Lyrics & Knowledge Personal Pages Record Shop Auction Links Radio & Media Kids Membership Help
The Mudcat Cafemuddy

Post to this Thread - Sort Descending - Printer Friendly - Home


The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)

Desert Dancer 04 Dec 10 - 08:25 PM
open mike 04 Dec 10 - 08:35 PM
katlaughing 04 Dec 10 - 08:50 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 04 Dec 10 - 09:22 PM
katlaughing 04 Dec 10 - 10:35 PM
MGM·Lion 05 Dec 10 - 01:05 AM
open mike 05 Dec 10 - 03:22 AM
Martha Burns 05 Dec 10 - 10:06 PM
open mike 06 Dec 10 - 12:51 AM
GUEST,Alan Whittle 06 Dec 10 - 04:49 AM
Share Thread
more
Lyrics & Knowledge Search [Advanced]
DT  Forum
Sort (Forum) by:relevance date
DT Lyrics:





Subject: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 04 Dec 10 - 08:25 PM

Being aired Sunday, but online (without story audio yet) today, including several videos: Who Were The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs'?

A nice long story, by Hal Cannon. Emphasizes the mixture of white, African-American, and Mexican cultures among the cowboys, and their effect on the songs. The main interviewee is Mike Searles, a professor of history at Augusta State University in Georgia.

The videos are of Don Edwards of Meridian, Texas, singing 'Streets of Laredo', 'Tom Sherman's Barroom' (apparently a bluesy varient of 'Streets'), and 'Cotton-Eye Joe'. (Looks like these may not be available until tomorrow, too.)

~ Becky in Long Beach


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: open mike
Date: 04 Dec 10 - 08:35 PM

Many of these similar songs and stories are available online at the
Western Folklife Center -- the organization that hosts the annual national cowboy gathering in elko nevada...Don Edwards plays there
almost every year...and there are videos on line at www.westernfolklife.org. Hal Cannon is involved with producing the
cowboy gathering there. Each year there is a cultural exchange featuring cowboys and cattle herders from other countries and cultures.
France, Mexico, Mongolia, Argentina and other countries have been represented. Last year we had cowboys from florida and Georgia who
shared their culture at the gathering. We learned that there have been
cattle in florida since 1493. This year I believe Hungarian cowboys will be participating in this cultural exchange. (the Elko Gathering is in late jan. / early feb.)


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: katlaughing
Date: 04 Dec 10 - 08:50 PM

Great stuff, both of you, thanks!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 04 Dec 10 - 09:22 PM

Be good to hear Don Edwards sing. The commentary, however, from the advance is at least in part a 'so-and-so-said' text.
The NPR 'Spotlight' quotes from Lomax, and includes 'hearsay', but there is bound to be much of that whenever cowboy songs are discussed. Some of the stories may even have been invented by the cowboys themselves. The era of the cattle drives and the free range cowboy was over by the time anyone got interested in the songs and started to collect them and look into their origins.

"Good-By, Old Paint" is a good example. Several stories, take your pick.
John A. Lomax changed stories more than once. The one he put in print came out in Lomax and Lomax, American Ballads & Folk Songs, 1934.

"Boothe Merrill, a friend of old college days, gave me this song in 1910, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, where we were attending the great Frontier Days Celebration. ........... Boothe sang "Old Paint," which he said was popular at times in western Oklahoma. For the last dance all other music is stopped, and the revelers, as they dance to a slow waltz time, sing "Good-by, Old Paint."

Several people, both black and white, have either claimed authorship or said that they knew 'who dunnit', but there is no proof for any of the claims.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: katlaughing
Date: 04 Dec 10 - 10:35 PM

That's the one thing I really regret, hearsay or not, I didn't ask my dad enough about where he got his tunes and songs. I know he got a lot of them from the old man who taught him fiddle and made one of the ones we have. The son of that old fiddlemaker, my dad's age and old when I met him, told me some of the stuff we know in our family is specific to western Colorado...just slight variations, etc. Of course, he got a lot off the old 78s he grew up listening to, also.

kat


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 05 Dec 10 - 01:05 AM

==='Tom Sherman's Barroom' (apparently a bluesy varient of 'Streets')===

I remember the late great Hedy West used to sing this one also, as "Lee Tharin's Barroom"

~M~


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: open mike
Date: 05 Dec 10 - 03:22 AM

another show that is on tomorrow is
american routes...Nick Spitzer, the host of this show was in Elko
last year, and some collaboration must have occurred.

http://americanroutes.publicradio.org/archives/show/666/from-home-page

maybe both of those shows are airing just a month or so before the
Elko Nevada gathering as a way to promote the upcoming event at the Western Folklife center in january..


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: Martha Burns
Date: 05 Dec 10 - 10:06 PM

Ask me, Hal Cannon has done an amazing job. What most impresses me is that he reveals history through music without the historian's typical reliance on song TEXTS. He shows the diversity of the old west by letting us hear it in the songs as they're sung. He makes an absolutely persuasive argument and bases it on sound, rather than on disembodied language.
A bravura performance!


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: open mike
Date: 06 Dec 10 - 12:51 AM

yes! Hal Canon and the folks at the western folklife center are also engaged in the other NPR project...
http://www.npr.org/series/9904205/what-s-in-a-song   
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=102168188


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate

Subject: RE: The Cowboys Behind 'Cowboy Songs' (NPR)
From: GUEST,Alan Whittle
Date: 06 Dec 10 - 04:49 AM

When i saw 'the cowboys behind' - I thought we were in Brokeback Mountain country.

Are there any songs about being a gay cowboy? People used to sing that song The Lavender Cowboy - years ago - but that was mocking.

you'd have thought there was plenty of male bonding out there on the range.


Post - Top - Home - Printer Friendly - Translate
  Share Thread:
More...

Reply to Thread
Subject:  Help
From:
Preview   Automatic Linebreaks   Make a link ("blue clicky")


Mudcat time: 16 July 11:13 AM EDT

[ Home ]

All original material is copyright © 1998 by the Mudcat Café Music Foundation, Inc. All photos, music, images, etc. are copyright © by their rightful owners. Every effort is taken to attribute appropriate copyright to images, content, music, etc. We are not a copyright resource.