

It's easy to be a beginner on bass but takes a lifetime to master and most never get there. I'm a perennial beginner but have often started people off on bass with some simple lessons. One thing I tell them (that was told to me):

Whenever you fret a note with your left hand on the neck as "one," you can usually fret the same position on the neck on the string behind it as "five" or pedal note. For example, in the key of E, if you press down the E note on the D string for "one" you can then press down the B note on the A string for "five" afterwards, same position on the neck, different string. If one string is played open (not fretted) you can play the string behind it also open. (By behind it, I mean the lower string where the strings are E/A/D/G and E is the lowest string.

By one and five, I actually mean (in 4/4 time) beats one and three. They talk about bass players playing one/five/one/five because of how they usually play the root and fifth of the key.

To remember the strings, I tell people "Eat All Dead Gophers" for a memory aid.

Remember that the bass needs to drive the tune in bluegrass and old-time, right at the front edge of the beat. In blues the bass is at the back edge of the beat. But you'll be responsible to keep the tempo as much as possible unless the others run away with the song and you have no choice but to catch them!

The bass is so much fun to play, kind of likc playing an instrument and dancing at the same time. Move with it and enjoy!

Hope this helps.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Bobert
Date: 04 Nov 10 - 09:46 PM

Well, tape, pencil marks (no pens) just to give you comfort zo0nes but really, it's just a matter of lettin' the "force be with you"... I play something called a "lowebow" which is both a fret-less bass and a fret- less gettar (kinda) and playin' it is the same as playin' an upright bass... Ya might need a few "cheaters" but if ya' just have one good practice session where you "hook up" with yer before the performance, you'll be fine...

BTW, I prefer pencil... You can see it but not many other folks will...

B~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 01:50 AM

You all are filling me up with exactly what I need. I'm glad I thought to start a thread.


When I am starting, how tall do I want to set the bass? I do need to be careful with my shoulder/arm and will probably be happiest if I can avoid reaching higher than is necessary. I suppose trial and error would set me straight, but asking you all is a lot easier.
It may not go short enough, but if it does, it would be kind of dumb to get it shorter than I need to..seems like that would make me have to work harder and I sure don't want to risk anything that drastic!

I think I'll have a chance to play with the group a couple times before the show. Until then, I plan to play with whatever I find on youtube..first stuff with bass for me to hear, then on to some old fiddlers and such..and sprinkle that with various cds that I have. I figure that ought to get me somewhat solid with keeping playing when I flub without losing my timing.
It's the best plan I can think of at the moment..seems like a tolerable way to start myself before I have to be responsible for steady sturdiness with folks that tend to waver.

I'm not sure what to do about the bicycle though.
It's a mighty long walk...

Thanks,
M


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 02:31 AM

For height, look at the part where the fingerboard meets the headstock, and set that at eye-level or slightly above -- well, at that level when the bass is slanted into playing position.

Half the battle on bass is strength, and that does not come overnight. The Simandl method (as recommended by Mitch) provides ways with dealing with the issue. One principle is that whenever possible, keep the fingers that arent playing the note ("behind" the fretted note) pressing down the string. E.g., when you are fretting a note w/ the pinky/4th finger, ALL the other fingers are also holding the string down. Third/ring finger is not used to fret notes in the lower reaches. 1st, 2nd, and 4th are splayed out, for reach and strength...so within one hand "position", you reach 3 notes on a string, not 4 (i.e. unlike guitar).

The positions are very important, too, in reaching the right notes in tune. Don't learn the instrument note by note by fishing. Instead, maintain a hand position as a bloc that moves in synch up and down the fingerboard.

When standing, let the corner of the bass fall slightly into your left-side crotch, with your left foot partly extended.No reach around from behind :~) The goal is to get the bass to stay there without holding onto it with your hands -- you shouldn't be trying to hold up the bass with your hands and play at the same time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 02:49 AM

My feet and the stem thingy should (sort of) be a tripod and I should be able to move both hands without the bass falling over, right?

If I learn position by key/chord and patterns, I'll be giving myself a solid foundation that I can build on as I improve?

That sounds perfect to me!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: jonm
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 03:53 AM

I too have the offer of a stand-up bass on loan and would dearly love to play it.

I'm a left-handed guitar player, with long "fingerstyle" nails.

I've played both lefty and right-handed bass guitars, the latter upside-down, but have had to use a plectrum as the strings damage my nails.

Might it be better to go against my first instincts and learn this thing right handed using my left for fretting?

Please DON'T go into the old "why don't you learn guitar right handed?" routine, that's been visited too many times before.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Mitch the Bass
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 04:09 AM

To add to what others have said...

Stand behind the bass and control its position with your body. Keep your hands free for playing rather than supporting the instrument. This will also help later if you want to use a bow, particularly a German one.

Put your left thumb on the back of the neck. There is always a temptation to grasp the neck between thumb and forefinger. This is one of those early lessons that will stick later.

Think in positions for your left hand but even when playing open strings, use your left hand to damp the strings between notes.

First position (first finger 1 tone above the nut) gives you scales of G and D without moving. A shift to half position (Simandl notation) gives you the low F for the key of C and top G# for A. A shift to Second Postion on the G string gives you top C.

Good Luck

Mitch


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 04:21 AM

There are a lot of useful, practical posts in this thread, jonm..seems like it would be an excellent time for you to give that bass a try!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 04:34 AM

What should I learn from these guys..and what should I be careful not to pick up?

Hartford and two basses


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Will Fly
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 05:01 AM

And DONT try to take it t a Gig on a Bicycle !!

Leadfingers - do you remember bassist Brian Brocklehurst, who cycled round London in all weather weating a short-sleeved check shirt, a pipe clamped between his teeth - and his double bass strapped round his back?

An institution on "Country Meets Folk", and a very popular jazz musician.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Wolfhound person
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 05:49 AM

There was an old guy in a Northumberland (UK) dance band who went to gigs with the bass strapped to the roof of the car and the rest of the band inside. One night he dropped the others off home, but was tired when he got home. He forgot to take the bass off the roof before putting the car in the garage.

Not recommended.

I don't know what the tape I use would be over the pond, but it's "Elastoplast" over here. The other place I've had blisters is between the thumb and first finger of the left hand , from running up and down the back of the neck - a bit like the guy on the left in the Hartford clip (but more inexpertly, obviously).

My bass is a 4/4 and doesn't have an adjustable foot (it's wooden). The "fretboard" starts at about ear level for me, and I just cuddle it however it feels comfortable.

Paws


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Leadfingers
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 06:42 AM

Will - As I recall , Brian B was a fairly hefty guy !


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: s&r
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 08:48 AM

A word of caution - we destroyed a double bass at a gig. A helpful member of the audience leaned it against a wall. Doesn't work; it spun and fell on the bridge, smashing the table. Lay them flat or on a stand or in a corner.

Stu


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST,Jonny Sunshine
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 12:46 PM

Can't offer any playing tips, but two pieces of practical advice

Get some sort of trolley or a "bass wheel" to help getting it about

Practice saying "very funny" whilst delivering a withering stare to everyone who shouts out "that's a big violin!" across the street at you.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 01:03 PM

A luggage rack with bungies works to transport a bass. A good stand is a good idea to keep it safer when not being played.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 02:33 PM

just curious, for any average sized bloke just starting out
looking for a double bass for amped up rockabilly;
what are the deciding factors
between a full size and 3/4 size instrument..

3/4 would seem to have more pros than cons..???


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 02:59 PM

Totally shameless, I know... But I did at least contribute info to the thread... Well, I am selling a bass. If you're in the Northeast U.S., please check it out. Thanks.

3/4 Size German Bass


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Crowhugger
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 03:14 PM

Here in cello land, the unplayed instrument is quite safe lying on its side, bow on top. A stand is nice too but rather than have one more thing to carry to 'n' fro' (bad back, y'see) I have a scrap piece of velvet or terrycloth in the case to prevent dings in the finish if I have to lay it on a hard floor.

Don't hesitate to try out the bow Melissa, especially if one comes with the bass. Most any violin shop has an employee who is qualified to show you how to hold it. When I play cello with folk music, which means I'm effectively playing bass (but it's an octave higher than you will be, whence the name double [the] bass), I sometimes use a short, slightly-bouncy bow stroke that gives a bit more oomph and duration than a basic pizz, a nice option if used with discretion. Called spiccato IIRC.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 07:38 PM

I've had the bow for several years and do intend to give it a fair try eventually. I'll most likely reopen this thread when I hit a glitch with that..
It will probably come with a stand (whew!) which will make that part a lot easier.

Winter might not be a very good season for bicycles or bungees on the roof. If it doesn't fit in my car, I'll let someone else do the hauling for me so I don't have to knock ice off to play.

Withering Stare! Good idea--I can practice that while I'm waiting for the bass to land in my anxious fingers! If that goes well, I may even branch out and add a Sinister Glare to accessorize my non-verbals.


Nice looking bass, Gibb Sahib!

thanks again, folks
You're filling me up with a lot of good tidbits and it's going to make my launch a lot easier. I appreciate it.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Crowhugger
Date: 05 Nov 10 - 09:05 PM

Oh boy do I wish I had a few thou' to plunk down on such an instrument as yours, Gibb! However, I very easily can be afflicted with IAS so maybe it's just as well I don't, plus I'm still dreaming of my own set of handbells...and a new banjo, and I've always been curious to try a banjolin but I'm putting it off because I'm sure I'd love it... Anyhow, Gibb I hope you find a good home for your bass. Does she have a name?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Allan C.
Date: 06 Nov 10 - 06:12 AM

WhiteOut, the stuff for covering typing errors in the olden days, works well for marking the "frets".

I once rigged up an old-style golf cart, (the hand truck sort; not the motorized vehicle,) to hold my bass. A friend turned me onto the idea. He said that it would come in handy when playing festivals, etc., where the parking lot is always a long way from the stage. The one I customized had nice, big wheels. I attached a length of copper pipe sideways to form a cradle. A few bunjees in the right places and it was good to go!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST,Hotenanny
Date: 06 Nov 10 - 08:57 AM

Leadfingers
You obviously never met Brian Brocklehurst. When Brian was doing a session at the BBC he could often be seen cycling down Bond Street in London's west end with a double bass under his left arm and casually smoking a pipe.

Hoot

P.S Jim Bray used to arrive with his bass in the back of a hearse.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 06 Nov 10 - 09:20 AM

In my note above where I said mentioned a luggage rack and bungees, I meant a rolling luggage CART (not the rack on top of a car), the bigger the wheels the better. We use one all the time at festivals. Can be bought at WalMart.

Whenever we buy a new vehicle, we test drive it to our house to see if the bass will fit before purchasing. One reason why we now own a mini-van and a pickup truck.

The bass can tear up your fingers even if you have the calluses. I know an experienced bass player with calluses who still keeps a supply of some kind of skin-like medical tape that he buys at CVS. When the fingers get bloody, he winds this stuff around them and continues to play for hours. 'course, he tears up the bass too!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST
Date: 06 Nov 10 - 05:49 PM

One of the key difference between the upright bass and many of the smaller stringed instruments, is that the bass is not played with just the hands.

The strength to "fret", as well as pluck, the strings comes from the shoulders. The muscles of your shoulders and arms are stronger and have more endurance than the muscles in your hands. Instead of using your left hand alone to squeeze the strings into the fretboard, keep your elbow up and use your entire arm as a large "C clamp". This has the added advantage of keeping your left thumb and hand more mobile.

As for the right hand, especially for simple root-five bass lines, keep your plucking finger(s) almost parallel to the string, pluck with the meat (not the tip) of your finger, and simply let the weight of your arm, as it hangs from your shoulder, do the work. For faster runs or solos you can transition so that your right fingers are more perpendicular to the board, enabling more of a faster alternating finger technique, but for the meat and potatoes stuff let gravity do much of the work. (Even after three or four sets, gravity never seems to tire.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 06 Nov 10 - 06:11 PM

Guest,
When you say 'pluck with the meat' you mean that I'll be using my fingerprint part instead of the ends, right?
It strikes me as a very good idea to let gravity do something positive for my body for a change!
Thanks, that angle stuff is useful for me.

Barbara,
Is it the clear tape that kind of has little holes (or looks like it does..probably doesn't since I think it's supposed to be waterproof) that your friend uses?
If it was put on when his fingers started getting tender, would he need to wrap it? Would a strip down the length of each finger give enough protection to put off the seeping?



If I'm pretty careful about sliding while I'm getting used to playing, will that allow my fingers to toughen up a little and help me postpone the bleeding?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 07 Nov 10 - 08:14 AM

Melissa, I think GUEST means to use the side of your finger by keeping your fingers parallel to the strings with your palm facing you, fingers pointing to the bridge. Then you would turn your hand to use the fingertips (palm facing neck of bridge, fingers pointing away from you)for faster picking of multiple strings.

Don't know what kind of tape my friend uses (I'll try emailing him, he lives in the next state) but it's pink and stretches. He winds it around the fingers a couple of times and it protects his fingers amazingly well, clinging enough to give him sensitivity but strong enough to cover the open blisters.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST,Ray
Date: 11 Nov 10 - 03:02 PM

Mention is made in previous posts of Brian Brocklehurst - something of an institution in the 1970's. It appears that Brian passed away on 26th October and this seems to have gone unnoticed.
Ray


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 12 Nov 10 - 01:59 PM

"palm facing neck of bridge" - thinko

Meant to say palm facing bass or palm facing fingerboard (above). Bridge doesn't have a neck although it does have feet!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Jack Campin
Date: 12 Nov 10 - 03:57 PM

Found this yesterday - it's set off a serious attack of IAS if I thought I was anywhere near affording one:

bazantar


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: open mike
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 05:09 AM

i have seen conga cunga players tape their hands before playing...is there a chance that bas players might do this too?
perhaps the most comprehensinve list of links i s here?
http://www.gollihurmusic.com/links.cfm

here are some stands that might prevent the falling scenario listed above http://www.musiciansfriend.com/navigation?q=double+bass+stand

more stands here..http://www.gollihurmusic.com/keyword/33-STANDS.html

or you might find a folding one!!

and here is a bass forum where they discuss such possibilities
http://www.talkbass.com/forum/showthread.php?t=599600


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 01:51 PM

It's here!
I haven't taken it out yet, but I know what I'll be doing this evening.
It seems pretty dumb to be excited about wearing holes in my fingers, but I am.


"palm facing neck of bridge"
Sounds like something I might say..made perfect sense to me when I read it a few days ago.


I'm sorry to hear about Brian Brocklehurst.
The world doesn't have nearly enough bass-toting cyclists..

Thanks again, everybody.
I will be back to thank you some more (and probably ask several questions)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 04:43 PM

Well, I don't think the leg-holding thing is going to work. I think I'm too short to provide an adequate support that way and can't reach the strings well enough to play if I turn the bass enough to support it with my body.
What's Plan B for a short gal? My outcroppings make the bass want to roll if I don't hold on well with my left hand.

This bass will have been set up as a bowed, orchestral instrument. Will the strings be the height I want? (they seem kind of tall to me)

When should I wrap my fingers?
I don't want to pamper them too much but I certainly won't want finger misery to stop me from working.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: GUEST,punkfolrocker
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 05:11 PM

ermm..

seems there were very good reasons why the Electric Bass Guitar
was invented over half a century ago....


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 05:24 PM

Don't give up! Keep playing with bare fingers until they get a bit sore, then give it a rest. Using the tape is a last resort when you get blisters and want to keep playing.

I'm short too (5'4") and support the bass by leaning the side against my stomach, so it becomes a sort of dancing partner that way, both of us having something to hang onto.

The action (height) of each bass is different and makes a difference in ease of playing, along with type of strings. I would just get used to what you have for awhile before you ask a luthier to vary things.

One thing I don't think anyone mentioned, play the strings (with right hand) down near the end of the fingerboard, rather than up higher on the neck.

Once you get used to things, you'll realize how much FUN and how gratifying it is to play bass.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 13 Nov 10 - 05:38 PM

I won't give up..but it's going to wear me out!

I've wanted to play upright for a very long time and fully intend to have a LOT of fun with it. My fingers will get a good chance to toughen up slowly..my wimpy arm is evidently going to insist on short sessions for a while.

Am I going to give myself a horrible habit if I sort of clamp the bass with my forearm/elbow until I feel more secure about letting it lean loosely against me?


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Allan C.
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 05:57 AM

"I won't give up..but it's going to wear me out!"
Yeah. Only the chosen few who play them know the stamina it takes to play the bass.

"Am I going to give myself a horrible habit if I sort of clamp the bass with my forearm/elbow until I feel more secure about letting it lean loosely against me?"

In a word, yes. The suggestion above with regard to its being like a dancing partner is pretty descriptive. You may need to adjust the foot (peg) to achieve the height and balance that works for you. I'm hoping that you are standing slightly behind the bass with its upper rear curve nudging your side. The inclination is to want to have a three-point balance scheme. However, it just doesn't work well that way. Your left arm and hand need to work independently of the support and balance issue. In other words, the foot and your side are the only two things that hold the bass in place. Naturally, you'll need to let the foot take most of the "responsibility" for the support.

Try this. Stand the bass on its foot and find the point at which it is most balanced - the point at which you could almost let go and have it stand. Next position yourself slightly behind the bass as I mentioned, but a half of a step away. Then lean the bass into your side.

I don't know if I have described this balancing act as well as it might be, but I hope it is of some use. Finding that balance is somewhat difficult at first, but becomes second nature after a short time.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: s&r
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 06:01 AM

You can improve the stability by setting the spike at its minimum setting and resting the bottom of the instrument on a cushion. It stops the bass spinning. Just while you get going

Stu


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 03:03 PM

I have the back edge of the side leaning against my left-front and have found a sturdy balance position. I don't imagine I'll manage to get it turned so I'm more behind than beside because I will not want my right forearm banging against the front edge. I do not like damaged ulnar nerves at all.
I'm not sure the arm clamping thing was an entirely bad idea..it taught my right hand to stay where I wanted it instead of flapping around, and I outgrew needing the security of holding it that way fairly quickly.

Peg Adjustment
If I have the bass laying in front of me with the spike pointing toward my body, which way do I need to turn the wingnut thingy (it's not a wing but I can't think of the right word) to loosen it? Mine is very tight and I don't want to turn it wrong.
It's pretty short already but could go down a little bit more.

So far, I'm having a hard time coordinating my hands. Dancing will come when my partner isn't such a stranger to me.

Barbara,
Is there any place I should NOT feel my muscles getting a workout?
My fingers are in good shape (only managed about 1.5h yesterday) but the rest of me can tell I've been doing something unexpected. My neck doesn't hurt, but from there to my seat cushion I can tell that I'm glad my arm didn't have enough stamina to play longer.

Thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Barbara Shaw
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 04:17 PM

I stand more around to the side so I can sometimes look at the strings I'm playing. And I often hunch over the neck with my ear closer to the strings so I can get into the groove better or something, not planned but I often find myself there.

With the peg pointing to you, the thingy (I don't know what it's called either) should turn away from you. If the bass is on it's side with the peg pointing to your right and the neck pointing to your left, it would be RIGHTY TIGHTY and LEFTY LOOSEY.

An hour and a half is a long time for a beginner. Play for awhile until you start to get achey then rest for awhile then play again. My left hand is usually the first thing to feel the pain because I don't play enough to develop any strength in my left arm or hand. I have had it cramp up on me during a song when the key requires everything in closed position (pressing down on a string with the left hand). Those are the times when (in the key of E for e.g. I just hit the open E string rather than play E closed on the D string and pray for an A to come along!

I don't know about anything else hurting, although I do know bass players (mostly women) who have had left shoulder surgery. Rest and short, frequent practices will gradually develop the strength and stamina to go longer. This is all theory for me because I jump into a jam when we're desperate for a bass and play until it hurts, and then don't play bass for months! (If you want to know about guitar or fiddle pains, see me again...)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: Upright (bass)--yike!
From: Melissa
Date: 14 Nov 10 - 07:27 PM

My weasel-arm didn't allow more than 5-10 minutes at a time until around bednight when I didn't have any problem doing about 40m. I imagine I'll be doing short episodes for a while.
Taking care of an aggravatingly wimpy arm ought to keep my from overworking any other body part.

Now I won't be nervous about putting a little more strength to that screw thingy! I had myself horrified at the idea that I might tighten it enough to spin the wingy-part off and if I did that, I know I'd never admit it..which would mean it would never get shortened.

I bet I am going to get really tired of Soldier's Joy before long...


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 15 July 11:50 PM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.