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pop as upper class culture

Jack Campin 28 Jan 11 - 06:46 AM
GUEST,Gail 28 Jan 11 - 07:48 AM
GUEST,glueman 28 Jan 11 - 08:04 AM
GUEST,erbert 28 Jan 11 - 08:04 AM
GUEST,Gail 28 Jan 11 - 09:05 AM
GUEST,Suibhne Astray 28 Jan 11 - 09:24 AM
Brakn 28 Jan 11 - 09:29 AM
MGM·Lion 28 Jan 11 - 09:42 AM
GUEST,Jonny Sunshine 28 Jan 11 - 10:36 AM
GUEST,glueman 28 Jan 11 - 02:22 PM
Howard Jones 28 Jan 11 - 02:33 PM
GUEST, topsie 29 Jan 11 - 07:59 AM
GUEST, topsie 29 Jan 11 - 08:00 AM
Dave Hanson 29 Jan 11 - 08:03 AM
Richard Bridge 29 Jan 11 - 09:06 AM
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Subject: pop as upper class culture
From: Jack Campin
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 06:46 AM

Interesting article from the BBC on the privileged backgrounds of the leading figures in British pop:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/newsid_9373000/9373158.stm

I didn't find it at all surprising, but there are posters to Mudcat who take the pop industry's word for it that it's speaking for the Great Unwashed.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,Gail
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 07:48 AM

Well, it's true that people can't help being born privileged any more than they can help being born poor but I guess it's just a tad easier to do what you want when you've got good family support.

It doesn't bother me that some of the most successful rock stars came from posh backgrounds because they still made good music.

What does bother me is 'musicians' who are less talented but have the confidence to succeed that privilege brings. I can't bear Florence Welch (Florence and the Machine) because she sings like an actress trying to be a singer and acts like wayward attention-seeking princess.

I actually believe that this poshing-up has happened substantially in the UK folk scene too. In a way it reflects the upwardly mobile society we've aspired to in recent decades, but a true working class hero is now found on the football field, not the music scene.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,glueman
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 08:04 AM

It may be a north-south thing. Oasis never struck me as silver spoon types. Generally speaking the media and associated activity is chockablock with public school boys and girls.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,erbert
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 08:04 AM

..ahem... Tony Blair...

My guess is the 'Bohemian' dissolute arty aristocrat influence
has always been rotting at the core of swinging 60's & 70's London pop 'n' rock..

but these days fewer council estate kids have the economic & cultural opportunities
to gain entry to the music scene in order to balance out the ever increasing social dominance
of the posh rich brats.

Back in my youth we still had the advantage of student grants, UB40's and housing benefit;
the unofficial musicians state funded subsistance,
to keep us housed and fed for a few years of creative music 'career development'
and 'arts/media' industry networking..


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,Gail
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 09:05 AM

I agree with you all.
This topic is an interesting partner to the Brassed Off thread discussing the place of brass bands in pit villages. Those bands have produced wonderful music and musicians from genuine working class communities and, as such, are largely ignored by the media.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,Suibhne Astray
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 09:24 AM

Working-class musicians are ignored on the whole anyway, regardless of what they do - be it pop, brass, folk or rock. They still do it though, regardless, and make great music in the process. Exceptions abound of course, from The Fall to Fleetwood's own Alfie Boe... but isn't this true of the media as a whole these days? And was it ever any different?


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: Brakn
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 09:29 AM

More from the BBC


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: MGM·Lion
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 09:42 AM

,,, which led me to Wikipedia, from which we learn that James Blunt was at Harrow, Bristol University and The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, and served six years as an officer in The Life Guards {Household Cavalry}, rising to rank of Captain; in which capacity he was one of those guarding the Queen Mother's coffin during its lying in state.

Hmmm... I think I see what Jack meant in his OP.

~Michael~


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,Jonny Sunshine
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 10:36 AM

Having family support, money and connections behind you will always help. How else can anyone afford to spend years doing the groundwork of poorly-paid gigs and self-funded recordings and publicity in the hope of someday breaking through?

Of course it's interesting how many pop-stars do their best to affect working-class accents and stress their humble backgrounds. It's all part of the industry mythology that anyone can make it if they have sufficient talent and determination.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST,glueman
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 02:22 PM

'Advance to Mayfair. If you pass Toby collect a recording contract'.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: Howard Jones
Date: 28 Jan 11 - 02:33 PM

"Having family support, money and connections behind you will always help."

Why assume a wealthier family will support a would-be musician? Aren't they more likely to put pressure on them to get a proper job with prospects?


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST, topsie
Date: 29 Jan 11 - 07:59 AM

Judge people by what they do, not their accents or where they came from, but it's not just pop artists who may affect a working class accent. When Nigel Kennedy was interviewed as a boy his accent was very different from the 'estusry' English of more recent years.


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: GUEST, topsie
Date: 29 Jan 11 - 08:00 AM

that should have been 'estuary' - sorry


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: Dave Hanson
Date: 29 Jan 11 - 08:03 AM

James Blount's mother is now having a go at the media, saying the way they are picking on him is reverse snobbery.

Dave H


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Subject: RE: pop as upper class culture
From: Richard Bridge
Date: 29 Jan 11 - 09:06 AM

I submit that pop may have different values from rock, metal, and mobo and hispanic rock etc.


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