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Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner

RTim 29 Nov 10 - 12:09 PM
GUEST,punkfolkrocker 29 Nov 10 - 12:37 PM
Leadfingers 29 Nov 10 - 12:45 PM
Crowhugger 29 Nov 10 - 01:27 PM
RTim 29 Nov 10 - 01:58 PM
Jack Campin 29 Nov 10 - 02:05 PM
JohnInKansas 29 Nov 10 - 02:35 PM
RTim 29 Nov 10 - 02:45 PM
JohnInKansas 29 Nov 10 - 04:41 PM
Tootler 29 Nov 10 - 05:00 PM
GUEST, Gurney 29 Nov 10 - 05:57 PM
GUEST,Pitch Pipe 10 Apr 11 - 11:02 PM
The Fooles Troupe 10 Apr 11 - 11:50 PM
Noreen 11 Apr 11 - 03:23 PM
Don Firth 11 Apr 11 - 03:51 PM
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Subject: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: RTim
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 12:09 PM

Hi all,

I am looking for a small electronic Tuner that I can sing into to decide what is the best Key or Stating note to sing in.
PLUS, I want to be able to use the SAME machine to play that Key/Note when I wish to actually sing the song.
I sing unaccompanied and only have basic "music" skills, and I live in the USA.

Can any of you suggest a good (and not too expensive) machine?

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: GUEST,punkfolkrocker
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 12:37 PM

I've been using a Seiko tuner for more than 15 years, very reliable and acurate.
If I needed to buy a replacement I'd check out the SAT-800
which is the same price I paid all those years ago..
and may well suit your requirements.


The latest range should be available in USA at good prices;
definitely from ebay sellers.

http://electronics.seiko.co.uk/index.php/metronomesandtuners/tuners.html


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Leadfingers
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 12:45 PM

A C whistle would do the job , Not need Batteries and be a LOT cheaper


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Crowhugger
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 01:27 PM

It may prove to be a challenge to find both functions in something small and not too expensive.

The chromatic tuner made by Korg is very good quality (responsive, accurate, small & lightweight) and widely available here in southern Ontario for about $20 CAD. Most of us who've gone to buy them had store clerks trying to sell us the guitar tuner instead. Warning: There's a BIG problem with the pitch generator included in that chromatic tuner Korg model CA-1: It doesn't allow one to select a pitch and play it. Push the button once and it plays the lowest note (middle C, a.k.a. C4), each successive push plays the next higher semitone until you get to B4, then it goes back to C4. Quite useless as a pitch pipe anywhere I've been! But the tuner function is why we bought them and we're very happy with that aspect.

If I'm singing freely and want to find out what key I'm in, I blow this and that on my little round reed pitch pipe until I find the note that matches doh best. These retail for around $30 CAD, over priced IMO but it's the going rate in eastern Greater Toronto Area. I have the tuner specifically to assist some people when I teach ear training or vocal production skills, and simply don't use its goofy pitch function.

The small electronic pitch pipes that my chorus bought many years ago haven't been available for at least 3 years; we've been looking for something to replace them during that time. There is a much-larger one (at $59-ish USD it's not what I'd call inexpensive), which includes a metronome (Intelli Digital Metronome, model DM-8LT). The unaccompanied singers I know of nearly all happily use the reed pitch pipes in solo or small group situations but they (meaning the pitch pipes, not the singers) aren't loud enough to be heard well in a large choral situation, and there are issues in precisely matching the pitch among several blowers at once.

A chorus member hunted for replacements of the small electronic pitch pipe (a couple of them went missing over many years), but we ran out of time and and so bought larger ones. They are too big to fit properly in a normal pant or shirt pocket; a men's suit jacket pocket can hold it but the weight & bulk don't look very tidy.

I'm curious about why it is important to you that the two functions be combined in one gizmo. I'm imagining you'd use the tuner at home during practice to work out what key you're in, then use the pitch pipe in performance to put yourself in the chosen key.

In any case I'm looking forward to someone posting the information you request! Best of luck in your search.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: RTim
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 01:58 PM

Hi Crowhugger - who said:
- >I'm curious about why it is important to you that the two functions be combined in one gizmo. I'm imagining you'd use the tuner at home during practice to work out what key you're in, then use the pitch pipe in performance to put yourself in the chosen key.

Yep - that's why, and I want something that is mine and I know where it is.
My musician wife has two larger beasts, one to find a note, the other to play it, that I can use at home, BUT I want mine that I can keep in my pocket!!

Tim


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Jack Campin
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 02:05 PM

Why not a reed one - either a reed guitar/violin pitch pipe, a chromatic 12-pitch wheel like a lot of singers use, or a harmonica (popular with choir directors)?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 02:35 PM

Why do you need a "pitch pipe." Any cheap harmonica can blow an octave or so of reasonably close notes.

Get the approximate note you want locked in your head and then swipe up or down the scale to get close, and suck/blow around the closest one to zero in. If you need to, tape a hole-number to note chart onto the top of the harmonica. A cheap one should be around $10 or $15 (US) or double that for a pretty one.

A diatonic one might not have all the notes, but you should be able to "sing it down" (for some reason easier for most people than bending up) a semi-tone once you've found the closest one on the harmonica. A chromatic harmonica could be an option, but they're generally a lot more expensive - and harder to find.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: RTim
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 02:45 PM

I would point out that I have been singing for over 40 years without the said instrument.
I do own a Pitch Pipe (one of those Circular ones) but it is not very good!!

I was just wondering with the pace of todays technology if I was missing something that might have been created, that I (ME, Myself, Alone, no one else) would find useful.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 04:41 PM

If you're interested in going "electronic" it might be worth looking at what the music shops call an electronic "metronome." There are inexpensive ones available, and several of the ones that I've seen can produce a steady "tone of your choice" as an accesory output.

Tuners - that hear a tone and tell you what it is - sometimes include this capability, but the ones I'e seen that give you the selectable tone output run a little above the basic tuner level in price, and you might find a metronome with the tone output feature that's a little cheaper than the more sophistcated tuners.

Unless you can decide on a fairly specific item that you want, your choices may depend more on what's available in your local market than on what exists elsewhere, so a visit to a good local music store might be the quickest way to find something that's at least "generically suitable." Shops that specialize in "band and orchestra" instruments in my area have a broader selection of kinds of stuff than the "rock shops" that mostly sell guitars and drums; but that may be different where you are. Once you narrow your target a web search for other things similar to what you think you've found (and for best prices) would be a good idea, but a "hands on" see-something-like-it-first is usually my preference when possible.

John


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Tootler
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 05:00 PM

To give yourself a note a plastic descant recorder will do the job. They are fully chromatic so no worries about not having the note you need.

I use a Korg electronic tuner to find what note I am singing in, but any decent chromatic tuner will do the job. You do not need a super expensive model.

Someone I know has recorded a set of pitches on his mobile phone.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: GUEST, Gurney
Date: 29 Nov 10 - 05:57 PM

I just had a try with an old guitar tuner, a QUiKTUNE, and found that that works for voice too. But you do have to hold a note.
It is one of the old-fashioned electronic ones that you put on your knee to tune the guitar, with a gauge for the note, and it also will play the note. Just the standard guitar open notes, of course, E-A-D-G-B-E.
It cost about US$12 when I bought it 10 years ago. You might find one on EBay.
There are other tuners that do the full scale. They are more expensive, but possibly nearer to RTim's requirements. You can also get free guitar tuner programs for the computer.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: GUEST,Pitch Pipe
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 11:02 PM

I guess this thread comes closest to what I'm looking for.

I found an old pitch pipe. Looks like a lipstick tube, about 2" long. A silver case, and inside is the pipe. It has several sleeves of brass inside and you turn the middle of the tube to create openings, air vents. Blow into the end to get a harmonica-like sound. An arrow on the side of the turning sleeve points to C, Cis, D, Dis and so on. Writing stamped on the sides says "Dur," "Moll," "A-440," and "Germany." In great shape, sounds good.

Does anyone know what this kind of pitch pipe is called? Any history on it?

Thanks.

Also, how do I find out which handles are being used by members here? Is SongWronger being used?


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 10 Apr 11 - 11:50 PM

Try to register with it - if it's used it will tell you.


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Noreen
Date: 11 Apr 11 - 03:23 PM

There is nobody using that name here- it's yours if you want it :)

Welcome!


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Subject: RE: Tech: Pitch Pipe/Tuner
From: Don Firth
Date: 11 Apr 11 - 03:51 PM

I have an Intellitouch electronic tuner that clamps to the headstock of my guitar that I keep in my gig back, but it makes no sound, it just shows you the pitch of the string you happen to be playing at the time—and how far off it is so you can make the necessary adjustments.

But if I need to find a pitch for singing whenever the guitar isn't around, I carry one of THESE with me. It's about 2½" in diameter and it's chromatic (all twelve notes). They've been standard equipment pitch pipe for singers and choir directors since Hector was a pup. Simple, accurate, straightforward. No batteries required. And if you keep it in the little red plastic box, it won't pick up any pocket fuzz.

I tried one of the Farley's "Pocket Tones" because it's small, handy-looking, and electronic. But it rolled over and died within two weeks. According to some of the reviews on Amazon, the same thing happened to a lot of people. Caveat emptor.

Don Firth


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