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Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?

Mr Happy 25 Nov 10 - 09:23 AM
John MacKenzie 25 Nov 10 - 09:29 AM
Mr Happy 25 Nov 10 - 09:40 AM
MGM·Lion 25 Nov 10 - 11:46 AM
acegardener 25 Nov 10 - 12:30 PM
Newport Boy 25 Nov 10 - 12:42 PM
GUEST 25 Nov 10 - 06:12 PM
MGM·Lion 26 Nov 10 - 03:26 AM
Darowyn 26 Nov 10 - 03:49 AM
Will Fly 26 Nov 10 - 03:54 AM
Mo the caller 26 Nov 10 - 04:35 AM
MGM·Lion 26 Nov 10 - 04:48 AM
Newport Boy 26 Nov 10 - 05:37 AM
autoharpbob 26 Nov 10 - 09:41 AM
BobKnight 26 Nov 10 - 10:34 AM
GUEST,Eliza 27 Nov 10 - 06:49 AM
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Subject: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Mr Happy
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 09:23 AM

In Britain [& I guess other places too] there's many words & expressions in commonplace use which don't appear in most dictionaries,

These terms aren't neccessarily slang, but perhaps more to do with area or dialect.

As well as being present in everyday speech in many places, this language also appears in folk [type] songs.


One which springs to mind is such as 'Whisht lads, ard ye gobs' [Lambton Worm] 'gob' meaning 'mouth'

More?


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: John MacKenzie
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 09:29 AM

Geggie = mouth in Glasgow slang


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Mr Happy
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 09:40 AM

Ah! I omitted to provide meanings for the overseas contingent as to how the given examples translate.

Gob = mouth

Lug'ole = ear

Lugs = ears

Conk = nose, or sometimes head


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 11:46 AM

These will in fact be found in any good dictionary, possibly rubricated as 'slang'. An interesting topic nonetheless.

One which I learnt from my late first wife, from her native Forest of Dean [Gloucestershire on Welsh border], and which I have not found in any dictionary, was "WEAKERS". When she asked a younger Forester if she knew where her weakers were , my wife got the answer, "Course I do: each side me yud" - i.e "each side of my head".

So there are two more for you, from the Forest of Dean:~~

weakers = ears

yud = head

~~ tho I think it should be noted that the first, 'weakers', is a dialect word in its own right, the other, 'yud', merely a somewhat eccentric dialect pronunciaiton of the standard word it represents in the local parlare: an important distinction, I think.

♥♫❤Michael❤♫♥


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: acegardener
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 12:30 PM

fizzog = face

snotterbox = nose


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Newport Boy
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 12:42 PM

tho I think it should be noted that the first, 'weakers', is a dialect word in its own right, the other, 'yud', merely a somewhat eccentric dialect pronunciaiton of the standard word it represents in the local parlare: an important distinction, I think.

A very important distinction, MtheGM. I was working at the Saracen's Head, Symonds Yat - at the edge of the Forest - in the late '50s. Two lads from just outside Coleford used to arrive most evenings on an old BSA. Their dialect pronounciation was certainly eccentric - I could understand about half a sentence.

And I'm born and brought up just 30 miles away!

snitch = nose

bonce = head

Phil


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: GUEST
Date: 25 Nov 10 - 06:12 PM

"nesh" = over-sensitive to cold, damp weather.
Understanding of this word is said to be a distinguishing feature between Northeners and Southrons.
Discuss!


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 03:26 AM

GUEST ~~ 'nesh' was one of my wife's Forest of Dean words ~~ that is West, rather than North or South. However, her word had no particular application to climatic conditions, but rather meant over-sensitive or physically fastidious to conditions generally: e.g. "So what if the sheet isn't perfectly tucked in? Just go to sleep and don't be so nesh." {Not, I hasten to add, an actual quotation I recall; just an example that occurred to me.}

~M~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Darowyn
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 03:49 AM

Our previous house had a catflap in the back door. (We had cats then).
One afternoon my wife, who was born and brought up in the Potteries, called to me in panic, "Dave! Come in here, there's a strug trying to get in through the catflap!"
As I ran into the kitchen I was going through my occult laws, silver bullets for werewolves, garlic for vampires, rowan for witches,... but no information at all about strugs and the threats they might pose.
The 'dreaded strug' at the door was an unfamiliar cat- probably a stray.
So here's another word:- In Staffordshire,
STRUG=stray
Cheers
Dave


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Will Fly
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 03:54 AM

"wazzum: a worm.

"lakin'": going it, as in, "By, we were lakin' last neet".

"gradely": very good, excellent, as in "Eh, we had a reet gradely do".

"brew": hill - from "brow"

"nesh": cold.

All from my Lancashire childhood.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Mo the caller
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 04:35 AM

Guest said ""nesh" = over-sensitive to cold, damp weather.
Understanding of this word is said to be a distinguishing feature between Northeners and Southrons.
Discuss! "

As a Londoner I first met the word in Stoke on Trent, which I wouldn't exactly call the north (though it was as far up as I'd been at the time)

At school we were told to change into our 'plimsoles' or 'gym shoes', on Teesside it was 'sand shoes' and I've heard them called 'pumps', but everyone wears trainers now so those words will die out.


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 04:48 AM

The old gym-shoes could also be called "daps" ~~ not sure where that fits regionally.

~M~


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: Newport Boy
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 05:37 AM

'Daps' - more correctly 'dappers' - was the word used in South Wales.

One that caught Anne out when we moved to Bristol - in the greengrocers she asked for 'gibbons' (soft G). They looked blank - and we'd never heard of 'spring onions'.

Phil


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: autoharpbob
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 09:41 AM

"tabs" for ears really threw me as a young teacher in Nottingham. Along with pikelets (crumpets).


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: BobKnight
Date: 26 Nov 10 - 10:34 AM

Aye, and you haven't even reached Scotland yet!!! :)


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Subject: RE: Folklore: Gob, Lugole, Conk?
From: GUEST,Eliza
Date: 27 Nov 10 - 06:49 AM

Norfolk has some interesting ones:-

mardle = to chat, have a bit of a natter
sorft = a bit daft or silly
mawther = a woman
dickie = donkey, as in "Ha yer father got a dickie?" , to which the reply is "Yis, an' he want a fule ter roid 'im. Will yew come?"

I particularly like bishiebarnaby for ladybird, and dodderman for snail.
I bet all these dialect words throughout the UK go back centuries, from original languages, eg Anglo Saxon, Norse, Gaelic etc. Isn't it fascinating?


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