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The old man who ravaged Anna

John Foxen 15 Jan 11 - 07:52 AM
maeve 15 Jan 11 - 08:09 AM
Jack Campin 15 Jan 11 - 08:13 AM
maeve 15 Jan 11 - 08:22 AM
maeve 15 Jan 11 - 08:23 AM
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Subject: The old man who ravaged Anna
From: John Foxen
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 07:52 AM

I've been listening to an album by Iain Machlachlan (Island Heritage) which includes the tune BODACHAN A MHILL ANNA - the old man who ravaged Anna. It's a very intriguing title. Can anyone provide any information/ English lyrics for it?


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Subject: RE: The old man who ravaged Anna
From: maeve
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 08:09 AM

Some information can be found here: "Bodachan a mhill Anna"

"There are several sets of Gaelic words to the tune, one from Scotland which begins "Bodachan a mhill Anna" (which can be found in Margaret Fay Shaw's South Uist collection) and another found in both Scotland and Cape Breton which commences "Bodachan a'Mhirein." A third set is from the Isle of Lewis and goes:
***
Domhnull beag an t-siúcair, an t-siúcair, an t-siúcair
Domhnull beag an t-siúcair, is dúil aige pósadh
Cha ghabh a' chlann-nighean e, chlann-nighean e, chlann-nighean e
Cha ghabh a' chlann-nighean e, bho nach 'eil e boidheach"
***************************


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Subject: RE: The old man who ravaged Anna
From: Jack Campin
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 08:13 AM

Is that the one that goes to the tune of The High Road to Linton?


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Subject: RE: The old man who ravaged Anna
From: maeve
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 08:22 AM

Perhaps someone here has Margaret Fay Shaw's "South Uist Collection" and will look it up for you; I don't know whether her collection includes English translations.


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Subject: RE: The old man who ravaged Anna
From: maeve
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 08:23 AM

Yes, I think so, Jack. From the same source I linked above:

"The melody is known as a (Scottish) Lowlands tune, despite the fact that Gaelic words are sometimes sung to it (see below). The title appears in Henry Robson's list of popular Northumbrian song and dance tunes ("The Northern Minstrel's Budget"), which he published c. 1800. English titles include "Jenny's Gone to Linton," and, in Norfolk, "The High Road to Lynn." Neil (1991) notes there are several versions of the tune extent. Perlman (1996) remarks that the 'A' and 'B' parts appear in older Scottish publications, but that the 'C' and 'D' parts are from modern Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, playing. The 'C' and 'D' parts were composed (copyright 1957) by the late Scottish dance bandleader and piano accordion player Bobby MacLeod of Tobermory. In fact, MacLeod wrote four parts to follow the original two, although only his 'C' and 'F' parts were absorbed into tradition."


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