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ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile

DigiTrad:
THE GALS O' CHILE


shipcmo 22 Feb 11 - 06:47 AM
Joe Offer 22 Feb 11 - 05:55 PM
Joe Offer 22 Feb 11 - 07:07 PM
RTim 22 Feb 11 - 07:12 PM
RTim 22 Feb 11 - 07:13 PM
Joe Offer 22 Feb 11 - 08:02 PM
Gibb Sahib 22 Feb 11 - 10:16 PM
shipcmo 23 Feb 11 - 05:59 AM
Gibb Sahib 25 Feb 11 - 07:54 PM
Lighter 25 Feb 11 - 10:53 PM
Gibb Sahib 25 Feb 11 - 11:30 PM
Gibb Sahib 26 Feb 11 - 02:38 PM
Lighter 26 Feb 11 - 03:17 PM
Gibb Sahib 26 Feb 11 - 04:59 PM
Lighter 26 Feb 11 - 07:46 PM
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Subject: ADD: Bangidero
From: shipcmo
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 06:47 AM

BANGIDERO

SOLO
To Chile's coast we are bound away,
    CHORUS
    To my hero Bangidero.
SOLO
To Chile's coast we are bound away,
    CHORUS
    To drink and dance fandango
SOLO
To Chile's coast we are bound away,
Where the Spanish girls are so bright and gay!
    CHORUS
    To my hero Bangidero! Singing Hey...... for a gay Hash girl!



The girls of Chile are hard to beat,
From top to toe, they are trim and neat,
From their black mantillas to their natty feet.

My Julia's beauty is rich and rare,
And with the smartest she can compare,
With her well-set figure, and her jet-black hair.

The old senoras, as may be seen,
Are frigate-molded, from ttuck to keel,
With their quarter galleries, and breadth of beam.

And when the time comes to say farewell,
From old Coquimbo to Coronel,
We'll send our addios, and we'll wish 'em well.


From Captain Robinson's collection, "Songs of the Chantey Man," published during July and August of 1917 as a series in the periodical The Bellman. (Minneapolis, MN, 1906-1919). Robinson stated that the refrain given was never actually sung, but substituted for the original which was too vulgar for publication.

X:1
T:Bangidero
L:1/16
M:3/4
K:D
A,4 | D3 E F4 E3 D | F3 G A4 B3 A | (A3G) C4 B3 A | A4 D4 A, 4 | D3 E F4 E3 D | F3 G A4 (B3c) | (d4d3) B G3 A | B4 A4 z2 A2 | B3 A d4 c3 A | B3 A d4 d2 c2 | B2 A2 (G2F2) E2 D2 | F2 D2 B,4 A,3 A, | D4 D4 F3 D | E4 E4 d B3 | A6 ^G A HB2 HA2 | D12 ||
w:To Chi le's coast we are bound a way, To my he e ro Ban gi de ro. To Ch le's coast we are bound a way, To o dr ink and dance fan dan go To Chi le's coast we are bound a way, Where the Span ish gi rls are so bright and gay! To my he ro Ban gi de ro! Sing ing Hey for a gay Hash girl!

To create a score, copy the abc notation above, and paste in Tune-O-Tron

Click to play


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 05:55 PM

Here's the Traditional Ballad Index entry on this song:

Bangidero

DESCRIPTION: Shanty. "To Chile's coast we are bound away, To my hero Bangidero. To Chile's coast we are bound away, We'll drink and dance fandango..." Verses sing the praises of Spanish girls and various sexual exploits.
AUTHOR: unknown
EARLIEST DATE: 1917 (_The Bellman_)
KEYWORDS: shanty bawdy
FOUND IN: Britain US
REFERENCES (2 citations):
Colcord, p. 98, "Bangidero" (1 text, 1 tune)
Hugill, pp. 53-54, "The Gals O' Chile" (1 text, 1 tune) [AbrEd, pp. 49-50]

ST Hug053 (Partial)
Roud #3222
ALTERNATE TITLES:
Timme Heave-o, Hang Her, Hilo
To My Hero Bangidero
The Girls of Chile
NOTES: Colcord got this from Captain Robinson's collection, "Songs of the Chantey Man," published during July and August of 1917 as a series in the periodical The Bellman. (Minneapolis, MN, 1906-1919). Robinson stated that the refrain given was never actually sung, but substituted for the original which was too vulgar for publication. Hugill also states that he changed both the verses and refrains to make the song printable. In addition, he makes a comment on this and other so-called "rare" shanties, that they were not so much rare in use as they were difficult to clean up and camouflage for publication and so when an opportunity came to write things down, they were left out. - SL
File: Hug053

Go to the Ballad Search form
Go to the Ballad Index Instructions
Go to the Bibiography
Go to the Discography

The Ballad Index Copyright 2010 by Robert B. Waltz and David G. Engle.


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 07:07 PM

There's a video of "Gals o' Chile" here (click).

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: RTim
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 07:12 PM

This version was sung by Ewan McCall and the Critics Group, and is on one of their recordings.
I have sung it in public before, but it is not one that trips off the tongue.

I believe Barry Finn sang a version.

Tim Radford


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: RTim
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 07:13 PM

By the way - The Mini is WAY TOO FAST!!!!!!!

Tim


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Joe Offer
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 08:02 PM

I'm having trouble figuring out the road map of this song; i.e., how to sing the second and subsequent verses. Can somebody give me clear instructions?

-Joe-


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 22 Feb 11 - 10:16 PM

Joe--

shipcmo's original post shows it: There are three unique lines per verse, however the first line is repeated. Actually, I can see the confusion because i the very first verse there, LINE 1 and LINE 2 are identical! However, the verses that follow each have 3 unique lines, that can be fit to this pattern:

LINE 1
choral response
LINE 1 (repeated)
choral response
LINE 2
LINE 3
choral response


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: shipcmo
Date: 23 Feb 11 - 05:59 AM

RTim,

I agree with you regarding the tempo, so I have started a thread to address that subject.

Tempo


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 25 Feb 11 - 07:54 PM

Anyone care to take some stabs at decoding the bowdlerized text?

Elsewhere I wrote,
"Berreadero" is "whorehouse" in Mexican Spanish (!). "Bang 'er here, oh, bang 'er there, oh"? (I'm kidding.) ...Gay Hash girls, indeed. Would Robinson have avoided "Dago" (as Hugill uses)?

I don't think we are looking for actual Spanish phrases that relate to "dirty" or sordid things. It should probably sound racy *in English*, but in a form that resembles innocuous Spanish words/place-names.


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Lighter
Date: 25 Feb 11 - 10:53 PM

There would have been little reason for Robinson to have avoided "dago." Possibly "Hash girl" is a typo (from a handwritten original) for "flash girl," but I'm just guessing wildly. "Flash girl" was probably printable anyway, though the elderly Robinson might have worried that it wasn't.

If it isn't a typo, there's no reason for Robinson to have written nonsense: he could just as well have written "Spanish," which scans better. So it's either a typo or something innocent that we're not familar with.

Where Robinson has "Hero bangidero," Hugill has "Heave-o, hang 'er hilo!" These could replace almost anything. Judging from some of Hugill's bowdlerizations, I'd say there's simply no way to conjure up the "real" words. Consider the related "Slav Ho"/"Saltpeter Shanty"; its structure and tune suggest the original words may have resembled those of "Three German Officers Crossed the Rhine," datable in one form or another to the 1830s.   

Robinson's lyrics may be almost completely bogus ("My Julia's beauty is rich and rare"? In a bawdy song?) and Hugill may simply have followed his lead. Nor is there any telling what Robinson in 1917 and Hugill's editors in 1961 may have thought "unprintable." Hugill had more latitude but not not much more.

FWIW, in Hugill's Sailortown (1967), "dago gals" becomes "dago whores," which is undoubtedly the original. "Heave-ho, hang 'er hilo!" becomes "Heave 'er, hang 'er, hilo!" Presumably the final syllable of the line really was "-o," as in a real Spanish word or a fake one. Beyond that, who knows?


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 25 Feb 11 - 11:30 PM

OK, did some more searching and evidently a "hash girl" or "hesh girl" was a prostitute that worked in taverns. So that part checks out as meaningful, even if we don't know if it was to cover something more "unprintable." Perhaps it *was* just "Dago whores," which was printable by Hugill's time, but not in Robinson's.


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 26 Feb 11 - 02:38 PM

Poquejiro, poquedero (poke her here-o, poke her there-o)

What a pair-o, hangin' there-o!


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Feb 11 - 03:17 PM

A good Spanish dictionary will reveal plenty of ridiculous possibilities. Try "gray and blue." And don't overlook place names. Hugill says Valparaiso was derided as "Wallop-me-ass[sic]-with-a-razor," not a phrase that would have occurred to me. Interestingly, it can be sung in place of of "We'll dance and all drink pisco!"


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Gibb Sahib
Date: 26 Feb 11 - 04:59 PM

Yeah, I browsed through some place names but nothing popped out at me. I suppose it's a disadvantage (e.g. Valparaiso) when one actually knows how to pronounce Spanish -- the goofy English mondegreens just don't "pop" so well!

The other confusion is that I still really don't know how to approach 19th century perspectives of obscenity. How "obscene" should it really be? Are we talking about pornographic here?

Why don't these bastards just tell us!!!!!

I suppose we have to have earned it.


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Subject: RE: ADD/Origins: Bangidero / The Gals of Chile
From: Lighter
Date: 26 Feb 11 - 07:46 PM

Have you looked into Randolph & Legman's collection of bawdy Ozark songs, mostly collected 1918-54? Not exactly comparable to shanties, but probably a similar level of taste. Many of Randolph's sources learned their material around 1900.

Most of the stuff is verbally crude and direct, more outspoken and outrageous than clever; not much is what you'd call pornographic. (There are a few stanzas of "The Hog-eye Man" that may rock you back, however.) Often the vulgarity is mixed with racism and misogyny, though I don't think it ever quite reaches the gangsta rap level.

Kind of like very crude high-school humor.

I imagine shanties ran the gamut(especially if Harlow's bawdy "Sailor's Alphabet" resembled the current rugby "Alphabet," which is not all that unlikely). My guess is that most of what was both common and unprintable by recent standards was more scatological than sexual, and, when sexual, more comic or grotesque than anything else.


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