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Urban Folk Music of the 1960s

NY Pinewoods 15 Jan 11 - 07:21 PM
NY Pinewoods 02 Mar 11 - 09:40 AM
Charley Noble 02 Mar 11 - 09:57 AM
Suffet 02 Mar 11 - 05:01 PM
banj 02 Mar 11 - 05:14 PM
NY Pinewoods 02 Mar 11 - 07:40 PM
GUEST 07 Mar 11 - 12:52 PM
NY Pinewoods 24 Mar 11 - 12:57 PM
NY Pinewoods 11 May 11 - 09:20 AM
Suffet 19 May 11 - 09:15 PM
GUEST,Anne Price 09 Jun 11 - 05:41 PM
Art Thieme 09 Jun 11 - 08:10 PM
Suffet 09 Jun 11 - 10:26 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 10 Jun 11 - 08:18 AM
Suffet 10 Jun 11 - 02:03 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 10 Jun 11 - 02:13 PM
Suffet 10 Jun 11 - 10:00 PM
GUEST 10 Jun 11 - 10:32 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 10 Jun 11 - 10:58 PM
Suffet 11 Jun 11 - 10:44 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 11 Jun 11 - 11:26 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 11 Jun 11 - 04:39 PM
Suffet 12 Jun 11 - 08:28 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 12 Jun 11 - 04:03 PM
Mark Ross 12 Jun 11 - 10:02 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 12 Jun 11 - 10:15 PM
Mark Ross 12 Jun 11 - 10:26 PM
Jerry Rasmussen 13 Jun 11 - 08:09 AM
NY Pinewoods 13 Jun 11 - 08:48 AM
Jerry Rasmussen 13 Jun 11 - 08:58 AM
Suffet 17 Aug 11 - 05:56 PM
NY Pinewoods 31 Aug 11 - 09:04 AM
NY Pinewoods 16 Sep 11 - 08:38 PM
GUEST,Anne Price 15 Oct 11 - 09:37 AM
NY Pinewoods 20 Oct 11 - 08:04 AM
Charley Noble 20 Oct 11 - 11:43 AM
Suffet 20 Oct 11 - 02:25 PM
Suffet 23 Oct 11 - 08:42 AM
Charley Noble 23 Oct 11 - 09:36 AM
Pete Jennings 23 Oct 11 - 10:39 AM
Thomas Stern 23 Oct 11 - 12:39 PM
BrooklynJay 23 Oct 11 - 02:24 PM
Charley Noble 23 Oct 11 - 03:40 PM
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Subject: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 15 Jan 11 - 07:21 PM

Preliminary announcement! Save this date!

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration & Tribute
New York City • October 22, 2011
Sponsored by the New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club

Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.
www.folkmusicny.org

Purpose: To examine and celebrate the North American urban folk music community of the 1960s, and to pay tribute to the people who were part of it.

Date: Saturday, October 22, 2011

Location:
Elisabeth Irwin High School
40 Charlton Street
New York, NY 10014

Tentative Schedule:
1:00-1:50 PM: The Great Folk Scare: Overview of Folk Music in the 1960s
2:00-2:50 PM: Political Protest Folk Music of the 1960s
3:00-3:50 PM: The Trans-Atlantic Connection: North America and the British Isles
4:00-6:00 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon: the Songs We Sang
6:00-7:30 PM: Dinner break
7:30 - 10:00 PM: Evening concert


This event is nine months away and the organizers are now in the very early stages of planning. More information will be posted as it becomes available.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 09:40 AM

Updated information!

New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club
(Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.)

presents

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration and Tribute
Saturday • October 22, 2011
1:00-10:00 PM

Doors open 12:30 PM

Confirmed participants:
Alix Dobkin
Jerry Epstein
Luke Faust
Bev Grant and the Dissident Daughters
Charlie Ipcar
Lisa Null
Anne Price
Jerry Rasmussen
Peter Stampfel
Heather Wood
Other performers to be announced once confirmed.
                     
Schedule:
1:00-2:30 PM: The Great Folk Scare, an Overview of the 1960s
2:45-4:15 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon Round Robin – Part 1
4:30-6:00 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon Round Robin – Part 2
7:30-10:00 PM: Evening Concert

Hosted by:
Elisabeth Irwin High School – LREI
40 Charlton Street
New York, NY 10014

Between Varick Street and Sixth Avenue

www.folkmusicny.org


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Charley Noble
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 09:57 AM

I'm certainly looking forward to this event. One of my songs has to be "The Faucets Are Dripping" in old New York City by Malvina Reynolds. But there are so many other great choices!

Cheerily,
Charley Noble, aka Charlie Ipcar


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 05:01 PM

Charlie,

Here is a link to a 2003 recording of The Faucets Are Dripping performed by Anne Price and the late Eric Levine, with Joel Landy and myself adding our voices on the choruses. The final verse is by your truly.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: banj
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 05:14 PM

bloody hell pete stampfel and luke faust, sounds good


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 02 Mar 11 - 07:40 PM

Banj--

We are honored and delighted that Peter, Luke, and the other people we listed above have accepted our invitation. We decided to limit the total number of featured performers to sixteen, and in addition to the ten named above, three others have told us that they would like to participate. However, we are awaiting final confirmation before we make their names public. Three other performers have yet to respond to our invitation.

We can, nevertheless, say that most if not all of the people we have invited were named in the Little Known '60s Folk Singers thread.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Mar 11 - 12:52 PM

Very interesting.   Why not check out American Folk Music, Past, Present and Future?


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 24 Mar 11 - 12:57 PM

Updated information!

New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club
(Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.)

presents...

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration and Tribute
Saturday • October 22, 2011
1:00-10:00 PM

Doors open 12:30 PM

1:00-2:30 PM: The Great Folk Scare, an Overview of the 1960s
Alix Dobkin
Susan Glass
Nick O'Han
Heather Wood

2:45-4:15 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 1
Jeff Davis
Alix Dobkin
Jerry Epstein
Bev Grant
Charlie Ipcar
Lisa Null
Heather Wood

4:30-6:00 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 2
Luke Faust
Pat Lamanna
Anne Price
Jerry Rasmussen
Peter Stampfel
Happy Traum

7:30-10:00 PM: Evening Concert
Bev Grant and the Dissident Daughters
Jeff Davis
Happy Traum
Heather Wood


Hosted by...
Elisabeth Irwin High School – LREI
40 Charlton Street
New York, NY 10014

Between Varick Street and Sixth Avenue

www.folkmusicny.org


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 11 May 11 - 09:20 AM

We have added Toby Fagenson to Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 2, from 4:30 to 6:00 PM. Also, we now have a price structure as follows:

All-event rates (afternoon and evening):
General admission: $40
FMSNY/Pinewoods or LREI member: $30
Child or F/T student: $20

Afternoon only or evening concert only:
General admission: $25
FMSNY/Pinewoods or LREI member: $20
Child or F/T student: $15

And, of course, this is now a Facebook event. Please click here and log in if necessary.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 19 May 11 - 09:15 PM

I will be the moderator for the first session, The Great Folk Scare, an Overview of the 1960s. This is going to be a lot of fun. I can hardly wait.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: GUEST,Anne Price
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 05:41 PM

This falls on my birthday. I'll officially be a Senior Citizen, eligible for Medicare.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Art Thieme
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 08:10 PM

Damn, you know I'll be there in spirit! Would that I could, but no.

Art Thieme


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 09 Jun 11 - 10:26 PM

Anne,

You become Medicare eligible on October 1, 2011. Coverage begins on the first day of the month in which your 65th birthday falls. Don't forget to apply in July.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 08:18 AM

My wife Ruth and I did a dry run into NYC last week to see where the school is, and on the way back, strolled down McDougal Street. Much to my astonishment and delight, I met the owner of the "Original Gaslight Cafe" which is re-opening after close to 40 years of odds and ends of stores. More accurately, it is the site of the Gaslight Cafe. You can't recreate the past, and probably just as well. The Gaslight was a life-changing experience for me from 1960-64. I'll forever be thankful for the countless hours I spent there, hearing great music, making a ton of friends, and cutting me performance teeth on the stage. I'm even more thankful that I've changed. We are all who we are because of who we were.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 02:03 PM

As Jerry and Ruth found out, Elisabeth Irwin High School is only about a 5 minute walk from the site of the Gaslight Cafe and another 2 or 3 minutes away from the fountain in Washington Square Park. From what I have been told, one recently deceased Elisabeth Irwin alumna with blonde hair and a beautiful voice, used to cut classes to hang out in that park.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 02:13 PM

We're coming down from Connecticut by train. Any suggestions, Steve, as the best way to get to the Village from Grand Central? We took the subway down to Bleeker, on the east side of the Village and hiked our way over.

Too bad the IRT isn't running anymore. :-)

I'm REALLY excited about this event!


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 10:00 PM

Jerry,

Here is the easiest way. From Grand Central, take the 7 Flushing Line train two stops westbound to Times Square. Get off at the front of the train and walk through the underground passage to the Eighth Avenue line. Then take the C or E downtown to Spring Street. When you exit the station you will be on Sixth Avenue. Walk uptown (north) one or two blocks (depending upon which exit you use) to Charlton Street, and make a left turn. The school is on the south side of Charlton Street between Sixth Avenue and Varick Street.

Alternatively, you can take the 7 Flushing Line one stop westbound to Fifth Avenue. Get off at the front of the train and then change for the Sixth Avenue line. Take the B, D, F, or M train downtown to West 4th Street. Get off at the front of the train and exit the station onto Sixth Avenue near West 3rd Street. Walk five blocks downtown (south) along Sixth Avenue to Charlton Street and make a right turn.

Sixth Avenue is a northbound one-way street, so if you are walking in the direction of traffic you are walking uptown. If you are walking opposite to the direction of traffic you are walking downtown.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: GUEST
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 10:32 PM

The poster is gargoyle...
Consuming -or soliciting or selling drugs within 800 meters (1000 yards) of a USA public school property .... is a FELONY.

While the jails are full...don't be a fool...

Obamma's Mamms is ready to take you and your kin for a "full ride."

Don't bring a lid
Don't keep the joint hid

Just say "No"
If you plan to go.

Subteranian Home Sick BLUES


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 10 Jun 11 - 10:58 PM

Thanks, Steve;

I'm ready.

I'll be interested in hearing the discussion. As far as Greenwich Village was concerned (and probably all the urban folk centers,) each of us remembers those times based on who we were at that time, as much as what was happening. There were pople who came for the music and the drugs, people who came for the music and the politics, people who came for music and free sex (called free love, back in those days,) People who just came for the music, and people who edned up there because it felt like home. I came for the music, and for a home. I had no clue what I was going to do with my life, and I wasn't alone. It was much clearer to me what I didn't want to do than what I wanted to do. That was all right, in the Village. Most of us figured it out, later.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 10:44 AM

I was born in 1947, and except for two years when my family lived out of New York City, I grew up in Jackson Heights, Queens. I was not allowed to take the subway into Manhattan by myself until I turn 13, so I didn't really discover Washington Square Park until 1960. I quickly became fascinated with the folk singers around the fountain, and within two years I had bought myself a Harmony Stella guitar and a copy of Jerry Silverman's Beginning the Folk Guitar. I then began spending warm Sunday afternoons trying to immerse myself in the folk scene. Of course, I was only a kid who had to be home by dinnertime and get ready for school Monday morning.

Nevertheless, I did learn a lot of music, and pretty soon I began performing in several of the pass-the-basket coffee houses just south of Washington Square Park. That's something I continued to do off and on throughout the 1960s. By that time I had started hanging around the Broadside magazine apartment/office on the Upper West Side, and I participated in a couple of the informal hoots that Sis Cunningham and Gordon Friesen organized. I had already discovered folk scenes outside of Greenwich Village. These included the one centered on the Abmaphd coffee house near Hofstra University in Nassau County, Long Island, and another based around the Interlude coffee house in Kew Gardens, Queens. I even made a couple of pilgrimages to the Boston/Cambridge area and one to Philadelphia.

Quite a coming of age!

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 11:26 AM

Thankis for sharing this, Steve. It's nice to get to know you a little better. Like you, I started out with a Stella guitar. It was actually a combination guitar and cheese slicer. You had to have the hands of an orangatan to make an F chord. Mine was painted long- underwear-cream-colored with feathered gray stripes. I stripped it down to the plywood and made "pearl" inlays ouf of a plastic place mat of my mother's. It still sounded terrible and was almost impossible to play. That was when I learned to sing loud, so you couldn't hear my guitar. :-)

Jerry

---------Duplicates tidied. Apologies. JoeClone--------


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 11 Jun 11 - 04:39 PM

I had a Stella 12 string which I gave to Dave Cohen after he was D. David Cuffe and before he was David Blue. It would have made a nifty planter.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 08:28 AM

Jerry,

I bought my used Harmony Stella in 1962 for $17, which included a brown canvas carrying bag, an elastic capo, a 6-note pitch pipe, and an assortment of picks.

Two years later I bought my first Gibson, so I sold the Stella for $10. A few months ago the person who bought the Stella contacted me on Facebook to remind me of that.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 04:03 PM

Hey, Steve (or anyone else who is reading this thread, but not contributing): It would be intresting to do a time line of the '60's. When I first started going to the Gaslight Cafe in the winter of '60 - '61, Dave Van Ronk had just released his first lp on Folkways, Tom Paxton had not yet released his first album, which came out on the Gaslight label (I still have my copy,) and Peter, Paul and Mary were not a group, and Paul was Noel.

By 1962, everything was changing. Instead of being able to nurse a cup of coffee for two hours at the Gaslight with no coverage charge, performers were doing "shows," and they cleared the place after each show, with a separate cover charge for each show.

I wasn't active much after the summer of 1964 when I moved to Connecticut, but by the mid and late '60's, the scene was very different than the no-cover, nurse-a-cup-of-coffee-all-night early '60's. I'm not sure what the timing was, but Peter, Paul and Mary had their first top 40 hit in 1962, and Dylan's first top 40 hit came in 1965. Everything was moving at a whirlwind pace. Peter, Paul and Mary had their last top 40 hit in 1969. In 1964, the Beatles had their first hit, I Want to Hold Your Hand, and folk was edlectric by 1965 when the Byrds had their first top 40 hit.

When you talk about urban folk music in the '60's, you almost have to ask "Which '60's?" It seems like there were at least hree different "60's."

How about some comments by all you mudcat grazers? I'm enjoying talking with Steve, but there's plenty of room around the old kitchen table. :-)


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Mark Ross
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 10:02 PM

By the time I hit the Village full time in '67, there were other basket houses where you could order a cup of very bad coffee (for a buck and a quarter) and sit there all night. To be able to maximize the turnover they had what I later found out was called the turnover act, someone who was good enough to get on stage, but not quite able to hold an audiences attention. That way they would leave and (hopefully) new customers would take their place. That was me. I managed to survive on maybe 5 dollars a night for quite a while. Most of that went for Mr Boston Apricot Brandy. Then came the day that I started to improve, and could hold an audience for more than one set, so they had to find some other sucker to take that slot on the bill.
It was a great training ground, doing 4 to 5 sets a night in front of very tough audiences, learning how to pace your sets, hold their attention, and get their money. And, even though I was the very bottom rung of the professional ladder, the big clubs (The Gaslight, The AuGoGo, The Bitter End, Gerdes) would all extend that courtesy to me. Which meant that I could get in to listen to the big acts, who didn't play one or two nights, but weeks, sometimes months, and study how they did it. Pat Sky took me aside and said, "Schmuck, you're around the best in the business, learn to pick brains!" And I became something of a pain in the butt, latching onto one or two performers and studying their styles, how they played guitar, how they put together a set. You could go backstage (there wasn't the kind of security they have now) , introduce yourself and ask, "How did you do that?"
When I was seventeen people were laying good odds that I would never see 21, but I survived, and now 44 years later I look back on those days and realize how lucky I was to have been in the right place at the right time. Some of those folks are still my firends, and I'm still learning from them.

Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 10:15 PM

Thanks for the post, Mark. I heard Rev. Gary Davis in those store front, phone booth, pass the hat coffee houses more than once in the early '60's. A lot of people came down wearing their tie-dyed t-shirts hoping to spot hippies...


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Mark Ross
Date: 12 Jun 11 - 10:26 PM

I walked into the Gaslight one night to hear the Rev. After his set I went backstage to meet him and tell him how much I loved his playing.   He just handed me his guitar (the J200), and said, "Here, change my strings." He complimented me on the job because I didn't put too many windings around the post.

Mark Ross


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 08:09 AM

Yes, Mark. It was an honor to hear him, which I did on several occasions.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 08:48 AM

We invited people who represent a broad range of the city-based 1960s folk music scene. They include people who were actively performing at the beginning of the decade, as well as those who came on the scene in the middle or towards the end of the sixties.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Jerry Rasmussen
Date: 13 Jun 11 - 08:58 AM

I'm glad you did, Pinewoods. To get an appreciation of folk music in the '60's as sung in urban areas, you need a great diversity of musicians and perspectives.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 17 Aug 11 - 05:56 PM

Greetings.

I will be moderating the opening panel as follows:

1:00-2:30 PM: The Great Folk Scare, an Overview of the 1960s
Alix Dobkin
Nick O'Han
Jerry Rasmussen
Heather Wood
+ possibly one other TBA

The "possibly one other TBA" is a well known music critic. NY Pinewoods Folk Music Club is awaiting confirmation of his participation. Stay tuned.

--- Steve Suffet


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 31 Aug 11 - 09:04 AM

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration and Tribute
October 22, 2011 • 1:00 to 10:00 PM
Sponsored by the New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club
(Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.)
Hosted by Elisabeth Irwin High School
40 Charlton Street • New York City

Complete information is now available online.

Click here for event webpage.

Clich here to order tickets.

Click here for Facebook event page. Facebook login required.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 16 Sep 11 - 08:38 PM

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration and Tribute
Elizabeth Irwin HS • 40 Charlton Street • New York City
Saturday • October 22, 2011
Sponsored by the New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club

(Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.)

Schedule of Events

1:00-2:30 PM: The Great Folk Scare: an Overview of the 1960s
Nick O'Han (welcoming remarks)
Steve Suffet (moderator)
Alix Dobkin
Jerry Rasmussen
Heather Wood

2:45-4:15 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 1
Heather Wood (participant-facilitator)
Jeff Davis
Alix Dobkin
Jerry Epstein
Bev Grant
Charlie Ipcar
Lisa Null

4:30-6:00 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 2
Anne Price (participant-facilitator)
Toby Fagenson
Luke Faust
Pat Lamanna
Jerry Rasmussen
Peter Stampfel
Happy Traum

7:30-10:00 PM: Evening Concert
Eileen Pentel & Steve Suffet (MCs)
E.I. Singers
High School Jazz Band
Happy Traum
Heather Wood
Jeff Davis
Bev Grant and the Dissident Daughters
Finale


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: GUEST,Anne Price
Date: 15 Oct 11 - 09:37 AM

Should be fun.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: NY Pinewoods
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 08:04 AM

Updated schedule:

North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
A Celebration and Tribute
Elizabeth Irwin HS • 40 Charlton Street • New York City
Saturday • October 22, 2011
Sponsored by the New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club
(Folk Music Society of New York, Inc.)

Schedule of Events

1:00-2:30 PM: The Great Folk Scare: an Overview of the 1960s
Nick O'Han (welcoming remarks from host school)
Steve Suffet (moderator)
Alix Dobkin
Susan Glass (from host school)
Jerry Rasmussen
Heather Wood

2:45-4:15 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 1
Heather Wood (participant-facilitator)
Jeff Davis
Alix Dobkin
Jerry Epstein
Bev Grant
Charlie Ipcar
Lisa Null

4:30-6:00 PM: Hoot in the Afternoon, Session 2
Micah Dov Gottlieb (one song and thank you from host school)
Anne Price (participant-facilitator)
Toby Fagenson
Luke Faust
Pat Lamanna
Jerry Rasmussen
Steve Suffet
Happy Traum

7:30-10:00 PM: Evening Concert
Eileen Pentel & Steve Suffet (MCs)
Elisabeth Irwin High School Singers and Jazz Band
Happy Traum
Heather Wood
Jeff Davis
Bev Grant and the Dissident Daughters
Finale


40 Charlton Street is between Varick Street and 6th Avenue in Lower Manhattan. The two closest subway stations are Spring Street on the C and E lines and Houston Street on the 1 line. On-street parking is legal on weekends, but it is very difficult to find. We recommend that you use public transportation if possible.

Please click here for additional information.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Charley Noble
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 11:43 AM

I'm certainly looking forward to this special event. I'm polishing up some of my housing organizing songs from the 1960s.

Looking forward to hearing Bev Grant sing again. I haven't heard her for years.

I wonder if there will be a follow-up field trip to Wall Street on Sunday?

Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 20 Oct 11 - 02:25 PM

Charlie,

Marilyn and I have been down to he Occupy Wall Street encampment eight or nine times already. There is always something happening and it's very easy to get to. Zuccotti Park is at the Corner of Broadway and LIberty Street. Just take the A, C, J, Z, 2, 3, 4, or 5 train to Fulton Street and you will be one to three short blocks away, depending upon which exit you use.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Suffet
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 08:42 AM

Greetings:

Here is a big THANK YOU to all the people who made North American Urban Folk Music of the 1960s such a wonderful event. This includes the performers, the volunteers from New York Pinewoods Folk Music Club, the people from Elisabeth Irwin High School, and the audience alike. We believe a good time was had by all.

Our only regret is that Peter Stampfel had to withdraw at the last minute because he needed to be with a sick friend. We missed him, but he was with us in spirit if not in person.

--- Steve


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Charley Noble
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 09:36 AM

The North America Folk Music event ce3rtainly went well. It was interesting to hear what people had to say about their experiences in the 1960s, and the songs were great.

Nice to meet some folks again such as Bev Grant who I hadn't heard since the 1980s. She led her tribute song to the organizers at Co-op City "Together We Can Move Mountains." I was also delighted to watch and listen to Happy Traum do his blues and other intricate guitar work. Then there were the young singing folks from the Elisabeth Irwin High School, full of energy and talent. And I'll provide more feedback when I get home to Maine and have my notes.

And thanks to Brooklyn Bob for keeping me company on the subway back to Brooklyn afterward.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Pete Jennings
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 10:39 AM

But I've been on for over 10 minutes now and it really does seem okay to me.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Thomas Stern
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 12:39 PM

Hi Steve,
Congratulations on an excellent event.
Sorry Stampfel didn't make it - would have been an interesting
additional facet of that heady ferment of the 60's.
Some collateral info -
1.Dust to Digital has released the John Fahey FONOTONE recordings, and there is an interesting essay (among many) in the book accompanying the set highlighting the opening of the vast store of roots music that flourished in that era. Blues, Appalachian music,
old-timey recordings which had been known almost exclusively to collectors of the shellac recordings began to become available on LP.
Fahey was one of those collectors, and synthesized much of that roots music in his work
2.A DVD of the documentary CHASIN GUS' GHOST has recently been released, about jug band music (IMO very lacking in that primary
objective) (GUS being GUS CANNON), but very interesting in exploring the resusitation of that music in the "folk revival". Includes interviews with Fritz Richmond, John Sebastian, Jeff Muldaur, Maria Muldaur and others.
There is another MUDCAT thread about IZZY YOUNG - didn't hear any mention of him in the discussions.
Best wishes, Thomas.


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: BrooklynJay
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 02:24 PM

Charley Noble: "And thanks to Brooklyn Bob for keeping me company on the subway back to Brooklyn afterward."

Goodness! I go to sleep and then wake up to find my name's been changed!   ; - )

But it was certainly a great time - even though I managed to miss the first two events (darn!).

Saw some old friends, met some new ones. And I was really impressed by the young performers from the Elisabeth Irwin School. A wonderful chorus, and three fine musicians - guitar, (left-handed) banjo, and mandolin. Sorta like looking into the future, musically.

So many great performances - Happy Traum (amazing!), Toby Fagenson, Jeff Davis, Ann Price (who did a beautiful rendition of "John Riley"), Steve Suffet, Bev Grant, Jerry Rasmussen, Heather Wood (who proved yet again that you don't need an instrument to hold an audience in the palm of your hand), well...the list could certainly go on. Again, my only regret was missing some of the earlier afternoon events. Aaaaaargh!! (Note to self: Must stop being such a night-owl.)

And yes, I got to meet Charley Noble. Had some nice discussions with him, got a peek at his soon-to-be-published book and did indeed ride the train with him into the Wilds of Brooklyn. And we also serenaded our fellow riders with an impromptu chorus of Steve Goodman's "Lincoln Park Pirates."

A most enjoyable and memorable day.

Jay


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Subject: RE: Urban Folk Music of the 1960s
From: Charley Noble
Date: 23 Oct 11 - 03:40 PM

Jay-

I just got up too early this morning and posted before I had my second mug of coffee. Any my brother's name is Bob.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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