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Origins: Lolly Toodum

DigiTrad:
LOLLY TOODUM


Yann - (ydebonne@earthlink.net) 12 Apr 97 - 01:42 AM
mim 12 Apr 97 - 02:55 AM
Murray 12 Apr 97 - 03:00 AM
mim 12 Apr 97 - 03:00 AM
Ralph Butts 12 Apr 97 - 09:16 AM
dick greenhaus 12 Apr 97 - 11:48 AM
rich r 12 Apr 97 - 06:53 PM
Yann (ydebonne@earthlink.net) 12 Apr 97 - 08:55 PM
GUEST,Sandra Parker 05 Dec 01 - 08:46 PM
GUEST,Johna 04 Apr 07 - 04:31 AM
Joe Offer 04 Apr 07 - 04:51 AM
Joe Offer 17 Jan 17 - 11:21 PM
Airymouse 18 Jan 17 - 09:42 AM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 18 Jan 17 - 06:12 PM
GUEST,Bob Coltman 18 Jan 17 - 06:20 PM
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Subject: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: Yann - (ydebonne@earthlink.net)
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 01:42 AM

Does anyone have the lyrics to a song I think is called, "Lolly Doo Dum." The only parts of the song I can remember was something like, "You'd better go wash them dishes and hush that flattering tongue, ahhhh, lolly doo dum, doo dum, lolly doo dum day...."

Thanks.


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Subject: Lyr Add: LOLLY-TOO-DUM
From: mim
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 02:55 AM

LOLLY-TOO-DUM

As I went out one morning to take the pleasant air,
Lolly-too-dum, too-dum, lolly-too-dum day.
As I went out one morning to take the pleasant air,
I overheard a mother a-scoldin' her daughter fair,
Lolly-too-dum, too-dum, lolly-too-dum day.

"You better go wash them dishes and hush that clattering tongue,
Lolly, etc.
I know you want to get married and that you are too young."
Lolly, etc.

"Oh, pity my condition as you would your own,
For seventeen long years I've been sleeping all alone."

"Yes, I'm seventeen and over, and that you will allow—
I must and I will get married for I'm in the notion now."

"Supposin' I was willin', where would you get your man?"
"Why, Lordy mercy, Mammy, I'd marry handsome Sam."

"Supposin' he should slight you like you done him before?"
Why, Lordy mercy, Mammy, I could marry forty more."

"There's peddlers and there's tinkers and boys from the plow.
Oh Lordy mercy, Mammy, I'm gettin' that feeling now!"

"Now my daughter's married and well fer to do,
Gather 'round young fellers, I'm on the market, too."

"Lordy mercy, Mammy, and who would marry you?
Ain't no man alive wants a wife as old as you."

There's doctors and there's lawyers and men of high degree,
And some of them will marry and one will marry me."

"Now we both are married and well fer to be.
Ha ha ha, you pretty young girls, that feeling's off of me."



I found these words in the "Folksinger's Wordbook", published in 1973. Compiled and edited by Irwin and Fred Silber. Page 344


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Subject: ADD Version: LOLLY TOO DUM
From: Murray
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 03:00 AM

It may be a Canadian song, and was recorded by Ed McCurdy many years ago now. Something like this:

LOLLY TOO DUM

As I went out one morning, to take the pleasant air,
Lolly too dum, too dum, lolly too dum day.
As I went out one morning to take the pleasant air,
I overheard a mother a-scolding her daughter fair,
Lolly too dum, too dum, lolly too dum day.

[Similarly:]

You'd better go wash them dishes, and hush that flatterin' tongue,
I know you want to get married, and that you are too young.

Oh pity my condition, just like you would your own,
For seventeen long years I've been sleeping all alone.

Supposing I were willing, where would you get your man?
O lawks-a-mercy mammy, I'd marry that handsome Sam.

Supposing he should slight you, like you done him before?
Oh lawks-a-mercy mammy, I could marry forty more.

There's doctors and there's lawyers, and folks of high degree,
Some of them will marry, and one will marry me.

There's peddlers and there's tinkers, and them that follow the plough,
Oh lawks-a-mercy mammy, the fit's upon me now.

So now my daughter's married, and well for to do,
Gather round, young fellas, I'm on the market too!


-- There may be another stanza missing.
--On second thought, this sounds more like a mountain song from Kentucky or so.
Murray Shoolbraid.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: mim
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 03:00 AM

Don't know how my source note ended up in the middle of the lyrics. It should have been at the end. Don't try singing it.


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: Ralph Butts
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 09:16 AM

From Burl Ives' "Sing Along Songbook" c1963 Franklin Watts, Inc. (companion to 6-record album). Listed there as "Lolly Tu Dum".

"The dialogue tradition of singing which had come over from the British Isles persisted in songs that originated in the Hills or on the Frontier. Early marriages were of necessity the rule for young pioneer girls, partly because of the lack of women and partly because of the difficulty of the life they were forced to lead. Not unlike "Billy Boy" in content, with a distinctively humerous American quality, this song is from Harlan County, the famous Kentucky region where Cecil Sharpe found so many variants of British folk songs."

In "Folk Song: U.S.A., The 111 Best American Ballads", c1947 by John A. and Alan Lomax, it is "Lolly-Too-Dum". They have a similar writeup, adding a lot of comments on the times, not directly related to the song.

In both cases, the same 8 verses are printed, with the expected slight variations.

.......Tiger


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: dick greenhaus
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 11:48 AM

At the risk of sounding monotonous, it's in the database. It's risky searching for exact matches of nonsense syllables--[Lolly Doo Dum], f'rinstance, won't find [Lolly Toodum]. On t'other hand, a search for Lolly or Loll* will turn up what you're looking for. As will married, or [too young].


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: rich r
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 06:53 PM

One must not forget that the Smothers Brothers used that same non-sensory "lolly" line in their classic rendition of " (I Fell Into A Vat Of) Chocolate"

rich r


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Subject: RE: Lyrics? Lolly doo dum
From: Yann (ydebonne@earthlink.net)
Date: 12 Apr 97 - 08:55 PM

I can't believe it! Thank you all very much! Much appreciated!

Cheers!

y


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Subject: Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day
From: GUEST,Sandra Parker
Date: 05 Dec 01 - 08:46 PM

I remember a verse or two and the chorus of this song. Does anyone know the rest of it? Thanks!

As I went out one morning to take the morning air,
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.
As I went out one morning to take the morning air
I heard a mother talkin' to her daughter fair.
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.

You better go wash them dishes and hush your chattering tongue
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.
You better go wash them dishes and hush your chattering tongue
I know you want to get married, but that you are too young.
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.


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Subject: RE: Lyr Req: Lolly Toodum
From: GUEST,Johna
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 04:31 AM

As I went out one evening to take the pleasant air...I over heard a mother a scoldin her daughter fair


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Subject: Origins: Lolly Toodum
From: Joe Offer
Date: 04 Apr 07 - 04:51 AM

It might be worth taking a look into this song and its variants. Here's quite an entry in the Traditional Ballad Index:

Lolly-Too-Dum

DESCRIPTION: Daughter comes to mother, asking to be married. Mother, after pointing out she's young, asks who she will marry. Daughter says, "Handsome Dan" -- or any of forty more if he's not available. (The daughter marries, and mother looks for a husband herself)
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1910 (Belden)
KEYWORDS: marriage loneliness courting mother
FOUND IN: US(Ap,So)
REFERENCES (13 citations):
Belden, p. 266, "Mother and Daughter" (1 text)
Randolph 370, "Rolly Trudum" (2 texts plus an excerpt, 1 tune)
Randolph/Cohen, pp. 299-300, "Rolly Trudum" (1 text, 1 tune -- Randolph's 370A)
Hudson 134, pp.280-281 , "Rolly Trudam" (1 text)
Moore-Southwest 189, "Lolly Trudom" (1 text, 1 tune)
Owens-1ed, pp. 214-216, "Rolly Troodum" (1 text, 1 tune)
Owens-2ed, pp. 122-123, "Rolly Troodum" (1 text, 1 tune)
Boswell/Wolfe 83, pp. 133-134, "Handsome Sam" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-FSUSA 12, "Lolly-Too-Dum" (1 text, 1 tune)
Lomax-Singing, pp. 126-127, "Lolly Too-Dum" (1 text, 1 tune)
Chase, pp. 138-139, "Lolly Too Dum" (2 texts, 1 tune, but the first is "Whistle, Daughter, Whistle")
Silber-FSWB, p. 344, "Lolly-Too-Dum" (1 text)
DT, LLYTOODM*

Roud #441
RECORDINGS:
Horton Barker, "Rolly Trudum" (on Barker01)
May Kennedy McCord, "Rolly Trudum" (AFS; on LC12)
Pete Seeger, "Lolly Too Dum" (on PeteSeeger32)

CROSS-REFERENCES:
cf. "I Must And Will Get Married (The Fit)" (theme)
NOTES: This song is named for its chorus, "Lolly-too-dum, lolly-too-dum-day." Thematically, it is identical to "I Must And Will Get Married (The Fit)," but the stanza form is different enough that I have separated them. (Roud, of course, lumps them.) - RBW
Last updated in version 3.5
File: LxU012

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Song List

Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Ballad Index Bibliography or Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2016 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


Here are the Digital Tradition lyrics. I wish I knew where this version came from. It says "recorded by Ives," but the lyrics on the Ives recording are slightly different.

LOLLY TOODUM

As I went out one evening to take the pleasant air
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.
As I went out one evening to take the pleasant air
I overheard a mother a-scoldin' her daughter fair
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.

Oh, go and wash them dishes, and hush your flatterin' tongue
I know you want to get married, and you know that you're too young.

Oh, pity my condition, just as you would your own
For fourteen long years I've been sleepin' all alone.

S'posin' I should let you, where would you get your man?
Why Laws a'mercy, Mammy, I'd marry that handsome Dan.

S'posin' he should slight you, like you done him before?
Why Laws a'mercy, Mammy, I could marry forty more!

There's tinkers and tailors, and boys from the plow,
Why Laws a'mercy, Mammy, I'm a-gettin' that feelin' now.

And now my daughter's married, and well for to do
It's gather 'round me, fellers, I'm on the market, too.

Recorded by Ives
@question @marriage @family
filename[ LLYTOODM
TUNE FILE: LLYTOODM
CLICK TO PLAY
RG


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Subject: ADD Version: Lolly Toodum (Burl Ives)
From: Joe Offer
Date: 17 Jan 17 - 11:21 PM

OK, so here's the Ives version, from the Golden Years of the Wayfaring Stranger box set.

LOLLY TOODUM

As I went out one morning to take the pleasant air
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.
As I went out one morning to take the pleasant air
I overheard a mother a-scoldin' her daughter fair
Lolly toodum, toodum, lolly toodum day.

You better go wash them dishes, and hush that flatterin' tongue
For you know you that want to get married, that you are too young.

Oh, pity my condition, just like you would your own
For fourteen long years I've been livin' all alone.

S'posin' I were willin', where would you get your man?
Lordy mercy, Mammy, I'd marry that handsome Sam.

S'posin' he should spite you, like you done him before?
Lordy mercy, Mammy, I could marry forty more!

There's peddlers and there's tinkers, and boys from the plow,
Lordy mercy, Mammy, I'm a-gettin' that feelin' now.

And now my daughter's married, and well for to do
Gather 'round, young fellers, I'm on the market, too.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lolly Toodum
From: Airymouse
Date: 18 Jan 17 - 09:42 AM

When I was a good deal younger, my wife and I visited Richard Chase in Banner Elk NC. Richard told us that he had changed "hush your chattering tongue" to "hush your flattering tongue," because "chattering tongue" didn't make any sense. But you can find "hush your chattering tongue" in THe Taming of the Shrew. Also the verse
There's pedlars and tinkers and boys behind the plow
Lolly True dum true dum, Lolly True dum day
There's pedlars and tinkers and boys behind the plow
Lordy mercy mammy, THE FIT COMES ON ME NOW
Richard told us that THE FIT COMES ON ME NOW was the name of a dance tune.
I suspect that the verse



Oh, pity my condition, just like you would your own
For fourteen long years I've slept in bed alone.

was too rough for some and got Bowdlerized.


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lolly Toodum
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 18 Jan 17 - 06:12 PM

The big news first. We appear to have an early 19th century precursor to this song, and it's called "Polly Holman's Wedding."

H. M. Belden, Ballads and Songs Collected by the Missouri Folk-lore Society (1940, 1955) p 266, says, "The oldest record of it in this country that I have noted is that found in [Washington] Irving's MS notes made, presumably, during his southwestern tour in 1832 and published by Leisy and Williams in Southwest Review XIX under the title 'Polly Holman's Wedding.'"

"Polly Holman's Wedding" as noted by Irving is at JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/43462119?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

I haven't a JSTOR account, but anyone who does would do a service by finding ways to get a copy up on this thread. It will be good to see just how close the versions three-quarters of a century apart turn out to be. Happy hunting!

Lacking a view of it, it appears we do have an 1837 source for "Lolly/Rolly-Tru-Dum."

Meanwhile, the earliest commercial recording of the song, adding to the field recordings listed in the Traditional Ballad Index, is by Uncle Dave Macon (1938), whose "My Daughter Wished to Marry" (Rolly Trudum) is a different version of the same song—note its title is the same as those recorded by Horton Barker and May Kennedy McCord, whoever learned from whom. It's one of a class of mother-daughter dialog songs, like "Whistle, Daughter, Whistle (Mother I Would Marry)."

It can be traced back well before Belden in 1910. Note, if searching, that Gus Meade's comprehensive "Country Music Sources" lists it under Polly-Tru-Dum-Day; the P may be a misprint for R, since it cites Macon's 1938 recording "My Daughter Wished to Marry."   

Belden (1910) cites the song (apparently not knowing what else to call it) as "Mother and Daughter":

As I went out one morning to get the morning air,
I saw a mother talking to her daughter fair.
Lol-i-trudum-trudam-i-dey

Oh hush up, my daughter, and hold your civil tongue,
You talk of getting married, you know you are too young,
Supposing I were willing, where'd you get your man?
Law, law, ma'am, I can get my handsome Sam.
Lol-i-trudum-trudam-i-dey

Supposing he was to slight you, as he has done before?
Law, law, ma'am, I, I can get a many more.
There's tinkers, and tailors, and boys that hold the plow.
They all want to marry, and why not marry now?
Lol-i-trudum-trudam-i-dey

In other words, a shorter, but similar version to Burl Ives's, which due to Ives' influence became the folk standard from about the 1950s onward.

Bob


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Subject: RE: Origins: Lolly Toodum
From: GUEST,Bob Coltman
Date: 18 Jan 17 - 06:20 PM

Looking again at the Belden and JSTOR material so far as I can see the latter, I believe I erred in drawing the conclusion that "Polly Holman's Wedding" was the name of the 1837 song.

Far from it, the name of Irving's article is "Polly Holman's Wedding," but as I can see only the first page of it, what the song may be called is more than I can guess.

JSTOR members, anyone? Can you help resolve what the 1837 song text and title are?

Bob


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